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Sample records for basin southeastern california

  1. Reconstructing hypoxia of the southeastern Gulf of California over the last 18,000 years: sediments of Pescadero Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumiline, K.; Lyons, T.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Escorza-Reyes, M.; Bates, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first high-resolution multiproxy reconstruction of the past 18,000 years of oceanic redox variability in the southeastern Gulf of California (GC) and eastern Pacific. The variation in oxygen content prove to be a crucial regulator responsible for changes in biota distribution, water chemistry, physicochemical transformations of dissolved and particulate phases for trace elements in the water column, and formation of authigenic minerals, among other effects. The gravity core DIPAL-III T2 collected aboard the R/V "El Puma" (UNAM) from Pescadero Basin, located within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the southern GC, was thoroughly studied in terms of C, S, trace element and Fe speciation. After establishing the age-model of the marine sediments, the produced data revealed two clear episodes of peleoceanographic variability, associated with changes in hypoxia. The first period (18.0 - 11.6 cal kyr BP), represented by massive sediments, points to a time with an oxygenated water column and moderate productivity, elucidated by low Corg, high S and a relatively low redox sensitive trace element content (Mo and U). The second (11.6 cal kyr BP - present), easily perceived by a clear lamination pattern, indicates a suboxic/anoxic episode, evidenced by higher Corg, Mo and U, among others. A clear dramatic shift is distinctly observable between these periods for most of the redox-proxies. This shift is related to the changes in sea-level that immediately followed the Last Glacial Maximum, when the ice sheets began to melt. This transitioned Pescadero hydrochemistry from a shallow well-ventilated basin (prior to 11.6 cal kyr BP) to a deep OMZ system. When compared to renowned marine sedimentary records, such as Cariaco and Guaymas basins, some events became more eminent than others. In the particular case of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial and Bolling Allerod (BA) interstadial, the Corg, S and some trace element patterns were similar among basins even from

  2. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  3. Potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The California Energy Commission is currently analyzing the use of energy farms to provide future sources of energy for California. Energy farms can be defined as growing plants and converting them to various forms of energy. The use of marginal desert lands in southeastern California for the siting of energy farms using acacia, Eucalyptus, euphorbia, quayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk is considered. Two hypothetical scenarios using either rainfall, or rainfall and groundwater as water sources were described to determine the maximum amount of energy produced from estimated amounts of suitable land in this area. Considering both scenarios, the maximum range of energy produced is .03 to 0.4 Quads. It is recommended that (1) genetic research be continued to increase biomass yields of these and other candidate plants grown in the desert; and (2) small test plots be established at varying desert locations to collect yield growth, and survival data. Once this information is known, the identification of the best plant(s) to use for energy farming in the California desert area will be known, as well as the cost and quantity of energy produced.

  4. California Basin Studies (CaBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The California Continental Borderland's present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 106 years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 106 years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation

  5. 78 FR 28147 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This proposed rule would increase the assessment rate established for...

  6. 78 FR 1715 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...This rule increases the assessment rate established for the California Desert Grape Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2012 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.0125 to $0.0150 per 18-pound lug of grapes handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order, which regulates the handling of grapes grown in a designated area of southeastern California. Assessments upon grape......

  7. 76 FR 7119 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This rule would increase the assessment rate established for the California...

  8. 77 FR 39184 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... assessment rate of $0.0150 per 18- pound lug is established for grapes grown in a designated area of...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA....

  9. California Basin Characterization Model Downscaled Climate and Hydrology

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The California Basin Characterization Model (CA-BCM 2014) dataset provides historical and projected climate and hydrologic surfaces for the region that encompasses...

  10. California's Adjudicated Groundwater Basins: History, Current Conditions, Potential Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, R.; Brown, A.; Rudestam, K.; Conrad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater adjudications are one approach to managing a groundwater basin in California. While the 2014 Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) established new management requirements for 127 high and medium priority groundwater basins, it exempted all 26 of the state's adjudicated groundwater basins from the Act. The State Water Resources Control Board prioritized the evaluation of these adjudicated basins to assist in aligning the processes and outcomes of adjudication with SGMA's goals for the sustainable management of groundwater. Working with the Board, our research evaluated the history and current condition of all of California's adjudicated basins along with potential future improvements to the adjudication process. Our presentation will provide a summary of our findings and highlight some successful features of the adjudication process along with the challenges adjudicated basins face to achieve long-term sustainable groundwater management. Our discussion will include a review of: whether most adjudications result in groundwater extractions at or near a basins' designated safe yield; whether overdraft conditions are reduced or eliminated over the long term; and the degree of collaboration and inclusion of community stakeholders in the adjudication process. In addition to this overview, we will highlight 3-4 basins with particularly interesting management challenges and solutions. For each of these basins, we will describe the problem that precipitated the need for the adjudication and how adjudication outcomes were influenced by: how the judgment defined and distributed water rights; the management structure and strategies to manage the basin; how safe yield and overdraft are defined and determined; and, importantly, the effectiveness of the adjudication in halting or reversing groundwater overdraft.

  11. Comparing Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in Large, Urbanized Basins of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Leif, R.; Eaton, G. F.

    2002-12-01

    We have sampled over 700 public drinking water wells as part of a study to assess relative contamination susceptibility of the major groundwater basins in California. The parameters used to rank wells according to vulnerability are groundwater age dates (using the tritium-3helium method), stable isotopes of the water molecule (for water source determination), and occurrence of low level Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Long-screened production wells supply clean, high quality samples, and sample the resource that is being used. However, the groundwater age distribution from production wells may be quite broad, and comparisons to the predicted initial tritium value for the measured mean age, along with analysis of radiogenic 4Helium are used to de-convolute the mixed age. Results from the Los Angeles and Orange County Basins, and Santa Clara Valley, will be presented. A large volume of both imported and locally captured water is artificially recharged in these intensively managed basins. An effective confining unit in the Santa Clara Valley basin prevents widespread vertical transport of contaminants down to drinking water wells. In the southern California basins, groundwater age and the frequency of occurrence of low-level VOCs are spatially correlated, with more recently recharged water likely to have VOC detections. 'Pre-modern' water is nearly always free of VOCs, except when a suspected 'short circuit', (e.g., loss of integrity in well casing) allows near surface contamination to reach 'old' water. Methyl-tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE) can be a useful time marker in groundwater basins, with water recharged after the 1980's showing traces of MTBE. Water resource managers can use these vulnerability assessments to focus monitoring efforts, site new wells, plan land use, and evaluate remediation activities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  12. Middle Ordovician Bioturbation Structures from Southeastern Margin of Ordos Basin and Their Environmentary Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Trace fossils were discovered in the Middle Ordovician Badou Member of Fengfeng Formation and the Member 1 of Jinsushan Formation in Mt. Jinsu of the Fuping region which lies at the southeastern margin of the Ordos basin. The rocks of the fore-mentioned parts contain a considerable amount of bioturbation structures, in which ichnogenus and ichnospecies can not be identified, and abundant stromatolites.The distributions and characteristics of the bioturbation structures are analyzed and summarized in this paper. The paleoenvironments of related formations and members were interpreted in the method of semiquantitative analysis of bioturbation structures with researches on stromatolites and sedimentology. It is suggested that Fuping zone, located in the southeastern margin of the Ordos basin, was a carbonate platform where stromatolite-developing tidal flat and low-energy subtidal open platform environments dominated. Also that this zone experienced three paleogeographic evolutions from tidal flat to low-energy subtidal open platform environments, that is, three larger-scale eustatisms occurred during the sedimentary period of Middle Ordovician Badou Member of Fengfeng Formation to the Member 1 of Jinsushan Formation.

  13. Response of ground-water levels of flood control operations in three basins, south-eastern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, William A.J.

    1974-01-01

    Three basins in southeastern Florida were investigated to determine the changes in ground-water levels and canal flows that occurred in response to operation of coastal water-control structures in each canal. All three basins are underlain by the Biscayne aquifer. They are, Snapper Creek Canal basin, where the Biscayne aquifer is of high permeability; the Snake Creek Canal basin, where the aquifer is of moderate permeability; and the Pompano-Cypress Canal basin, where the aquifer is of low permeability. In each basin, drainage is a function of permeability; thus, where the permeability of the aquifer is high, drainage is excellent. The coastal water-conrol structures are intended to afford flood protection in the three basins. In general the control operation criteria for flood control in newly developing areas in southeastern Florida do not provide adequate protection from flooding because of the time required for the aquifer to respond to changes in the controls. Adequate protection would require increasing the density of secondary drainage canals, but this could achieved only by reducing the quantity of water available for recharging those segments of the Biscayne aquifer adjacent to the canals. (Woodrad-USGS)

  14. Preservation conditions for marine shale gas at the southeastern margin of the Sichuan Basin and their controlling factors

    OpenAIRE

    Dongfeng Hu; Hanrong Zhang; Kai Ni; Guangchun Yu

    2014-01-01

    Complex tectonic movements and high thermal maturity of marine shale dominate South China, where preservation conditions are critical for shale gas enrichment and productivity. Based on the exploration practices of the Silurian shale gas at the southeastern margin of the Sichuan Basin in recent years, conventional gas and shale gas were compared in terms of their preservation conditions. The results revealed that superior roof and floor conditions are indispensable to shale gas preservation. ...

  15. Paleoenvironmental changes during the late Miocene (Messinian)–Pliocene transition (Bajo Segura Basin, southeastern Spain): sedimentological and ichnological evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Caracuel Martín, Jesús Esteban; Corbí, Hugo; Giannetti, Alice; Monaco, Paolo; Soria Mingorance, Jesús Miguel; Tent-Manclus, Jose Enrique; Yébenes Simón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    A detailed sedimentological and paleontological analysis of the uppermost Miocene (Messinian)–Pliocene boundary at the northern border of the Bajo Segura Basin, southeastern Spain, was carried out in order to describe the evolution of the regional paleocoastline during the Pliocene reflooding of the Mediterranean immediately after the sea-level fall related to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Multiple trace fossils typical of firm- and hardgrounds were recognized, allowing identification of Glo...

  16. A 500-year history of floods in the semi arid basins of south-eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez García, Carlos; Schulte, Lothar; Peña, Juan Carlos; Carvalho, Filpe; Brembilla, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Floods are one of the natural hazards with higher incidence in the south-eastern Spain, the driest region in Europe, causing fatalities, damage of infrastructure and economic losses. Flash-floods in semi arid environments are related to intensive rainfall which can last from few hours to days. These floods are violent and destructive because of their high discharges, sediment transport and aggradation processes in the flood plain. Also during historical times floods affected the population in the south-eastern Spain causing sever damage or in some cases the complete destruction of towns. Our studies focus on the flood reconstruction from historical sources of the Almanzora, Aguas and Antas river basins, which have a surface between 260-2600 km2. We have also compiled information from the Andarax river and compared the flood series with the Guadalentín and Segura basins from previous studies (Benito et. al., 2010 y Machado et al., 2011). Flood intensities have been classified in four levels according to the type of damage: 1) ordinary floods that only affect agriculture plots; 2) extraordinary floods which produce some damage to buildings and hydraulic infrastructure; 3) catastrophic floods which caused sever damage, fatalities and partial or complete destruction of towns. A higher damage intensity of +1 magnitude was assigned when the event is recorded from more than one major sub-basin (stretches and tributaries such as Huércal-Overa basin) or catchment (e.g. Antas River). In total 102 incidences of damages and 89 floods were reconstructed in the Almanzora (2.611 km2), Aguas (539 km2), Antas (261 km2) and Andarax (2.100 km2) catchments. The Almanzora River was affected by 36 floods (1550-2012). The highest events for the Almanzora River were in 1580, 1879, 1973 and 2012 producing many fatalities and destruction of several towns. In addition, we identified four flood-clusters 1750-1780, 1870-1900, 1960-1977 and 1989-2012 which coincides with the periods of

  17. A water system model for exploring electric energy alternatives in southeastern US basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric power generation often involves the use of water for power plant cooling and steam generation, which typically involves the release of cooling water to nearby rivers and lakes. The resulting thermal pollution may negatively impact the ecosystems of these water bodies. Water resource systems models enable the examination of the implications of alternative electric generation on regional water resources. This letter documents the development, calibration, and validation of a climate-driven water resource systems model of the Apalachicola–Chattahoochee–Flint, the Alabama–Coosa–Tallapoosa, and the Tombigbee River basins in the states of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, in the southeastern US. The model represents different water users, including power plants, agricultural water users, and municipal users. The model takes into account local population, per-capita use estimates, and changes in population growth. The water resources planning model was calibrated and validated against the observed, managed flows through the river systems of the three basins. Flow calibration was performed on land cover, water capacity, and hydraulic conductivity of soil horizons; river water temperature calibration was performed on channel width and slope properties. Goodness-of-fit statistics indicate that under 1980–2010 levels of water use, the model robustly represents major features of monthly average streamflow and water temperatures. The application of this integrated electricity generation–water resources planning model can be used to explore alternative electric generation and water implications. The implementation of this model is explored in the companion paper of this focus issue (Yates et al 2013 Environ. Res. Lett. 8 035042). (letter)

  18. Groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel groundwater basins, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Fernando and San Gabriel groundwater basins constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  19. Geodatabase of the available top and bottom surface datasets that represent the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers, Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in the States of Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  20. Magnetic stratigraphy and a test for block rotation of sedimentary rocks within the San Andreas fault zone, Mecca Hills, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Allen, Clarence R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    1987-01-01

    A 500-m section of the Palm Spring Formation in the southern Mecca Hills, located within the San Andreas fault zone in southeastern California, has been paleomagnetically sampled to determine possible tectonic rotation in this area and to establish time-stratigraphic control. This work was partly stimulated by the fact that 80 km farther south, previous studies demonstrated 35° of postdepositional rotation in the Palm Spring Formation of the Vallecito-Fish Creek basin east of the Elsinore fault. Several lines of evidence suggest that hematite is the main magnetic carrier of the Mecca Hills samples. Large anhedral hematite grains observed in magnetic extracts and a positive fold test imply a detrital origin of the remanence. The polarity reversal patterns, together with earlier vertebrate paleontologic studies, restrict the time span for deposition of this unit to the middle-late Matuyama chron (2.0-0.75 myr ago), thus of uppermost Pliocene and early Pleistocene age. Characteristic directions of best least-squares fit for 73 samples suggest little or no overall rotation, despite the severe late Quaternary tectonic activity demonstrated by the intense deformation of these strata.

  1. Positive anomalous concentrations of Pb in some gabbroic rocks of Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwualu-John, J N

    2016-08-01

    Gabbroic rocks have intruded the sedimentary sequence at Ameta in Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria. Petrographic and geochemical features of the rocks were studied in order to evaluate their genetic and geotectonic history. The petrographic results show that the rocks contain plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene, biotite, iron oxide, and traces of quartz in three samples. Major element characteristics show that the rocks are subalkaline. In addition, the rocks have geochemical characteristics similar to basaltic andesites. The trace elements results show inconsistent concentrations of high field strength elements (Zr, Nb, Th, Ta), moderate enrichment of large-ion lithophile elements (Rb, Sr, Ba) and low concentrations of Ni and Cr. Rare earth element results show that the rocks are characterized by enrichment of light rare earth elements, middle rare earth elements enrichment, and depletion of heavy rare earth elements with slight positive europium anomalies. Zinc concentrations are within the normal range in basaltic rocks. There are extremely high concentrations of Pb in three of the rock samples. The high Pb concentrations in some of these rocks could be as a result of last episodes of magmatic crystallization. The rocks intruded the Asu River Group; organic components in the sedimentary sequence probably contain Pb which has been assimilated into the magma at the evolutionary stage of the magma. Weathering of some rocks that contain galena could lead to an increase in the concentration of lead in the gabbroic rocks, especially when the migration and crystallization of magma take place in an aqueous environment. Nevertheless, high concentration of lead is hazardous to health and environment. PMID:27003284

  2. The Alegre Lineament and its role over the tectonic evolution of the Campos Basin and adjacent continental margin, Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Salomão Silva; Neves, Mirna Aparecida; Guadagnin, Felipe; França, George Sand; Vincentelli, Maria Gabriela Castillo

    2016-08-01

    The structural framework and tectonic evolution of the sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of the South American continent are closely associated with the tectonic framework and crustal heterogeneities inherited from the Precambrian basement. However, the role of NW-SE and NNW-SSE structures observed at the outcropping basement in Southeastern Brazil and its impact over the development of those basins have not been closely investigated. In the continental region adjacent to the Campos Basin, we described a geological feature with NNW-SSE orientation, named in this paper as the Alegre Fracture Zone (AFZ), which is observed in the onshore basement and can be projected to the offshore basin. The main goal of this work was to study this structural lineament and its influence on the tectonic evolution of the central portion of the Campos Basin and adjacent mainland. The onshore area was investigated through remote sensing data joint with field observations, and the offshore area was studied through the interpretation of 2-D seismic data calibrated by geophysical well logs. We concluded that the AFZ occurs in both onshore and offshore as a brittle deformation zone formed by multiple sets of fractures that originated in the Cambrian and were reactivated mainly as normal faults during the rift phase and in the Cenozoic. In the Campos Basin, the AFZ delimitates the western side of the Corvina-Parati Low, composing a complex fault system with the NE-SW faults and the NW-SE transfer faults.

  3. SIR2015-5175, Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley and surrounding groundwater basins, Nevada and California, version 1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This vector data set contains polygons representing the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater basin and surrounding groundwater basins in Nevada and California.

  4. 2002 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins are in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in southern California. Ground water from these basins supplies a...

  5. 76 FR 21620 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... in their local area and are thus in a position to formulate an appropriate budget and assessment rate... February 9, 2011 (76 FR 7119). Copies of the proposed rule were also mailed or sent via facsimile to all... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern...

  6. 78 FR 39548 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... local area and are thus in a position to formulate an appropriate budget and assessment rate. The... concerning this action was published in the Federal Register on May 14, 2013 (78 FR 28147). Copies of the... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern...

  7. Trace elements and organic compounds in the Spring River Basin of southeastern Kansas in 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We sampled sediments and aquatic biota at five locations in the Spring River drainage in southeastern Kansas. The samples were analyzed for metals, organochlorine...

  8. Bird use of fields treated postharvest with two types of flooding in Tulare Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Skalos, Daniel A.; Farinha, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    We surveyed birds on grain and non-grain fields in the Tulare Basin of California treated post-harvest with two types of flooding that varied in duration and depth of water applied (Flooded-type fields [FLD]: 1 week; Irrigated-type fields [IRG]: 1 week) flooding increased waterbird use of grain fields in the Tulare Basin more than in the northern Central Valley. Thus, even though water costs are high in the Tulare Basin, if net benefit to waterbirds is considered, management programs that increase availability of FLD-type fields (especially grain) in the Tulare Basin may be a cost-effective option to help meet waterbird habitat conservation goals in the Central Valley of California.

  9. Tectonoestratigraphic and Thermal Models of the Tiburon and Wagner Basins, northern Gulf of California Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J.; Ramirez Zerpa, N. A.; Negrete-Aranda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California Rift System consist sofa series faults that accommodate both normal and strike-slip motion. The faults formed a series of half-greens filled with more than 7 km of siliciclastic suc­cessions. Here, we present tectonostratigraphic and heat flow models for the Tiburón basin, in the southern part of the system, and the Wag­ner basin in the north. The models are constrained by two-dimensional seis­mic lines and by two deep boreholes drilled by PEMEX­-PEP. Analysis of the seismic lines and models' results show that: (i) subsidence of the basins is controlled by high-angle normal faults and by flow of the lower crust, (ii) basins share a common history, and (iii) there are significant differences in the way brittle strain was partitioned in the basins, a feature frequently observed in rift basins. On one hand, the bounding faults of the Tiburón basin have a nested geometry and became active following a west-to-east sequence of activation. The Tiburon half-graben was formed by two pulses of fault activity. One took place during the protogulf extensional phase in the Miocene and the other during the opening of Gulf of California in the Pleistocene. On the other hand, the Wagner basin is the result of two fault generations. During the late-to middle Miocene, the west-dipping Cerro Prieto and San Felipe faults formed a domino array. Then, during the Pleistocene the Consag and Wagner faults dissected the hanging-wall of the Cerro Prieto fault forming the modern Wagner basin. Thermal modeling of the deep borehole temperatures suggests that the heat flow in these basins in the order of 110 mW/m2 which is in agreement with superficial heat flow measurements in the northern Gulf of California Rift System.

  10. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  11. Assessment of Undiscovered Natural Gas Resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a new assessment of undiscovered natural gas resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS mean estimates of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources are 534 billion cubic feet of natural gas and 323 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids in the Sacramento Basin Province. Additional undiscovered oil accumulations larger than 0.5 million barrels are considered unlikely.

  12. Groundwater flow, recharge rates and mean ages in the Roswell basin, Southeastern New Mexico, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-four water samples were collected from sites throughout the Roswell groundwater basin in southeastern New Mexico that were previously sampled in the 1970's. These data sets were used to evaluate the transience of δ18O values in the basin in hopes of simulating transient conditions with a numerical model. No long term transient trend in the data was established. A compartmental (mixing cell) model was developed and calibrated with the spatial distribution of δ18O. The model was run as a steady-state simulation and produced estimates of groundwater flow paths, volumetric flow rates, recharge rates and residence times. The results estimate the total annual recharge to the carbonate aquifer as 284 million cubic meters (MCM), slightly lower than previous estimates. Furthermore, the model predicts that 114 MCM of the annual recharge to the carbonate aquifer is provided by underflow from deeper units whose source waters originate in the Sacramento Mountains. Mean groundwater ages in the basin ranged from about 230 to 920 years and were strongly influenced by the fraction of recharge derived from the underflow component. (author)

  13. Mechanical Erosion in a Tropical River Basin in Southeastern Brazil: Chemical Characteristics and Annual Fluvial Transport Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the mechanical erosion processes that occur in a tropical river basin, located in the São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil, through the chemical characterization of fine suspended sediments and the transport mechanisms near the river mouth, from March 2009 to September 2010. The chemical characterization indicated the predominance of SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 and showed no significant seasonal influences on the major element concentrations, expressed as oxides. The concentration variations observed were related to the mobility of chemical species. The evaluation of the rock-alteration degree indicated that the physical weathering was intense in the drainage basin. The fine suspended sediments charge was influenced by the variation discharges throughout the study period. The solid charge estimate of the surface runoff discharge was four times higher in the rainy season than the dry season. The transport of fine suspended sediments at the Sorocaba River mouth was 55.70 t km−2 a−1, corresponding to a specific physical degradation of 37.88 m Ma−1, a value associated with the mechanical erosion rate that corresponds to the soil thickness reduction in the drainage basin.

  14. Stratigraphic and structural analysis of the Neogene sediments of the offshore portion of the Salina del Istmo Basin, southeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cabrera, Pedro Tomas

    2003-10-01

    Southeastern Mexico has been affected by regional and local tectonic events. Regional tectonic events are the Gulf of Mexico opening and the lateral movement of micro-plates on the Pacific margin. The local tectonic events are related to salt tectonics. Autochthonous Jurassic salt serves as the detachment level for the main compressional event in the late Miocene. Jurassic salt was allochthonously emplaced in the late Miocene, then partially displaced by a huge quantity of terrigenous sediments during the Plio-Pleistocene. This research is a study of the main geological processes that have influenced the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the Neogene sediments in the offshore portion of the Salina del Istmo basin known as the Marbella area. Owing to data availability, the project was divided into regional and local studies. The regional study is based on 2D multi-channel seismic reflection data, and the local study is based on a 3D seismic streamer survey. Structural analysis in the regional study permits the recognition of four buried fold belts (Agua Dulce, Catemaco, Marbella, and Marbella Norte) trending roughly NE. These fold belts are the result of tectonic convergence in the pacific margin during late Miocene. The Agua Dulce and Marbella Norte fold belts are separated by an enormous salt withdrawal basin called the Pescadores basin. The Pescadores basin is bounded on the north by a spectacular stepped, counter-regional structure. Beyond the Pescadores basin, a salt mini-basin area is recognized in the upper continental slope. Another important structural element is the Sal Somera canopy in the southern part of the study area. Sedimentation-rate analysis, based on isochore mapping in the local study area, indicates that from SB-2.4 to SB-2.6 Ma, deposition rate peaked with a maximum of 7.5 mm/yr. Regional and local structural restorations show that, in general, the maximum allochthonous salt mobilization was during the Plio-Pleistocene because of the

  15. Reactive Transport of Nitrate in Northern California Groundwater basins: An Integrated Characterization and Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, B. K.; Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Carle, S. F.; McNab, W.; Tompson, A. F.; Moore, K.; Beller, H.; Kane, S.; Eaton, G.

    2003-12-01

    More than 1/3 of active public drinking water supply wells in California produce water with nitrate-N levels indicative of anthropogenic inputs (> 4 mg/L). Understanding how the distribution of nitrate in California groundwater basins will evolve is vital to water supply and infrastructure planning. To address this need, we are studying the basin-scale reactive transport of nitrate in the Livermore and Llagas basins of Northern California. Both basins have increasingly urban populations heavily reliant on groundwater. A distinct nitrate "plume" exists in the Livermore Basin (Alameda County) whereas pervasive nitrate contamination exists in shallow groundwaters of the Llagas Basin (Santa Clara County). The sources and timing of nitrate contamination in these basins are not definitively known; septic systems, irrigated agriculture and livestock operations exist or have existed in both areas. The role of denitrification in controlling nitrate distribution is also unknown; dissolved oxygen levels are sufficiently low in portions of each basin as to indicate the potential for denitrification. We have collected water from 60 wells, and are determining both groundwater age (by the 3H/3He method) and the extent of denitrification (by the excess N2 method). Excess nitrogen is being determined by both membrane-inlet and noble gas mass spectrometry, using Ar and Ne content to account for atmospheric N2. We are also analyzing for stable istotopes of nitrate and water, nitrate co-contaminants, and general water quality parameters. Preliminary analysis of archival water district data from both basins suggests positive correlations of nitrate with Ca+2, Mg+2 and bicarbonate and negative correlation with pH. In the Llagas Basin, a negative correlation also exists between nitrate and temperature. Flow path-oriented reactive transport modeling is being explored as a tool to aid in the identification of both the sources of nitrate and evidence for denitrification in both basins

  16. Arsenic, Boron, and Fluoride Concentrations in Ground Water in and Near Diabase Intrusions, Newark Basin, Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    During an investigation in 2000 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) of possible contaminant releases from an industrial facility on Congo Road near Gilbertsville in Berks and Montgomery Counties, southeastern Pennsylvania, concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above USEPA drinking-water standards of 10 ?g/L and 4 mg/L, respectively, and of boron above the USEPA health advisory level of 600 ?g/L were measured in ground water in an area along the northwestern edge of the Newark Basin. In 2003, the USEPA requested technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help identify sources of arsenic, boron, and fluoride in the ground water in the Congo Road area, which included possible anthropogenic releases and naturally occurring mineralization in the local bedrock aquifer, and to identify other areas in the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania with similarly elevated concentrations of these constituents. The USGS reviewed available data and collected additional ground-water samples in the Congo Road area and four similar hydrogeologic settings. The Newark Basin is the largest of the 13 major exposed Mesozoic rift basins that stretch from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. Rocks in the Newark Basin include Triassic through Jurassic-age sedimentary sequences of sandstones and shales that were intruded by diabase. Mineral deposits of hydrothermal origin are associated with alteration zones bordering intrusions of diabase and also occur as strata-bound replacement deposits of copper and zinc in sedimentary rocks. The USGS review of data available in 2003 showed that water from about 10 percent of wells throughout the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania had concentrations of arsenic greater than the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ?g/L; the highest reported arsenic concentration was at about 70 ?g/L. Few data on boron were available, and the highest reported boron concentration in well-water samples was 60 ?g/L in contrast

  17. The Tortonian salinity crisis in the Fortuna Basin (southeastern Spain): Stratigraphic record, tectonic scenario and chronostratigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Tent-Manclús, J. E.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Soria, J. M.; Departamento Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, San Vicente del Raspeig, 03080 Alicante; Estévez, A.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apto. 99, 03080 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain; Lancis, C.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Caracuel, J. E.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Dinarès-Turell, J.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Yébenes, A.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apto. 99, 03080 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain

    2008-01-01

    The Neogene Fortuna and Bajo Segura basins are located on the northeastern end of the Trans-Alborán Shear Zone (TASZ), on the eastern Betic cordillera. The stratigraphic study of the infilling of these basins has shown two major sedimentary discontinuities. The first one, represented by an erosive surface separating open marine marls from an overlying coastal conglomeratic unit, is linked to the onset of the activity along the TASZ, which in this area indicates the beginning of the Abanilla T...

  18. Four new species of Polycirrus Grube, 1850 (Polychaeta: Terebellidae) from Campos Basin, southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrerette, Orlemir; Nogueira, João Miguel De Matos

    2013-01-01

    Four new species of Polycirrus were collected at the Campos Basin, state of Rio de Janeiro, during a survey coordinated by CENPES/PETROBRAS under the scope of the project, "Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin". These species are P. nonatoi sp. nov., P. papillosus sp. nov., P. breviuncinatus sp. nov., and P. habitats sp. nov. All these species are herein described and compared with the morphologically most similar congeners. In addition, a key is provided for the identification of the species of Polycirrus which have been originally described for the Brazilian coast. PMID:26176130

  19. Field trip guidebook to the hydrogeology of the Rock-Fox River basin of Southeastern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, C. L. R., Jr.; Cotter, R.D.; Green, J.H.; Olcott, P.G.

    1970-01-01

    On this trip we will examine some hydrogeologic characteristics of glacial features and emphasize ground-water management within the Rock-Fox River basin. Field stops will include the hydrogeology of a classical glacial terrane--the Kettle moraine--and the management of ground-water resources for industrial, municipal, agricultural, and fish-culture purposes. Descriptions of the geology, soils, water availability and characteristics, water quality, water use, and water problems within the basin are given in the accompanying U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Atlas (HA-360). This atlas is a product of the cooperative program of University Extension--the University of Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey.

  20. Radiolarian and Diatom Fluxes in Two California Borderland Basins as Indices of Climate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Weinheimer, Amy L.

    1994-01-01

    The diversity, wide ranging habitats, and endemism of diatoms and radiolarians make them useful biological indicators of physical oceanography. The unique varved sediment (yearly layers) of the Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins (SMB and SBB, respectively) in the Southern California Borderland permits analysis of the diatom and radiolarian record at an annual resolution. In addition to the high resolution record preserved in the sediment, present-day teleconnections suggest that climate va...

  1. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  2. Effects of Water-Management Strategies on Water Resources in the Pawcatuck River Basin, Southwestern Rhode Island and Southeastern Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Bent, Gardner C.; Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.; Scherer, J. Eric; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pawcatuck River Basin in southwestern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut is an important high-quality water resource for domestic and public supplies, irrigation, recreation, and the aquatic ecosystem. Concerns about the effects of water withdrawals on aquatic habitat in the basin have prompted local, State, and Federal agencies to explore water-management strategies that minimize the effects of withdrawals on the aquatic habitat. As part of this process, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Rhode Island Water Resources Board completed a study to assess the effects of current (2000-04) and potential water withdrawals on streamflows and groundwater levels using hydrologic simulation models developed for the basin. The major findings of the model simulations are: *Moving highly variable seasonal irrigation withdrawals from streams to groundwater wells away from streams reduces short-term fluctuations in streamflow and increases streamflow in the summer when flows are lowest. This occurs because of the inherent time lag between when water is withdrawn from the aquifer and when it affects streamflow. *A pumped well in the vicinity of small streams indicates that if withdrawals exceed available streamflow, groundwater levels drop substantially as a consequence of water lost from aquifer storage, which may reduce the time wetlands and vernal pools are saturated, affecting the animal and plant life that depend on these habitats. *The effects of pumping on water resources such as ponds, streams, and wetlands can be minimized by relocating pumping wells, implementing seasonal pumping schemes that utilize different wells and pumping rates, or both. *The effects of projected land-use change, mostly from forest to low- and medium density housing, indicate only minor changes in streamflow at the subbasin scale examined; however, at a local scale, high flows could increase, and

  3. Past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Sun; Chen, H. S.; W. M. Ju; Song, J.; Li, J. J.; Ren, Y. J.; Sun, J.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the causes of the past water cycle variations and the influence of climate variability on the streamflow, lake storage, and flood potential, we analyze the changes in streamflow and the underlying drivers in four typical watersheds (Gaosha, Meigang, Saitang, and Xiashan) within the Poyang Lake Basin, based on the meteorological observations at 79 weather stations, and datasets of streamflow and river level at four hydrological stations for the period of 1961-2000. The contributi...

  4. Past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Sun; Chen, H. S.; W. M. Ju; Song, J.; Li, J. J.; Ren, Y. J.; Sun, J.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the causes of the past water cycle variations and the influence of climate variability on the streamflow, lake storage, and flood potential, we analyze the changes in streamflow and the underlying drivers in four typical watersheds (Gaosha, Meigang, Saitang, and Xiashan) within the Poyang Lake Basin, based on the meteorological observations at 79 weather stations, and datasets of streamflow and river level at four hydrological stations for the period of 1961-20...

  5. The past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Sun; H. S. Chen; W. M. Ju; Song, J.; Li, J. J.; Ren, Y. J.; Sun, J.

    2011-01-01

    Water resources have a close relationship with climate. The changes of streamflow affect the exploitation and utilization of water resources directly, and the social security and the stability of ecological system. Meteorological observations at 79 weather stations, and datasets of streamflow and river level at 4 hydrological stations were collected to analyze the changes of streamflow and underlying drivers in four typical watersheds within Poyang Lake Basin during the period from 1961 to 20...

  6. Groundwater flow and solute transport at the Mourquong saline-water disposal basin, Murray Basin, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Craig; Narayan, Kumar; Woods, Juliette; Herczeg, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Saline groundwater and drainage effluent from irrigation are commonly stored in some 200 natural and artificial saline-water disposal basins throughout the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia. Their impact on underlying aquifers and the River Murray, one of Australia's major water supplies, is of serious concern. In one such scheme, saline groundwater is pumped into Lake Mourquong, a natural groundwater discharge complex. The disposal basin is hydrodynamically restricted by low-permeability lacustrine clays, but there are vulnerable areas in the southeast where the clay is apparently missing. The extent of vertical and lateral leakage of basin brines and the processes controlling their migration are examined using (1) analyses of chloride and stable isotopes of water (2H/1H and 18O/16O) to infer mixing between regional groundwater and lake water, and (2) the variable-density groundwater flow and solute-transport code SUTRA. Hydrochemical results indicate that evaporated disposal water has moved at least 100 m in an easterly direction and that there is negligible movement of brines in a southerly direction towards the River Murray. The model is used to consider various management scenarios. Salt-load movement to the River Murray was highest in a "worst-case" scenario with irrigation employed between the basin and the River Murray. Present-day operating conditions lead to little, if any, direct movement of brine from the basin into the river. Résumé. Les eaux souterraines salées et les effluents de drainage de l'irrigation sont stockés dans environ 200 bassins naturels ou artificiels destinés à retenir les eaux salines dans tout le bassin de Murray-Darling, en Australie. Leur impact sur les aquifères sous-jacents et sur la rivière Murray, l'une des principales ressources en eau d'Australie, constitue un problème grave. Dans une telle situation, les eaux souterraines salines sont pompées dans le lac Mourquong, complexe dans lequel les nappes se d

  7. Late Pleistocene shortening rate on the northern margin of the Yanqi Basin, southeastern Tian Shan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-liang; Yang, Xiao-ping; Li, An; Pierce, Ian K. D.; Thompson, Jessica A.; Angster, Stephen J.; Zhang, Ling

    2015-11-01

    How strain is distributed and partitioned on individual faults and folds on the margins of intermontane basins remains poorly understood. The Haermodun (Ha) anticline, located along the northern margin of the intermontane Yanqi Basin on the southeastern flank of the Tian Shan, preserves flights of passively deformed alluvial terraces. These terraces cross the active anticline and can be used to constrain local crustal shortening and uplift rates. Geologic and geomorphic mapping, in conjunction with high-resolution dGPS topographic surveys, reveal that the terrace surfaces are perpendicular to the fold's strike, and display increased rotation with age, implying that the anticline has grown by progressive limb rotation. Combined with the open sinusoidal curve model and excess area method, we calculated uplift and shortening values for each terrace since abandonment. Using the published exposure ages of each terrace, we found the vertical uplift rate gradually decreased from ∼0.43 to ∼0.11 mm/a, whereas the shortening rate remained constant at ∼0.3 mm/a since the anticline began to grow. A fresh fault scarp, 0.4 ± 0.1 m high, is visible along the southern portion of the Ha anticline, and is interpreted to be the most recent evidence of seismic activity. Using an estimated rupture area and the length of the fresh offset created by this earthquake, we estimate that the main thrust underlying the Ha anticline has generated moderate (M < 7) earthquakes in the past. The shortening rates of the Ha anticline from geomorphology agree with current GPS measurements cover-over the fold, and highlight the importance of determining slip rates for individual faults in order to resolve patterns of strain distribution across intermontane belts.

  8. Occurrence of major sequence stratigraphic boundaries in relation to basin development in Cenozoic deposits of the southeastern North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, O.; Danielsen, M.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Jordt, H.; Laursen, G.V.; Thomsen, E.

    1995-05-01

    The post-Danian Cenozoic succession in the southeastern North Sea is subdivided into seven informal `major sequence stratigraphic units`, comprising twenty-one sequences. The boundaries of the units are easily recognized seismic sections over the entire study area. The North Sea is an epicontinental basin. It underwent considerable changes during the Cenozoic as regards subsidence rates, direction of sediment transport, and position of depocentres. The six unit boundaries are interpreted to reflect some of the major events in the development of the basin. The boundary between units 1 and 2 (lowermost Eocene) is associated with a regional hiatus followed by a large relative sea-level rise, whereas the boundary between units 2 and 3 (Lower Eocene) coincides with a shift in the direction of sediment transport from north to west. The boundary between units 3 and 4 (Eocene-Oligocene transition) marks an important change in the depositional environment of the North Sea with a shift in the direction of sediment transport from west to mainly northeast. In the northeastern part of the study area, thick prograding deposits of unit 4 are situated on distal deposits of units 1, 2 and 3. The transition between units 4 and 5 (uppermost Oligocene) shows a pronounced basinward shift in onlap, and it is interpreted to reflect a major fall in the relative sea level. The boundary between units 6 and 7 (Middle Miocene) is identified on a shift from a prograding reflection pattern to an aggrading pattern. The lower part of unit 7 is interpreted to represent a starved depositional environment, related to a pronounced increase in subsidence rate. The North Sea sequences are correlated with the Danish onshore deposits. The sequence boundaries generally coincide with an unconformity in the Danish deposits. A glauconitic horizon characterises the initial deposits overlying each of the unconformities. (au) (29 refs.)

  9. Rovearinids (stemless crinoids) in the Albian carbonates of the offshore Santos Basin, southeastern Brazil: stratigraphic, palaeobiogeographic and palaeoceanographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Brito, D.; Ferré, B.

    2001-06-01

    Microfacies analysis of marine carbonates cored by Petrobras well 1-SPS-6 in the offshore Santos Basin (southeastern Brazil) has revealed a remarkable fossil assemblage of calpionellids (colomiellids), favusellids, hedbergellids, globigerinelloidids, buliminids, radiolarians, inoceramid prisms, roveacrinids, and saccocomids(?) preserved in lower Albian calcimudstones-wackestones of the lower part of the Guarujá Formation. This assemblage represents an allochtonous accumulation in a deep neritic to shallow bathyal hypoxic environment. Besides 'saccocomid-like' sections, the only determinable sections of roveacrinids are thecal plates of Poecilocrinus dispandus elongatus Peck, 1943. This species was previously only known from the Weno Formation of Texas. The Brazilian material extends its records farther south from at least the lower Albian, which then represents the earliest occurrence of this peculiar family in the South Atlantic region. Taking into account their Albian global distribution and the location of their oldest representative (Hauterivian near Alicante, Spain), the Roveacrinidae dispersed westward throughout all of Cretaceous Tethys. The Tethyan origin of Roveacrinidae is further evidence that, during late Aptian-Albian times, the northern South Atlantic (north of the Walvis-São Paulo Ridge) was supplied by a Tethyan water mass.

  10. Characteristics of sulfur isotope during the epigenetic alteration of oil-gas and coalbed methane in the southeastern Songliao Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through studying the characteristics of pyrite and sulfur isotope in the rock of Upper Cretaceous Quantou Formation, Yaojia Formation and Nenjiang Formation in the southeastern Songliao Basin, occurrence features of pyrite and characteristics of sulfur isotope in gray and grayish-green sandstone produced by epigenetic reducing decoloration of Quantou Formation and Yaojia Formation indicate the characteristics of organic fluid composition in deep-seated oil-gas and coalbed methane. δ34SV-CDT of sulfur isotope in original sedimentary diagenite is positive, δ34SV-CDT of organic fluid in oil-gas and coalbed methane is negative. Reduction of oil-gas and coalbed methane not only makes mottled and purplish-red original oxidized sandstone reduce to grey and grayish-green reducing sandstone, which makes the reducing capacities of rocks increase greatly, but also uranium is superimposed and enriched during the interaction of rocks with organic fluid of oil-gas and coalbed methane and uranium content increases generally, which results in the forming of uranium anomaly and mineralization in some areas. Stockwork damouritization is discovered in the ore-bearing sandstone of Yaojia Formation in Menda area at the first time, which shows the uranium mineralization is characterized by low temperature hydrothermal alteration and is related with low temperature hydrothermal fluid. (authors)

  11. Status of aeromagnetic survey coverage of Yucca Mountain and vicinity to a radius of about 140 kilometers, southwestern Nevada and southeastern California, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty aeromagnetic surveys in the southwestern part of Nevada and the southeastern part of California have been evaluated to assess the quality and coverage of aeromagnetic data within 140 kilometers (km) of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The compilation shows that all the study area is covered by aeromagnetic surveys, but in some areas, particularly in the Death Valley region, new surveys flown with closer flight line spacing and lower elevations than the existing coverage are needed. In addition, the California part of the study area needs to be analytically continued downward to 305 meters (m) above ground level to provide a consistent data set for interpretation of subsurface geologic structures

  12. Studies of geology and hydrology in the Basin and Range province, southwestern United States, for isolation of high-level radioactive waste-characterization of the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Death Valley region, Nevada and California, in the Basin and Range province, is an area of about 80,200 sq km located in southern Nevada and southeastern California. Precambrian metamorphic and intrusive basement rocks are overlain by a thick section of Paleozoic clastic and evaporitic sedimentary rocks. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks include extrusive and intrusive rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks. Structural features within the Death Valley indicate a long and complex tectonic evolution from late Precambrian to the present. Potential repository host media in the region include granite and other coarse-grained plutonic rocks, ashflow tuff, basaltic and andesitic lava flows, and basin fill. The Death Valley region is composed largely of closed topographic basins that are apparently coincident with closed groundwater flow systems. In these systems, recharge occurs sparingly at higher altitudes by infiltration of precipitation or by infiltration of ephemeral runoff. Discharge occurs largely by spring flow and by evaporation and transpiration in the playas. Death Valley proper, for which the region was named, is the ultimate discharge area for a large, complex system of groundwater aquifers that occupy the northeastern part of the region. The deepest part of the system consists of carbonate aquifers that connect closed topographic basins at depth. The discharge from the system occurs in several intermediate areas that are geomorphically, stratigraphically, and structurally controlled. Ultimately, most groundwater flow terminates by discharge to Death Valley; groundwater is discharged to the Colorado River from a small part of the region

  13. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  14. Closed basin brine evolution and the influence of Ca-Cl inflow waters : Death Valley and Bristol Dry Lake California, Qaidam Basin, China, and Salar de Atacama, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Lowenstein, T. K.; Risacher, François

    2009-01-01

    Diagenetic-hydrothermal brines, here called "hydrothermal Ca-Cl brines," have compositions that reflect interactions between groundwaters and rocks or sediments at elevated temperatures. Hydrothermal Ca-Cl brines reach the surface by convection-driven or topographically driven circulation, and discharge as springs or seeps along fault zones to become important inflow waters in many tectonically active closed basins. Case studies from (1) Qaidam Basin, China, (2) Death Valley, California, (3) ...

  15. Tertiary basin development and tectonic implications, Whipple detachment system, Colorado River extensional corridor, California and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, J. E.; Beratan, K. K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic mapping, stratigraphic and structural observations, and radiometric dating of Miocene deposits of the Whipple detachment system, Colorado River extensional corridor of California and Arizona. From these data, four regions are distinguished in the study area that correspond to four Miocene depositional basins. It is shown that these basins developed in about the same positions, relative to each other and to volcanic sources, as they occupy at present. They formed in the early Miocene from a segmentation of the upper crust into blocks bounded by high-angle faults that trended both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of extension and which were terminated at middle crustal depths by a low-angle detachment fault.

  16. Quaternary tectonics and basin history of Pahrump and Stewart Valleys, Nevada and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pahrump fault system is an active fault system located in Pahrump and Stewart Valleys, Nevada and California, in the southern part of the Basin and Range Province. This system is 50 km long by 30 km wide and is comprised of three fault zones: the right-lateral East Nopah fault zone, the right-oblique Pahrump Valley fault zone, and the normal West Spring Mountains fault zone. All three zones have geomorphic evidence for late Quaternary activity. Analysis of active fault patterns and seismic reflection lines suggests that the Pahrump basin has had a two-stage genesis, an early history associated with a period of low angle detachment faulting probably active 10-15 Ma, and a more recent history related to the present dextral shear system, probably active post-4 Ma

  17. The past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Water resources have a close relationship with climate. The changes of streamflow affect the exploitation and utilization of water resources directly, and the social security and the stability of ecological system. Meteorological observations at 79 weather stations, and datasets of streamflow and river level at 4 hydrological stations were collected to analyze the changes of streamflow and underlying drivers in four typical watersheds within Poyang Lake Basin during the period from 1961 to 2000. The contributions of different factors to the changes of streamflow in four typical watersheds were quantitatively quantified using water balance equation. Then, the possible future change of streamflow was assessed using precipitation and evaporation projected by different GCMs under three different emission scenarios, including medium greenhouse gases emission scenario (SRESA1B, high greenhouse gases emission scenario (SRESA2, and low greenhouse gases emission scenario (SRESB1.

    The change of streamflow exhibited different characteristics the four watersheds exist different increasing trends during 1961 to 2000. The increase in streamflow in Meigang and Gaosha watersheds was at the 5% significance level, with increasing rate of 4.80 m3 s−1 yr−1 and 1.29 m3 s−1 yr−1, respectively. The increase in precipitation is the biggest contributor to streamflow increment in Meigang Gaosha, and Xiashan watersheds, while the decrease in evaporation is the major explainer for streamflow increment in Saitang watershed. Radiation and wind have larger contributions than actual vapor pressure and mean temperature to evaporation and streamflow.

    If soil water storage will not change in the future, with the increasing precipitation and the decreasing evaporation (not including the SRESB1 in Xiashan watershed, the streamflow shows an uptrend. Furthermore, the largest increase of

  18. Past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Sun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To understand the causes of the past water cycle variations and the influence of climate variability on the streamflow, lake storage, and flood potential, we analyze the changes in streamflow and the underlying drivers in four typical watersheds (Gaosha, Meigang, Saitang, and Xiashan within the Poyang Lake Basin, based on the meteorological observations at 79 weather stations, and datasets of streamflow and river level at four hydrological stations for the period of 1961-2000. The contribution of different climate factors to the change in streamflow in each watershed is estimated quantitatively using the water balance equations. Results show that in each watershed, the annual streamflow exhibits an increasing trend from 1961–2000. The increases in streamflow by 4.80 m3 s−1 yr−1 and 1.29 m3 s−1 yr−1 at Meigang and Gaosha, respectively, are statistically significant at the 5% level. The increase in precipitation is the biggest contributor to the streamflow increment in Meigang (3.79 m3 s−1 yr−1, Gaosha (1.12 m3 s−1 yr−1, and Xiashan (1.34 m3 s−1 yr−1, while the decrease in evapotranspiration is the major factor controlling the streamflow increment in Saitang (0.19 m3 s−1 yr−1. In addition, radiation and wind contribute more than actual vapor pressure and mean temperature to the changes in evapotranspiration and streamflow for the four watersheds.

    For revealing the possible change of streamflow due to the future climate change, we also investigate the projected precipitation and evapotranspiration from of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3 under three greenhouse gases emission scenarios (SRESA1B, SRESA2 and SRESB1 for the period of 2061–2100. When the future changes in the soil water storage

  19. Paleostress inversion of fault-slip data from the Jurassic to Cretaceous Huangshan Basin and implications for the tectonic evolution of southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianbing; Tang, Shuai; Lin, Shoufa

    2016-08-01

    Eight paleostress stages are established in the Jurassic-Cretaceous Huangshan Basin based on fault-slip analysis and age estimation. The first six stages correspond to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate or the northward motion of the Philippine Block along the southeastern active margin of the South China Block: (1) the 169-162 Ma strike-slip regime was caused by westward low-angle subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate, which resulted in NNE-striking folds and top-to-the west thrusting along the southeastern margin of the Huangshan Basin; (2) the 156-125 Ma NW-SE extensional regime was triggered by slab break-off of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This extension led to Early Cretaceous magmatism, deposition of Early Cretaceous sediments and development of normal faults along the northern boundary of the Huangshan Basin; (3) the 125-107 Ma strike-slip regime was induced by the N-S collision between the Philippine and South China blocks. This tectonic event caused the angular unconformity between the Upper and Lower Cretaceous and the inversion of the Early Cretaceous extensional basin; (4) the 105-86 Ma WNW-ESE extensional regime resulted from an off-shore arc jump of the subducted Paleo-Pacific Plate. This extension triggered the deposition of the Late Cretaceous Qiyunshan Formation; (5) the 86-80 Ma strike-slip regime was induced by high-angle subduction of the Pacific Plate after the off-shore arc jump. This event led to regional uplift and an unconformity at the base of the Late Cretaceous Xiaoyan Formation; (6) the 80-36 Ma N-S extensional regime was caused by the extension following the collision between the Philippine and South China blocks, corresponding to the deposition of the Late Cretaceous Xiaoyan Formation. The last two paleostress stages were the consequences of the far-field effect of the India-Asia continent-continent collision to the southwest of the South China Block: (7) the 36-30 Ma strike-slip regime was caused by the India-Asia collision. It

  20. Subsidence History of the Laguna Salada Basin in Northeastern Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J.; Martin-Barajas, A.; Herguera, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Salton Trough region in southern California and the Mexicali valley in northwestern Mexico are areas of (i) rapid subsidence due to trans-tension along the San Andreas-Imperial fault system, and (ii) high flux of sediments transported by the Colorado River, all of which confer this region with a high potential to preserve a complete record of climatic and tectonic activity information. Here we present the subsidence history of the Laguna Salada basin, and the history of activity of the master bounding faults on its eastern side. The Laguna Salada is a lacustrine basin located west of the Mexicali valley and to the south of the Salton Trough. Sedimentological as well as time series analyses performed on two 42 m-long cores drilled in the center of the basin, estimated to span the past 50 and 70KaBP, indicate a modulation of the late Quaternary stratigraphy by cyclic variations in lake level driven by Milankovitch forcing. Based on these results we derive the long-term history of the basin from a gamma-ray log recovered from a 2.8 km-deep geothermal borehole drilled by the Mexican Power Company adjacent to the Laguna Salada fault. The stratigraphy of the deep borehole reveals a history of activity pulses related to the initial breakage of the Laguna Salada fault and its interaction with neighboring faults. A first pulse started at 1.5 Ma and records the initiation of the Laguna Salada fault and rapid uplift of the crystalline block of the Sierra Cucapa. A second pulse started around 1 Ma, and is very likely related to the hard linking of the Laguna Salada fault with the Cañada David detachment by the Cañon Rojo fault. The onset of the Laguna Salada fault at 1.5 Ma appears to be synchronous with an early Pleistocene regional fault reorganization among the San Jacinto, San Andreas and Elsinore fault systems in southern California, suggesting that this reorganization may have affected a large area from San Gorgonio pass to the northern Gulf of California.

  1. California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Groundwater in the Livermore Valley Basin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources Source attribution and nitrate fate and transport are therefore the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the City of Livermore, where high nitrate levels affect both public supply and private domestic wells. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, (delta)15N values greater than 10(perthousand) indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations above the MCL of 45 mg NO3 L-1. In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos induces flux of the contaminant to the regional aquifer. The low (delta)15N value (3.1(perthousand)) in this location implicates synthetic fertilizer. Geochemical

  2. California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Groundwater in the Livermore Valley Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H; Eaton, G F; Ekwurzel, B E; Esser, B K; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; McNab, W; Moody-Bartel, C; Moore, K; Moran, J E

    2005-11-18

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources Source attribution and nitrate fate and transport are therefore the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the City of Livermore, where high nitrate levels affect both public supply and private domestic wells. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, {delta}{sup 15}N values greater than 10{per_thousand} indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations above the MCL of 45 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1}. In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos induces flux of the contaminant to the regional aquifer. The low {delta}{sup 15}N value (3.1{per_thousand}) in this location implicates

  3. Resistivity Imaging of the Mono-Inyo Volcanic Chain, Mono Basin, California Using the Audiomagnetotelluric Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, D. K.; Ponce, D. A.; Pera McDonell, A.; Chuchel, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) models of data collected in Mono Basin, California show significant structure within the upper kilometer of the basin and image a shallow resistor that may be related to a shallow basement feature. The Mono-Inyo volcanic chain is a 25-km long, north-south trending series of domes and craters extending southward from Mono Lake and into the western part of the Long Valley Caldera. Gravity and magnetic modeling in the region, prompted by a volcano hazards study, show a basement high associated with an apparent circular magnetic anomaly. AMT data are used to further investigate this potential field anomaly and image the geoelectric structure within the volcanic rocks in Mono Basin. We collected AMT data along two profiles in Pumice Valley and along the western margin of the domes. Profile A runs approximately east-west, perpendicular to the regional geologic strike, and extends 2.5 km from the southern edge of North Coulee into the basin. Profile B is a north-south trending 6 km-long profile within the basin and was located several hundred meters away from the volcanic chain. Both profiles perpendicularly intersect the circular magnetic feature. We computed both one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) inverse models along each profile. 2D models were computed using the conjugate gradient, finite-difference method of Rodi and Mackie (2001) and a 100 ohm-m half-space, starting model. One-dimensional model sensitivity and various 2D starting models indicate a depth of investigation of about 1 km. Preliminary models show a relatively conductive (~20 ohm-m) volcanic basin fill likely associated with the Bishop Tuff, a voluminous pyroclastic flow, whose eruption resulted in formation of the Long Valley caldera 760 Ka ago. Resistivity variations within the basin fill may be related to the porosity or amount of fracturing of individual flows. A resistive (> 200 ohm-m) feature at roughly 600-800 m depth coincides with the magnetic high and relative

  4. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  5. The supra-detachment tectono-sedimentary record of rifted margins: the example of the Los Barriles Basin, SE Baja California Sur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Emmanuel; Robin, Cécile; Geoffroy, Laurent; Strzerzynski, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    The study of rifted margins have shown that the main controlling structures are changing from classical high-angle faults to low-angle detachment fault dominated extension when the crust thins to less than 10 km, which is the case in hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins. While the stratigraphic record related to classical high-angle faulting is well constrained, little is known about the tectono-sedimentary evolution of hyper-extended rift systems. A major question remains, how supra-detachment tectono-sedimentary systems are recorded in the stratigraphic record? This remains largely unexplored and must be better constrained by observations. In our poster, we present preliminary results from our study of a rift basin floored by a low-angle detachment system exposed at the southeastern edge of the Baja California Peninsula in the so-called Los Barriles area in the Gulf of California. This area represents one of the best examples of an active transtensional rift system from which the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the rift to drift transition can be studied in the field. The syn-tectonic sedimentary sequence is floored by a detachment fault and is limited oceanward by an extensional allochthon. The syn- to post-tectonic stratigraphy can be summarized into 4 main formations: (1) The Pescadero fluvial fm. (no available ages) evolves upsection from poorly organized polymictic in components and faulted breccias to more granitic and stratified conglomerates. It overlies the extensional allochthon and is tilted continentwards. The channel incisions show EW paleoflows and the upper Pescadero fm. is transitional to the following Refugio fm. (2) The overlying Refugio fm. (Lower Pliocene) occurs as thick marine sandy deposits within the basin axis, is granitic in composition and has average paleocurrents directions trending N-S. The upper part of the fm. is transitional to the following Barriles fm. (3) The Barriles fm. (Upper Miocene - Lower Pleistocene) occurs as very

  6. Macrobenthic community response to copper in Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Carlos; Mendoza, Guillermo; Levin, Lisa A; Zirino, Alberto; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Porrachia, Magali; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2011-04-01

    We examined Cu contamination effects on macrobenthic communities and Cu concentration in invertebrates within Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego Bay, California. Results indicate that at some sites, Cu in sediment has exceeded a threshold for "self defense" mechanisms and highlight the potential negative impacts on benthic faunal communities where Cu accumulates and persists in sediments. At sites with elevated Cu levels in sediment, macrobenthic communities were not only less diverse but also their total biomass and body size (individual biomass) were reduced compared to sites with lower Cu. Cu concentration in tissue varied between species and within the same species, reflecting differing abilities to "regulate" their body load. The spatial complexity of Cu effects in a small marina such as SIYB emphasizes that sediment-quality criteria based solely on laboratory experiments should be used with caution, as they do not necessarily reflect the condition at the community and ecosystem levels. PMID:21354577

  7. Heavy-duty truck emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Gary A; Schuchmann, Brent G; Stedman, Donald H

    2013-08-20

    California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer heavy-duty diesel engines require an order of magnitude reduction in particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement campaigns have been conducted at a Port of Los Angeles location and an inland weigh station in the South Coast Air Basin of California. Fuel specific oxides of nitrogen emissions at the Port have decreased 12% since 2010 while infrared opacity (a measure of particulate matter) remained low, showing no diesel particulate filter deterioration. The weigh station truck's fuel specific oxides of nitrogen emission reductions since 2010 (18.5%) almost double the previous three year's reductions and are the result of new trucks using selective catalytic reduction systems. Trucks at the weigh station equipped with these systems have a skewed oxides of nitrogen emissions distribution (half of the emissions were from 6% of the measurements) and had significantly lower emissions than similarly equipped Port trucks. Infrared thermographs of truck exhaust pipes revealed that the mean temperature observed at the weigh station (225 ± 4.5 °C) was 70 °C higher than for Port trucks, suggesting that the catalytic aftertreatment systems on trucks at our Port site were often below minimum operating temperatures. PMID:23926948

  8. Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis of detrital microclines from the southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrital microcline grains from sedimentary strata preserve a record of thermal evolution in the temperature range approx.= 1000 to 2000C which can be revealed by 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis. Microcline separates from deep drill hole intersections with Eocene to Miocene sediments in the Basin and Tejon Blocks of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, analysed by the age spectrum approach show radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) gradients that record both the slow cooling of the uplifting sediment source approx.= 65 Ma ago, and a recent thermal event. This information, in conjunction with the observation of fission track annealing in the coexisting apatites, allows estimation of the temperature-time conditions of this thermal event at about 1400C for approx.= 200 ka. Present and paleotemperature data is in accord with heating related to several kilometers of Pleistocene sediment deposition. Heat flow calculations suggest that this recent subsidence has depressed the thermal gradient from about 300C km-1 to the present apparent gradient of 240C km-1. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of detrital microcline crystals yields thermochronological information in the temperature-time range of petroleum maturation and provides this technique with potential as both a useful exploration tool and as a means of probing the fundamental geodynamic processes of basin evolution. (orig.)

  9. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  10. Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface waves, and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐wave velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐wave propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface waves with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a 3D velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface waves and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.

  11. Potential for using the Upper Coachella Valley ground-water basin, California, for storage of artificially recharged water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Michael J.; Swain, Lindsay A.; Tyley, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the geohydrologic factors affecting storage of water by artificial recharge in the upper Coachella Valley, Calif. The ground-water basin of the upper Coachella Valley seems to be geologically suitable for large-scale artificial recharge. A minimum of 900 ,000 acre-feet of water could probably be stored in the basin without raising basinwide water levels above those that existed in 1945. Preliminary tests indicate that a long-term artificial recharge rate of 5 feet per day may be feasible for spreading grounds in the basin if such factors as sediment and bacterial clogging can be controlled. The California Department of Water Resources, through the Future Water Supply Program, is investigating the use of ground-water basins for storage of State Water Project water in order to help meet maximum annual entitlements to water project contractors. (USGS)

  12. History of the 1912 “Pope” Map of California Redwood Park: The Big Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Stanley D.

    1994-01-01

    A map has a history of its own. Research on an old map can make it live and breathe again. A map can open windows to information like few other sources.The “discovery” of the earliest (1912), detailed, map of Big Basin State Park, a park located entirely within Santa Cruz County, California, has inspired this study of the history of the map, its maker, the people associated with the map, the reason for the map, the place names depicted thereon, and their meaning. The California Redwood Park [...

  13. Areas permitted for irrigation, storage, evaporation, and disposal of treated sewage effluent in the upper Carson River Basin, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of areas permitted for irrigation, storage, evaporation, and disposal of treated sewage effluent in the Upper Carson River Basin, California...

  14. Space Use by Swainson’s Hawk (Buteo swainsoni in the Natomas Basin, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fleishman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We used satellite-based remote sensing to estimate home ranges for Swainson’s Hawk, a species listed as threatened in California (USA, on its breeding grounds in the Natomas Basin (northern Central Valley, California and to evaluate whether the species’ space-use intensity (statistically derived density of telemetry locations was associated with land cover, sex, reproductive success, or life stage of offspring. We differentiated seven classes of land cover—alfalfa, annually rotated irrigated crops, developed, grassland, orchard / vineyard, rice, and water. From 2011–2013, we fitted transmitters with global positioning systems to 23 adult Swainson’s Hawks. We recorded a minimum of six locations per day per bird from spring through early autumn of each year. We used a fixed, bivariate-normal kernel estimator to calculate a utilization distribution at 30-m resolution for each life stage of each individual within each year. We used a linear mixed model to estimate the associations between intensity of space use and land cover, sex, and reproductive status. The majority of adult Swainson’s Hawks traveled distances up to 8–10 km from the nest throughout the breeding season. Median seasonal home-range sizes in a given year ranged from 87–172 km2. The association between intensity of space use and grassland was 50–139% stronger, and the association between intensity of space use and alfalfa 23–59% stronger, than the associations between intensity of space use and any other land-cover type. Intensity of space use did not vary as a function of sex, reproductive status, or life stage. Given our results and additional knowledge of the species’ ecology, we suggest that reproductive success and, in turn, population-level recruitment may be associated equally if not more closely with availability of nesting sites than with the current distribution of land cover.

  15. High resolution multi-proxy records of the last 60 kyr in the Southeastern Carpathian basin: towards a palaeoclimatic reconstruction from NW to SE Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Slobodan; Stevens, Thomas; Hambach, Ulrich; Machalett, Björn; Bokhorst, Mark; Vandenberghe, Jef; Svirčev, Zorica; Zöller, Ludwig

    2010-05-01

    Contrary to the intensively investigated North Atlantic marine and ice cores, and "classical" loess records in the Western and Central Europe, our knowledge about the last glacial climate and environmental dynamics of Southeastern Europe is still poorly known. Recent research advances in this region have established thick loess deposits in the region as important archives for understanding the last glacial climatic and environmental evolution on the continental scale. Vojvodina is a region in northern Serbia, located in the southeastern part of the Carpathian (Pannonian) Basin, and encompassing the confluence area of the Danube, Sava and Tisa rivers. More than 60% of this lowland area is covered with loess and loess-like sediments. Aeolian silt accumulation in Vojvodina began in the late early Pleistocene and culminated during the last glacial period. As a result of relatively high accumulation rates and widespread occurrence, the last glacial loess-palaeosol sequences preserve a detailed and robust record of the last glacial climate and environmental changes in the region. Investigations conducted during the last decade have improved knowledge and understanding of the distribution, chronostratigraphy, palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental record of the late Pleistocene loess-palaeosol sequences in the Vojvodina region. Generally, the last glacial climate in the southeastern part of Carpathian Basin was much drier and warmer than in other European loess provinces. The last glacial palaeoclimatic record indicates two main cold and dry periods, corresponding with deposition of two loess layers, V-L1L1 and V-L1L2. Short-term variations of magnetic susceptibility and sedimentological proxies may be an expression of abrupt, brief, cold and dry episodes, although limitations in dating methods make suggestions of teleconnections with corresponding climatic variations in the North Atlantic region tentative. Recent high sampling resolution luminescence dating and

  16. Stomach contents of the Pacific sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon longurio (Carcharhiniformes, Carcharhinidae) in the southeastern Gulf of California

    OpenAIRE

    Yolene R Osuna-Peralta; Domenico Voltolina; Morán-Angulo, Ramón E.; J. Fernando Márquez-Farías

    2014-01-01

    The feeding habits of the sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon longurio of the SE Gulf of California are described using the stomach contents of 250 specimens (135 males and 115 females) obtained weekly from December 2007 to March 2008 in the two main landing sites of the artisanal fishing fleet of Mazatlan. The mean total length (TL) was 77.7 ± 12.8 cm and the respective ranges for males and females were 60-120 cm and 52120 cm. Size distribution showed two modal groups (juveniles: 52-80 cm, mode 7...

  17. Verification and error sources of the California Seasonal Hydrologic Forecast (CaliForecast) System over the Feather River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G.; Imam, B.; Sorooshian, S.

    2008-12-01

    Operational water resource planning and management heavily rely on the seasonal streamflow forecasts of reservoir. The California Hydrologic Forecast System, a regional implementation of the West-Wide Seasonal Hydrologic forecast System over the state of California at the University of California-Irvine in a 1/8th degree resolution, provides probabilistic forecasts in the form of ensemble streamflow predictions (ESP) to facilitate our need in the state of California. Similar to any other hydrologic forecast systems, CaliForecast, however, contains significant forecast errors and uncertainties that are propagated from many sources. These within the CaliForecast system, includes uncertainty associated with the interpolation techniques (Index station method) for the precipitation input, validity of ESP with respect to the climate change, efficiency of snow assimilation scheme, error in naturalized streamflow, and many others. This presentation will attempt to verify the ESP forecasts over the Feather River Basin that is a major tributary to the Sacramento River Basin, provide understanding of error sources using existing verification metrics, and finally suggest next steps towards improving forecast skills.

  18. Sand dispersal in the southeastern Austral Basin, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina: Outcrop insights from Eocene channeled turbidite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Olivero, Eduardo B.

    2012-02-01

    We made a detailed facies analysis of well exposed Eocene foredeep and wedge-top successions in the SE Austral Basin of eastern Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, contributing to a better understanding of its patterns of sand dispersal. The analysis reveals that these successions constitute portions of turbidite systems with recurrent facies associations, interpreted as channel, channel-margin and levée depositional elements. The channel facies, paleocurrents and interpreted paleogeography suggest that the studied successions form the transfer zone of the turbidite systems that fed the foreland basin. We hypothesize that the SE Austral Basin, which forms the transition between the Austral and Malvinas Basins, acted as an east-west conduit for sediments sourced at the Fuegian Andes and transported to a deeper depositional zone in the SW Malvinas Basin. The fill of the channels in the transfer zone involved a large amount of turbidity flows, which in addition to the evidence of levée confinement in the studied deposits suggests that the sandier portion of the flows was able to reach the depositional zone, were mostly unconfined (sheeted) sand bodies may have formed. In addition, overbank sand bodies were deposited within the transfer zone, associated to processes of flow overspill. Both types of sand bodies constitute potential reservoirs in this hydrocarbon producing basin, implying that the Eocene SE Austral Basin, and the ultimate zone of deposition in the SW Malvinas Basin may constitute major prospects for hydrocarbon exploration. The proposed model define a new perspective for future research on the sedimentologic and stratigraphic evolution of the SE portion of the Austral Basin.

  19. Biomonitoring recycled water in the Santa Ana River Basin in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Carney, Michael; Hinton, David E; Lyon, Stephen; Woodside, Greg; Duong, Cuong N; Kim, Sang-Don; Schlenk, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Santa Ana River (SAR) is the primary source of groundwater recharge for the Orange County Groundwater Basin in coastal southern California. Approximately 85% base flow in the SAR originates from wastewater treatment plants operated by three dischargers. An on-line, flow-through bioassay using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a means of judging potential public health impacts was employed to evaluate the water quality of the surface water and shallow groundwater originating from the SAR. Three chronic (3-4.5 mo) exposures using orange-red (outbred, OR) and see-through (color mutant, ST-II) Japanese medaka as bioindicators were conducted to evaluate endocrinologic, reproductive, and morphologic endpoints. No statistically significant differences in gross morphological endpoints, mortality, gender ratios, and vitellogenin induction were observed in fish from SAR groundwater treatment compared to the group tested in solute reconstituted reverse osmosis-treated or granular activated carbon (GAC)-treated control waters. Significant differences were observed in egg reproduction and the time to hatch in SAR groundwater; however, total hatchability was not significantly lower. To evaluate the estrogenic activity of the surfacewater source of the groundwater, SAR surface water was evaluated for vitellogenin and gonadal histopathology in juvenile medaka with no effects observed. These results demonstrate that OR Japanese medaka may be a sensitive strain as an on-line monitor to predict potential impacts of water quality, but further studies are needed to elicit causative agents within the water mixture. PMID:18080901

  20. AUTOCHTHONOUS BIOFACIES IN THE PLIOCENE LORETO BASIN, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHELE PIAZZA

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the molluscan and/or echinoid assemblages recovered from two lithostratigraphic units (Piedras Rodadas Sandstone and Arroyo de Arce Norte Sandstone outcropping in the Pliocene Loreto Basin, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Ten biofacies have been identified, i.e. Trachycardium procerum-Trachycardium senticosum Biofacies, Chione compta-Transennella modesta Biofacies, Laevicardium elenense-Chione kelletii Biofacies, Xenophora sp. 1-Strombus subgracilior Biofacies, Crassostrea californica osunai Biofacies, Myrakeena angelica Biofacies, Vermetid-Nodipecten Biofacies, Argopecten abietis abietis Biofacies, Aequipecten dallasi Biofacies and Encope Biofacies. The first four biofacies have been defined on the basis of statistical analyses (cluster analysis, MDS. The other six, which are monospecific or definitely low-diversity, were already identified during field work. The deduced paleoecological bearing of biofacies, largely relying upon the comparison to their closest modern counterparts, provides the basis for the paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The latter also considers sedimentological evidence and is framed within the tectonic and sedimentary context recently proposed by American workers. Biofacies point toward environments differing in terms of substrate texture, presence/absence of vegetal cover, energy level, variously distributed within the low tide mark-40 m bathymetric range. 

  1. Geochemical features of heavy metal bioaccumulation in the Guaymas Basin of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, L. L.; Galkin, S. V.

    2009-10-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy (flame and graphite furnace techniques) and instrumental neutron activation analysis were used for determining the Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cr, As, Se, Sb, Ba, Au, and Hg contents in 25 samples of different tissues and whole organisms inhabiting the southern trough in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) and in several samples of its bottom waters. It is shown that the habitat environment of this hydrothermal field with high primary production of both photosynthetic and bacterial chemosynthetic origin influences the Fe and Mn ratios in the waters of the microbiotopes and the distribution patterns of the metals in the external and internal organs of the benthic animals. In the dominant specialized taxa, the maximal bioaccumulation of metals is registered both in the organs related to bacterial chemosynthesis such as the trophosome of Vestimentifera Riftia pachyptila and the gills of the vesicomyid clam Archivestica gigas and in other organs. The other organisms such as the mollusks Nuculana grasslei, actinias Paraphelliactis pabista, Actinaria, and Spongia and the crabs Munidopsis alvisca demonstrate high bioaccumulation properties as well. The metal concentration coefficient is highly variable ranging from 10 to 104. The changes in the molar Fe/Mn ratio values imply the partitioning of these two metals in the following migration succession: microbiotope water-external organs-internal organs.

  2. Biology and ecomorphology of stream fishes from the rio Mogi-Guaçu basin, Southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Katiane M. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    The córrego Paulicéia is a direct tributary of the rio Mogi-Guaçu, located in Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. This stream runs inside a savannah-like (cerrado) environment and it associated vegetation. Biological and ecomorphological aspects of its fish community were studied in three stretches of the stream, denominated herein as the upper, middle and lower courses. The fish fauna recorded in this study consisted of 15 species, belonging to five orders an...

  3. Status of groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel study unit, 2005--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile San Fernando--San Gabriel (FG) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study area is in Los Angeles County and includes Tertiary-Quaternary sedimentary basins situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA FG study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) throughout California. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 35 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the FG study unit. The quality of groundwater in primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the FG study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.

  4. Stomach contents of the Pacific sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon longurio (Carcharhiniformes, Carcharhinidae in the southeastern Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolene R Osuna-Peralta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The feeding habits of the sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon longurio of the SE Gulf of California are described using the stomach contents of 250 specimens (135 males and 115 females obtained weekly from December 2007 to March 2008 in the two main landing sites of the artisanal fishing fleet of Mazatlan. The mean total length (TL was 77.7 ± 12.8 cm and the respective ranges for males and females were 60-120 cm and 52120 cm. Size distribution showed two modal groups (juveniles: 52-80 cm, mode 72.5 cm, and adults: 85-140 cm, mode 92.5 cm. Out of the 395 preys identified in 235 stomachs with identifiable contents, the most important were cephalopods (Index of Relative Importance, IRI = 93.1%, mainly Argonauta spp. (IRI = 92.9%. The total IRI value for fish was 5.9%, mostly represented by Oligoplites refulgens and Oligoplites sp. (joint IRI value = 4.8%. The diversity of the stomach contents of males and females was not significantly different, and although the values of diversity, equitability and dietary breadth indexes were lower in juveniles than in adults, ANOSIM analysis did not show differences in dietary habits related to age and sex. The results indicate a specialized feeding behaviour, with Argonauta spp. as preferred prey. This behaviour does not agree with all previous information on R. longurio, and is probably due to local availability of this prey during the sampling period.

  5. Reconnaissance assessment of erosion and sedimentation in the Canada de los Alamos Basin, Los Angeles and Ventura counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    An assessment of present erosion and sedimentation conditions in the Canada de Los Alamos basin, Calif., was made to aid in estimating the impact of off-road-vehicle use on the sediment yield of the basin. Evaluations were made by reconnaissance techniques and by comparing the study area with other off-road-vehicle sites in California. Major-storm sediment yields for the basin were estimated, using empirical equations developed for the Transverse Ranges and measurements of gully erosion in a representative off-road vehicle basin. Normal major-storm yields of 73,200 cubic yards would have to be increased to about 98,000 cubic yards to account for the existing level of accelerated erosion caused by off-road vehicles. Long-term sediment yield of the Canada de Los Alamos basin upstream from its confluence with Gorman Creek, under present conditions of off-road-vehicle use, is approximately 420 cubic yards per square mile per year--a rate that is considerably lower than a previous estimate of 1,270 cubic yards per square mile per year for the total catchment area above Pyramid Lake. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. The flux and recovery of bioactive substances in the surface sediments of deep basins off southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment microbial community biomass and activity in Santa Monica Basin, a nearshore basin in the California Continental Borderland, were examined in October 1985, 1986 and 1987, May 1986, April 1987 and January 1990. Millimeter-scale ATP profiles and incubation of intact cores with 3H-adenine indicated a high-biomass interface microbial population in the low-oxygen central basin, which was absent in samples from the basin slope sediments. A majority of microbial activity and organic matter mineralization occurred in the top cm of sediment. Comparison of measured ATP and total organic carbon profiles suggest that the C:ATP ratio (wt:wt) ranges between 47:1 and 77:1 in central basin interfacial populations, substantially lower than reported for other aquatic environments. Carbon production estimated from DNA synthesis measurements via 3H-adenine incorporation was compared with TCO2 fluxes measured by in situ benthic chamber experiments. Within the uncertainty of the C:ATP ratio, an overall microbial carbon assimilation efficiency of 75--90% was indicated. The low C:ATP ratios and high carbon assimilation efficiencies significantly affect estimates of microbial growth and respiration and are substantially different than those often assumed in the literature. These results suggest that without independent knowledge of these ratios, the uncertainty in tracer-derived microbial growth and respiration rates may be larger than previously reported. 66 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Dissolved Organic Matter Composition and Microbial Diversity In The Lake Tahoe Basin, Sierra Nevada, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, L.; Goldberg, S. J.; Ball, G. I.; Mendoza, W. G.; Simpson, A.; Kharbush, J.; Nelson, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) inputs into high elevation lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California are seasonally segregated, and this enables an examination of the dominant compositional features and microbial responses associated with allochthonous versus autochthonous DOM inputs. Furthermore, because lakes within this watershed have very different hydraulic residence times, extending from days (e.g., Upper Angora Lake) to centuries (Lake Tahoe), the Tahoe Basin represents an ideal experimental system in which to characterize long-lived DOM. We used a variety of analytical tools, including elemental, stable isotope and radiocarbon measurements, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, comprehensive 2D gas chromatography coupled to time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry and fluorescence measurements, to characterize solid phase extracted (SPE) DOM, and in some cases, whole DOM. Our data show that DOM with typical terrestrial characteristics is quickly removed in lakes with >annual water residence time, leaving behind SPE DOM that is extremely N-rich, with a functional group distribution that is consistent with protein. Furthermore, our radiocarbon measurements estimate a 100-200 year residence time for the N-rich DOM accumulating in Lake Tahoe. All of the analytical techniques distinguish samples based on lake water residence time, which indicates that the lacustrine reactor plays an important role in determining the composition of DOM that accumulates on long timescales. We also examined temporal variations in the microbial community of Lake Tahoe to identify taxa that may be involved in processing DOM from distinct sources. Our results confirm the importance of DOM as a currency for carbon and nitrogen exchange between different compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem and argue for its inclusion in models that examine the response of lake ecosystems to global change.

  8. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the Southern Great Basin of Nevada and California in 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1990, the Southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 1050 earthquakes in the SGB, as compared to 1190 in 1989. Local magnitudes, M{sub L}, ranged from 0.0 for various earthquakes to 3.2 for an earthquake on April 3, 1990 5:47:58 UTC, 37.368{degrees} North, 117.358{degrees} West, Mud Lake, Nevada quadrangle. 95% of those earthquakes have the property, M{sub L} {le} 2.4. Within a 10 km radius of the center of Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository, one earthquake with M{sub L} = 0.6 was recorded at 40-Mile Wash. The estimated depth of focus of this earthquake is 3.8 km below sea level. Other, smaller events may have also occurred in the immediate vicinity of Yucca Mountain, but would have been below the detection threshold (M{sub L}{approx}0.0 at Yucca Mountain). Focal mechanisms are computed for seventeen earthquakes in the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the SGB west of the NTS for the year 1990. Solutions are mostly strike-slip, although normal slip is observed for a hypocenter at Stonewall Flat, Nevada, and reverse slip is observed for a hypocenter at Tucki Mountain, California. The average direction of the focal mechanism P-axes is North 47{degrees} East, with nearly horizontal inclination, and the average direction of the T-axes is North 42{degrees} West, with nearly horizontal inclination, consistent with a regional tectonic model of active northwest extension during the Holocene epoch.

  9. Normal Fault Basin Geometries From Gravity Analyses in the La Paz - Los Cabos Region, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Martinez-Gutierrez, G.

    2008-12-01

    The southern cape region of the Baja California peninsula is ruptured by an array of roughly north-striking, left-stepping active normal faults, which accommodate regional transtension. Dominant faults within this system include the Carrizal, San Juan de los Planes (SJP) (and offshore Espiritu Santo fault), La Gata, and San Jose del Cabo (SJC) faults. We conducted gravity surveys across the basins bounded by these faults to gain insight into fault slip rates and basin evolution to better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely rifted plate margin. The geodetic location of each gravity observation station was measured to cm-scale accuracy with real-time kinematic GPS and the relative gravity was measured with a LaCoste and Romberg Model G gravity meter to an accuracy of 0.01 mgal. Gravity data were modeled as a 2D two-layer model with a bedrock density of 2.67 g/cm3 and a basin fill density of 2.1 or 2.2 g/cm3. The hanging wall of the east-dipping Carrizal fault hosts the La Paz basin. In the subsurface, this basin is a half-graben that is manifest as two smaller basins (few hundred meters deep) separated by a bedrock high, which likely reflects the two main east-dipping splays (Carrizal and Centenario faults). The SJP basin is a graben bound by the SJP fault on the west and the La Gata fault on the east and has a modeled maximum depth of approximately 1.5 km. This basin is marked by a series of relict normal faults dipping toward the basin center. The maximum depth to bedrock is just northwest of center, asymmetric toward the SJP fault, indicating that slip may be greater along the SJP than along the La Gata fault. It might also mark the possible location of basin inception, indicating that as the basin evolved, faulting moved outward to the presently active SJP and La Gata Faults. The SJC basin has a maximum depth of approximately 2.5 km. The favored gravity model depicts the SJC basin as resulting from slip along a series

  10. Numerical Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Assessment of the Effects of Artificial Recharge in the Rialto-Colton Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    The Rialto?Colton Basin, in western San Bernardino County, California, was chosen for storage of imported water because of the good quality of native ground water, the known storage capacity for additional ground-water storage in the basin, and the availability of imported water. To supplement native ground-water resources and offset overdraft conditions in the basin during dry periods, artificial-recharge operations during wet periods in the Rialto?Colton Basin were begun in 1982 to store surplus imported water. Local water purveyors recognized that determining the movement and ultimate disposition of the artificially recharged imported water would require a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. In this study, a finite-difference model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Rialto?Colton Basin to gain a better understanding of the ground-water flow system and to evaluate the hydraulic effects of artificial recharge of imported water. The ground-water basin was simulated as four horizontal layers representing the river- channel deposits and the upper, middle, and lower water-bearing units. Several flow barriers bordering and internal to the Rialto?Colton Basin influence the direction of ground-water flow. Ground water may flow relatively unrestricted in the shallow parts of the flow system; however, the faults generally become more restrictive at depth. A particle-tracking model was used to simulate advective transport of imported water within the ground-water flow system and to evaluate three artificial-recharge alternatives. The ground-water flow model was calibrated to transient conditions for 1945?96. Initial conditions for the transient-state simulation were established by using 1945 recharge and discharge rates, and assuming no change in storage in the basin. Average hydrologic conditions for 1945?96 were used for the predictive simulations (1997?2027). Ground-water-level measurements made during 1945 were used for comparison with the

  11. Evidence of Neoproterozoic back arc basin development in the Central Ribeira Belt, southeastern Brazil: new geochronological and geochemical constraints from the Sao Roque - Acungui Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ribeira Belt (RB) of southeastern Brazil represents an important manifestation of the Brasiliano Orogeny formed during the assembly of West Gondwana. Contemporaneous sedimentation and volcanism within the RB provide a basis for helping understand its tectonic evolution and paleogeography. U-Pb monazite data from the basal metavolcanic rocks of the Sao Roque Group indicate a crystallization age of 628 Ma and the upper sequence is cut by a 605 Ma (U-Pb zircon) rhyolite intrusion. Zircon and monazite analyses of metavolcanic (mafic) rocks and from metagabbros of the lower Acungui supergroup yield crystallization ages of 614 and 617 ma, respectively. This supergroup is intruded by a 607 ma granite. Geochemical signatures of basal mafic units in both sequences are characteristic of E-MORB subalkaline tholeitic basaltic rocks. Nd isotopic signatures of the metamafic rocks indicate that they were derived in part from the asthenospheric mantle (consistent with emplacement in an extensional setting), whereas the felsic bodies appear to have come from the melting of paleoproterozoic lithosphere. The paleogeographic reconstruction of part of the RB suggests that the Sao Roque/Acungui groups represent extensional sequences, with features of backarc basins, which evolved during the syn-collisional phase of the Brasiliano Orogeny. These data support the hypothesis that we have a rapid evolution (10-20 ma) between extensional and compressional tectonics during the geological history of the Sao Roque/Acungui Backarc. (author)

  12. The use of environmental tracers to determine focused recharge from a saline disposal basin and irrigation channels in a semiarid environment in Southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, T. C.; Webb, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Lake Tutchewop in southeastern Australia is a former ephemeral wetland that has been used as a saline disposal basin since 1968, forming part of the salinity management of the Murray River. The extent of saline focused recharge from Lake Tutchewop and fresh recharge from nearby unlined irrigation channels was determined using pore water and groundwater stable isotope and major ion chemistry, which were able to separate the influence of lake water, irrigation water and regional groundwater. In ∼45 years, saline water from Lake Tutchewop has infiltrated only up to 165 m from the lake edge in most directions, due to the underlying relatively impermeable clay-rich sediments, and a maximum of 700 m due to preferential groundwater flow along a sandy palaeochannel. The saline leakage has had limited, if any, impact on surrounding agricultural land use. Fresh water leakage from unlined irrigation channels extends up to 10 m deep, validating the current program to replace these channels with pipelines. This study demonstrates that focused recharge from different sources can be positively identified where the recharge waters have distinctive compositions, and that underlying clay-rich sediments restrict the extent of seepage. Therefore, management of focused recharge sources, particularly those that could decrease groundwater quality, requires a detailed knowledge of both the groundwater composition around the site and the underlying geology.

  13. SIMS zircon U-Pb dating of the Late Cretaceous dinosaur egg-bearing red deposits in the Tiantai Basin, southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huaiyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Shunxing; Cheng, Xin; Zhang, Jialiang; Zhou, Zhonghe; Zhao, Zikui; Jiang, Yangen; Yu, Fangming; Deng, Chenglong; Yang, Jinhui; Zhu, Rixiang

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur eggs or fragments are abundant and extensively distributed in China. They can be very informative in biostratigraphic division and correlation of continental strata where other fossils are relatively lacking. Despite remarkable discoveries of vertebrate fossils, particularly dinosaur eggs and skeletons from the middle and Late Cretaceous of both northern and southern China, there is hardly any direct evidence for the ages of the vertebrate-bearing terrestrial deposits. To constrain their depositional ages, here we have obtained SIMS U-Pb zircon ages from the tuffs interbedded with dinosaur egg-bearing sediments from the Laijia and Chichengshan formations of the terrestrial red deposits of the Late Cretaceous in the Tiantai Basin, Zhejiang Province, southeastern China. The SIMS zircon U-Pb ages from the Laijia and Chichengshan formations are about 96-99 Ma (Cenomanian) and 91-94 Ma (Turonian), respectively, providing direct time constraints on the vertebrate and dinosaur egg evolution in the Late Cretaceous as well as a basis for correlation with terrestrial Cretaceous deposits in other regions of southern and northern China.

  14. Characterization of the origin of coalbed gases in southeastern Illinois Basin by compound-specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Eble, C.; Schimmelmann, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coalbed gases and waters from exploratory and production gas wells in the southeastern Illinois Basin were sampled to assess geochemically the origin of coalbed gases, with an emphasis on the Springfield and Seelyville Coal Members that are commercially targeted for coalbed methane production in Indiana. On-line analyses of hydrocarbon gases methane to butanes (C1, C2, C3, n-C4, i-C4) and CO2 yielded gas concentrations, plus ??D and ??13C values. The low thermal maturity of Indiana coals with vitrinite reflectance R0 ??? 0.6% is in agreement with an overwhelmingly biogenic isotopic signature of coalbed gases containing ???96% methane generated via bacterial CO2-reduction. In contrast, thermogenic gas was generated in the stratigraphically equivalent coal beds in western Kentucky's Rough Creek Graben zone where higher maturities of up to R0 ??? 0.8% were reached owing to tectonic and hydrothermal activity. No secondary biogenic methane was observed in more mature western Kentucky coal beds where greater burial depth limits the recharge of meteoric water. Biogenic and thermogenic coalbed gases represent two end-members that are compositionally and isotopically distinct. Microbial biodegradation of thermogenic C2+ hydrocarbon gases in Indiana coal beds preferentially targets C3 and introduces isotope fractionation whereby remaining C3 is enriched in deuterium and 13C.

  15. Evaluation of artificial recharge in the Mojave River Ground-Water Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Christina L.; Martin, Peter; Predmore, Steven K.

    2002-01-01

    The Mojave River Basin relies almost entirely on ground water to meet the needs of its growing population and agriculture, which has resulted in overdraft conditions. Some of the ground-water management alternatives being proposed to mitigate the effects of overdraft include artificial recharge using water from the California State Water Project (SWP) and using SWP water in lieu of ground-water pumpage. A calibrated ground-water flow model was used to evaluate six proposed water-management alternatives using SWP water during a 20-year simulation period, 2000-2019, using constant rates from 1999 for recharge and pumpage (with the exception of recharge derived from Mojave River streamflows which were variable). The measured streamflow for the period of 1970-1989 was used to simulate the Mojave River streamflow. Water-management alternative 1 assumed that none of the Mojave Water Agency allocation of SWP water was available for mitigation measures and resulted in increases in hydraulic head in the floodplain aquifer in years of above-average streamflow (2008-2010, 2013) and decreases in years of below average streamflow. In general, simulated hydraulic heads in the regional aquifer declined with the exception of the El Mirage and Harper Lake areas. Also, average storage depletion for the entire ground-water basin over the 20-year simulation was 40,940 acre-feet per year. Water-management alternative 2 assumed that 30,000 acre-feet per year of SWP water was artificially recharged at Rock Springs Road Outlet (RSO). By 2019, the simulated hydraulic heads were as much as 75 feet higher in the Alto at the recharge site, 24 feet higher in the Transition zone, 15 feet higher in the Centro, and 17 feet higher in the Baja model subareas than the hydraulic heads resulting from water-management alternative 1. Water-management alternative 2 affected simulated hydraulic heads by as much as 5 feet in an area totalling 290 square miles; most of the change occurred in the Alto and

  16. Mineral Occurrence, Translocation, and Weathering in Soils Developed on Four Types of Carbonate and Non-carbonate Alluvial Fan Deposits in Mojave Desert, Southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Soil geomorphology and mineralogy can reveal important clues about Quaternary climate change and geochemical process occurring in desert soils. We investigated (1) the mineral transformation in desert soils developed on four types of alluvial fans (carbonate and non-carbonate) under the same conditions of climate and landscape evolution; and (2) the effects of age, parent materials, and eolian processes on the transformation and translocation of the minerals. Four types of alluvial-fan deposits along the Providence Mountains piedmonts, Mojave Desert, southeastern California, USA were studied: (1) carbonate rocks, primarily limestone and marble (LS), (2) fine-grained rhyodacite and rhyolitic tuff mixed with plutonic and carbonate rocks (VX), (3) fine- to coarse- grained mixed plutonic (PM) rocks, and (4) coarse-grained quartz monzonite (QM). These juxtaposed fan deposits are physically correlated in a small area (about 20 km by 15 km) and experienced the same climatic changes in the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The soils show characteristic mineral compositions of arid/semiarid soils: calcite is present in nearly all of the samples, and a few of the oldest soils contain gypsum and soluble salts. Parent material has profound influence on clay mineral composition of the soils: (1) talc were observed only in soils developed on the volcanic mixture fan deposits, and talc occurs in all horizons; (2) palygorskite occur mainly in the petrocalcic (Bkm) of old soils developed on the LS and VX fan deposits, indicating pedogenic origin; (3) chlorite was observed mainly in soils developed on VX fan deposits (all ages) and on some LS deposits, but it is absent in soils developed on PM and QM fan deposits; and (4) vermiculite was common throughout soils developed on plutonic rock fan deposits. These mineralogical differences suggest that minerals in the soils are primarily inherited from their parent materials and that mineral weathering in this area was weak. Except the

  17. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional

  18. River water quality of the River Cherwell: an agricultural clay-dominated catchment in the upper Thames Basin, southeastern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Hill, Linda; Wickham, Heather

    2006-05-01

    The water quality of the River Cherwell and a tributary of it, the Ray, are described in terms of point and diffuse sources of pollution, for this rural area of the upper Thames Basin. Point sources of pollution dominate at the critical ecological low flow periods of high biological activity. Although the surface geology is predominantly clay, base flow is partly supplied from springs in underlying carbonate-bearing strata, which influences the water quality particularly with regards to calcium and alkalinity. The hydrogeochemistry of the river is outlined and the overall importance of urban point sources even in what would normally be considered to be rural catchments is stressed in relation to the European Unions Water Framework Directive. Issues of phosphorus stripping at sewage treatment works are also considered: such stripping on the Cherwell has reduced phosphorus concentrations by about a factor of two, but this is insufficient for the needs of the Water Framework Directive. PMID:16253306

  19. Using Clumped Isotopes to Investigate the Causes of Pluvial Conditions in the Southeastern Basin and Range during the Last Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowler, A.; Lora, J. M.; Mitchell, J.; Risi, C.; Lee, H. I.; Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    The last deglacial interval (~19-11 ka) was marked by major perturbations to Earth's climate coupled with rising atmospheric temperatures and CO2 concentrations, reaching near-modern levels by the early Holocene. Several discharges of freshwater into the North Atlantic caused by melting and collapse of continental ice sheets affected ocean circulation and sea-surface temperatures, triggering abrupt changes in terrestrial climate worldwide. While the timing and amount of associated temperature changes have been quantified from ice core records at high latitudes, corresponding information from lower latitudes is comparatively low and concentrated along coastlines, at high elevations, and in tropical and mesic regions. This is problematic for efforts to improve the reliability of long-term climate forecasts, reliant on models lacking sufficient validation from paleoclimate reconstructions for interior drylands that comprise nearly half of Earth's land surface. Evidence for past hydrologic changes in arid regions comes from ancient lake-shoreline deposits in internally drained basins, allowing quantitative comparison of the recorded effective moisture increases. However, the utility of these records depends on our relatively limited ability to deconvolve the contributions of temperature and precipitation to these changes. Here we explore the possible role of the summer monsoon in causing deglacial-age highstands in the southern Basin and Range. We employ clumped isotope analysis to generate paleotemperature and surface-water d18O estimates from carbonates in fossil shoreline and wetland deposits for comparison to output from PMIP3 coupled climate models and the model ensemble. Additionally, we present higher resolution output from LMDZ, the atmosphere-only component of the IPSL coupled model, employing LGM boundary conditions along with a hosing experiment designed to simulate Heinrich 1. For all simulations, we present analysis of changes in moisture transport

  20. Late Quaternary climatic and oceanographic changes in the Northeast Pacific as recorded by dinoflagellate cysts from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico)

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Andrea M; Mertens, Kenneth; Pospelova, Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of...

  1. Sedimentation and basin-fill history of the Neogene clastic succession exposed in the southeastern fold belt of the Bengal Basin, Bangladesh: a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royhan Gani, M.; Mustafa Alam, M.

    2003-02-01

    The Tertiary basin-fill history of the Bengal Basin suffers from oversimplification. The interpretation of the sedimentary history of the basin should be consistent with the evolution of its three geo-tectonic provinces, namely, western, northeastern and eastern. Each province has its own basin generation and sediment-fill history related mainly to the Indo-Burmese and subordinately to the Indo-Tibetan plate convergence. This paper is mainly concerned with facies and facies sequence analysis of the Neogene clastic succession within the subduction-related active margin setting (oblique convergence) in the southeastern fold belt of the Bengal Basin. Detailed fieldwork was carried out in the Sitapahar anticline of the Rangamati area and the Mirinja anticline of the Lama area. The study shows that the exposed Neogene succession represents an overall basinward progradation from deep marine through shallow marine to continental-fluvial environments. Based on regionally correlatable erosion surfaces the entire succession (3000+ m thick) has been grouped into three composite sequences C, B and A, from oldest to youngest. Composite sequence C begins with deep-water base-of-slope clastics overlain by thick slope mud that passes upward into shallow marine and nearshore clastics. Composite sequence B characteristically depicts tide-dominated open-marine to coastal depositional systems with evidence of cyclic marine regression and transgression. Repetitive occurrence of incised channel, tidal inlet, tidal ridge/shoal, tidal flat and other tidal deposits is separated by shelfal mudstone. Most of the sandbodies contain a full spectrum of tide-generated structures (e.g. herringbone cross-bedding, bundle structure, mud couplet, bipolar cross-lamination with reactivation surfaces, 'tidal' bedding). Storm activities appear to have played a subordinate role in the mid and inner shelf region. Rizocorallium, Rosselia, Planolites and Zoophycos are the dominant ichnofacies within the

  2. Hydrogeologic Provinces for California based upon established groundwater basins and watershed polygons.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Ten hydrogeologic provinces of California are represented by a region- class feature called "provinces" within this digital data set. These provinces were...

  3. Hydrogeochemical data as a tool for exploration and mapping: a case study from part of Afikpo Basin southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Kalu K; Akaolisa, Casmir C Z

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen (14) characters from six (6) water samples collected from springs, ponds, and streams located in Lower Cretaceous sedimentary area of Afikpo Basin have been analyzed. These include pH, turbidity, conductivity, total dissolved solid, hardness, Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-), and Na+. These sediments, which are Turonian and Coniacian in age, are subdivided into two by a basic rock dyke. Results of the analyses show clearly that the Turonian sediments, intruded by dolerite, have net Fe2+, HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Cl-, and SO4(2-) concentration while those from the younger Coniacian sediment have net higher amounts of K+, Na+, and Mn2+. The overriding mafic minerals in the basic intrusive rock possibly led to higher leaching into ground water system near it. On the other hand, the presence of feldsparthic to kaolinitic sands of the younger Coniacian units led to higher K+ and Na+ matter in the water from these zones. The formations dip away from the older sediments. Concentrations of these characters are within acceptable drinking water standards by World Health Organization but noticeable anomalous zones for Fe2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ are zones of basic rock suites. Areas with greater Na+ and K+ are traceable to sandy units. It is thus concluded that more analysis of surface, subsurface, and pond water samples can be utilized for minerals search and geological mapping. At this stage, it forms a veritable reconnaissance tool. PMID:19105037

  4. Description and relationships of Otothyropsis marapoama, a new genus and species of hypoptopomatine catfish (Siluriformes: Loricariidae from rio Tietê basin, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Ribeiro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Otothyropsis marapoama, a new genus and species, is described based on specimens recently collected in a headwater stream of the middle stretch of the rio Tietê, a river from the upper rio Paraná basin in southeastern Brazil. The new taxon belongs to a clade also encompassing the genera Schizolecis, Otothyris and Pseudotothyris. Otothyropsis marapoama is hypothesized to be the sister-group of Pseudotothyris and Otothyris based mainly on the presence of several derived characters of the swimbladder capsule and associated bones. Several paedomorphic characters shared by Pseudotothyris and Otothyris and their significance for the phylogenetic position of the new genus are discussed.Otothyropsis marapoama, novo gênero e espécie, é descrito baseado em espécimes recentemente coletados em um riacho de cabeceira da porção media do rio Tietê, um rio da bacia do alto rio Paraná no sudeste do Brasil. O novo táxon pertence a um clado que inclui também os gêneros Schizolecis, Otothyris e Pseudotothyris. Otothyropsis marapoama é considerado o grupo-irmão de Pseudotothyris e Otothyris baseado principalmente na presença de vários caracteres derivados da cápsula da bexiga natatória e ossos associados. Vários caracteres pedomórficos compartilhados por Pseudotothyris e Otothyris e seu significado filogenético para a posição deste novo gênero são discutidos.

  5. Coenzyme F430, quantification and isotope analysis from the Eel River Basin California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, L. R.; Fulton, J. M.; Dawson, K.; Orphan, V. J.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Large amounts of methane are oxidized by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, preventing this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere (Orphan et al., 2001; Scheller et al., 2010). Methyl-coenzyme M reductase, an enzyme traditionally associated with methanogenesis, has recently been linked to the anaerobic oxidation of methane suggesting methane oxidation follows a pathway similar to reverse methanogenesis. Coenzyme F430, a tetrapyrrole-nickel complex within the active site of methyl-coenzyme M, is used in methanogenesis and is hypothesized to play a key role in archaeal methanotrophy (Scheller et al., 2010). We recently developed a method to extract and isolate F430 from natural sediments so it can be purified for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis. Sediments are extracted using an ultrasonic homogenizer, first in water (pH 7), then twice in dilute formic acid (pH 3). The combined extract is neutralized and the F430-containing fraction is isolated using Sephadex and Amberlite column chromatography. Further purification is performed using two dimensional high performance liquid chromatography, first with a reverse phase C-18 column followed by separation on a ThermoFisher Hypercarb column. F430 is then quantified using photo diode array detection with fractions collected for isotope analysis using a nano-scale elemental analyzer isotope ratio mass spectrometer (nano-EA-IRMS; Polissar et al., 2009). Compound identity and purity are confirmed using molar C:N ratios, UV absorbance and MSn detection of the parent ion (m/z 905). Here, we report F430 concentrations and isotopic data determined from active seep sediment cores from the Eel River Basin (California), a site where the anoxic oxidation of methane occurs. A spike in the concentration of F430 is observed at the 3-6 cm depth horizon corresponding with peak abundance in ANME-2/Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus aggregate counts. Carbon isotope values of F430 are significantly

  6. Impacts of Land Use on Surface Water Quality in a Subtropical River Basin: A Case Study of the Dongjiang River Basin, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Ding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between land use and surface water quality is necessary for effective water management. We estimated the impacts of catchment-wide land use on water quality during the dry and rainy seasons in the Dongjiang River basin, using remote sensing, geographic information systems and multivariate statistical techniques. The results showed that the 83 sites can be divided into three groups representing different land use types: forest, agriculture and urban. Water quality parameters exhibited significant variations between the urban-dominated and forest-dominated sites. The proportion of forested land was positively associated with dissolved oxygen concentration but negatively associated with water temperature, electrical conductivity, permanganate index, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and chlorophyll-a. The proportion of urban land was strongly positively associated with total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen concentrations. Forested and urban land use had stronger impacts on water quality in the dry season than in the rainy season. However, agricultural land use did not have a significant impact on water quality. Our study indicates that urban land use was the key factor affecting water quality change, and limiting point-source waste discharge in urban areas during the dry season would be critical for improving water quality in the study area.

  7. Biology and ecomorphology of stream fishes from the rio Mogi-Guaçu basin, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiane M. Ferreira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The córrego Paulicéia is a direct tributary of the rio Mogi-Guaçu, located in Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. This stream runs inside a savannah-like (cerrado environment and it associated vegetation. Biological and ecomorphological aspects of its fish community were studied in three stretches of the stream, denominated herein as the upper, middle and lower courses. The fish fauna recorded in this study consisted of 15 species, belonging to five orders and nine families, based in a total of 715 collected individuals representing 1,450 kg of biomass. The most important abiotic factors related to the occurrence and distribution of the fish fauna were the substrate, current speed, and presence or absence of riparian vegetation. The analysis of 336 stomach contents of 13 species demonstrated that 65% of food items are autochthonous, 32% allochthonous, and 3% are of unknown origin. Four alimentary guilds could be identified, based on the predominant food items: omnivores with tendency to insectivory - Astyanax paranae, A. fasciatus and Piabina argentea; larvivores - Corydoras difluviatilis, Cetopsorhamdia iheringi, Phenacorhamdia tenebrosa, Characidium gomesi, Eigenmannia virescens, and Rhamdia quelen; periphyton feeders - Hisonotus sp., Hypostomus ancistroides and Synbranchus marmoratus; and piscivore - Hoplias malabaricus. Reproductions data are presented for Astyanax altiparanae and Hisontus sp. Three ecomorphological groups could be established, based on swimming, feeding, and microhabitat strategies: nektonic (A. fasciatus, A. paranae, Bryconamericus stramineus, P. argentea, H. malabaricus and Phallotorynus jucundus, benthic (C. gomesi, P. tenebrosa, C. iheringi, R. quelen, C. difluviatilis, H. ancistroides and Hisonotus sp., and necktobenthic (E. virescens and S. marmoratus.O córrego Paulicéia é um afluente direto do rio Mogi-Guaçu, situado no município de Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Estado de S

  8. Estimating of suspended sediment loads of rivers in the Seine downstream basin and coastal rivers in Southeastern Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landemaine, Valentin; Cerdan, Olivier; Laignel, Benoit; Fournier, Matthieu; Copard, Yoann

    2014-05-01

    and multi sediment rating curve (MRC). From the results, the MRC algorithm had the best performance in terms of bias and precision between real and estimated sediment loads. This algorithm has been used to determine the sediment loads of all watersheds. On the Seine downstream basin, sediment fluxes from tributaries range from 171,000 t/year to 945,000 t/year depending on the year. This represents between 3% and 9% of sediment fluxes passing into the Seine. Finally, the long term variability analysis showed a high variability from year to year depending on climatic conditions. This study suggests the need to investigate fluxes over several years, to extract representative orders of magnitude and to quantify uncertainties.

  9. Direct and indirect evidence for earthquakes; an example from the Lake Tahoe Basin, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J. M.; Noble, P. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Schmauder, G. C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution seismic CHIRP data can image direct evidence of earthquakes (i.e., offset strata) beneath lakes and the ocean. Nevertheless, direct evidence often is not imaged due to conditions such as gas in the sediments, or steep basement topography. In these cases, indirect evidence for earthquakes (i.e., debris flows) may provide insight into the paleoseismic record. The four sub-basins of the tectonically active Lake Tahoe Basin provide an ideal opportunity to image direct evidence for earthquake deformation and compare it to indirect earthquake proxies. We present results from high-resolution seismic CHIRP surveys in Emerald Bay, Fallen Leaf Lake, and Cascade Lake to constrain the recurrence interval on the West Tahoe Dollar Point Fault (WTDPF), which was previously identified as potentially the most hazardous fault in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Recently collected CHIRP profiles beneath Fallen Leaf Lake image slide deposits that appear synchronous with slides in other sub-basins. The temporal correlation of slides between multiple basins suggests triggering by events on the WTDPF. If correct, we postulate a recurrence interval for the WTDPF of ~3-4 k.y., indicating that the WTDPF is near its seismic recurrence cycle. In addition, CHIRP data beneath Cascade Lake image strands of the WTDPF that offset the lakefloor as much as ~7 m. The Cascade Lake data combined with onshore LiDAR allowed us to map the geometry of the WTDPF continuously across the southern Lake Tahoe Basin and yielded an improved geohazard assessment.

  10. Structure of the Wagner Basin in the Northern Gulf of California From Interpretation of Seismic Reflexion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M.; Aguilar, C.; Martin, A.

    2007-05-01

    The northern Gulf of California straddles the transition in the style of deformation along the Pacific-North America plate boundary, from distributed deformation in the Upper Delfin and Wagner basins to localized dextral shear along the Cerro Prieto transform fault. Processing and interpretation of industry seismic data adquired by Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) allow us to map the main fault structures and depocenters in the Wagner basin and to unravel the way strain is transferred northward into the Cerro Prieto fault system. Seismic data records from 0.5 to 5 TWTT. Data stacking and time-migration were performed using semblance coefficient method. Subsidence in the Wagner basin is controlled by two large N-S trending sub-parallel faults that intersect the NNW-trending Cerro Prieto transform fault. The Wagner fault bounds the eastern margin of the basin for more than 75 km. This fault dips ~50° to the west (up to 2 seconds) with distinctive reflectors displaced more than 1 km across the fault zone. The strata define a fanning pattern towards the Wagner fault. Northward the Wagner fault intersects the Cerro Prieto fault at 130° on map view and one depocenter of the Wagner basin bends to the NW adjacent to the Cerro Prieto fault zone. The eastern boundary of the modern depocenter is the Consag fault, which extends over 100 km in a N-S direction with an average dip of ~50° (up to 2s) to the east. The northern segment of the Consag fault bends 25° and intersects the Cerro Prieto fault zone at an angle of 110° on map view. The acoustic basement was not imaged in the northwest, but the stratigraphic succession increases its thickness towards the depocenter of the Wagner basin. Another important structure is El Chinero fault, which runs parallel to the Consag fault along 60 km and possibly intersects the Cerro Prieto fault to the north beneath the delta of the Colorado River. El Chinero fault dips at low-angle (~30°) to the east and has a vertical offset of about 0

  11. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long

  12. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of

  13. Basin evolution during change from convergent to transform continental margin in Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S.A.; Hitzman, M.; McCloy, C.; Turner, R.; Ward, R.

    1984-03-01

    Miocene nonmarine and shallow marine strata exposed east of San Francisco Bay record a change from convergent-margin tectonics to transform margin tectonics. During the middle Miocene, the East Bay area occupied the oceanward side of a shelved forearc basin that was progressively incorporated in the evolving San Andreas strike-slip orogene. Patterns of deposition in the broad forearc basin were relatively simple: andesitic arc-derived detritus was transported the full width of the forearc basin from the Sierras to the East Bay area. In contrast, the wrench-tectonic regime produced complex patterns of sedimentation displaying greater local variability. On the basis of stratigraphic data, we infer that the west-facing slope of the forearc basin in the East Bay area was reversed about 13 Ma with uplift of the area between the eventual traces of the San Andreas and Hayward faults on the site of the present bay. A fluvial clastic wedge was shed eastward into the East Bay area from this uplifted terrane of Mesozoic subduction complex and forearc basin rocks. Initial rupturing along the Hayward fault trend followed the uplift at about 10 Ma. Loci of basaltic volcanism (10-7 Ma) along these fractures interfinger with the clastic wedge. A similar pattern of uplift and drainage reversal apparently presaged the onset of wrenching along the nearby Calaveras trend from 8-6 Ma. Expansion of the strike-slip orogene segmented the outer forearc basin into local basins, some characterized by episodic lacustrine deposition and probable internal drainage. By the end of the Miocene, Sierran arc volcanism waned at the latitude of San Francisco Bay, and arc-derived volcaniclastics were fully supplanted by recycled Coast Range-derived detritus in the East Bay area. Certain of these Coast Range sediment sources, particularly blueschist-bearing Franciscan terranes, permit an estimate of 7-27 km (4-17 mi) of total right slip on the Hayward fault.

  14. FRESHWATER ALGAE OF RAE LAKES BASIN, KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK (CALIFORNIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report illustrates and characterizes algae (exclusive of diatoms) found in Kings Canyon National Park, California and describes their distribution among the Rae Lakes within. It is the first taxonomic study of the freshwater algae for the southern Sierra Nevada and the most ...

  15. Hydrostratigraphy of the Westside Groundwater Basin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, E. H.; Laforce, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    The Westside Groundwater Basin is a coastal aquifer system located on the San Francisco Peninsula between Golden Gate Park and Burlingame. Since the beginning of the 20th century groundwater from the Basin has been used for drinking water and irrigation purposes. Unfortunately, the Basin wide potentiometric surface has gradually declined and saltwater intrusion from the Pacific Ocean is threatening this fragile aquifer system. Several studies have looked at groundwater movement within the Basin (Boone, Cook and Associates (1987), Yates et al. (1990), Applied Consultants (1991), Geo/Resources Consultants (1993), Phillips et al. (1993), CH2Mhill (1997)); unfortunately, all of the studies assumed horizontal layering of the hydrostratigraphic units. However, recent studies indicate that tectonic deformation and intense folding has altered the stratigraphy of the Westside Basin close to the Pacific Ocean (Bonilla (1998), Barr (1999)). Accordingly, the purpose of this study is to delineate hydrostratigraphic units within the Westside Basin by using tritium, helium, and oxygen isotopes in conjunction with general mineral water quality data, water level data, and geologic cross-sections to depict the subsurface hydrogeology of the system. Our results indicate that the upper part of the Merced Formation (sequences P through Z of Clifton and Hunter (1991, 1999)) forms the major hydrostratigraphic units where groundwater is extracted, and that the Serra Fault separates the upper part of the Merced from the lower part (below sequence P) along most of its extent. In addition, thick clay layers, observed in well logs and identified in cross sections, were tentatively correlated with sequences W and S2. These clay layers, although discontinuous at places, work as aquitards between the hydrostratigraphic units as the difference in water chemistry and age indicates.

  16. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Kwak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteristics, and the drought with a 20-year return period (17.2 million acre-feet (MAF per year in the Sacramento River basin could be considered a critical level of drought for water shortages.

  17. Activity and habitat use of two species of stingrays (Myliobatiformes: Potamotrygonidae in the upper Paraná River basin, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Garrone Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The life history of freshwater stingrays (Potamotrygonidae under natural conditions has been poorly documented. In this study, we investigated theperiod of activity and the habitat use of two species of the genus Potamotrygon in the upper Paraná River basin, Southeastern Brazil. Potamotrygon falkneri and P. motoro are similar to each other as far as the analyzed behavior is concerned. Individuals of both species segregate according to their size, and in function of the depth and period of the day. Younger individuals inhabit mostly sandy beaches and places that are no deeper than four meters throughout the whole day. Bigger stingrays realize bathymetric migrations, alternating their position between places deeper than eight meters during the day, and shallow areas at night. Individuals of intermediate size inhabit transition environments that have greater habitat diversity. Both species presented mostly nocturnal habits, especially regarding their feeding behavior. The behavioral patterns observed seem to go through ontogenetic variations and probably change throughout the year, between dry and wet seasons.Informações sobre o modo de vida das raias de água doce (Potamotrygonidae sob condições naturais são escassas. Neste trabalho, estudamos o período de atividade e as formas de uso do habitat de duas espécies do gênero Potamotrygon na bacia do alto rio Paraná, no Sudeste do Brasil. Potamotrygon falkneri e P. motoro apresentaram comportamento muito semelhante, com nítida segregação espacial dos indivíduos em função do seu tamanho, da profundidade e do período do dia. Juvenis estiveram associados a praias arenosas e locais com profundidades abaixo de quatro metros ao longo de todo o dia. Raias de grande porte realizaram migrações batimétricas, alternando sua posição entre locais com profundidade superior a oito metros durante o dia e áreas mais rasas à noite. Indivíduos com tamanho intermediário ocuparam ambientes de

  18. Environmental isotope investigation of groundwater flow in the Honey Lake Basin, California and Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T.P.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Varian, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrology of Honey Lake Basin was studied using environmental isotope measurements of approximately 130 water samples collected during 1995 and 1996. The principal analytical methods included hydrogen, oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratio measurements, radiocarbon and tritium dating, and measurements of dissolved noble gas abundances.

  19. 1994 Water-Table Contours of the Morongo Ground-Water Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital water-table contours for the Morongo Basin. The U.S. Geological Survey constructed a water-table map of the Morongo ground-water...

  20. Bacterial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal sediments of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Depth distribution and temperature dependence of bacterial sulfate reduction were studied in hydrothermal surface sediments of the southern trough of the Guaymas Basin at 2000 m water depth. In situ temperatures ranged from 2.8 degreesC at the sediment surface to > 130degreesC at 30 cm depth in t...

  1. Bulk densities and porosities of Cenozoic and Cretaceous basin-filling strata and Cretaceous and older basement rocks, Los Angeles Basin, California, determined from measurements of core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, L.A.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes and provides a digital data file of selected bulk properties of subsurface rocks sampled in and around Los Angeles basin, California. Selected properties include measured dry bulk density (range 0.78 to 3.01 g/cm3), measured or estimated grain (matrix) density, calculated water saturated bulk density (range 1.47 to 3.01 g/cm3), calculated total porosity (range 0 to 69 porosity percent), geologic age, and lithology. Most of the rocks are conventional core samples taken from wells drilled by the petroleum industry. A small percentage of the core samples are from shallow borings. Rocks studied range in age from pre-Cambrian (?) to Recent and include sedimentary (98.8%), and volcanic, metamorphic and intrusive (1.2%) samples. Core samples studied were taken from measured drillhole depths that range from 35 to 20,234 ft (11 to 6,167 m). Version 1.0 of the data base (dated June 1998) contains information for 7378 samples from 234 wells, including two redrilled wells. This report/data base can be accessed on U. S. Geological Survey servers at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-788. Periodic additions to the on-line data base will be provided as new data is gathered.

  2. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Jaewon Kwak; Soojun Kim; Gilho Kim; Singh, Vijay P; Jungsool Park; Hung Soo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN) model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteris...

  3. A century of oilfield operations and earthquakes in the greater Los Angeles Basin, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauksson, Egill; Goebel, Thomas; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Cochran, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the seismicity in the Los Angeles Basin (LA Basin) occurs at depth below the sediments and is caused by transpressional tectonics related to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. However, some of the seismicity could be associated with fluid extraction or injection in oil fields that have been in production for almost a century and cover ∼ 17% of the basin. In a recent study, first the influence of industry operations was evaluated by analyzing seismicity characteristics, including normalized seismicity rates, focal depths, and b-values, but no significant difference was found in seismicity characteristics inside and outside the oil fields. In addition, to identify possible temporal correlations, the seismicity and available monthly fluid extraction and injection volumes since 1977 were analyzed. Second, the production and deformation history of the Wilmington oil field were used to evaluate whether other oil fields are likely to experience similar surface deformation in the future. Third, the maximum earthquake magnitudes of events within the perimeters of the oil fields were analyzed to see whether they correlate with total net injected volumes, as suggested by previous studies. Similarly, maximum magnitudes were examined to see whether they exhibit an increase with net extraction volume. Overall, no obvious previously unidentified induced earthquakes were found, and the management of balanced production and injection of fluids appears to reduce the risk of induced-earthquake activity in the oil fields.

  4. Temperature, salinity, radioisotopes, sediments, and other data from Phase II Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Monitoring Program in the Santa Maria Basin, California from 21 Oct 1986 to 08 Mar 1987 (NODC Accession 8900198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the data collected for the California Phase II OCS Monitoring Program of the Santa Maria Basin by Dr. Hyland from Battelle Ocean Science and...

  5. Down Core Oxygen Isotopic Measurements Of Diatom δ18O From The Guaymas Basin, Gulf Of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, A. J.; Spero, H. J.; Thunell, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Guaymas Basin (GB), Gulf of California (27º53'N, 111º40'W ), is an evaporative basin, with sea surface temperatures (SST) varying between ~30oC (summer) and ~15oC (winter). Productivity is controlled mostly by seasonal upwelling starting in fall (early November) and extending into spring. We are currently analyzing δ18Odiatom from a boxcore (BC-43) using microfluorination (Menicucci, et al. 2013). This boxcore was previously analyzed for UK '37 alkenones and 210Pb activity (Goni, et al. 2001). Residual BC-43 material was sampled at ~2cm intervals. Samples were cleaned to isolate diatoms from other sediments, then equilibrated in water with δ18Owater = +85‰ for 70 hours at 21oC prior to vacuum dehydroxylation and microfluorination. The latter equilibration was done to account for fractionation between covalently bound O and OH- groups during vacuum dehydroxylation, preserving the original δ18Odiatom value. We present δ18Odiatom data from BC-43 samples covering 27cm, equivalent to >225 years of sediment accumulation. δ18O data are converted to temperature (T) based on an existing calibration (Leclerc and Labeyrie 1987). Our data suggest δ18Odiatom values record a T range of 22-18oC, corresponding to the mixed layer depth and the chlorophyll maximum during the fall bloom. These T values are offset from SST data by a mean of 5oC for the same sample intervals. However, δ18Odiatom values from the most recent samples suggest a ~2oC increase in diatom T relative to SST during the last 35 years. This subsurface warming may be due to decreased fall upwelling, increased mixed layer and chlorophyll maximum depths, and/or the timing of the peak diatom bloom. Such correlations are being investigated and the latest results will be presented. Goni, M. A., et al. (2001). Oceanographic considerations for the application of the alkenone-based paleotemperature U-37(K ') index in the Gulf of California. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta 65: 545-557. Leclerc, A. J. and L

  6. A four-dimensional petroleum systems model for the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 12 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lampe, Carolyn; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Lillis, Paul G.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    A calibrated numerical model depicts the geometry and three-dimensional (3-D) evolution of petroleum systems through time (4-D) in a 249 x 309 km (155 x 192 mi) area covering all of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California. Model input includes 3-D structural and stratigraphic data for key horizons and maps of unit thickness, lithology, paleobathymetry, heat flow, original total organic carbon, and original Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen index for each source rock. The four principal petroleum source rocks in the basin are the Miocene Antelope shale of Graham and Williams (1985; hereafter referred to as Antelope shale), the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935; hereafter referred to as Tumey formation), and the Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation. Due to limited Rock-Eval/total organic carbon data, the Tumey formation was modeled using constant values of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index. Maps of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index were created for the other three source rocks. The Antelope shale was modeled using Type IIS kerogen kinetics, whereas Type II kinetics were used for the other source rocks. Four-dimensional modeling and geologic field evidence indicate that maximum burial of the three principal Cenozoic source rocks occurred in latest Pliocene to Holocene time. For example, a 1-D extraction of burial history from the 4-D model in the Tejon depocenter shows that the bottom of the Antelope shale source rock began expulsion (10 percent transformation ratio) about 4.6 Ma and reached peak expulsion (50 percent transformation ratio) about 3.6 Ma. Except on the west flank of the basin, where steep dips in outcrop and seismic data indicate substantial uplift, little or no section has been eroded. Most petroleum migration occurred during late Cenozoic time in distinct stratigraphic intervals along east-west pathways from pods of active petroleum source rock in the Tejon and

  7. Connecting science to managers in river restoration in the Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2009-12-01

    The semi-arid Upper Klamath Basin is a complex landscape of agricultural land, pasture and forests, drained by rivers, lakes, and wetlands. Unique characteristics of the river systems include high natural nutrient loadings, large springs, low gradients, high sinuosity, fine sediment, herbaceous-dominated riparian vegetation, and habitat for salmonid and sucker fish. Following listing of several fish species under the Endangered Species Act in the 1980s to 90s, the Upper Klamath Basin has become a focal point of river management and restoration. Drought conditions in 2001 resulted in a cutoff of irrigation water and a political crisis. The crisis engendered a distrust of scientists by many residents of the basin. Political conflict over allocation of water resources and ecosystem management has continued since 2001. In this environment, multiple groups, including federal and state agencies and NGOs, have developed restoration assessments and agendas, and they have also implemented numerous restoration projects. These restoration guidance documents are typically based on input from local residents and landowners as well as the published scientific literature. The documents from different groups are generally consistent but priorities vary somewhat. Gaps in scientific understanding of the river systems are recognized as a handicap in restoration planning. The science knowledge base has been growing since 2001 but generally lags behind on-the-ground restoration activities. Research can help in addressing two critical questions important in restoration implementation. What restoration strategies are best suited to the processes and dynamics of this system? Are the specific restoration designs being employed effective at meeting restoration goals? In addition to following scientific standards of practice, scientific research needs to be framed with an awareness of how formal and informal knowledge is used in restoration implementation.

  8. Chemometric differentiation of crude oil families in the San Joaquin Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kenneth E.; Coutrot, Delphine; Nouvelle, Xavier; Ramos, L. Scott; Rohrback, Brian G.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Zumberge, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemometric analyses of geochemical data for 165 crude oil samples from the San Joaquin Basin identify genetically distinct oil families and their inferred source rocks and provide insight into migration pathways, reservoir compartments, and filling histories. In the first part of the study, 17 source-related biomarker and stable carbon-isotope ratios were evaluated using a chemometric decision tree (CDT) to identify families. In the second part, ascendant hierarchical clustering was applied to terpane mass chromatograms for the samples to compare with the CDT results. The results from the two methods are remarkably similar despite differing data input and assumptions. Recognized source rocks for the oil families include the (1) Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, (2) Eocene Tumey Formation, (3–4) upper and lower parts of the Miocene Monterey Formation (Buttonwillow depocenter), and (5–6) upper and lower parts of the Miocene Monterey Formation (Tejon depocenter). Ascendant hierarchical clustering identifies 22 oil families in the basin as corroborated by independent data, such as carbon-isotope ratios, sample location, reservoir unit, and thermal maturity maps from a three-dimensional basin and petroleum system model. Five families originated from the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation source rock, and three families came from the overlying Eocene Tumey Formation. Fourteen families migrated from the upper and lower parts of the Miocene Monterey Formation source rocks within the Buttonwillow and Tejon depocenters north and south of the Bakersfield arch. The Eocene and Miocene families show little cross-stratigraphic migration because of seals within and between the source rocks. The data do not exclude the possibility that some families described as originating from the Monterey Formation actually came from source rock in the Temblor Formation.

  9. Production, exportation and preservation of silicoflagellates in Alfonso Basin, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Aída; Álvarez-Gómez, Irela G.; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia; Verdugo-Díaz, Gerardo; Villegas-Aguilera, María Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Limited areas of sea floor have the physiochemical conditions that allow for the formation and preservation of high resolution (yearly or close to yearly) laminated sediments that can function as a historic proxy for past oceanographic and climate conditions. We evaluated and established the fidelity of the sedimentary record in recording these signals by analyzing silicoflagellates production, changes in species composition, skeletal settling and their subsequent burial in bottom sediments at Alfonso Basin. The data series from December 2005 to February 2008 showed similar tendencies in both the vertical flux and overlying euphotic zone (Zeu) production of silicoflagellates. Both series were numerically dominated by Octactis pulchra with maxima values being recorded for the mixed water column period. Observed differences occurred during the studied years in both magnitude and in flux composition. The presence of a mixed assemblage with (warm-temperate-cold) species such as Dictyocha fibula var. robusta, Dictyocha epiodon and Distephanus speculum could be explained by a synchronization of trends between a predominantly positive Pacific Decadal Oscillation and a positive North Pacific Gyre Oscillation climate phases that were the background conditions underlying the early 2006 through 2007 El Niño event. A Morisita's similarity index value of 97.5% between winter trap and Zeu samples combined with an annualized settling factor of 0.45, suggests that Alfonso Basin is a favorable settling environment for silicoflagellates. However, core-top sediments showed an attenuation of record fidelity (burial factor = 0.25) resulting in a modified record for the production and settling of skeletons. O. pulchra that were not preserved in sediments as the dominant species and with this removal, the signal was also lost of the highest silicoflagellate production season (Mixing-cyclonic eddy periods) from the sedimentary record of the Alfonso Basin.

  10. Gravity and magnetic investigations of the Mono-Inyo Volcanic Chain, Mono Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, A. A.; Ponce, D. A.; McPhee, D. K.; Battaglia, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Mono Inyo volcanic chain is a 25-km long, north-south trending series of domes and craters extending southward from Mono Lake and into the west moat of Long Valley Caldera. Based on the Holocene history of eruptions in the area, the chain appears to hold the greatest potential for renewed magmatic activity (Hildreth, 2004). To better characterize the geometry and structure of Mono Basin for future dynamic modeling of the Mono Inyo volcanic chain a new gravity and magnetic survey was conducted. We collected gravity data at over 320 stations in and around the northern and central region of the Mono-Inyo volcanic chain and around Mono Lake in the summer of 2010. Regional gravity data was collected at one-mile spacing and data collected on profile lines was collected at quarter-mile intervals. We collected magnetic data on major roads along several transects across Mono Basin that include one coincident with a seismic refraction line (Hill and others, 1985). Rock samples were collected for analysis of density and magnetic susceptibility. The new gravity and magnetic data will be compiled with pre-existing data from studies dating back to the 1960’s (Pakiser and others, 1960, 1976; Christensen, 1969) to produce new isostatic gravity and magnetic anomaly maps. Preliminary isostatic gravity and magnetic maps from pre-existing data show the presence of gravity and magnetic lows in Mono Lake and Long Valley Caldera where low density volcanic sediments are prevalent; gravity highs were observed to the east and west of Mono Lake and to the east of Long Valley Caldera. A region with a high magnetic anomaly lies to the east of the volcanic chain. Two-dimensional forward modeling of potential field data along profiles that extend across Mono Basin will constrain the density and magnetization distribution, stratification and structural geology of the Mono-Inyo volcanic chain. These efforts are critical to improve dynamic modeling of Sierran range-front faulting and dike

  11. A basin-scale approach to estimating stream temperatures of tributaries to the lower Klamath River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Stream temperature is an important component of salmonid habitat and is often above levels suitable for fish survival in the Lower Klamath River in northern California. The objective of this study was to provide boundary conditions for models that are assessing stream temperature on the main stem for the purpose of developing strategies to manage stream conditions using Total Maximum Daily Loads. For model input, hourly stream temperatures for 36 tributaries were estimated for 1 Jan. 2001 through 31 Oct. 2004. A basin-scale approach incorporating spatially distributed energy balance data was used to estimate the stream temperatures with measured air temperature and relative humidity data and simulated solar radiation, including topographic shading and corrections for cloudiness. Regression models were developed on the basis of available stream temperature data to predict temperatures for unmeasured periods of time and for unmeasured streams. The most significant factor in matching measured minimum and maximum stream temperatures was the seasonality of the estimate. Adding minimum and maximum air temperature to the regression model improved the estimate, and air temperature data over the region are available and easily distributed spatially. The addition of simulated solar radiation and vapor saturation deficit to the regression model significantly improved predictions of maximum stream temperature but was not required to predict minimum stream temperature. The average SE in estimated maximum daily stream temperature for the individual basins was 0.9 ?? 0.6??C at the 95% confidence interval. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment; Volume I: Turning basin sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Folsom, B.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor, Oakland, CA. Test protocols from the Corps' Management Strategy for Disposal of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachates, plants, and animals at an upland disposal site. Two sediments from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor were tested: a composite sample of cores taken from the surface to 38-ft depth (upper sediment) and a composite sample of cores taken from 38- to 45-ft depth (lower sediment). In addition, two potential disposal site soils were tested: Twitchell Island and 7th Street disposal site. Sediment characterization indicated that the Oakland upper sediment contained higher concentrations of most contaminants than the lower sediment. Metal concentrations in the Oakland lower sediment were in the range of values found at the Twitchell Island disposal site. The Oakland upper sediment contained levels of cadmium and arsenic similar to those in Twitchell Island levee soils, but higher levels of zinc, nickel, lead, and copper.... Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  13. Sulfur, carbon, and oxygen isotope variations in submarine hydrothermal deposits of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, J.M.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur, carbon, and oxygen isotope values were measured in sulfide, sulfate, and carbonate from hydrothermal chimney, spire, and mound samples in the southern trough of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, USA. ??34S values of sulfides range from -3.7 to 4.5%. and indicate that sulfur originated from several sources: 1. (1) dissolution of 0??? sulfide contained within basaltic rocks, 2. (2) thermal reduction of seawater sulfate during sediment alteration reactions in feeder zones to give sulfide with positive ??34S, and 3. (3) entrainment or leaching of isotopically light (negative-??34S) bacteriogenic sulfide from sediments underlying the deposits. ??34S of barite and anhydrite indicate sulfur derivation mainly from unfractionated seawater sulfate, although some samples show evidence of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation reactions during mixing within chimneys. Oxygen isotope temperatures calculated for chimney calcites are in reasonable agreement with measured vent fluid temperatures and fluid inclusion trapping temperatures. Hydrothermal fluids that formed calcite-rich chimneys in the southern trough of Guaymas Basin were enriched in 18O with respect to seawater by about 2.4??? due to isotopic exchange with sedimentary and/or basaltic rocks. Carbon isotope values of calcite range from -9.6 to -14.0??? ??34CpDB, indicating that carbon was derived in approximately equal quantities from the dissolution of marine carbonate minerals and the oxidation of organic matter during migration of hydrothermal fluid through the underlying sediment column. Statistically significant positive, linear correlations of ??34S, ??34C, and ??18O of sulfides and calcites with geographic location within the southern trough of Guaymas Basin are best explained by variations in water/rock ( w r) ratios or sediment reactivity within subsurface alteration zones. Low w r ratios and the leaching of detrital carbonates and bacteriogenic sulfides at the southern vent sites result in relatively

  14. Post-middle Miocene Tuffs of Bodie Hills and Mono Basin, California: Paleomagnetic Reference Directions and Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, J. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Farner, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The relative motions of the Pacific and North American plates about the Sierra Nevada-North American Euler pole is accommodated by dextral slip along the San Andreas Fault System (~75%) and the Walker Lane-Eastern California Shear Zone system of faults, east of the Sierra Nevada microplate (~25%). The Bodie Hills and Mono Basin regions lie within the Walker Lane and partially accommodate deformation by vertical axis rotation of up to 60o rotation since ~9.4 Ma. This region experienced recurrent eruptive events from mid to late Miocene, including John et al.'s (2012) ~12.05 Ma Tuff of Jack Springs (TJS) and Gilbert's (1968) 11.1 - 11.9 Ma 'latite ignimbrite' east of Mono Lake. Both tuffs can be identified by phenocrysts of sanidine and biotite in hand specimens, with TJS composed of a light-grey matrix and the latite ignimbrite composed of a grey-black matrix. Our paleomagnetic results show these units to both be normal polarity, with the latite ignimbrite exhibiting a shallow inclination. TJS's normal polarity is consistent with emplacement during subchron C5 An. 1n (12.014 - 12.116 Ma). The X-ray fluorescence analyses of fiamme from TJS in Bodie Hills and the latite ignimbrite located east of Mono Lake reveal them both to be rhyolites with the latite ignimbrite sharing elevated K composition seen in the slightly younger Stanislaus Group (9.0 - 10.2 Ma). We establish a paleomagnetic reference direction of D = 352.8o I = 42.7o α95 = 7.7o n = 5 sites (42 samples) for TJS in the Bodie Hills in a region hypothesized by Carlson (2012) to have experienced low rotation. Our reference for Gilbert's latite ignimbrite (at Cowtrack Mountain) is D = 352.9o I = 32.1o α95 = 4.7o. This reference locality is found on basement highland likely to have experienced less deformation then the nearby Mono Basin since ignimbrite emplacement. Paleomagnetic results from this latite ignimbrite suggests ~98.2o × 5.5o of clockwise vertical axis rotation of parts of eastern Mono Basin since

  15. Possible Recording of the Hilina Pali Excursion in the Mono Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, R.; Liddicoat, J.

    2012-04-01

    Inclination of about negative 40˚ in basalt from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii (Teanby et al., 2002), that is assigned an age of about 18,000 radiocarbon years (uncorrected)(Coe et al., 1978, after Rubin and Berthold, 1961) and an excursion in northeastern China at Changbaishan Volcano of similar age from Ar40/Ar39 dates (Singer et al., 2011) that was interpreted to be the Blake Subchron (Zhu et al., 2000) using K/Ar (Liu, 1987) and Ar40/39 dates (Lin, 1999), might be recorded as shallow positive inclination in lacustrine siltstone in the bank of Wilson Creek in the Mono Basin, CA. The siltstone was deposited in Pleistocene Lake Russell, of which Mono Lake is the remnant, and was exposed when Wilson Creek was incised as the shoreline of Mono Lake receded (Lajoie, 1968). Basaltic and rhyolitic volcanic ash layers exposed in the bank of the creek are stratigraphic markers that have been important for studies of the Mono Lake Excursion (Denham and Cox, 1971; Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1992; Coe and Liddicoat, 1994) and Pleistocene climate in the U.S. Great Basin (Zimmerman et al., 2006). Those ash layers likewise are useful for locating paleomagnetic directions along strike that might be the negative inclination in Hawaii named the Hilina Pali Excursion (Teanby et al., 2002). The portion of the lacustine section exposed along Wilson Creek that is of interest records waveform Delta in Lund et al. (1988) in Subunit E of Lajoie (1993) that is bracketed by ash layers 12 and 13; in Lajoie (1968), those ash layers are numbered 8 and 7, respectively. About midway in Subunit E, which has a thickness of 1.1 m, the inclination is about 15˚ in four back-to-back horizons that span 8 cm. The subsamples, each 2 cm thick, were treated by either alternating field or thermal demagnetization. The Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) for the horizon with the shallowest inclination (14.9˚) is 53.8˚ N, 22.7˚ E (n = 6, Alpha-95 = 2.3˚), and the VGPs within waveform Delta when followed

  16. Governing change: land-use change and the prevention of nonpoint source pollution in the north coastal basin of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Anne G

    2013-01-01

    Many rural areas in the United States and throughout much of the postindustrial world are undergoing significant ecological, socioeconomic, and political transformations. The migration of urban and suburban dwellers into rural areas has led to the subdivision of large tracts of land into smaller parcels, which can complicate efforts to govern human-environmental problems. Non-point source (NPS) pollution from private rural lands is a particularly pressing human-environmental challenge that may be aggravated by changing land tenure. In this article, I report on a study of the governance and management of sediment (a common NPS pollutant) in the North Coastal basin of California, a region undergoing a transition from traditional extractive and agricultural land uses to rural residential and other alternative land uses. I focus on the differences in the governance and management across private timber, ranch, residential, vacation, and other lands in the region. I find that (1) the stringency and strength of sediment regulations differ by land use, (2) nonregulatory programs tend to target working landscapes, and (3) rural residential landowners have less knowledge of sediment control and report using fewer sediment-control techniques than landowners using their land for timber production or ranching. I conclude with an exploration of the consequences of these differences on an evolving rural landscape. PMID:21805381

  17. Carbon sources and signals through time in an Alpine groundwater Basin, Sagehen California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumhagen, Erik D. [Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Clark, Jordan F. [Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu

    2008-08-15

    In 2003, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) apparent ages, major ion chemistry and C isotopes were determined in nine springs from Sagehen Basin, a high elevation watershed in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Springs with similar apparent ages, which ranged between 15 and 45 a, had very similar chemistry despite being found in different areas of the watershed. In agreement with earlier studies, concentrations of rock-derived cations (Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +}), conductivity, temperature and pH increase with apparent age, documenting the chemical evolution of this groundwater system. In contrast with the cation data, {delta}{sup 13}C and {sigma}CO{sub 2} show no correlation with apparent age. {delta}{sup 13}C displays a strong linear relationship with 1/{sigma}CO{sub 2} (R{sup 2} = 0.91). This is consistent with results from a previously developed soil respiration/diffusion model. Spring radiocarbon content ranged between 85 and 110 pmc and varied with apparent age, whereby the youngest groundwater has the highest radiocarbon values. The spring radiocarbon is set by the soil pCO{sub 2} and its trend can be best described assuming the soil CO{sub 2} is composed of a mixture of 50-66% fast- (15-25 a) and 33-50% slow- (4 ka) cycling components. These results are consistent with previous soil C studies. The C isotope data indicate that in Sagehen Basin the groundwater {sigma}CO{sub 2} is inherited from the soil zone with little, if any, contribution from the dissolution of disseminated calcite.

  18. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Slide and Grass Valley Fires, San Bernardino County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Slide and Grass Valley Fires in San Bernardino County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 3.50 inches (88.90 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  19. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  20. Finite Element Analysis Of Structural And Magmatic Interactions At Mono Basin (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marra, D.; Manconi, A.; Battaglia, M.

    2010-12-01

    Mono Basin is a northward trending graben situated east of the Sierra Nevada and west of Cowtrack Mountains, extending from the northern edge of Long Valley Caldera towards the Bodie Hills. From a hydrographic perspective, the Mono Basin is defined by all streams that drain into Mono Lake. The Mono-Inyo Craters forms a prominent 25-km-long volcanic complex from the NW corner of Long Valley caldera to the southern edge of Mono Lake. The late Quaternary Hartley Springs fault occurs along the Sierran range front between June Lake and the northern border of Long Valley Caldera. Recently it has been proposed that the manifestation of the volcanic and of the tectonic activity in this area is likely interrelated. According to Bursik et al (2003), stratigraphic data suggest that during the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence of ~1350 A.D., a series of strong earthquakes occurred across the end of the North Mono explosive phase and the beginning of the Inyo explosive phase. Moreover, geological and geomorphic features of the Hartley Springs fault are consistent with rupture of the fault during the eruption sequence. We use the Finite Element Method (FEM) to simulate a three-dimensional model and investigate the feedback mechanism between dike intrusion and slip along the Hartley Springs fault. We first validate our numerical model against the Okada (1985) analytical solution for a homogeneous and elastic flat half-space. Subsequently, we evaluate the distribution of local stress changes to study the influence of the Inyo Dike intrusion in ~1350 A.D. on Hartley Springs fault, and how the fault slip may encourage the propagation of dikes towards the surface. To this end, we considered the standard Coulomb stress change as failure criterion. Finally, we analyze the effects of the topography and of vertical and lateral heterogeneities of the crust on the distribution of local and regional stress changes. In this presentation, we highlight the preliminary results of our analysis

  1. High-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Mono Basin-Long Valley Caldera region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, D. A.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.

    2013-12-01

    A new high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Mono Basin-Long Valley Caldera region greatly enhances previous magnetic interpretations that were based on older, low-resolution, and regional aeromagnetic data sets and provides new insights into volcano-tectonic processes. The surveyed area covers a 8,750 km2 NNW-trending swath situated between the Sierra Nevada to the west and the Basin and Range Province to the east. The surveyed area includes the volcanic centers of Mono Lake, Mono-Inyo Craters, Mammoth Mountain, Devils Postpile, and Long Valley Caldera. The NW-trending eastern Sierra frontal fault zone crosses through the study area, including the active Mono Lake, Silver Lake, Hartley Springs, Laurel Creek, and Hilton Creek faults. Over 6,000 line-kilometers of aeromagnetic data were collected at a constant terrain clearance of 150 m, a flight-line spacing of 400 m, and a tie-line spacing of 4 km. Data were collected via helicopter with an attached stinger housing a magnetic sensor using a Scintrex CS-3 cesium magnetometer. In the northern part of the survey area, data improve the magnetic resolution of the individual domes and coulees along Mono Craters and a circular shaped magnetic anomaly that coincides with a poorly defined ring fracture mapped by Kistler (1966). Here, aeromagnetic data combined with other geophysical data suggests that Mono Craters may have preferentially followed a pre-existing plutonic basement feature that may have controlled the sickle shape of the volcanic chain. In the northeastern part of the survey, aeromagnetic data reveal a linear magnetic anomaly that correlates with and extends a mapped fault. In the southern part of the survey, in the Sierra Nevada block just south of Long Valley Caldera, aeromagnetic anomalies correlate with NNW-trending Sierran frontal faults rather than to linear NNE-trends observed in recent seismicity over the last 30 years. These data provide an important framework for the further analysis of the

  2. Analysis of the Carmel Valley alluvial ground-water basin, Monterey County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapple, Glenn W.; Mitten, Hugh T.; Durbin, Timothy J.; Johnson, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional, finite-element, digital model was developed for the Carmel Valley alluvial ground-water basin using measured, computed, and estimated discharge and recharge data for the basin. Discharge data included evapotranspiration by phreatophytes and agricultural, municipal, and domestic pumpage. Recharge data included river leakage, tributary runoff, and pumping return flow. Recharge from subsurface boundary flow and rainfall infiltration was assumed to be insignificant. From 1974 through 1978, the annual pumping rate ranged from 5,900 to 9,100 acre-feet per year with 55 percent allotted to municipal use principally exported out of the valley, 44 percent to agricultural use, and 1 percent to domestic use. The pumpage return flow within the valley ranged from 900 to 1,500 acre-feet per year. The aquifer properties of transmissivity (about 5,900 feet squared per day) and of the storage coefficient (0.19) were estimated from an average alluvial thickness of 75 feet and from less well-defined data on specific capacity and grain-size distribution. During calibration the values estimated for hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient for the lower valley were reduced because of the smaller grain size there. The river characteristics were based on field and laboratory analyses of hydraulic conductivity and on altitude survey data. The model is intended principally for simulation of flow conditions using monthly time steps. Time variations in transmissivity and short-term, highrecharge potential are included in the model. The years 1974 through 1978 (including "pre-" and "post-" drought) were selected because of the extreme fluctuation in water levels between the low levels measured during dry years and the above-normal water levels measured during the preceding and following wet years. Also, during this time more hydrologic information was available. Significantly, computed water levels were generally within a few feet of the measured levels, and computed

  3. Earthquake location data for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1984 through 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data in map and table form for earthquake parameters such as hypocentral coordinates and magnitudes for earthquakes located by the southern Great Basin Seismic network for the time period January 1, 1984, through December 31, 1986. These maps show concentrations of earthquakes in regions previously noted to be seismically active, including the Pahranagat Shear Zone, Pahroc Mountains, southern Nevada Test Site, Timber Mountain, Black Mountain, Gold Mountain, Montezuma Range, and Grapevine Mountains. A concentration of earthquake activity in the Reveille Range was observed in 1986, in a previously inactive area. The northern Nevada Test Site had fewer earthquakes than a comparable area of the southern Nevada Test Site, indicating that the low-yield nuclear testing program is not currently triggering significant numbers of aftershocks. Eight microearthquakes occurred at Yucca Mountain during the 1984-1986 monitoring period. Depths of focus for well-located earthquakes continue to indicate a bimodal distribution, with peaks at 1 to 2 and 8 to 9 km below sea-level and a local minimum at 4 to 5 km. Focal mechanisms range from strike slip to normal slip. No dependence of slip mode on depth or magnitude is evident. 8 refs., 46 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Hydrologic and Geologic Reconnaissance of Pinto Basin, Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Fred

    1963-01-01

    Pinto basin, in the north-central part of Riverside County, Calif., is a typical desert valley formed by downfaulting along several major fault zones. The valley is filled with alluvium, and ground water in the alluvium discharges as subsurface outflow through an alluvium-filled gap at the east end of the valley. Occasionally surface water from cloudburst floods also discharges in a wash through the gap at the east end of the valley. A northeastward extension of the major fault along the south side of the valley acts as a barrier to the discharge of ground water from the valley. The average ground-water gradient is less than 1 foot per mile across the main part of the valley above this barrier, but the water level drops abruptly across the fault. The ground-water storage capacity of the uppermost 100 feet of saturated alluvium beneath the central valley area is estimated to be about 230,000 acre-feet. All this water in storage occurs at depths greater than 95 feet below the land surface and cannot be reached by plants or animals. During 1959 virtually all the water pumped in the area was withdrawn from storage. However, the quantity of water pumped is small in relation to the total quantity in storage. Except for a small decline in head, no evidence indicates that the pumping will greatly impair the yield for many years or cause the water to deteriorate in quality.

  5. California GAMA Special Study: Importance of River Water Recharge to Selected Groundwater Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, Jean E. [California State Univ. East Bay (CalState), Hayward, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    River recharge represents 63%, 86% and 46% of modern groundwater in the Mojave Desert, Owens Valley, and San Joaquin Valley, respectively. In pre-modern groundwater, river recharge represents a lower fraction: 36%, 46%, and 24% respectively. The importance of river water recharge in the San Joaquin valley has nearly doubled and is likely the result of a total increase of recharge of 40%, caused by river water irrigation return flows. This emphasizes the importance of recharge of river water via irrigation for renewal of groundwater resources. Mountain front recharge and local precipitation contribute to recharge of desert groundwater basins in part as the result of geological features focusing scarce precipitation promoting infiltration. River water recharges groundwater systems under lower temperatures and with larger water table fluctuations than local precipitation recharge. Surface storage is limited in time and volume, as evidenced by cold river recharge temperatures resulting from fast recharge, compared to the large capacity for subsurface storage. Groundwater banking of seasonal surface water flows therefore appears to be a natural and promising method for increasing the resilience of water supply systems. The distinct isotopic and noble gas signatures of river water recharge, compared to local precipitation recharge, reflecting the source and mechanism of recharge, are valuable constraints for numerical flow models.

  6. Selenium in aquatic biota inhabiting agricultural drains in the Salton Sea Basin, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W

    2012-09-01

    Resource managers are concerned that water conservation practices in irrigated farmlands along the southern border of the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California, could increase selenium concentrations in agricultural drainwater and harm the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), a federally protected endangered species. As part of a broader attempt to address this concern, we conducted a 3-year investigation to collect baseline information on selenium concentrations in seven agricultural drains inhabited by pupfish. We collected water, sediment, selected aquatic food-chain taxa (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [Chironomidae] larvae), and two poeciliid fishes (western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna) for selenium determinations. The two fish species served as ecological surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice. Dissolved selenium ranged from 0.70 to 32.8 μg/L, with selenate as the major constituent. Total selenium concentrations in other environmental matrices varied widely among drains, with one drain (Trifolium 18) exhibiting especially high concentrations in detritus, 5.98-58.0 μg Se/g; midge larvae, 12.7-50.6 μg Se/g; mosquitofish, 13.2-20.2 μg Se/g; and mollies, 12.8-30.4 μg Se/g (all tissue concentrations are based on dry weights). Although toxic thresholds for selenium in fishes from the Salton Sea are still poorly understood, available evidence suggests that ambient concentrations of this element may not be sufficiently elevated to adversely affect reproductive success and survival in selenium-tolerant poeciliids and pupfish. PMID:21915593

  7. Quantifying quagga mussel veliger abundance and distribution in Copper Basin Reservoir (California) using acoustic backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael A; Taylor, William D

    2011-11-01

    Quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) have been linked to oligotrophication of lakes, alteration of aquatic food webs, and fouling of infrastructure associated with water supply and power generation, causing potentially billions of dollars in direct and indirect damages. Understanding their abundance and distribution is key in slowing their advance, assessing their potential impacts, and evaluating effectiveness of control strategies. Volume backscatter strength (Sv) measurements at 201- and 430-kHz were compared with quagga mussel veliger and zooplankton abundances determined from samples collected using a Wisconsin closing net from the Copper Basin Reservoir on the Colorado River Aqueduct. The plankton within the lower portion of the water column (>18 m depth) was strongly dominated by D-shaped quagga mussel veligers, comprising up to 95-99% of the community, and allowed direct empirical measurement of their mean backscattering cross-section. The upper 0-18 m of the water column contained a smaller relative proportion of veligers based upon net sampling. The difference in mean volume backscatter strength at these two frequencies was found to decrease with decreasing zooplankton abundance (r(2) = 0.94), allowing for correction of Sv due to the contribution of zooplankton and the determination of veliger abundance in the reservoir. Hydroacoustic measurements revealed veligers were often present at high abundances (up to 100-200 ind L(-1)) in a thin 1-2 m layer at the thermocline, with considerable patchiness in their distribution observed along a 700 m transect on the reservoir. Under suitable conditions, hydroacoustic measurements can rapidly provide detailed information on the abundance and distribution of quagga mussel veligers over large areas with high horizontal and vertical resolution. PMID:21906773

  8. Quantifying sources of methane and light alkanes in the Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas; Atlas, Elliot; Blake, Donald; Brioude, Jerome; Daube, Bruce; de Gouw, Joost; Frost, Gregory; Gentner, Drew; Gilman, Jessica; Goldstein, Allen; Harley, Robert; Holloway, John; Kuster, William; Santoni, Gregory; Trainer, Michael; Wofsy, Steven; Parrish, David

    2013-04-01

    We use ambient measurements to apportion the relative contributions of different source sectors to the methane (CH4) emissions budget of a U.S. megacity. This approach uses ambient measurements of methane and C2-C5 alkanes (ethane through pentanes) and includes source composition information to distinguish between methane emitted from landfills and feedlots, wastewater treatment plants, tailpipe emissions, leaks of dry natural gas in pipelines and/or local seeps, and leaks of locally produced (unprocessed) natural gas. Source composition information can be taken from existing tabulations or developed by direct sampling of emissions using a mobile platform. By including C2-C5 alkane information, a linear combination of these source signatures can be found to match the observed atmospheric enhancement ratios to determine relative emissions strengths. We apply this technique to apportion CH4 emissions in Los Angeles, CA (L.A.) using data from the CalNex field project in 2010. Our analysis of L.A. atmospheric data shows the two largest CH4 sources in the city are emissions of gas from pipelines and/or from geologic seeps (47%), and emissions from landfills (40%). Local oil and gas production is a relatively minor source of CH4, contributing 8% of total CH4 emissions in L.A. Absolute CH4 emissions rates are derived by multiplying the observed CH4/CO enhancement ratio by State of California inventory values for carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in Los Angeles. Apportioning this total suggests that emissions from the combined natural and anthropogenic gas sources account for the differences between top-down and bottom-up CH4 estimates previously published for Los Angeles. Further, total CH4 emission attributed in our analysis to local gas extraction represents 17% of local production. While a derived leak rate of 17% of local production may seem unrealistically high, it is qualitatively consistent with the 12% reported in a recent state inventory survey of the L.A. oil and

  9. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  10. Diurnal and weekday variations in the source contributions of ozone precursors in California's South Coast Air Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John C; Bowen, John L; Goliff, Wendy S; Stockwell, William R; Lawson, Douglas R

    2003-07-01

    For at least 30 years, ozone (O3) levels on weekends in parts of California's South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin (SoCAB) have been as high as or higher than on weekdays, even though ambient levels of O3 precursors are lower on weekends than on weekdays. A field study was conducted in the Los Angeles area during fall 2000 to test whether proposed relationships between emission sources and ambient nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) levels can account for observed diurnal and day-of-week variations in the concentration and proportions of precursor pollutants that may affect the efficiency and rate of O3 formation. The contributions to ambient NMHC by motor vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions, estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling, ranged from 65 to 85% with minimal day-of-week variation. Ratios of ambient NOx associated with black carbon (BC) to NOx associated with carbon monoxide (CO) were approximately 1.25 +/- 0.22 during weekdays and 0.76 +/- 0.07 and 0.52 +/- 0.07 on Saturday and Sunday, respectively. These results demonstrate that lower NOx emissions from diesel exhaust can be a major factor causing lower NOx mixing ratios and higher NMHC/NOx ratios on weekends. Nonmobile sources showed no significant day-of-week variations in their contributions to NMHC. Greater amounts of gasoline emissions are carried over on Friday and Saturday evenings but are, at most, a minor factor contributing to higher NMHC/NOx ratios on weekend mornings. PMID:12880072

  11. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  12. Organic matter cycling across the sulfate-methane transition zone of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Tomoko; Burdige, David J.; Li, Huan-Lei; Magen, Cédric; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Cada, Abraham K.

    2016-03-01

    Consumption of sulfate (SO42-) in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) has often been considered to be due solely to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). However, recent studies show SO42- fluxes into the SMTZ that exceed methane (CH4) fluxes, thereby challenging this conceptual model. Co-occurrence of organoclastic SO42- reduction (oSR) with AOM in the SMTZ has been hypothesized to be the cause for this flux imbalance, but conclusive evidence is lacking. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated organic matter cycling in the SMTZ of the organic-rich sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, and examined the occurrence of oSR within this zone using bulk solute profiles and Δ14C and δ13C values of selected carbon pools. We also tested the hypothesis that the SMTZ acts as an oxidation front not just for CH4, but also for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that is produced below the SMTZ and migrates upward. Mass balance calculations for the SMTZ based on reaction stoichiometry and Δ14C and δ13C values of associated carbon fluxes indicate that ∼35-45% of total SO42- reduction in the SMTZ occurs via oSR, with the remainder attributable to AOM. The δ13C value of net DOC production is distinct from that of the fraction of bulk POC undergoing degradation, suggesting that pore-water DOC represents a compositionally unique slice of the metabolizable POC pool. DOC diffusing upward at 450 cm is virtually free of 14C and contain low levels of short-chain organic acids. Radiocarbon mass balance shows that >30% of this pre-aged, and presumably refractory, DOC is removed from the pore waters within or immediately below the SMTZ. Although the SMTZ does not appear to be a major net DOC oxidation front, these results show that DOC dynamics provide unique insights into organic matter processing in these subsurface sediments.

  13. Seismic reflection-based evidence of a transfer zone between the Wagner and Consag basins: implications for defining the structural geometry of the northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escobar, Mario; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco; Hernández-Pérez, José Antonio; Martín-Barajas, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the structural characteristics of the northern Gulf of California by processing and interpreting ca. 415 km of two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection lines (data property of Petróleos Mexicanos PEMEX) collected in the vicinity of the border between the Wagner and Consag basins. The two basins appear to be a link between the Delfín Superior Basin to the south, and the Cerro Prieto Basin to the north in the Mexicali-Imperial Valley along the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The seismic data are consistent with existing knowledge of four main structures (master faults) in the region, i.e., the Percebo, Santa María, Consag Sur, and Wagner Sur faults. The Wagner and Consag basins are delimited to the east by the Wagner Sur Fault, and to the west by the Consag Sur Fault. The Percebo Fault borders the western margin of the modern Wagner Basin depocenter, and is oriented N10°W, dipping (on average) ˜40° to the northeast. The trace of the Santa María Fault located in the Wagner Basin strikes N19°W, dipping ˜40° to the west. The Consag Sur Fault is oriented N14°W, and dips ˜42° to the east over a distance of 21 km. To the east of the study area, the Wagner Sur Fault almost parallels the Consag Sur Fault over a distance of ˜86 km, and is oriented N10°W with an average dip of 59° to the east. Moreover, the data provide new evidence that the Wagner Fault is discontinuous between the two basins, and that its structure is more complex than previously reported. A structural high separates the northern Consag Basin from the southern Wagner Basin, comprising several secondary faults oriented NE oblique to the main faults of N-S direction. These could represent a zone of accommodation, or transfer zone, where extension could be transferred from the Wagner to the Consag Basin, or vice versa. This area shows no acoustic basement and/or intrusive body, which is consistent with existing gravimetric and magnetic data for the region.

  14. Analysis of projected water availability with current basin management plan, Pajaro Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. T.; Lockwood, B.; Schmid, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    The projection and analysis of the Pajaro Valley Hydrologic Model (PVHM) 34 years into the future using MODFLOW with the Farm Process (MF-FMP) facilitates assessment of potential future water availability. The projection is facilitated by the integrated hydrologic model, MF-FMP that fully couples the simulation of the use and movement of water from precipitation, streamflow, runoff, groundwater flow, and consumption by natural and agricultural vegetation throughout the hydrologic system at all times. MF-FMP allows for more complete analysis of conjunctive-use water-resource systems than previously possible with MODFLOW by combining relevant aspects of the landscape with the groundwater and surface-water components. This analysis is accomplished using distributed cell-by-cell supply-constrained and demand-driven components across the landscape within “water-balance subregions” (WBS) comprised of one or more model cells that can represent a single farm, a group of farms, watersheds, or other hydrologic or geopolitical entities. Analysis of conjunctive use would be difficult without embedding the fully coupled supply-and-demand into a fully coupled simulation, and are difficult to estimate a priori. The analysis of projected supply and demand for the Pajaro Valley indicate that the current water supply facilities constructed to provide alternative local sources of supplemental water to replace coastal groundwater pumpage, but may not completely eliminate additional overdraft. The simulation of the coastal distribution system (CDS) replicates: 20 miles of conveyance pipeline, managed aquifer recharge and recovery (MARR) system that captures local runoff, and recycled-water treatment facility (RWF) from urban wastewater, along with the use of other blend water supplies, provide partial relief and substitution for coastal pumpage (aka in-lieu recharge). The effects of these Basin Management Plan (BMP) projects were analyzed subject to historical climate variations

  15. Geochemical and Morphologic Evolution of Soil-Covered Hillslopes in the Feather River Basin, California: Responses to Channel Incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, B.; Yoo, K.; Mudd, S. M.; Hurst, M. D.; Mayer, K.; Maher, K.

    2009-12-01

    Tectonically driven changes in channel incision rates lead to changes in hillslope erosion rates that propagate upslope. In an effort to understand how these changes affect soil geochemistry, this study theoretically and empirically integrates sediment transport and chemical weathering. Here, we focus on a tributary basin of the Middle Folk Feather River (FR) in Sierra Nevada, California. This basin is adjusting to an increase in main stem channel incision that has resulted in rapidly eroding, steep hillslopes near the main stem channel and gentler, more slowly eroding slopes further upstream. To constrain how geomorphic signals (i.e., knickpoint) propagate upslope and affect soil geochemistry, soils were sampled in July 2009 along three hillslope transects within the FR basin: transect POMD (40% slope at 780m elevation), FTA (70% slope at 680m elevation), and BRC (90% slope at 630m elevation). To capture and bracket a coupled change in soil geochemistry upslope, transects were specifically chosen so that POMD is downstream of the knickpoint of the main channel, FTA in a transitional region, and BRC upstream of the knickpoint. Along each ~50 m transect, soil pits were dug <10 m apart of each other to depths of about 1m. CRN samples were collected from the upper saprolite and undisturbed B horizons to determine the soil production rates. For constraining soil mixing, sediment ages, and chemical weathering, OSL and geochemistry samples were collected every ~10 cm in the A, B, and saprolite horizons. Judging from the soil color, the abundances of pedogenic iron oxides systematically are greater in the less steep hillslopes. This is consistent with a preliminary view that the soils have briefer residence times in the steeper hillslopes, which have greater rates of channel incision at their lower boundaries. One contrast to our expectations, however, was that the soils were not consistently thicker in the gentler hillslopes, which presumably undergo reduced rates of

  16. Water Resources Data for California, water year 1981: Vol. 1. Colorado River basin, Southern Great basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1982-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1981 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 169 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 42 streams and 21 wells; water levels for 169 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  17. Water resources data for California, water year 1979; Volume 1: Colorado River basin, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    California District of the Water Resources Division

    1981-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1979 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; records of water levels in selected observation wells; and selected chemical analyses of ground water. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. These data, a contribution to the National Water Data System, were collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  18. Water resources data for California, water year 1978; Volume 1: Colorado River basin, southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific Slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    California District of the Water Resources Division

    1979-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1978 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; records of water levels in selected observation wells; and selected chemical analyses of ground water. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. These data, a contribution to the National water Data System, were collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  19. Water resources data for California, water year 1980; Volume 1, Colorado River basin, Southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of water resources data for the 1980 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lake and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 174 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 stations; water levels for 165 observation wells. Also included are 9 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  20. Structure and Stratigraphy of the Rift Basins in the Northern Gulf of California: Results from Analysis of Seismic Reflection and Borehole Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, A.; González, M.; Helenes, J.; García, J.; Aragón, M.; Carreño, A.

    2008-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California contains two parallel, north-south trending rift basin systems separated by a basement-high. The interpretation of several exploration wells, and ~4500 km of seismic reflection data from PEMEX (Mexican national oil company) indicate that the tectonically active basins to the west (Wagner- Consag and Upper Delfin basins) may have initiated synchronously with the now abandoned Tiburón- Tepoca-Altar basins to the east in the Sonora margin. In both basin systems the lower sequence (A) is marine mudstone-siltstone, has parallel reflectors and a largely uniform thickness that reaches up to1.5 km, and gradually pinches out toward the lateral margins. This suggests that the unit was deposited prior to their segmentation by transtensional faulting. Marine microfossils from borehole samples from sequence A in the Tiburón and Consag basins indicates middle Miocene (>11.2 Ma) proto-Gulf conditions. Sequence B conformably overlies sequence A, and is characterized by up to 2 km growth strata with a fanning geometry that show a clear genetic relationship to the major transtensional faults that control the segmentation of the two basin systems. Sequence C in the Tiburón and Tepoca basins is comparatively thin (<800 m) and includes several unconformities, but is much less affected by faulting. In contrast, sequence C in the active Wagner, Consag and Upper Delfin basin is a much thicker (up to 2 km) growth sequence with abundant volcanic intrusions. Marked variations in sequence C in the different basin systems clearly demonstrate a major westward shift of deformation and subsidence at this time. The modern depocenter in Wagner-Consag basins is controlled by the Consag and Wagner faults, which trend parallel to the north ~20 km apart, and show opposite normal offset. These two faults merge at an oblique angle (70°-50°, respectively) into the Cerro Prieto transform fault to the north and likely accommodate an important amount of dextral shear. To

  1. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) file of topographic elevations for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1-degree Digital Elevation Model data files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevation data have been compiled into a digital data base for an ∼100,000-km2 area of the southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada, and SE Calif., located between lat 35 degree N, long 115 degree W, and lat 38 degree N, long 118 degree W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site, Yucca Mountain, and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water system. Because digital maps are often useful for applications other than that for which they were originally intended, and because the area corresponds to a region under continuing investigation by several groups, these digital files are being released by USGS

  2. Development of a local-scale urban stream assessment method using benthic macroinvertebrates: An example from the Santa Clara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.L.; Purcell, A.H.; Fend, S.V.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Research that explores the biological response to urbanization on a site-specific scale is necessary for management of urban basins. Recent studies have proposed a method to characterize the biological response of benthic macroinvertebrates along an urban gradient for several climatic regions in the USA. Our study demonstrates how this general framework can be refined and applied on a smaller scale to an urbanized basin, the Santa Clara Basin (surrounding San Jose, California, USA). Eighty-four sampling sites on 14 streams in the Santa Clara Basin were used for assessing local stream conditions. First, an urban index composed of human population density, road density, and urban land cover was used to determine the extent of urbanization upstream from each sampling site. Second, a multimetric biological index was developed to characterize the response of macroinvertebrate assemblages along the urban gradient. The resulting biological index included metrics from 3 ecological categories: taxonomic composition ( Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (shredder richness), and habit ( clingers). The 90th-quantile regression line was used to define the best available biological conditions along the urban gradient, which we define as the predicted biological potential. This descriptor was then used to determine the relative condition of sites throughout the basin. Hierarchical partitioning of variance revealed that several site-specific variables (dissolved O2 and temperature) were significantly related to a site's deviation from its predicted biological potential. Spatial analysis of each site's deviation from its biological potential indicated geographic heterogeneity in the distribution of impaired sites. The presence and operation of local dams optimize water use, but modify natural flow regimes, which in turn influence stream habitat, dissolved O2, and temperature. Current dissolved O2 and temperature regimes deviate from natural

  3. A regional view of urban sedimentary basins in Northern California based on oil industry compressional-wave velocity and density logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    Compressional-wave (sonic) and density logs from 119 oil test wells provide knowledge of the physical properties and impedance contrasts within urban sedimentary basins in northern California, which is needed to better understand basin amplification. These wire-line logs provide estimates of sonic velocities and densities for primarily Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene clastic rocks between 0.1 - and 5.6-km depth to an average depth of 1.8 km. Regional differences in the sonic velocities and densities in these basins largely 1reflect variations in the lithology, depth of burial, porosity, and grain size of the strata, but not necessarily formation age. For example, Miocene basin filling strata west of the Calaveras Fault exhibit higher sonic velocities and densities than older but finer-grained and/or higher-porosity rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Great Valley Sequence. As another example, hard Eocene sandstones west of the San Andreas Fault have much higher impedances than Eocene strata, mainly higher-porosity sandstones and shales, located to the east of this fault, and approach those expected for Franciscan Complex basement rocks. Basement penetrations define large impedence contrasts at the sediment/basement contact along the margins of several basins, where Quaternary, Pliocene, and even Miocene deposits directly overlie Franciscan or Salinian basement rocks at depths as much as 1.7 km. In contrast, in the deepest, geographic centers of the basins, such logs exhibit only a modest impedance contrast at the sediment/basement contact at depths exceeding 2 km. Prominent (up to 1 km/sec) and thick (up to several hundred meters) velocity and density reversals in the logs refute the common assumption that velocities and densities increase monotonically with depth.

  4. Studies of geology and hydrology in the Basin and Range province, southwestern United States, for isolation of high-level radioactive waste: characterization of the Sonoran region, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sonoran region of California lies west of the Colorado River and adjoins the Mojave Desert on the west, Death Valley on the northwest, and the Salton trough on the south. The region is arid with annual precipitation ranging from less than 80 millimeters to as great as 250 millimeters in one mountain range; annual free-surface evaporation is as great as 2,500 millimeters. The characteristic basin and range topography of the region was caused by a mid-Tertiary period of intense crustal extension, accompanied by volcanic eruptions, clastic sedimentation, faulting, and tilting. Potential host media for isolation of high-level radioactive waste include granite and other coarsegrained plutonic rocks, ash-flow tuff, and basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows. Thick sections of the unsaturated zone in basin fill, intrusive, and volcanic rocks appear to have potential as host media. The region is bordered on the west by areas of relatively greater Quaternary faulting, vertical crustal uplift, and seismicity. The region has a few areas of Quaternary volcanic activity. Geothermal heat flows of 2.5 heat-flow units or greater and one earthquake of magnitude 6-7 have been recorded. The region includes topographically closed basins as well as basins that drain to the Colorado River. Dry lakes and playas occupy the closed basins. Ground-water recharge and surface runoff are small because of the small amount of precipitation and great potential evaporation. Natural ground-water discharge is by evaporation in the basin playas and by underflow to the Colorado River. Dissolved-solids concentration of ground water generally is less than 500 milligrams per liter, and much of it is of the sodium bicarbonate type. Ground water is saline in many of the playas, and chloride or sulfate is the predominant anion. Small tonnages of ore have been produced from numerous precious and fewer base-metal deposits. (author)

  5. Water resources data for California, water year 1976; Volume 1: Colorado River basin, southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific Slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    California District of the Water Resources Division

    1977-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1976 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; records of water levels in selected observation wells; and selected chemical analyses of ground water. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of Lee R. Peterson, district chief; Winchell Smith, assistant district chief for hydrologic data; and Leonard N. Jorgensen, chief of the basic-data section. These data, a contribution to the National Water Data System, were collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  6. Water resources data for California, water year 1975; Volume 1: Colorado River basin, southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific Slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1977-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1975 water year for California consist of records of streamflow and contents of reservoirs at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites; records of water quality including the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of surface and ground water; and records of water levels in selected observation wells. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of Lee R. Peterson, district chief; Winchell Smith, assistant district chief for hydrologic data; and Leonard N. Jorgensen, chief of the basic data section. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  7. Water resources data for California, water year 1977; Volume 1: Colorado River Basin, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    California District of the Water Resources Division

    1978-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1977 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; records of water levels in selected observation wells; and selected chemical analyses of ground water. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of Winchell Smith, Assistant District Chief for Hydrologic Data and Leonard N. Jorgensen, Chief of the Basic-Data Section. These data, a contribution to the National Water Data System, were collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  8. Effect of irrigation pumpage during drought on karst aquifer systems in highly agricultural watersheds: example of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin, southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Subhasis; Srivastava, Puneet; Singh, Sarmistha

    2016-04-01

    In the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river basin in Alabama, Georgia, and Florida (USA), population growth in the city of Atlanta and increased groundwater withdrawal for irrigation in southwest Georgia are greatly affecting the supply of freshwater to downstream regions. This study was conducted to understand and quantify the effect of irrigation pumpage on the karst Upper Floridan Aquifer and river-aquifer interactions in the lower ACF river basin in southwest Georgia. The groundwater MODular Finite-Element model (MODFE) was used for this study. The effect of two drought years, a moderate and a severe drought year, were simulated. Comparison of the results of the irrigated and non-irrigated scenarios showed that groundwater discharge to streams is a major outflow from the aquifer, and irrigation can cause as much as 10 % change in river-aquifer flux. The results also show that during months with high irrigation (e.g., June 2011), storage loss (34 %), the recharge and discharge from the upper semi-confining unit (30 %), and the river-aquifer flux (31 %) are the major water components contributing towards the impact of irrigation pumpage in the study area. A similar scenario plays out in many river basins throughout the world, especially in basins in which underlying karst aquifers are directly connected to a nearby stream. The study suggests that improved groundwater withdrawal strategies using climate forecasts needs to be developed in such a way that excessive withdrawals during droughts can be reduced to protect streams and river flows.

  9. A reindeer footprint in a drilling core from the Allerød-Bølling age succession of Lille Slotseng basin, south-eastern Jylland, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe-Nygaard, Nanna; Milàn, Jesper; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt

    2005-01-01

    ,000 to around 8,000 cal yr BP years. The basin sedimentation starts with old melt water deposits just below the Bølling Interstadial (GI 1-e), followed by older Dryas (GI 1-d), Allerød, (GI 1-c, 1-b, 1-a) and Younger Dryas (GS 1) which terminates the Late Glacial succession. Preboreal algal gyttja and...

  10. Biología reproductiva del bagre cominate Occidentarius platypogon (Pisces: Ariidae) en el sureste del golfo de California Reproductive biology of the cominate sea catfish Occidentarius platypogon (Pisces: Ariidae) from the southeastern Gulf of California

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Amezcua; Víctor Muro-Torres

    2012-01-01

    En el sureste del golfo de California, el bagre cominate presenta gran abundancia y es explotado comercialmente. Sin embargo, estudios sobre su biología son escasos y no existen normas que regulen su explotación en México. En este trabajo se describe la biología reproductiva de Occidentarius platypogon. Se capturaron 480 organismos con redes agalleras entre octubre 2008 y diciembre 2009. El estado de madurez gonadal se determinó macroscópicamente. Esta especie tiene una época de desove de may...

  11. Macroalgae blooms and δ15N in subtropical coastal lagoons from the Southeastern Gulf of California: Discrimination among agricultural, shrimp farm and sewage effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroalgae blooms of Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Hypnea spinella and Spyridia filamentosa have been found in coastal lagoons in the SE Gulf of California. Agriculture, livestock, shrimp and poultry farms and sewage contribute anthropogenic nitrogen to the systems. The δ15N of these sources, water column and macroalgae were studied in order to identify the N supply for macroalgae blooms. δ15N of three species of macroalgae (4.3-13.6 per mille ) were enriched compared to the water column (δ15N-NO3- 3.7-6.8 per mille ), probably because of fractioning from the macroalgae. δ15N of POM (1.4-10.3 per mille ) was similar to the water column but the relationship was unclear. Depending on the site, macroalgae showed different δ15N values since some sites receive more or less influence from one given source of the associated watershed, which is reflected in the different δ15N values of the macroalgae of the same system and in the relative contributions of the sources.

  12. A brief history of oil and gas exploration in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California: Chapter 3 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The Golden State got its nickname from the Sierra Nevada gold that lured so many miners and settlers to the West, but California has earned much more wealth from so-called “black gold” than from metallic gold. The San Joaquin Valley has been the principal source for most of the petroleum produced in the State during the past 145 years. In attempting to assess future additions to petroleum reserves in a mature province such as the San Joaquin Basin, it helps to be mindful of the history of resource development. In this chapter we present a brief overview of the long and colorful history of petroleum exploration and development in the San Joaquin Valley. This chapter relies heavily upon the work of William Rintoul, who wrote extensively on the history of oil and gas exploration in California and especially in the San Joaquin Valley. No report on the history of oil and gas exploration in the San Joaquin Valley would be possible without heavily referencing his publications. We also made use of publications by Susan Hodgson and a U.S. Geological Survey Web site, Natural Oil and Gas Seeps in California (http://seeps.wr.usgs.gov/seeps/index.html), for much of the material describing the use of petroleum by Native Americans in the San Joaquin Valley. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the contribution of Don Arnot, who manages the photograph collection at the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft, California. The collection consists of more than 10,000 photographs that have been scanned and preserved in digital form on CD-ROM. Many of the historical photographs used in this paper are from that collection. Finally, to clarify our terminology, we use the term “San Joaquin Valley” when we refer to the geographical or topographical feature and the term “San Joaquin Basin” when we refer to geological province and the rocks therein.

  13. The quality of our Nation's waters: water quality in basin-fill aquifers of the southwestern United States: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Paul, Angela P.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anning, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The Southwest Principal Aquifers consist of many basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. Demands for irrigation and drinking water have substantially increased groundwater withdrawals and irrigation return flow to some of these aquifers. These changes have increased the movement of contaminants from geologic and human sources to depths used to supply drinking water in several basin-fill aquifers in the Southwest.

  14. Use of tritium-helium groundwater age and anthropogenic VOCs to assess deep groundwater susceptibility in California urban and agricultural basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Leif, R. N.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Moran, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    With the discovery of MTBE contamination in public supply wells in the 1990's and the subsequent demonstration that most public supply wells were in close proximity to leaking underground fuel tanks, the State of California recognized the need to rapidly assess the vulnerability of public supply wells throughout the State. The California Aquifer Susceptibility project funded by the State of California GAMA Program used a cost-effective approach to assess ambient groundwater susceptibility at large scales through the use of groundwater age (using the tritium/helium-3 method), the presence of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-trace levels, and stable isotopes of water. To date, over 2000 wells have been sampled in the major agricultural and urban basins in California. One pattern that has emerged is a significantly greater vulnerability to contamination in the alluvial aquifers of the Central Valley than in either southern or northern Coastal Basins. The project also has allowed investigation of the utility of the tritium/helium-3 method for vulnerability assessment. This method in conjunction with noble gas analysis allows determination of mean apparent groundwater age from 2 to 50 years, and the fraction of water recharged before atmospheric weapons testing in mid-century. Long-screened supply wells can produce waters with old mean apparent ages (indicating that they are not vulnerable) and still contain small fractions of young highly vulnerable water (through improper well construction, short-circuiting, screening across shallow zones, and dispersive transport). The recent introduction and wide dispersion of anthropogenic VOCs into the environment coupled with our ability to detect these compounds at ultra-trace levels (low ppt) allow their use as proxies for small mixing fractions of young contaminated water. The occurrence of anthropogenic VOCs in tritium-dead groundwater is infrequent but not rare, evidence for apparent groundwater age

  15. Freshwater Vulnerability to Nitrate Contamination as an Indicator of Sustainability and Resilience within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus of the California Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, L.; Geyer, G.; Gurdak, J. J.; Orencio, P. M.; Endo, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The California Coastal Basin (CCB) aquifers are representative of many coastal aquifers that are vulnerable to nonpoint-source (NPS) contamination from intense agriculture and increased urbanization combined with historical groundwater use and overdraft conditions. Overdraft has led to seawater intrusion along parts of the central California coast, which negatively affects food production because of high salinity concentrations in groundwater used for irrigation. Recent drought conditions in California have led to an increased need to further understand freshwater sustainability and resilience within the water-energy-food (WEF) nexus. Assessing the vulnerability of NPS contamination in groundwater provides valuable information for optimal resource management and policy. Vulnerability models of nitrate contamination in the CCB were developed as one of many indicators to evaluate risk in terms of susceptibility of the physical environment at local and regional scales. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to predict the probability of NPS nitrate contamination in recently recharged groundwater and to identify significant explanatory variables as controlling factors in the CCB. Different factors were found to be significant in the sub-regions of the CCB and issues of scale are important. For example, land use is scale dependent because of the difference in land management practices between the CCB sub-regions. However, dissolved oxygen concentrations in groundwater, farm fertilizer, and soil thickness are scale invariant because they are significant both regionally and sub-regionally. Thus, the vulnerability models for the CCB show that different explanatory variables are scale invariant. This finding has important implications for accurately quantifying linkages between vulnerability and consequences within the WEF nexus, including inherent tradeoffs in water and food production in California and associated impacts on the local and regional economy

  16. Using (137)Cs measurements to estimate soil erosion rates in the Pčinja and South Morava River Basins, southeastern Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Jelena; Dragović, Snežana; Dragović, Ranko; Đorđević, Milan; Đokić, Mrđan; Zlatković, Bojan; Walling, Desmond

    2016-07-01

    The need for reliable assessments of soil erosion rates in Serbia has directed attention to the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to derive estimates of soil redistribution rates. Since, to date, this approach has not been applied in southeastern Serbia, a reconnaissance study was undertaken to confirm its viability. The need to take account of the occurrence of substantial Chernobyl fallout was seen as a potential problem. Samples for (137)Cs measurement were collected from a zone of uncultivated soils in the watersheds of Pčinja and South Morava Rivers, an area with known high soil erosion rates. Two theoretical conversion models, the profile distribution (PD) model and diffusion and migration (D&M) model were used to derive estimates of soil erosion and deposition rates from the (137)Cs measurements. The estimates of soil redistribution rates derived by using the PD and D&M models were found to differ substantially and this difference was ascribed to the assumptions of the simpler PD model that cause it to overestimate rates of soil loss. The results provided by the D&M model were judged to more reliable. PMID:27077326

  17. Morfometría en la Cuenca Hidrológica de San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur, México Morfometry in San José del Cabo Hidrologic Basin, South Baja California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro Martínez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La cuenca hidrológica-forestal de San José del Cabo, localizada al sur de la península de Baja California, México, es la de mayor extensión en el estado de Baja California Sur y es considerada como una de las principales fuentes de recursos hídricos. Los acuíferos que suministran agua a las áreas turísticas y urbanas están en las partes bajas (planicies aluviales de la cuenca. Un complejo cristalino constituido por rocas ígneas y metamórficas caracteriza la región montañosa de la cuenca. Análisis de imagen Landsat ETM, fotografías aéreas y modelo digital de elevación fueron usados para cartografiar la geomorfología, geología y desarrollar un análisis morfométrico en la margen occidental de la cuenca. Rasgos estructurales tales como alineamientos rectos o curvilíneos y diques fueron obtenidos del modelo digital de elevación. Parámetros morfométricos y análisis estructural de siete subcuencas se derivaron para determinar áreas potenciales de captura hacia la Cuenca Hidrológica de San José del Cabo (CHSJ. Del análisis se identificó que la captura toma lugar en la parte serrana de la cuenca, dentro del basamento cristalino a través de un sistema de fracturamiento interconectado. Se proponen dos subcuencas como las principales áreas de recarga hacia la CHSJC. Los resultados muestran que la investigación con imagen Landsat y el modelo digital de elevación proporcionan, una fuente acertada de datos e información para la identificación de áreas de recarga y descarga a una escala regional.The San José del Cabo basin is located in the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in México. The basin is one of the largest in the state and is considered the major water source for the state. The aquifers and wells that supply water to the urban and tourist areas are in the lower areas (alluvial plains of the basin; however the aquifers recharge takes place in the mountain region. A crystalline complex basement made

  18. Impact of change in erosion rate and landscape steepness on hillslope and fluvial sediments grain size in the Feather River basin (Sierra Nevada, California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attal, M.; Mudd, S. M.; Hurst, M. D.; Weinman, B.; Yoo, K.; Naylor, M.

    2015-03-01

    The characteristics of the sediment transported by rivers (e.g. sediment flux, grain size distribution - GSD) dictate whether rivers aggrade or erode their substrate. They also condition the architecture and properties of sedimentary successions in basins. In this study, we investigate the relationship between landscape steepness and the grain size of hillslope and fluvial sediments. The study area is located within the Feather River basin in northern California, and studied basins are underlain exclusively by tonalite lithology. Erosion rates in the study area vary over an order of magnitude, from >250 mm ka-1 in the Feather River canyon to processes that can reduce grain size. For slopes in excess of 0.7 m m-1, landslides and scree cones supply much coarser sediment to rivers, with D50 and D84 more than one order of magnitude larger than in soils. In the tributary basins of the Feather River, a prominent break in slope developed in response to the rapid incision of the Feather River. Downstream of the break in slope, fluvial sediment grain size increases, due to an increase in flow competence (mostly driven by channel steepening) as well as a change in sediment source and in sediment dynamics: on the plateau upstream of the break in slope, rivers transport easily mobilised fine-grained sediment derived exclusively from soils. Downstream of the break in slope, mass wasting processes supply a wide range of grain sizes that rivers entrain selectively, depending on the competence of their flow. Our results also suggest that, in this study site, hillslopes respond rapidly to an increase in the rate of base-level lowering compared to rivers.

  19. Three-dimensional model of the Mono Basin (California): finite element analysis of the interaction between the Hartley Spring Fault and the Mono Dike

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marra, D.; Manconi, A.; McDonnell, A.; Battaglia, M.

    2012-12-01

    Mono Basin is a northward-trending structural depression lying immediately east of the central Sierra Nevada (California) that extends from the northern edge of Long Valley Caldera towards the center of Mono Lake. The Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain forms a prominent 17-km-long arcuate ridge within the Mono Basin. Recent studies have proposed that the volcanism and tectonism in this area is likely interrelated. Stratigraphic data suggest that a series of strong earthquakes occurred during the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence of 1350 A.D. Geological data are consistent with rupture of the Hartley Springs fault during the eruption sequence. The temporal proximity of these events suggests the possibility of a causal relationship. We use the Finite Element Method (FEM) to generate a three-dimensional model of the Mono Basin and investigate the feedback mechanism between dike intrusion and slip along the Hartley Springs fault. First we combine the potential of the FEM with the Okada (1992) analytical solution for a homogeneous elastic flat half-space to validate our model. Then, to better simulate a geodynamic model of the Mono Basin, we implement more realistic dynamics that include gravity forces, vertical and lateral heterogeneities of the crust, and topography. We evaluate the distribution of local stress changes to study the influence of the Inyo dike intrusion on the Hartley Springs fault and how slip along the fault may encourage the propagation of dikes towards the surface. We employ the Coulomb stress change as a failure criterion on the Hartley Springs fault. Preliminary results indicate that slip along the Hartley Springs fault may have encouraged the intrusion of the Mono Dike.

  20. 2010 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Groundwater Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies made approximately 2,500 water-level measurements in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins....

  1. Mobility of radionuclides in high chloride environments: a case study of waters within and near the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of naturally occurring isotopes of uranium, thorium, radium and radon were measured in freshwaters and in sodium-chloride brines near the site of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in southeastern New Mexico. Supplemental water chemistry analyses (chloride, alkalinity, P/sub CO2/, ΣCO2, Fe, Mn, ΣH2S) were made to aid in interpreting the natural radionuclide results. Three features of radionuclide mobility are evident from our results: (1) There is a slight tendency for U and Ra concentrations to correlate with the chloride content of the water samples. Whether this results from complexation by Cl- ions or cation exchange competition for adsorption sites cannot be resolved with the available information. (2) Much more dramatic than the correlation with Cl- concentration is the effect of the redox state of the waters on U and Ra concentrations. Chemically reducing groundwaters contain much lower U concentrations and much higher Ra concentrations than were measured in oxic and suboxic samples. Calculated retardation factors of about 1 for Ra indicate that this element can migrate freely in anoxic brines. (3) Low chemical recoveries of Th, and to a lesser extent U, by methods that work well with seawater samples suggest that these elements may be present in an unreactive dissolved or colloidal complex with organic matter. A similar situation has been observed for Pu in freshwaters containing high DOC concentrations by other investigators. The unreactive nature of the U and Th in the brines suggests that even though the concentrations are low, the U and Th that are present in the water may be quite mobile because of their unrective nature. 16 figs., 13 tabs

  2. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  3. Application of a new model for groundwater age distributions: Modeling and isotopic analysis of artificial recharge in the Rialto-Colton basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T.R.; Woolfenden, L.

    2002-01-01

    A project for modeling and isotopic analysis of artificial recharge in the Rialto-Colton basin aquifer in California, is discussed. The Rialto-Colton aquifer has been divided into four primary and significant flowpaths following the general direction of groundwater flow from NW to SE. The introductory investigation include sophisticated chemical reaction modeling, with highly simplified flow path simulation. A comprehensive reactive transport model with the established set of geochemical reactions over the whole aquifer will also be developed for treating both reactions and transport realistically. This will be completed by making use of HBGC123D implemented with isotopic calculation step to compute Carbon-14 (C14) and stable Carbon-13 (C13) contents of the water. Computed carbon contents will also be calibrated with the measured carbon contents for assessment of the amount of imported recharge into the Linden pond.

  4. Inflation of Long Valley caldera, California, Basin and Range strain, and possible Mono Craters dike opening from 1990-94 GPS surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, G.A.; Langbein, J.; Stein, R.S.; Lisowski, M.; Svarc, J.

    1997-01-01

    Five years of annual Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of a network centered on Long Valley, California, constrain displacement rates for these stations relative to a central station in the network. These observations are consistent with recent models of resurgent dome inflation in Long Valley (Langbein et al., 1995) and have sufficient signal to detect the presence of Basin and Range strain in the Long Valley region. The data also allow for the possibility of dike inflation beneath the Mono Craters; dike intrusion is consistent with the Mono Craters' recent geologic history of ash eruptions, with seismic tomography, leveling data, and geologic studies of these volcanic domes and flows. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Geology, Geochemistry and Re-Os systematics of manganese deposits from the Santa Rosalía Basin and adjacent areas in Baja California Sur, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio Salas, R.; Ruiz, J.; Ochoa-Landín, L.; Noriega, O.; Barra, F.; Meza-Figueroa, D.; Paz-Moreno, F.

    2008-06-01

    The manganese ores in the Santa Rosalía region, western Mexico, are mainly stratiform horizons or mantos, constrained to the initial stages of sedimentary cycles of the Miocene Boléo Formation. The manganese mineralization is generally restricted to isolated paleo-basins and related to NW-SE faults formed during the early stages of the opening of the Gulf of California. Jasper, Fe, and Mn oxides associated to the NW-SE structures may represent feeder zones for the mineralized system. The manganese oxide minerals include pyrolusite, cryptomelane, todorokite, hollandite, jacobsite, and pyrochroite. Trace elements in the manganese ores indicate a hydrothermal origin for the deposits of the Santa Rosalía area. Rare earth elements (REE) patterns obtained for manganese minerals from the Lucifer and El Gavilán deposits also support a hydrothermal origin, whereas the middle REE enrichment observed in samples from the Boléo district indicates mixing between hydrothermal and hydrogenous sources. Osmium and rhenium concentrations of the manganese minerals range between 33-173 ppt and 0.14-89 ppb, respectively. The initial 187Os/188Os ratios in the manganese oxides from Lucifer and the Boléo district range between 0.43 to 0.51 and 0.70 to 0.74, respectively. These ratios are different from seawater at 7 Ma (0.84-0.89), which suggests important contributions of osmium from underlying rocks such as the Miocene volcanic rocks and the Cretaceous quartz-monzonite basement. Field evidence, manganese oxide mineralogy coupled with major and trace element geochemistry and Re-Os systematics support a hydrothermal origin for the manganese deposits from the Santa Rosalía region. The ore deposition style indicates an exhalative-intraformational environment restricted to isolated basins in a diagenetic stage related to the initial evolution of the Gulf of California.

  6. Airborne Measurements of Ammonia and Implications for Ammonium Nitrate Formation in the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant gas-phase base in the troposphere. As a consequence, NH3 abundance influences aerosol formation and composition. Ammonium nitrate aerosol is formed from the reaction of gas phase NH3 and nitric acid (HNO3). Anthropogenic emissions of NH3 and NOx (NO + NO2), which in sunlight can be oxidized to form HNO3, can react to form ammonium nitrate aerosol. Agricultural activity (i.e., dairy farms), and urban centers (i.e., Fresno, Los Angeles) are sources of ammonium nitrate gas-phase precursors in both the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin. Airborne measurements of NH3, HNO3, particle composition, and particle size distribution were made aboard the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft during May and June 2010 in the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin of California, as part of CalNex 2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change). The highest mixing ratios of NH3, well over 100 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv), were measured downwind of dairy farms. The high NH3 mixing ratios were highly anti-correlated with HNO3 mixing ratios on fast time scales (~1 s) that correspond to short flight distances (~100 m). During these periods particulate nitrate (NO3-) concentrations increased, indicating ammonium nitrate formation. The meteorological and chemical environments during these periods will be studied to determine the factors driving or limiting ammonium nitrate formation and the resulting regional differences. Finally, the relationship between the NH3 observations and NH3 sources will be examined to assess the emissions and their contribution to ammonium nitrate abundance.

  7. Dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of millennial scale climatic and oceanographic variability in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) during the Late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, *Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2015-04-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in Late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of core MD02-2515. This is one of the first studies in the Northeast Pacific to document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the Late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages three major dinoflagellate cyst zones were established, and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages 1 to 3. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record, and is characterized by an increase in warm water taxa such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where cooler sea-surface conditions are not recorded, and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of warm water species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes. Keywords: Dansgaard-Oeschger events; dinoflagellate cyst; Gulf of California; late Quaternary climate change; upwelling; Younger Dryas.

  8. Fine-scale simulation of ammonium and nitrate over the South Coast Air Basin and San Joaquin Valley of California during CalNex-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James T.; Baker, Kirk R.; Nowak, John B.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Markovic, Milos Z.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Weber, Rodney J.; Roberts, James M.; Veres, Patrick R.; Gouw, Joost A.; Beaver, Melinda R.; Newman, Sally; Misenis, Chris

    2014-03-01

    National ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) have been set for PM2.5 due to its association with adverse health effects. PM2.5 design values in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and San Joaquin Valley of California exceed NAAQS levels, and NH4+ and NO3- make up the largest fraction of total PM2.5 mass on polluted days. Here we evaluate fine-scale simulations of PM2.5 NH4+ and NO3- with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model using measurements from routine networks and the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change 2010 campaign. The model correctly simulates broad spatial patterns of NH4+ and NO3- including the elevated concentrations in eastern SoCAB. However, areas for model improvement have been identified. NH3 emissions from livestock and dairy facilities appear to be too low, while those related to waste disposal in western SoCAB may be too high. Analyses using measurements from flights over SoCAB suggest that problems with NH3 predictions can influence NO3- predictions there. Offline ISORROPIA II calculations suggest that overpredictions of NHx in Pasadena cause excessive partitioning of total nitrate to the particle phase overnight, while underpredictions of Na+ cause too much partitioning to the gas phase during the day. Also, the model seems to underestimate mixing during the evening boundary layer transition leading to excessive nitrate formation on some nights. Overall, the analyses demonstrate fine-scale variations in model performance within and across the air basins. Improvements in inventories and spatial allocations of NH3 emissions and in parameterizations of sea spray emissions, evening mixing processes, and heterogeneous ClNO2 chemistry could improve model performance.

  9. Natural CO2 migrations in the South-Eastern Basin of France: implications for the CO2 storage in sedimentary formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of natural CO2 analogues brings key informations on the factors governing the long term stability/instability of future anthropogenic CO2 storages. The main objective of this work, through the study of cores from V.Mo.2 well crosscutting the Montmiral natural reservoir (Valence Basin, France), is to trace the deep CO2 migrations in fractures. Petrographic, geochemical and micro-thermometric studies of the V.Mo.2 cores were thus performed in order: 1) to describe the reservoir filling conditions and 2) to detect possible CO2-leakage through the sediments overlying the reservoir. Fluid inclusions from the Paleozoic crystalline basement record the progressive unmixing of a hot homogeneous aquo-carbonic fluid. The Montmiral reservoir was therefore probably fed by a CO2-enriched gas component at the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene. The study of the sedimentary column in V.Mo.2 well, demonstrates that the CO2 did not migrate towards the surface through the thick marly unit (Domerian-Middle Oxfordian). These marls have acted as an impermeable barrier that prevented the upward migration of fluids. Two main stages of fluid circulation have been recognized: 1) an ante- Callovian one related to the Tethysian extension 2) a tertiary stage during which the upper units underwent a karstification, with CO2 leakage related but which remained confined into the deeper parts of the Valence Basin. Since the Paleogene, the Montmiral reservoir has apparently remained stable, despite the Pyrenean and alpine orogeneses. This is mainly due to the efficient seal formed by the thick marly levels and also to the local structuration in faulted blocks which apparently acted as efficient lateral barriers. (author)

  10. Magnetic mineral study of Holocene marine sediments from the Alfonso Basin, Gulf of California - implications for depositional environment and sediment sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pérez Cruz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of a rock magnetic study of marine sediments from the Alfonso Basin, Bay of La Paz are used to investigate sediment sources and depositional environment in the southern Gulf of California during the Holocene. Radiocarbon dating provides stratigraphic control, with age for the core bottom sediments of 7597-7831 cal. yr B.P. Magnetic signal is dominated by fine-grained titanomagnetites, derived from the silicic volcanic units surrounding the Bay of La Paz. Magnetic mineralogy is relatively homogenous as seen in bulk magnetic properties of low-field susceptibility, remanent intensity and coercivity. Magnetic hysteresis loops show strong variable paramagnetic components; after paramagnetic correction loops show saturation at low fields and high saturation magnetization values. Plots of hysteresis parameter ratios for domain state show that samples group in the pseudo-single domain field, with mixtures of single and multi-domain particles. Magnetic susceptibility log shows relatively high frequency dependence factors, particularly for the Middle Holocene, suggesting contribution of fine-grained superparamagnetic minerals related to eolian deposition. The well-preserved laminated sequence indicates predominant anoxic conditions in the basin floor. Depositional environment had a dominant supply of pluvial detrital sediments and eolian fimaterial with less abundant biogenic input.

  11. Modified Gulf of California model for South Georgia,north Scotia Ridge, and implications for the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin, southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabaster, T.; Storey, B. C.

    1990-06-01

    New field mapping and an integrated trace element and Nd isotopic study have been undertaken on the Jurassic-Cretaceous Larsen Harbour Complex on the island of South Georgia, recognized as a displaced part of the southern Andes ensialic, autochthonous Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Five basalt groups (Groups I-V) are identified from trace element data; initial Nd isotopic compositions suggest that they are derived from only two sources. Magmas produced during early stages of continental lithospheric attenuation (Groups I-III) were derived by varying degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization from a large ion lithophile element (LILE)-enriched, low-ɛNd mantle source relative to normal (N)-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). Magmas produced during later stages of rifting (Groups IV and V) were, however, derived from a high-ɛNd asthenospheric mantle source similar to N-type MORB, unaffected by earlier LILE enrichment. Our data do not concur with previous suggestions that the Larsen Harbour Complex and, by implication, the Rocas Verdes formed in a supra-subduction-zone setting. On the basis of geologic and geochemical evidence, we favor basin formation along an oblique-slip margin akin to that of the Gulf of California.

  12. A basin-scale approach for assessing water resources in a semiarid environment: San Diego region, California and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Flint

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many basins throughout the world have sparse hydrologic and geologic data, but have increasing demands for water and a commensurate need for integrated understanding of surface and groundwater resources. This paper demonstrates a methodology for using a distributed parameter water-balance model, gaged surface-water flow, and a reconnaissance-level groundwater flow model to develop a first-order water balance. Flow amounts are rounded to the nearest 5 million cubic meters per year.

    The San Diego River basin is 1 of 5 major drainage basins that drain to the San Diego coastal plain, the source of public water supply for the San Diego area. The distributed parameter water-balance model (Basin Characterization Model was run at a monthly timestep for 1940–2009 to determine a median annual total water inflow of 120 million cubic meters per year for the San Diego region. The model was also run specifically for the San Diego River basin for 1982–2009 to provide constraints to model calibration and to evaluate the proportion of inflow that becomes groundwater discharge, resulting in a median annual total water inflow of 50 million cubic meters per year. On the basis of flow records for the San Diego River at Fashion Valley (US Geological Survey gaging station 11023000, when corrected for upper basin reservoir storage and imported water, the total is 30 million cubic meters per year. The difference between these two flow quantities defines the annual groundwater outflow from the San Diego River basin at 20 million cubic meters per year. These three flow components constitute a first-order water budget estimate for the San Diego River basin. The ratio of surface-water outflow and groundwater outflow to total water inflow are 0.6 and 0.4, respectively. Using total water inflow determined using the Basin Characterization Model for the entire San Diego region and the 0.4 partitioning factor, groundwater outflow from the San Diego region, through

  13. A basin-scale approach for assessing water resources in a semiarid environment: San Diego region, California and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.; Stolp, B.J.; Danskin, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Many basins throughout the world have sparse hydrologic and geologic data, but have increasing demands for water and a commensurate need for integrated understanding of surface and groundwater resources. This paper demonstrates a methodology for using a distributed parameter water-balance model, gaged surface-water flow, and a reconnaissance-level groundwater flow model to develop a first-order water balance. Flow amounts are rounded to the nearest 5 million cubic meters per year. The San Diego River basin is 1 of 5 major drainage basins that drain to the San Diego coastal plain, the source of public water supply for the San Diego area. The distributed parameter water-balance model (Basin Characterization Model) was run at a monthly timestep for 1940–2009 to determine a median annual total water inflow of 120 million cubic meters per year for the San Diego region. The model was also run specifically for the San Diego River basin for 1982–2009 to provide constraints to model calibration and to evaluate the proportion of inflow that becomes groundwater discharge, resulting in a median annual total water inflow of 50 million cubic meters per year. On the basis of flow records for the San Diego River at Fashion Valley (US Geological Survey gaging station 11023000), when corrected for upper basin reservoir storage and imported water, the total is 30 million cubic meters per year. The difference between these two flow quantities defines the annual groundwater outflow from the San Diego River basin at 20 million cubic meters per year. These three flow components constitute a first-order water budget estimate for the San Diego River basin. The ratio of surface-water outflow and groundwater outflow to total water inflow are 0.6 and 0.4, respectively. Using total water inflow determined using the Basin Characterization Model for the entire San Diego region and the 0.4 partitioning factor, groundwater outflow from the San Diego region, through the coastal plain aquifer to

  14. A groundwater-basin approach to conceptualize and simulate post-Pleistocene subsurface flow in a semi-arid region, southeastern New Mexico and western Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Thomas F.

    2000-06-01

    Numerical simulation was used to enhance conceptual understanding of the post-Pleistocene hydrogeology of a layered sequence of clastic and evaporite sediments. This work is part of an effort to evaluate the suitability of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), New Mexico, USA, as a repository for transuranic waste. The numerical model is three-dimensional, extends laterally to topographic features that form the actual boundaries of a regional groundwater system, and uses a free surface with seepage face as an upper boundary condition to simulate the effect of change in recharge rate on the position of the water table. Simulation results suggest that the modern-day flow field is still adjusting to the drying of the climate that has occurred since the end of the Pleistocene Epoch. A wetter climate at the end of the Pleistocene resulted in a shallow water table, and patterns of groundwater flow were controlled by the intermediate features of the land-surface topography. As the climate became drier and the water table declined, groundwater flow began to increasingly reflect the land-surface topography at the scale of the entire groundwater basin. The modern-day flow pattern has not equilibrated with either the present recharge rate or the position of the water table.

  15. Bryophyte and pteridophyte spores and other palynomorphs in quaternary marine sediments from Campos Basin, southeastern Brazil: Core BU-91-GL-05

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gonçalves de Freitas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents morphological descriptions and ecological data of cryptogam spores and other non-pollen palynomorphs from Quaternary sediments of Campos Basin, Rio de Janeiro, SE Brazil. The ages were derived from biostratigraphy of planktonic foraminifers and two radiocarbon dates, and suggest that sediment deposition started in the last 140,000 years BP. Thirty different types of palynomorphs were identified, described, and photographed: two bryophyte spores (sensu lato; 21 pteridophyte spores; four freshwater microalgae; onePseudoschizaea; and two microfungi. Some of the identified spores (Sphagnum, Blechnum, Cyatheaceae, Dennstaedtiaceae, Lycopodiella, Microgramma, Polypodium, Acrostichum, Pityrogramma, and Lygodium are related to the modern flora found on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro State, at the Restinga of Jurubatiba, from vegetation types such as shrub swamp/coastal swamp formation, seasonally flooded forest, Clusia and Ericaceae woods, and disturbed vegetation. The freshwater microalgae and the microfungi are also presently recorded from the coastal lagoons of this region. The high spore concentration in slope sediments reflects the intense terrigenous influx, caused by a relative low sealevel during glacial stages. Palynological analysis suggests the presence of taxa from flooded forests and humid areas in the coastal plain during glacial and interglacial stages of the Late Pleistocene.

  16. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Application of a watershed model (HSPF) for evaluating sources and transport of pathogen indicators in the Chino Basin drainage area, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, Joseph A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Church, Clinton D.; Mendez, Gregory O.

    2011-01-01

    A watershed model using Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) was developed for the urbanized Chino Basin in southern California to simulate the transport of pathogen indicator bacteria, evaluate the flow-component and land-use contributions to bacteria contamination and water-quality degradation throughout the basin, and develop a better understanding of the potential effects of climate and land-use change on water quality. The calibration of the model for indicator bacteria was supported by historical data collected before this study and by samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from targeted land-use areas during storms in water-year 2004. The model was successfully calibrated for streamflow at 5 gage locations representing the Chino Creek and Mill Creek drainages. Although representing pathogens as dissolved constituents limits the model's ability to simulate the transport of pathogen indicator bacteria, the bacteria concentrations measured over the period 1998-2004 were well represented by the simulated concentrations for most locations. Hourly concentrations were more difficult to predict because of high variability in measured bacteria concentrations. In general, model simulations indicated that the residential and commercial land uses were the dominant sources for most of the pathogen indicator bacteria during low streamflows. However, simulations indicated that land used for intensive livestock (dairies and feedlots) and mixed agriculture contributed the most bacteria during storms. The calibrated model was used to evaluate how various land use, air temperature, and precipitation scenarios would affect flow and transport of bacteria. Results indicated that snow pack formation and melt were sensitive to changes in air temperature in the northern, mountainous part of the Chino Basin, causing the timing and magnitude of streamflow to shift in the natural drainages and impact the urbanized areas of the central Chino Basin. The relation between

  18. Franciscan olistoliths in Upper Cretaceous conglomerate deposits, Western Transverse Ranges, California: Implications for basin morphology and tectonic history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, W.E.; Campbell, M.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Compositional analyses reveal that Upper Cretaceous sediments exposed in the Western Transverse Ranges of CA were deposited in submarine fan systems in a forearc basin. Point count data suggest a magmatic arc/recycled orogen as the dominant provenance for these sediments. Paleocurrent measurements from conglomerates in these sediments yield a northerly transport direction. Removal of ca. 90[degree] of clockwise rotation and 70 km of right-lateral slip restore this section to a position west of the San Diego area. The forearc basin would have had a N-S orientation, with the bulk of sediments supplied by the Peninsular Ranges to the east. Evidence of the erosion of the accretionary wedge is provided by the presence of large, internally stratified olistoliths of Franciscan material interbedded with and surrounded by upper Cretaceous conglomerate. Petrographic, quantitative SEM, and microprobe analyses indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine, and blueschist are found intermixed with the conglomerates in close association with the olistoliths. This association provides strong field evidence that recirculation of melange material within the subduction zone was active and well-established by late Cretaceous time. Inferences regarding the forearc system morphology can be drawn from these observations. The occurrence of coarse, easterly-derived conglomerates surrounded by large, stratified, but sheared, westerly-derived Franciscan debris, suggests a narrow, relatively steep-sided basin. Paleocurrent measurements gave no indication of axial transport within the basin. This morphology suggests that, in late Cretaceous time, the forearc basin was youthful, with a narrow arc-trench gap. Thus, relative convergence rates between the North American and Pacific plates were possibly slower than Tertiary convergence rates.

  19. Natural Offshore Oil Seepage and Related Tarball Accumulation on the California Coastline - Santa Barbara Channel and the Southern Santa Maria Basin: Source Identification and Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Wong, Florence L.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Oil spillage from natural sources is very common in the waters of southern California. Active oil extraction and shipping is occurring concurrently within the region and it is of great interest to resource managers to be able to distinguish between natural seepage and anthropogenic oil spillage. The major goal of this study was to establish the geologic setting, sources, and ultimate dispersal of natural oil seeps in the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Basins. Our surveys focused on likely areas of hydrocarbon seepage that are known to occur between Point Arguello and Ventura, California. Our approach was to 1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seep oils or tar; 2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential tar sources in this region, both onshore and offshore; 3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; 4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; and 5) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. To document the location of sub-sea oil seeps, we first looked into previous studies within and near our survey area. We measured the concentration of methane gas in the water column in areas of reported seepage and found numerous gas plumes and measured high concentrations of methane in the water column. The result of this work showed that the seeps were widely distributed between Point Conception east to the vicinity of Coal Oil Point, and that they by in large occur within the 3-mile limit of California State waters. Subsequent cruises used sidescan and high resolution seismic to map the seafloor, from just south of Point Arguello, east to near Gaviota, California. The results of the methane survey guided the exploration of the area west of Point Conception east to Gaviota using a combination of seismic instruments. The

  20. Water column distribution of stable isotopes and carbonate properties in the South-eastern Levantine basin (Eastern Mediterranean): Vertical and temporal change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisma-Ventura, G.; Yam, R.; Kress, N.; Shemesh, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water column distributions of the oxygen isotopic composition of sea-water (δ18OSW) and the stable carbon isotope ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), total alkalinity (AT) and the pH (total scale) at 25 °C (25 °CpHTotal) were investigated along the Southeast Mediterranean (SE-Med) shelf and open water, during 2009-2010. While, the vertical profiles of δ18OSW lacked a clear depth signature, those of δ13CDIC were characterized by a structure that reflects the major water masses in the Levantine basin, with noticeable vertical gradients. The δ13CDIC Suess effect of the Levantine water column was estimated from the difference between the average profiles of 1988 and 2009-2010 (Δδ13CDIC). We observed δ13CDIC temporal change, which indicates propagation of anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) to depth of about 700 m. The Modified Atlantic Water (MAW; 0-200 m) and the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW; 200-400 m) exhibited a depletion rate of - 0.13 ± 0.03 and - 0.11 ± 0.03‰ decade- 1, respectively, representing ~ 50% of the atmospheric change, while the deep water of the Adriatic source (700-1300 m) did not change during this period. A Δδ13CDIC depletion trend was also recognized below 1350 m, corresponding to the Aegean source deep water (EMDWAeg) and therefore associated to the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) event. Anthropogenic CO2 accumulation rate of 0.38 ± 0.12 mol C m- 2 yr- 1 for the upper 700 m of the SE-Med, over the last 22 yr, was estimated on the basis of mean depth-integrated δ13CDIC Suess effect profile. Our results confirm lower accumulation rate than that of the subtropical North Atlantic, resulting due to the super-saturation with respect to CO2 of the well-stratified Levantine surface water. High pCO2 saturation during summer (+ 150 μatm), in oppose to a small degree of under-saturation in winter (- 30 μatm) was calculated from surface water AT and 25 °CpHTotal data. However, the δ13CDIC depletion trend of the LIW and the

  1. Underground water and pollution vulnerability assessment of lower Imo sedimentary basin of South-eastern Nigeria: A case study of Nwangele Local Government Area of Imo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onunkwo – A, A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water exploitation and population explosion are two major problems facing Nwangele Local Government. This study was therefore predicated on these problems to assess the underground water and pollution vulnerability of the study area. The method of study involves literature survey of previous work done in Imo River sedimentary basin and other works considered necessary for the study. A total of ten (10 vertical electricity soundings (VES was conducted for data generation using terrameter 300 SAS employing Schlumberger configuration. Aquifer (sands from boreholes within three (3 communities and ten (10 water samples were collected and used for statistical and geochemical analysis. The result shows that the lithology is made of sand, silt sand, clay and shale. Three (3 aquifer systems exits in the area confined, semi confined and unconfined aquifers, these occur as upper (33.5m, middle (82m and lower (102 to 115m aquifers. The lithology comprises 4 to 6 layers with water bearing bed occurring at the fifth layer. Average aquifer thickness measured 38 metres. Multiaquifer system exists in some localities. Hydraulic conductivity values range from 25.6m/day to 28.9m/day, transmissivity ranges from 450.842/day to 111.7m2/day while the storativity values ranges from 0.468 x 10-5 to 1.13 x 10-5, all indicate aquifer of good yield. Aquifer thickness ranges from 12.5 to 45m. The water chemistry is neutral, mildly acidic to mildly alkaline. The underground water is of calcium by carbonate type (CaHCO3 fresh and ideal for consumption, irrigation and laundry industry. None of the constituents fell short of WHO (1984 standard . Environmental pollution is only confined to upper aquifer. It is recommended that the three aquifer horizons can be tapped at the depth range of 18 to 102 metres. Multiple screen should be employed where there are more than one aquifer horizon. It is advisable that down the hole electric logging be conducted prior to the installation of

  2. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  3. Three-Dimensional Analysis of dike/fault interaction at Mono Basin (California) using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marra, D.; Battaglia, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mono Basin is a north-trending graben that extends from the northern edge of Long Valley caldera towards the Bodie Hills and is bounded by the Cowtrack Mountains on the east and the Sierra Nevada on the west. The Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain forms a north-trending zone of volcanic vents extending from the west moat of the Long Valley caldera to Mono Lake. The Hartley Springs fault transects the southern Mono Craters-Inyo Domes area between the western part of the Long Valley caldera and June Lake. Stratigraphic data suggest that a series of strong earthquakes occurred during the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence of ~1350 A.D. The spatial and temporal proximity between Hartley Springs Fault motion and the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence suggests a possible relation between seismic events and eruptions. We investigate the interactions between slip along the Hartley Springs fault and dike intrusion beneath the Mono-Inyo craters using a three-dimensional finite element model of the Mono Basin. We employ a realistic representation of the Basin that includes topography, vertical and lateral heterogeneities of the crust, contact relations between fault planes, and a physical model of the pressure required to propagate the dike. We estimate (a) the distribution of Coulomb stress changes to study the influence of dike intrusion on Hartley Springs fault, and (b) the local stress and volumetric dilatation changes to understand how fault slip may influence the propagation of a dike towards the surface.

  4. Design, implementation and hydrologic evaluation of a snow-measurement network using wireless sensors in the American River basin of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R.; Bales, R. C.; Marks, D. G.; Conklin, M. H.; Zhang, Z.; Glaser, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    American River Hydrologic Observatory in the Sierra Nevada of California, comprising of portions of the American River basin that receive significant snow, is the site for the deployment of a wireless sensor network (WSN) that provides distributed estimates of water balance and a full-basin, well-instrumented research platform. The WSN is a set of sensors integrated into a single instrument to make spatial measurements to capture the landscape variability, and provide both spatially distributed and representative values of snowcover and the energy that drives snowmelt across the basin. Each local WSN has 10 snow-depth, air-temperature and relative-humidity sensors placed in a ~1-km2 area, and is centered on existing snow-pillow, snow-course and meteorological-station. A subset of the nodes are equipped with 15-20 soil-moisture and soil-temperature sensors. The temporal resolution of all measurements are 15-minutes. Results indicate that the aggregate of all measurement nodes are representative of the landscape variability across the American River basin, as well as the three forks of the American River. Snow measurements across elevation gradients and at each local WSN show similar trends but different magnitudes. Across elevation gradients snow amounts can vary as much as 60%-80%, while variability across a 1-km2 10 measurement network range by as much as 60%. Additionally, spatially distributed sensors distinguish temperature and humidity differences across topographic and vegetation variables, which control variable snowmelt rates across the terrain. Snowmelt rates across a 1-km2 can ranged from 8 to 70 mm day-1. The Hydrologic data from the WSN is being used for research, and for modernizing forecasting and decision-support systems through spatially explicit modeling, and by enhancing existing physically and statistically based snowmelt and hydrologic models. Data are available through the American River Hydrologic Observatory (arho@ucmerced.edu) and real

  5. Multi-Scale Simulations of Past and Future Projections of Hydrology in Lake Tahoe Basin, California-Nevada (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswonger, R. G.; Huntington, J. L.; Dettinger, M. D.; Rajagopal, S.; Gardner, M.; Morton, C. G.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Water resources in the Tahoe basin are susceptible to long-term climate change and extreme events because it is a middle-altitude, snow-dominated basin that experiences large inter-annual climate variations. Lake Tahoe provides critical water supply for its basin and downstream populations, but changes in water supply are obscured by complex climatic and hydrologic gradients across the high relief, geologically complex basin. An integrated surface and groundwater model of the Lake Tahoe basin has been developed using GSFLOW to assess the effects of climate change and extreme events on surface and groundwater resources. Key hydrologic mechanisms are identified with this model that explains recent changes in water resources of the region. Critical vulnerabilities of regional water-supplies and hazards also were explored. Maintaining a balance between (a) accurate representation of spatial features (e.g., geology, streams, and topography) and hydrologic response (i.e., groundwater, stream, lake, and wetland flows and storages), and (b) computational efficiency, is a necessity for the desired model applications. Potential climatic influences on water resources are analyzed here in simulations of long-term water-availability and flood responses to selected 100-year climate-model projections. GSFLOW is also used to simulate a scenario depicting an especially extreme storm event that was constructed from a combination of two historical atmospheric-river storm events as part of the USGS MultiHazards Demonstration Project. Historical simulated groundwater levels, streamflow, wetlands, and lake levels compare well with measured values for a 30-year historical simulation period. Results are consistent for both small and large model grid cell sizes, due to the model's ability to represent water table altitude, streams, and other hydrologic features at the sub-grid scale. Simulated hydrologic responses are affected by climate change, where less groundwater resources will be

  6. Water Resources Data, California Water Year 1982, Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Butcher, M.T.; Lamb, C.E.; Singer, J.A.; Smith, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1982 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 160 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 20 streams and 20 wells; water levels for 174 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  7. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinoski, K.G.; Hoffman, E.B.; Smith, G.B.; Bowers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 134 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 24 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, 5 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 16 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  8. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 144 gaging stations; stage and contents for 15 lakes and reservoirs; watet quality for 21 streams. Also included are crest-stage partial-record stations, 3 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 5 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  9. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 134 gaging stations; stage and contents for 16 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 16 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, 3 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 10 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  10. Water Resources Data for California, 1983. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Butcher, M.T.; Lamb, C.E.; Singer, J.A.; Smith, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1983 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 154 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 20 streams and 18 wells; water levels for 165 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1985. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1985 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 150 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 23 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, three miscellaneous measurement sites, and one waterquality partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  13. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  14. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area

  15. Interim report on streamflow, sediment discharge, and water quality in the Calabazas Creek Basin, Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, J.M.; Pederson, G.L.; Middelburg, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment-discharge, and water-quality data are being collected in the Calabazas Creek basin, Santa Clara County, Calif., to determine annual water and sediment discharge at base-line conditions that are representative of a basin prior to urbanization. Results of the first 3 years of the study (1973-75) are given in this report. Climatic conditions during this period were representative of a very wet year (1973) and 2 years of above-average rainfall (1974 and 1975). Daily water and sediment discharge were monitored at three primary stations, and periodic measurements were made at five secondary stations during selected storms. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station was transported during a few days each year. Maximum daily sediment discharge in a given year ranged from 23 to 62 percent of the annual total. Daily water discharge at the gaging station Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive, near Cupertino, ranged from no flow to 3.31 cubic meters per second. Streamflow at this location was significantly augmented during low flow by diversion of water from the South Bay Aqueduct. Annual sediment discharge at Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive was 4,900 t in 1974 and 9,570 t in 1975. A large quantity of sediment was trapped in a debris basin at Comer Drive upstream from this station during both years. If this sediment had not been trapped, sediment discharge at the station would have been about 35 percent greater in 1974 and 30 percent greater in 1975. Most of the trapped sediment consists of sand and gravel that would probably have been deposited in the Calabazas Creek channel downstream from the station. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1994-06-01

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC.

  17. A study of the TEX86 paleothermometer in the water column and sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    OpenAIRE

    Huguet, Carme; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Thunell, Robert; Lourens, Lucas J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Particulate organic matter collected during a 2-year period, as part of an ongoing sediment trap study, and a high-resolution sediment record from 1850 to 1987 A.D. from the Santa Barbara Basin were analyzed for TEX86, a temperature proxy based on marine crenarchaeotal membrane lipids. Highest fluxes of crenarchaeotal lipids in the water column were found in May–June 1996 and from October 1996 to January 1997 and, in general, showed a good correlation with mass fluxes. TEX86 reconstructed tem...

  18. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC

  19. A History of Warming Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Acidification Recorded by Planktonic Foraminifera Geochemistry from the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, E.; Thunell, R.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Chartier, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry of foraminiferal shells has been widely used to reconstruct past conditions of the ocean and climate. Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenically produced CO2 has resulted in an increase in global temperatures and a decline in the mean pH of the world's oceans. The California Current System is a particularly susceptible region to ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes that also cause a reduction in seawater pH. The trace element concentration of magnesium and boron in planktonic foraminiferal shells are used here as proxies for temperature and carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), respectively. Newly developed calibrations relating Mg/Ca ratios to temperature (R2 0.91) and B/Ca ratios to [CO32-] (R2 0.84) for the surface-mixed layer species Globogerina bulloides were generated using material collected in the Santa Barbara Basin sediment trap time-series. Using these empirical relationships, temperature and [CO32-] are reconstructed using a 0.5 meter long multi-core collected within the basin. 210Pb activities were used to determine a sedimentation rate for the core to estimate ages for core samples (sedimentation rate: 0.341 cm/yr). A spike in 137Cs activity is used as a tie-point to the year 1965 coinciding with the peak of nuclear bomb testing. Our down-core record extends through the mid-19th century to create a history of rising sea surface temperatures and declining [CO32-] as a result of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  20. Late Quaternary climatic and oceanographic changes in the Northeast Pacific as recorded by dinoflagellate cysts from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of the core MD02-2515. In this study, we document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages, three dinoflagellate cyst zones were established and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages (MISs) 1 to 3. MISs 1 and 3 are dominated by cysts of heterotrophic dinoflagellates, whereas MIS 2 is characterized by enhanced variability and a greater proportion of cysts produced by autotrophic taxa. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record where it is characterized by an increase in warm taxa, such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where warmer conditions are recorded and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of tropical species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium, and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations, and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes.

  1. Relationship between waterfowl nutrition and condition on agricultural drainwater ponds in the Tulare Basin, California: waterfowl body composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Jarvis, R.L.; Gilmer, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    We examined carcass composition and proximate food composition of ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis), northern shovelers (Anas clypeata), and northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering on agricultural drainwater ponds in California during 1983-84. Lipids varied seasonally in northern shovelers and northern pintails. Protein did not fluctuate except in ruddy ducks whose protein mass increased over winter, suggesting that some protein was catabolized prior to arrival on wintering areas or that a buildup of protein occurred prior to spring migration. Waterfowl diets varied among species and time, but the nutritional composition of the diets was relatively stable. Ruddy ducks and shovelers consumed mostly animal foods rich in protein (53-60%) and low in Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE)(1-7%). Pintail diets contained more NFE (23-38%) and less protein (14-38%) because of greater consumption of plant foods. Nutritional composition of pintail diets varied with lower protein consumption occurring from November through January.

  2. Whole-Genome Analysis of Cryptococcus gattii, Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Chandler C.; Engelthaler, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a recognized pathogenic fungus along the Pacific coast of the United States from California to Washington. Here we report that C. gattii may also be endemic to the southeastern United States and has probably been present there longer than in the Pacific Northwest. PMID:27191335

  3. Hydrates in the California Borderlands Revisited: Results from a Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Survey of the Santa Cruz Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannberg, P. K.; Constable, S.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrate, an ice-like clathrate of water and methane, forms in shallow continental slope sediments, and is both a potential energy source and geologic hazard. Hydrates presence is traditionally inferred from the presence of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), a seismic velocity inversion resulting from free gas pooling at the base of the hydrate stability field. The BSR is not a measure of hydrate, but rather a proxy for free gas presence. Whereas seismic methods are sensitive to velocity anomalies, controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods are sensitive to conductivity anomalies. The electrically resistive methane hydrate makes a favorable target for CSEM surveys, which are capable of detecting and potentially quantifying the presence of methane hydrate directly. Building on previous work 100km to the south in the San Nicolas Basin, we present initial results from a 6-day June 2014 survey in the Santa Cruz Basin, located 100km west of Los Angeles. CSEM surveys are performed by deep-towing an EM source that is transmitting a known signal; this signal is detected by towed and seafloor receivers. The initial EM source signal is altered by the electrical properties of the surrounding environment. Conductors such as brine and seawater are attenuating mediums, while resistors such as methane hydrate, gas, and oil are preservative of the original signal. Twenty-one seafloor receivers, as well as a 4 receiver towed array were deployed to image the resistivity structure of the Santa Cruz Basin. Using 30-year-old 2D seismic profiles as a guide, potential hydrate targets were identified, and the transmitter and array were towed over 150 km on 6 lines with 5 seafloor receivers each. The 6 towed lines were coincident with legacy seismic lines. The towed array is sensitive to sediment depths less than 1km, allowing for high data density through the hydrate stability field. The larger transmitter-receiver offsets of the seafloor receivers allow sensitivity to at

  4. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W., III; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Coupled Subsurface-Atmospheric Simulations to Investigate the Impact of Irrigation on Atmospheric Response in the San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J. M.; Maxwell, R. M.; Gochis, D. J.; Maples, S.; Markovich, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Observational and modeling studies are continually improving our understanding of terrestrial and atmospheric process interactions over natural and managed systems. Recent studies have implicated irrigation as a strong factor in perturbing land-atmosphere coupling, although the details of this interaction are not fully characterized. Therefore, in this study we seek to better understand the role of subsurface flow under conditions of groundwater extraction and irrigation on resulting atmospheric states. We use an ensemble of coupled ParFlow-WRF simulations over the San Joaquin River Basin in California to identify the type and character of land-atmosphere interactions for a set of irrigation scenarios. Ensemble members include selected boundary layer schemes, land surface model configurations, and initial and boundary condition perturbations. Variability in atmospheric response, particularly in boundary layer height and precipitation patterns, under high water table (characteristic of predevelopment conditions) and lowered water table (resulting from historic groundwater extraction) conditions are evaluated in the context of the uncertainty resulting from choice of model physics and atmospheric perturbations. Hydrologic alterations associated with lowered water table elevation appear linked to the atmosphere via changes in boundary layer height.

  6. Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2012 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 5.4 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 487 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled about $263 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2012. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in funding infrastructure renewal efforts of powerplants feeding the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems. This funding, which totaled more than $71 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rainfall strained our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2012 in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System totaled approximately $29 million. About $8 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We

  7. Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-31

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2011 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 6.2 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 489 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled more than $264 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2011. This funding, which totaled more than $45 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in the funding efforts in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems of projects. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rain placed strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2011 totaled approximately $38 million. About $9 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to

  8. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1998. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.; Anderson, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 157 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, water quality for 22 streamflow-gaging stations and 14 partialrecord stations, and precipitation data for 3 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  9. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1996. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 149 gaging stations and 6 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage height records for 1 station, water quality for 19 streamflow-gaging stations and 17 partial record stations, and precipitation data for 4 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  10. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2002, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, G.L.; Pope, G.L.; Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 188 gaging stations and 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 39 streamflow-gaging stations and 11 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1990. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Jensen, R.M.; Hoffman, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1990 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 157 streamflow-gaging stations, 16 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 2miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 16 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records for 19 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 partial-record stations; and precipitation records for 13 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1995. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 141 streamflow-gaging stations, 6 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and contents records for 20 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partial-record stations; and (4) precipitation records for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1993. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J.R.; Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 156 streamflow-gaging stations, 12 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 5 miscellaneous measurement stations; (2) stage and contents records for 26 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 17 streamflow-gaging stations and 6 partial-record stations; and (4) precipitation records for 10 stations . These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  14. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Jensen, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 137 gaging stations; stage and contents for 15 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 25 streams; and precipitation for 8 gaging stations. Also included are 15 crest-stage partial-record stations, 7 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 5 water-quality partial record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  15. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1994. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 143 streamflow-gaging stations, 15 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and contents records for 20 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water quality records for 19 streamflow-gaging stations and 2 partial-record stations; and ( 4) precipitation records for 8 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  16. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1991. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.M.; Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Mullen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains dischrage records for 171 streamflow-gaging stations, 16 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 3 miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records for 23 streamflow-gaging stations, 4 partial-record stations; and precipitation records for 16 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U,S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  17. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2000, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.W.; Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 175 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 20 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 27 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 4 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  18. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Mullen, J.R.; Hayes, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 161 streamflow-gaging stations, 15 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 5 miscellaneous measurement stations; (2) stage and contents records for 26 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 23 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partialrecord stations; and ( 4) precipitation records for 11 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  19. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2001, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.; Anderson, S.W.; Pope, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 180 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 20 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 37 streamflow-gaging stations and 2 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 3 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  20. Water Resources Data -- California, Water Year 2003, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, G.L.; Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 193 gaging stations and 11 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 22 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 47 streamflow-gaging stations and 12 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  1. Water resources data, California, water year 2004, volume 1. southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.; Rockwell, G.L.; Pope, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 195 gaging stations and 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 47 streamflow-gaging stations and 7 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 5 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  2. The Role of Fault Zones in Capillary and Dissolution Trapping of CO2 in the Southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of a fault zone on CO2 accumulation, trapping, cross-fault flow, and upward leakage depend on (1) the degree of permeability reduction and capillary-pressure enhancement of the fault core zone in the storage formation, and (2) the degree of permeability enhancement and capillary-pressure reduction of the fault damage zone in the caprock, in comparison to pre-faulting conditions. To investigate these fault effects for a hypothetical geologic carbon sequestration project in the southern San Joaquin Basin, we developed a 3D numerical model with six explicitly represented major faults. The model was developed based on detailed fault characterization, including effects of numerous faults on petroleum trapping and leakage, groundwater flow, and petroleum-production-induced subsidence, as well as core-scale fault properties. The characterization benefited from more than a century of petroleum exploration and production in the basin. To account for uncertainties in fault effects and properties, we considered four fault property scenarios, including a range of faulting-induced property changes, heterogeneity of fault zones, and intra-formation layering. It was assumed that five million tons of CO2 per year was injected for 50 years into the deep Vedder Sand, which is immediately overlain by the Temblor-Freeman Silt. Simulation results indicate that in the base case of moderate faulting-induced property changes, CO2 migrates updip toward, accumulates under, eventually breaks through, and further migrates away from two faults. The total injected CO2 mass is essentially fully trapped in the storage formation by capillarity and dissolution mechanisms. Further sensitivity analyses show that CO2 trapping and leakage (through the fault sections in the caprock) depend on a complicated interplay of the faulting-induced property changes, intra-formation layering, and heterogeneity of faults.

  3. Artificial recharge in the northern part of Chino ground-water basin, upper Santa Ana Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This study was made to help management design and implement a recharge-recapture system for State Water Project water in Chino Basin. Nine test holes were drilled in the study area. Analyses of data from these test holes and drillers ' logs of water wells indicate the presence of clay deposits. The clay deposits cannot be correlated between holes which indicates that they are in the form of discontinuous beds or lenses. The existence and location of two ground-water barriers (Barrier ' J ' and Red Hill Barrier) have been postulated in previous reports. Water-level data indicate that Barrier ' J ' is probably not effectively stopping the movement of ground water. Data are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of the Red Hill barrier. Five existing recharge facilities in the study area were previously constructed to control floodflow. Infiltration tests were conducted at three of the facilities, and results of these tests indicate infiltration rates of 2.6 feet per day at Day Creek, 2.0 feet per day at East Etiwanda, and 1.3 feet per day at San Sevaine. A total of about 9,000 acre-feet of State Water Project water was recharged between June 1980 and July 1981. Rising water levels in wells indicate that recharge water is percolating down to the water table. (USGS)

  4. Distribution and abundance of decapod crustacean larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on commercial species. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, D.A.; Incze, L.S.; Wencker, D.L.; Armstrong, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Contents include: Distribution and abundance of king crab larvae, Paralithodes camtschatica and P. platypus in the southeast Bering Sea; Distribution and abundance of the larvae of tanner crabs in the southeastern Bering Sea; Distribution and abundance of other brachyuran larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on Erimacrus isenbeckii; Distribution and abundance of shrimp larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on pandalid species; Distribution and abundance of hermit crabs (Paguridae) in the southeasternBering Sea; Possible oil impacts on decapod larbae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphesis on the St. George Basin.

  5. Major and trace-element analyses of acid mine waters in the Leviathan Mine drainage basin, California/Nevada; October, 1981 to October, 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Water issuing from the inactive Leviathan open-pit sulfur mine has caused serious degradation of the water quality in the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin which drains into the East Fork of the Carson River. As part of a pollution abatement project of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic and water quality data for the basin during 1981-82. During this period a comprehensive sampling survey was completed to provide information on trace metal attenuation during downstream transport and to provide data for interpreting geochemical processes. This report presents the analytical results from this sampling survey. Sixty-seven water samples were filtered and preserved on-site at 45 locations and at 3 different times. Temperature, discharge, pH, and Eh and specific conductance were measured on-site. Concentrations of 37 major and trace constituents were determined later in the laboratory on preserved samples. The quality of the analyses was checked by using two or more techniques to determine the concentrations including d.c.-argon plasma emission spectrometry (DCP), flame and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. Additional quality control was obtained by comparing measured to calculated conductance, comparing measured to calculated Eh (from Fe-2 +/Fe-3+ determinations), charge balance calculations and mass balance calculations for conservative constituents at confluence points. Leviathan acid mine waters contain mg/L concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, T1, V and Zn, and hundreds to thousands of mg/L concentrations of Al, Fe, and sulfate at pH values as low as 1.8. Other elements including Ba, B, Be, Bi, Cd , Mo, Sb, Se and Te are elevated above normal background concentrations and fall in the microgram/L range. The chemical and 34 S/32 S isotopic analyses demonstrate that these

  6. Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    1996-04-01

    Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

  7. Analysis of potential water-supply management options, 2010-60, and documentation of revisions to the model of the Irwin Basin Aquifer System, Fort Irwin National Training Center, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Lois M.; Densmore, Jill N.; Martin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Fort Irwin National Training Center is considering several alternatives to manage their limited water-supply sources in the Irwin Basin. An existing three-dimensional, finite-difference groundwater-flow model—the U.S. Geological Survey’s MODFLOW—of the aquifer system in the basin was updated and the initial input dataset was supplemented with groundwater withdrawal data for the period 2000–10. The updated model was then used to simulate four combinations, or scenarios, of groundwater withdrawal and recharge over the next 50 years (January 2011 through December 2060). The scenarios included combinations of continuing withdrawals from currently active production wells, supplementing any increases in demand with withdrawals from an inactive production well, reducing withdrawal amounts and rates, and reducing the discharge of treated wastewater to infiltration ponds that provide a recharge source to the underlying aquifer. Results of the simulations indicated that, depending on the scenario implemented, groundwater levels would rise (over the next 50 years) from 40 feet to as much as 65 feet in the northwestern part of the Irwin Basin, and from 5 feet to 10 feet in the southeastern part.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Haloxylon ammodendron Population along the Southeastern Margin of the Zhunger Basin%准噶尔盆地东南缘梭梭种群结构与动态研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国军; 张希明; 朱军涛; 吕朝燕; 鲁艳

    2011-01-01

    通过样地调查和数据统计分析,对准噶尔盆地东南缘梭梭种群现状绘制径级结构图,编制生命表、分析存活曲线、死亡率曲线和寿命期望等参数,并运用时间序列模型预测种群数量动态.结果表明:种群整体结构属于增长型,但梭梭种群幼苗个体少,Ⅰ、Ⅱ龄级个体数目少于Ⅲ龄级的个体数目.存活曲线基本接近DeeveyⅢ型,种群偏离典型存活曲线的程度与幼苗缺乏有关;环境因素和人为干扰的影响,梭梭在Ⅲ~V龄级死亡率较高,种群在第Ⅳ级出现死亡高峰,且只有少量幼年个体能进入成年阶段,个体平均生存能力的期望在第Ⅳ级最大;时间序列分析表明,在未来第Ⅱ、Ⅳ、Ⅵ、Ⅷ龄级的个体会呈现老龄个体增加的趋势,种群稳定性长期维持困难.适当的人工辅助恢复和现有植株及生境的保护是保持梭梭种群自然更新和种群恢复的关键.%In this research the size structure, life tables, survival curve, mortality curve and life expectancy of Haloxylon ammodendron population in southeastern margin of the Zhunger Basin were studied.Based on a field investigation and data analysis,we aimed to learn the actuality of H.ammodendron population,and forecast the dynamics of H.ammodendron population.Population dynamics were also predicted by a time sequence model.The results show that: the structure of the population of H.ammodendron was a stable population.However,the seedling number was a few,and the individuals number of size class Ⅰ , Ⅱ was less than that of Ⅲ.The survival curve of H.ammodendron population mainly belongs to Deevey-Ⅲ type.The difference that H.ammodendron population depart to typical survival curve related to shortage of seedlings.Being affected by environmental factors and human being disturbance, the death rate in class Ⅲ ~ V was higher,and reached its peak value in class Ⅳ ,and only a few of younger individuals could survive.The biggest

  9. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1997. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 151 gaging stations and 16 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage height records for 1 station, water quality for 23 streamflow-gaging stations and 10 partialrecord stations, and precipitation data for 5 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Califomia.

  10. Petrography of volcaniclastic rocks in intra-arc volcano-bounded to fault-bounded basins of the Rosario segment of the Lower Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic arc, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Barone, M.; Critelli, S.; Busby, C.; Fackler-Adams, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Rosario segment of the Early Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic magmatic arc in Baja California displays a record of arc-axis sedimentation and volcanism that is well preserved in outcrops within a southern volcano-bounded and a northern fault-bounded basin that flanked an intervening subaerial edifice. This record includes volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that range from felsic to mafic in composition. Volcaniclastic/tuffaceous sandstone samples from two previously published measured sections are mainly composed of volcanic clasts with moderate plagioclase content. Locally quartz and/or potassium feldspar are present in trace to moderate amounts. The proportions of volcanic lithic types exhibiting vitric, microlitic, lathwork, and felsitic textures are highly variable with no distinct stratigraphic trends, likely as a function of the mixed styles of eruption and magma compositions that produced pyroclasts, as well as erosion-produced epiclastic debris. The volcaniclastic fill of the basins is consistent with an oceanic arc setting, except for the relatively high felsitic volcanic lithic content, likely associated with subaerial, as opposed to the more common submarine felsic magmatism associated with arc extension in oceanic settings. There are no major differences in compositional modes of tuff and sandstone between the fault-bounded and volcano-bounded basin strata, even though they exhibit distinctly different volcaniclastic facies. This suggests that proximal arc-axis basins of varying types around a single major subaerial edifice provide a faithful record of volcanic trends in the arc segment, regardless of variation in transport and depositional processes.

  11. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations. PMID:26803267

  12. Development of water facilities in the Santa Ana River Basin, California, 1810-1968: a compilation of historical notes derived from many sources describing ditch and canal companies, diversions, and water rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    This report traces by text, maps, and photographs, the development of the water supply in the Santa Ana River basin from its beginning in 1810 or 1811 to 1968. The value of the report lies in the fact that interpretation of the hydrologic systems in the basin requires knowledge of the concurrent state of development of the water supply, because that development has progressively altered the local regimen of both surface water and ground water. Most of the information for the earlier years was extracted and condensed from an investigation made by W. H. Hall, California State Engineer during the years 1878-87. Hall's study described irrigation development in southern California from its beginning through 1888. Information for the years following 1888 was obtained from the archives of the numerous water companies and water agencies in the Santa Ana River basin and from the various depositories of courthouse, county, and municipal records. The history of water-resources development in the Santa Ana River basin begins with the introduction of irrigation in the area by the Spanish, who settled in southern California in the latter part, of the 18th century. The first irrigation diversion from the Santa Ana River was made in 1810 or 1811 by Jose Antonio Yorba and Juan Pablo Peralta. Irrigation remained a localized practice during the Mexican-Californian, or rancho, period following the separation of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Rancho grantees principally raised cattle, horses, and sheep and irrigated only small· plots of feed grain for their livestock and fruit crops for household use. The breakup of the ranchos through sales to Americans, who were migrating to California in ever-increasing numbers following the acquisition of California by the United States in 1848, marked the beginning of a rapid increase in water use and the beginning of widespread irrigation. Many water companies and water agencies were organized to divert the surface flow of the Santa Ana River and

  13. Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, F.

    1995-06-22

    This conference covers four main topics: (1) Southeastern Labor Market and its Impact on Corporate/Industry Development; (2) New Issues for Science and Technology in the Year 2000 and Beyond; (3) The Role of Academia in Developing the Labor Force of the Southeast; and (4) K-12 Education: Challenges for the 21st Century.

  14. Kink folding in an extended terrane: Tortilla Mountains, southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruk, Stephen J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann; Currier-Lewis, Debra; Davis, George H.; Faulds, James E.; Lewis, Scott W.

    1986-12-01

    Structural analysis of early Miocene metre-scale kink folds in southeastern Arizona shows that they formed in an extensional stress field and that they record horizontal extension. The folds represent a previously unrecognized style of extensional fold. *Present addresses: Faulds—Department of Geology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131; Currier-Lewis and Lewis—Calpine Energy Corporation, San Jose, California 95110

  15. Phylogeography and RAPD-PCR variation in Hoplias malabaricus (Bloch, 1794) (Pisces, Teleostei) in southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Dergam Jorge A.; Paiva Samuel R.; Schaeffer Carlos E.; Godinho Alexandre L.; Vieira Fabio

    2002-01-01

    In the Rio Doce basin of southeastern Brazil, the freshwater fish Hoplias malabaricus (trahira) is a widespread predatory characin and one of the few resilient native fishes in a highly impacted lake system. In order to test for genetic differentiation in populations within this basin and for biogeographic relationships among populations of this species in other basins, a study was conducted using RAPD-PCR analysis of Rio Doce samples (N = 63) and phylogeographic analyses with mitochondrial D...

  16. Tectonostratigraphy and depositional history of the Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary sequences in Kid area, southeastern Sinai, Egypt: Implications for intra-arc to foreland basin in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Obeid, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a stratigraphic and sedimentary study of Neoproterozoic successions of the South Sinai, at the northernmost segment of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), including the Kid complex. This complex is composed predominantly of thick volcano-sedimentary successions representing different depositional and tectonic environments, followed by four deformational phases including folding and brittle faults (D1-D4). The whole Kid area is divisible from north to south into the lower, middle, and upper rock sequences. The higher metamorphic grade and extensive deformational styles of the lower sequence distinguishes them from the middle and upper sequences. Principal lithofacies in the lower sequence include thrust-imbricated tectonic slice of metasediments and metavolcanics, whereas the middle and upper sequences are made up of clastic sediments, intermediate-felsic lavas, volcaniclastics, and dike swarms. Two distinct Paleo- depositional environments are observed: deep-marine and alluvial fan regime. The former occurred mainly during the lower sequence, whereas the latter developed during the other two sequences. These alternations of depositional conditions in the volcano-sedimentary deposits suggest that the Kid area may have formed under a transitional climate regime fluctuating gradually from warm and dry to warm and humid conditions. Geochemical and petrographical data, in conjunction with field relationships, suggest that the investigated volcano-sedimentary rocks were built from detritus derived from a wide range of sources, ranging from Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic continental crust. Deposition within the ancient Kid basin reflects a complete basin cycle from rifting and passive margin development, to intra-arc and foreland basin development and, finally, basin closure. The early phase of basin evolution is similar to various basins in the Taupo volcanics, whereas the later phases are similar to the Cordilleran-type foreland basin. The

  17. Effects of smectite on the oil-expulsion efficiency of the Kreyenhagen Shale, San Joaquin Basin, California, based on hydrous-pyrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewan, Michael D.; Dolan, Michael P.; Curtis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of oil that maturing source rocks expel is expressed as their expulsion efficiency, which is usually stated in milligrams of expelled oil per gram of original total organic carbon (TOCO). Oil-expulsion efficiency can be determined by heating thermally immature source rocks in the presence of liquid water (i.e., hydrous pyrolysis) at temperatures between 350°C and 365°C for 72 hr. This pyrolysis method generates oil that is compositionally similar to natural crude oil and expels it by processes operative in the subsurface. Consequently, hydrous pyrolysis provides a means to determine oil-expulsion efficiencies and the rock properties that influence them. Smectite in source rocks has previously been considered to promote oil generation and expulsion and is the focus of this hydrous-pyrolysis study involving a representative sample of smectite-rich source rock from the Eocene Kreyenhagen Shale in the San Joaquin Basin of California. Smectite is the major clay mineral (31 wt. %) in this thermally immature sample, which contains 9.4 wt. % total organic carbon (TOC) comprised of type II kerogen. Compared to other immature source rocks that lack smectite as their major clay mineral, the expulsion efficiency of the Kreyenhagen Shale was significantly lower. The expulsion efficiency of the Kreyenhagen whole rock was reduced 88% compared to that of its isolated kerogen. This significant reduction is attributed to bitumen impregnating the smectite interlayers in addition to the rock matrix. Within the interlayers, much of the bitumen is converted to pyrobitumen through crosslinking instead of oil through thermal cracking. As a result, smectite does not promote oil generation but inhibits it. Bitumen impregnation of the rock matrix and smectite interlayers results in the rock pore system changing from water wet to bitumen wet. This change prevents potassium ion (K+) transfer and dissolution and precipitation reactions needed for the conversion of smectite to

  18. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  19. SIR 2015-5175, Water-level altitude contours of Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley and surrounding groundwater basins, Nevada and California, version 1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This vector data set contains lines representing water-level altitude contours of Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley and surrounding groundwater basins in Nevada and...

  20. Morfometría en la Cuenca Hidrológica de San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur, México Morfometry in San José del Cabo Hidrologic Basin, South Baja California, México

    OpenAIRE

    Genaro Martínez; José de J. Díaz

    2011-01-01

    La cuenca hidrológica-forestal de San José del Cabo, localizada al sur de la península de Baja California, México, es la de mayor extensión en el estado de Baja California Sur y es considerada como una de las principales fuentes de recursos hídricos. Los acuíferos que suministran agua a las áreas turísticas y urbanas están en las partes bajas (planicies aluviales) de la cuenca. Un complejo cristalino constituido por rocas ígneas y metamórficas caracteriza la región montañosa de la cuenca. Aná...

  1. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was -254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, -218‰ in the San Joaquin River, -175‰ in the California State Water Project and -152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California's Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, -204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between -275 and -687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California's Central Valley.

  2. Recativation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, Steven

    1997-03-24

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modem reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  3. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Resrvoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Creties; Sprinkel, Doug; Deo, Milind; Wydrinski, Ray; Swain, Robert

    1997-10-21

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  4. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.; Forster, C.; Jenkins, C.; Schamel, S.; Sprinkel, D.; and Swain, R.

    1999-02-01

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having simular producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially t o other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  5. Simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals and artificial recharge on discharge to streams, springs, and riparian vegetation in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed of the Upper San Pedro Basin, southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Pool, Donald R.; Leenhouts, James M.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of ground-water resources, “capture” or “streamflow depletion” refers to withdrawal-induced changes in inflow to or outflow from an aquifer. These concepts are helpful in understanding the effects of long-term development of ground-water resources. For the Upper San Pedro Basin in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, a recently developed ground-water flow model is available to help quantify capture of water from the river and riparian system. A common method of analysis is to compute curves of capture and aquifer-storage change for a range of time at select points of interest. This study, however, presents results of a method to show spatial distributions of total change in inflow and outflow from withdrawal or injection for select times of interest. The mapped areal distributions show the effect of a single well in terms of the ratio of the change in boundary flow rate to rate of withdrawal or injection by the well. To the extent that the system responds linearly to ground-water withdrawal or injection, fractional responses in the mapped distributions can be used to quantify response for any withdrawal or injection rate. Capture distributions calculated using the Upper San Pedro model include response to (1) withdrawal in the lower basin-fill aquifer for times of 10 and 50 years following the initiation of pumping from predevelopment conditions and (2) artificial recharge to the water table in the area underlain by the lower basin-fill aquifer after 10 and 50 years. The mapped distributions show that response to withdrawals and injections is greatest near the river/riparian system. Presence of clay layers in the vertical interval between withdrawal locations and the river/riparian system, however, can delay the response.

  6. Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

  7. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, James R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  8. HFC-152a and HFC-134a emission estimates and characterization of CFCs, CFC replacements, and other halogenated solvents measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase over the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Barletta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS study. Whole air samples were obtained on board research flights that flew over California during June 2008 and analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds, including several halogenated species. Samples collected over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB, which includes much of Los Angeles (LA County, were compared with samples from inflow air masses over the Pacific Ocean. The levels of many halocarbon species were enhanced significantly over the SoCAB, including compounds regulated by the Montreal Protocol and subsequent amendments. Emissions estimates of HFC-152a (1,1-difluoroethane, CH3CHF2; 0.82 ± 0.11 Gg and HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, CH2FCF3; 1.16 ± 0.22 Gg in LA County for 2008 were obtained using the observed HFC:carbon monoxide (CO enhancement ratio. Emission rates also were calculated for the SoCAB (1.60 ± 0.22 Gg yr−1 for HFC-152a and 2.12 ± 0.28 Gg yr−1 for HFC-134a and then extrapolated to the United States (32 ± 4 Gg yr−1 for HFC-152a and 43 ± 6 Gg yr−1 for HFC-134a using population data. In addition, emission rates of the two HFCs in LA County and SoCAB were calculated by a second method that utilizes air quality modeling. Emissions estimates obtained using both methods differ by less than 25% for the LA County and less than 45% for the SoCAB.

  9. HFC-152a and HFC-134a emission estimates and characterization of CFCs, CFC replacements, and other halogenated solvents measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase) over the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, B.; Nissenson, P.; Meinardi, S.; Dabdub, D.; Sherwood Rowland, F.; Vancuren, R. A.; Pederson, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    This work presents results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) study. Whole air samples were obtained on board research flights that flew over California during June 2008 and analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds, including several halogenated species. Samples collected over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB), which includes much of Los Angeles (LA) County, were compared with samples from inflow air masses over the Pacific Ocean. The levels of many halocarbon species were enhanced significantly over the SoCAB, including compounds regulated by the Montreal Protocol and subsequent amendments. Emissions estimates of HFC-152a (1,1-difluoroethane, CH3CHF2; 0.82 ± 0.11 Gg) and HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, CH2FCF3; 1.16 ± 0.22 Gg) in LA County for 2008 were obtained using the observed HFC:carbon monoxide (CO) enhancement ratio. Emission rates also were calculated for the SoCAB (1.60 ± 0.22 Gg yr-1 for HFC-152a and 2.12 ± 0.28 Gg yr-1 for HFC-134a) and then extrapolated to the United States (32 ± 4 Gg yr-1 for HFC-152a and 43 ± 6 Gg yr-1 for HFC-134a) using population data. In addition, emission rates of the two HFCs in LA County and SoCAB were calculated by a second method that utilizes air quality modeling. Emissions estimates obtained using both methods differ by less than 25% for the LA County and less than 45% for the SoCAB.

  10. HFC-152a and HFC-134a emission estimates and characterization of CFCs, CFC replacements, and other halogenated solvents measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase over the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Barletta

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS study. Whole air samples were obtained on board research flights that flew over California during June 2008 and analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds, including several halogenated species. Samples collected over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB, which includes much of Los Angeles (LA County, were compared with samples from inflow air masses over the Pacific Ocean. The levels of many halocarbon species were enhanced significantly over the SoCAB, including compounds regulated by the Montreal Protocol and subsequent amendments (e.g., enhancements of 13 pptv and 11 pptv for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively. Emissions estimates of HFC-152a (0.98±0.05 Gg and HFC-134a (1.40±0.11 Gg in LA County for 2008 were obtained using the observed HFC:CO enhancement ratio. The emission rates were extrapolated to the SoCAB (1.48±0.07 Gg for HFC-152a and 2.12±0.17 Gg for HFC-134a and US (30.1±1.5 Gg for HFC-152a and 43.0±3.4 Gg for HFC-134a using population data. In addition, emission rates of the two HFCs in LA County and SoCAB also were calculated by a second method that utilizes air quality modeling. Estimates obtained using both methods agree well.

  11. Structure of the crust beneath the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau from Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Lili; Rondenay, S.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2008-01-01

    Southeastern Tibet marks the site of presumed clockwise rotation of the crust due to the India-Eurasian collision and abutment against the stable Sichuan basin and South China block. Knowing the structure of the crust is a key to better understanding crustal deformation and seismicity in this region

  12. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-11-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. One of the main objectives of Budget Period I was to return the Pru Fee property to economic production and establish a baseline productivity with cyclic steaming. By the end of the second quarter 1996, all Pru producers except well 101 had been cyclic steamed two times. Each steam cycle was around 10,000 barrels of steam (BS) per well. No mechanical problems were found in the existing old wellbores. Conclusion is after several years of being shut-in, the existing producers on the Pru lease are in reasonable mechanical condition, and can therefore be utilized as viable producers in whatever development plan we determine is optimum. Production response to cyclic steam is very encouraging in the new producer, however productivity in the old producers appears to be limited in comparison.

  13. Geohydrology and simulated response to groundwater pumpage in Carson Valley, a river-dominated basin in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model was used to simulate the effect of development of the groundwater reservoir in Carson Valley on Carson River outflow, evapotranspiration, and groundwater levels and storage. The basin-fill groundwater reservoir consists of: (1) confined and unconfined sedimentary deposits of Quaternary age that underlie the valley floor, and (2) sedimentary deposits of Tertiary age that are exposed mainly on the east side of the valley. Water levels indicate the presence of two confined aquifer systems: one River flow, 360,000; (2) direct precipitation, 70,000; (3) runoff from perennial and ephemeral streams, 24,000: and (4) subsurface inflow, 38,000. Approximate estimates of outflow components were, in acre-ft/yr; (1) mainstem Carson River flow, 291,000; (2) potential evapotranspiration, 200,000. Both inflow and outflow totaled about 490,000 acre-ft/yr. These flow volumes show that the hydrologic regimen of the basin is dominated by surface water flow of the Carson River. Steady-state and transient calibration of the model provided an unacceptable fit of observed versus simulated groundwater level fluctuations and storage, and surface water outflow from the valley. These values provide a reasonable balance for the simulated steady-state water budget. Simulations show that surface water flow is the ultimate source of about 75% of pumped water for six scenarios of possible future ground-water development. Model simulations indicate that changes from agricultural to urban land uses could decrease the loss of Carson River outflow to pumpage when streamflow is not used for flood irrigation in that area. (Lantz-PTT)

  14. Playing It Safe: Assessing Cumulative Impact and Social Vulnerability through an Environmental Justice Screening Method in the South Coast Air Basin, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Scoggins

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA and state authorities like the California Air Resources Board (CARB, have sought to address the concerns of environmental justice (EJ advocates who argue that chemical-by-chemical and source-specific assessments of potential health risks of environmental hazards do not reflect the multiple environmental and social stressors faced by vulnerable communities. We propose an Environmental Justice Screening Method (EJSM as a relatively simple, flexible and transparent way to examine the relative rank of cumulative impacts and social vulnerability within metropolitan regions and determine environmental justice areas based on more than simply the demographics of income and race. We specifically organize 23 indicator metrics into three categories: (1 hazard proximity and land use; (2 air pollution exposure and estimated health risk; and (3 social and health vulnerability. For hazard proximity, the EJSM uses GIS analysis to create a base map by intersecting land use data with census block polygons, and calculates hazard proximity measures based on locations within various buffer distances. These proximity metrics are then summarized to the census tract level where they are combined with tract centroid-based estimates of pollution exposure and health risk and socio-economic status (SES measures. The result is a cumulative impacts (CI score for ranking neighborhoods within regions that can inform diverse stakeholders seeking to identify local areas that might need targeted regulatory strategies to address environmental justice concerns.

  15. Orbital- to Sub-Orbital-Scale Cyclicity in Seismic Reflections and Sediment Character in Early to Middle Pleistocene Mudstone, Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. D.; Behl, R. J.; Nicholson, C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Sorlien, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection records and well logs from the Santa Barbara Channel suggest that large parts of the Pleistocene succession records climate variability on orbital to sub-orbital scales with remarkable sensitivity, much like the well-studied sediments of the last glacial cycle (ODP Site 893). Spectral analysis of seismic reflection data and gamma ray logs from stratigraphically similar Pleistocene sections finds similar cyclic character and shifts through the section. This correlation suggests that acoustic impedance and physical properties of sediment are linked by basin-scale, likely climatically-driven, oscillations in lithologic composition and fabric during deposition, and that seismic profiling can provide a method for remote identification and correlation of orbital- and sub-orbital-scale sedimentary cyclicity. Where it crops out along the northern shelf of the central Santa Barbara Channel, the early to middle Pleistocene succession (~1.8-1.2 Ma) is a bathyal hemipelagic mudstone with remarkably rhythmic planar bedding, finely laminated fabric, and well-preserved foraminifera, none of which have been significantly altered, or obscured by post-depositional diagenesis or tectonic deformation. Unlike the coarser, turbiditic successions in the central Ventura and Los Angeles basins, this sequence has the potential to record Quaternary global climate change at high resolution. Seismic reflection data (towed chirp) collected on the R/V Melville 2008 Cruise (MV08) penetrate 10's of meters below seafloor into a ~1 km-long sequence of south-dipping seismic reflectors. Sampling parallel to the seafloor permits acquisition of consistent signal amplitude for similar reflectors without spreading loss. Based on established age ranges for this section, sedimentation rates may range from 0.4 to 1.4 meters/kyr, therefore suggesting that the most powerful cycles are orbital- to sub-orbital-scale. Discrete sets of cycles with high power show an abrupt shift

  16. Quality-control results for ground-water and surface-water data, Sacramento River Basin, California, National Water-Quality Assessment, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Cathy; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluating the extent that bias and variability affect the interpretation of ground- and surface-water data is necessary to meet the objectives of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Quality-control samples used to evaluate the bias and variability include annual equipment blanks, field blanks, field matrix spikes, surrogates, and replicates. This report contains quality-control results for the constituents critical to the ground- and surface-water components of the Sacramento River Basin study unit of the NAWQA Program. A critical constituent is one that was detected frequently (more than 50 percent of the time in blank samples), was detected at amounts exceeding water-quality standards or goals, or was important for the interpretation of water-quality data. Quality-control samples were collected along with ground- and surface-water samples during the high intensity phase (cycle 1) of the Sacramento River Basin NAWQA beginning early in 1996 and ending in 1998. Ground-water field blanks indicated contamination of varying levels of significance when compared with concentrations detected in environmental ground-water samples for ammonia, dissolved organic carbon, aluminum, and copper. Concentrations of aluminum in surface-water field blanks were significant when compared with environmental samples. Field blank samples collected for pesticide and volatile organic compound analyses revealed no contamination in either ground- or surface-water samples that would effect the interpretation of environmental data, with the possible exception of the volatile organic compound trichloromethane (chloroform) in ground water. Replicate samples for ground water and surface water indicate that variability resulting from sample collection, processing, and analysis was generally low. Some of the larger maximum relative percentage differences calculated for replicate samples occurred between samples having lowest absolute concentration differences and(or) values near

  17. Clustering of GPS velocities in the Mojave Block, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    We find subdivisions within the Mojave Block using cluster analysis to identify groupings in the velocities observed at GPS stations there. The clusters are represented on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. The most significant representation as judged by the gap test involves 4 clusters within the Mojave Block. The fault systems bounding the clusters from east to west are 1) the faults defining the eastern boundary of the Northeast Mojave Domain extended southward to connect to the Hector Mine rupture, 2) the Calico-Paradise fault system, 3) the Landers-Blackwater fault system, and 4) the Helendale-Lockhart fault system. This division of the Mojave Block is very similar to that proposed by Meade and Hager. However, no cluster boundary coincides with the Garlock Fault, the northern boundary of the Mojave Block. Rather, the clusters appear to continue without interruption from the Mojave Block north into the southern Walker Lane Belt, similar to the continuity across the Garlock Fault of the shear zone along the Blackwater-Little Lake fault system observed by Peltzer et al. Mapped traces of individual faults in the Mojave Block terminate within the block and do not continue across the Garlock Fault [Dokka and Travis, ].

  18. Erosion processes, fluvial sediment transport, and reservoir sedimentation in a part of the Newell and Zayante Creek basins, Santa Cruz County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. M., III

    1973-01-01

    The drainage basins upstream from Loch Lomond, a water-supply reservoir on Newell Creek, and a proposed reservoir site on Zayante Creek were investigated for their characteristics with respect to the erosion, transportation, and deposition of sediment. The study area is underlain predominantly by sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Tertiary age that decompose readily into moderately deep soils, friable colluvium, and easily transported sediment particles. The Rices Mudstone and Twobar, Shale Members of the San Lorenzo Formation of Brabb (1964) underlie steep dip slopes in the study area, and probably are the most highly erodible of the several geologic units present there. However, nearly all of the geologic units have shown a propensity for accelerated erosion accompanying the disturbance of the land surface by the roadbuilding practices that predominate over other types of sediment-producing land-use activities in the study area. Sediment transport in the study area was estimated from (1) a reservoir survey of Loch Lomond in 1971 that was compared with a preconstruction survey of 1960, and (2) sampling of sediment transported in suspension by Zayante Creek during the 1970 and 1971 water years. At least 46 acre-feet of sediment accumulated in Loch Lomond in a 10-year period, and an unmeasured quantity of very fine sediment in the form of a thin layer over much of the reservoir bottom was observed. The measured quantity of deposited sediment in a 10-year period represented a sediment yield of about 1,100 tons annually per square mile of drainage basin upstream from the reservoir arms where the major deposition occurred. This sediment occupied less than i percent of the original capacity of Loch Lomond, but the volume of measured sediment deposition is probably conservative in view of the unmeasured deposits observed and a reservoir trap efficiency of about 95 percent. Sediment sampling on Zayante Creek indicated suspended-sediment yields of about 4,570 and 570 tons

  19. Suicide in Batman, Southeastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altindag, Abdurrahman; Ozkan, Mustafa; Oto, Remzi

    2005-01-01

    The southeastern part of Turkey has comparatively high female suicide rates. We aimed to research social, economic, cultural, and psychiatric reasons of suicides in Batman in a case-controlled psychological autopsy study comparing suicides with matched community controls. The female suicide rate was 9.3 per 100.000 and the female/male ratio was…

  20. Correlated remote sensing and subsurface geoscience datasets in southeastern Saskatchewan: mounting evidence for basement controlled structural lineaments influencing deep petroleum targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, L.; Mollard, J.

    1997-04-01

    The correlation of surface lineaments in southeastern Saskatchewan with subsurface lineaments and their relationship to the distribution of oil pools and fields was discussed. The mapping, compilation and synthesis of lineament datasets from the Williston Basin have shown good matching detail in both trend and areal distribution. Careful analysis and interpretation of the superimposed datasets is required to identify the trends and locations that would be of economic significance in oil and gas exploration. Examples of inferred basement control in the Red River Basin illustrate how basement-to-surface lineament mapping can aid petroleum exploration and development in the Williston Basin of southeastern Saskatchewan.

  1. Preliminary Basin Analysis of Latest Miocene Conglomerate Near Bahía Kino, Coastal Sonora: A New Record of Crustal Deformation During Initial Opening of the Northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Peryam, T. C.; Bennett, S.; Oskin, M. E.; Iriondo, A.

    2008-12-01

    In coastal Sonora northwest of Bahía Kino, we have initiated a basin-analysis study of nonmarine conglomerate (Tcg) that overlies and is locally interbedded with the 6.4-Ma Tuff of Mesa Cuadrada (Tmc). Tcg conglomerate is deeply eroded and cut by a complex set of syn- to post-basinal, N- to NNE-striking normal faults and NW-striking dextral strike-slip faults. We carried out detailed mapping and field descriptions, measured stratigraphic sections, and collected paleocurrent and clast-count data in Tcg. Zircons from the newly discovered Seri tuff near the base of the section, 160 m below Tmc, were dated using U-Pb SHRIMP geochronology at Stanford University. We obtained a 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 6.53+/-0.18 Ma (n=14; MSWD=1.3), which yields a sediment-accumulation rate of 0.8+/-0.2 mm/yr for lower Tcg. Tcg is dominated by debris-flow facies consisting of massive, poorly sorted, weakly bedded, matrix-rich, pebble, cobble, to small-boulder conglomerate. A subsidiary sheet-flood facies is somewhat better sorted, generally lacks boulders, and contains weak but pervasive horizontal stratification. Both facies of Tcg record deposition in an alluvial fan environment. Well sorted and stratified stream deposits are conspicuously lacking. Preserved sections of Tcg range up to 170 to 240 meters thick in the southern part of the study area, and increase to at least 470 meters in the north where the Punta Chueca fault, a large NW-directed low-angle normal fault, apparently produced more extension and subsidence than smaller faults in the south. Clasts in Tcg are dominated by middle Miocene andesite, the 12.6-Ma Tuff of San Felipe, minor amounts of Tmc, and variable amounts of older basement rocks including tonalite, granodiorite, quartzite, metavolcanic rock, and a megacrystic K-spar-bearing granite that we have not seen in the local bedrock. After correcting for bedding dips and vertical-axis clockwise rotations determined from paleomagnetic analysis, restored

  2. An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

    2005-10-01

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

  3. 105-KE basin pilot run relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to present the bases for selecting the exact in-facility location for installation of process equipment to support pilot testing activities in the 105-KE Basin at the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The 105-KE Basin was constructed during the early 1950s, as an integralcomponent of the 105-K East reactor building. Similar basins were provided in all Hanford weapons production reactor buildings to receive fuel elements discharged from the reactors and stage them for rail transport to 200 Area fuel reprocessing plants. The 105-KE reactor began operation in 1955. It was shut down in 1971. However, the 105-KE Basin was reactivated several years later to store spent fuel from the N-Reactor basin and permit its continued operation during outages at the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant in the 200E Area

  4. Using cosmogenic isotopes to measure basin-scale rates of erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a new and different approach to interpreting the abundance of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides such as 36Cl, 26Al, and 10Be. Unlike most existing models, which are appropriate for evaluating isotope concentrations on bedrock surfaces, this model can be used to interpret isotope concentration in fluvial sediment. Because sediment is a mixture of material derived from the entire drainage basin, measured isotope abundances can be used to estimate spatially-averaged rates of erosion and sediment transport. Their approach has the potential to provide geomorphologists with a relatively simple but powerful means by which to constrain rates of landscape evolution. The model considers the flux of cosmogenic isotopes into and out of various reservoirs. Implicit in model development are the assumptions that a geomorphic steady-state has been reached and that sampled sediment is spatially and temporally representative of all sediment leaving the basin. Each year, the impinging cosmic-ray flux produces a certain quantity of cosmogenic isotopes in the rock and soil of a drainage basin. For a basin in steady state, the outgoing isotope flux is also constant. They solve for the rate of mass loss as a function of isotope abundance in the sediment, the cosmic ray attenuation length, the isotope half life, and the effective isotope production rate. There are only a few published measurements of cosmogenic isotope abundance in sediment. They calculated model denudation rates for sediment samples from Zaire and central Texas. The denudation rates they calculated appear reasonable and are similar to those they have measured directly on granite landforms in Georgia and southeastern California and those calculated for the Appalachian Piedmont

  5. California's experience with alternative fuel vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    California is often referred to as a nation-state, and in many aspects fits that description. The state represents the seventh largest economy in the world. Most of California does not have to worry about fuel to heat homes in the winter. What we do worry about is fuel for our motor vehicles, approximately 24 million of them. In fact, California accounts for ten percent of new vehicle sales in the United States each year, much of it used in the transportation sector. The state is the third largest consumer of gasoline in the world, only exceeded by the United States as a whole and the former Soviet Union. California is also a leader in air pollution. Of the nine worst ozone areas in the country cited in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, two areas the Los Angeles Basin and San Diego are located in California. Five of California's cities made the top 20 smoggiest cities in the United States. In reality, all of California's major metropolitan areas have air quality problems. This paper will discuss the beginnings of California's investigations of alternative fuels use in vehicles; the results of the state's demonstration programs; and future plans to improve California's air quality and energy security in the mobile sector

  6. A new species of Contulma Flint (Trichoptera, Anomalopsychidae from southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Jardim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Contulma Flint (Trichoptera, Anomalopsychidae from southeastern Brazil. Contulma sana sp. nov. is described and illustrated based on specimens collected in the Rio Macaé Basin, Macaé, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The new species can be distinguished from congeners by the following male genitalia characters: long posterior lobes, dorsomedian processes of segment IX diverging on apical third, and well developed phallotremal sclerite. The female and immature stages are unknown.

  7. Petroleum geology and resources of southeastern Mexico, northern Guatemala, and Belize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Petroleum deposits in southeastern Mexico and Guatemala occur in two main basinal provinces: the Gulf Coast Tertiary basin area, which includes the Reforma and offshore Campeche Mesozoic fields, and the Peten basin of eastern Chiapas State (Mexico) and Guatemala. Major oil production, in order of importance, is from Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Jurassic carbonate reservoirs in the reforma and offshore Campeche area. Several small oil fields have been discovered in Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in west-central Guatemala. Almost all important production is in salt structure traps or on domes and anticlines that may be related to deep-seated salt movement. Some minor oil production has occurred in Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in a buried overthrust belt along the west flank of the Veracruz basin. Gas production is mainly from Tertiary sandstone reservoirs.

  8. SOURCE TERM REMEDIATION and DEMOLITION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD K-AREA SPENT FUEL BASINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the technologies applied at Hanford's K-Basins to mitigate risk and reduce the source term in preparing the basins for deactivation and demolition. These project technologies/strategies (in various stages of implementation) are sequential in nature and are the basis for preparing to dispose of the K Basins--two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities are underway to prepare the basin structures for de-inventory, decontamination, and disposal

  9. Phylogeography and RAPD-PCR variation in Hoplias malabaricus (Bloch, 1794 (Pisces, Teleostei in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dergam Jorge A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Rio Doce basin of southeastern Brazil, the freshwater fish Hoplias malabaricus (trahira is a widespread predatory characin and one of the few resilient native fishes in a highly impacted lake system. In order to test for genetic differentiation in populations within this basin and for biogeographic relationships among populations of this species in other basins, a study was conducted using RAPD-PCR analysis of Rio Doce samples (N = 63 and phylogeographic analyses with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplotypes, including the Rio Grande and Macacu river basins. In the Rio Doce basin, the patterns of genetic similarity of RAPD-PCR markers (individual fingerprinting and Nei?s genetic distance suggest the existence of two genetically different groups, one composed of the lacustrine populations Carioca and Dom Helvécio, and the other of riverine and the remaining lacustrine populations. The differences in the RAPD-PCR patterns may be explained by the existence of sub-basins within this lacustrine system. A maximum parsimony tree of cytochrome b fragment (383 base pairs supports the view that trahiras of the Rio Doce share a complex biogeographic history with those of neighboring basins. The phylogeographic patterns may be explained by a common history of the watersheds of the Rio Doce, Paraíba do Sul, and Rio Grande basins, corroborating the hypothesis of a Plio-Pleistocene separation of these drainage systems, forming the Mantiqueira "divortium aquarium".

  10. Peculiarities of distribution of oil polution in the Southeastern Baltic by satellite data and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulycheva, E. V.; Krek, A. V.; Kostianoy, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of satellite monitoring of oil pollution of the sea surface and field measurements of the concentration of oil products in the water column and bottom sediments for the first time allowed the establishment of a relation between the surface pollution from ships and the general characteristics of spatial and temporal distribution of oil products in the Southeastern Baltic Sea. Areas with increased concentrations of oil products in the surface and bottom layers were determined in the southeastern Baltic Sea. The basic directions of pollution spread, which are consistent with the main direction of annual mean transport of substances in the Gdansk Basin, are determined.

  11. MOSES AND DENNISON PEAK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Lipton, David A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted in the Moses and Dennison Peak Roadless Areas, southeastern Sierra Nevada, California. One area within the Moses Roadless Area is classified as having substantiated mineral-resource potential for small base-metal skarn deposits. Additionally, geochemical data indicate probable potential for small base-metal skarn deposits from one locality within Dennison Peak Roadless Area and for small tungsten skarn deposits from a region within Moses Roadless Area. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  12. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  13. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  14. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  15. Butterfly Surveys in Southeastern North Dakota : 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this study was to inventory butterflies and skippers on a number of wetland prairie sites in southeastern North Dakota, and pinpoint the location and...

  16. Butterfly Surveys in Southeastern North Dakota : 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this study was to inventory butterflies and skippers on a number of wetland prairie sites in southeastern North Dakota, and pinpoint the location and...

  17. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  18. Stable-isotope studies of groundwaters in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen-18/16 and deuterium/hydrogen ratio measurements have been made on groundwaters sampled according to specific field criteria applied during pump tests of the Rustler Formation in Nash Draw, a solution-subsidence valley west of the WIPP site in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. Comparison of these data with similar measurements on other groundwaters from the northern Delaware Basin indicates two nonoverlapping populations of meteoric groundwaters. Most of the Rustler waters in Nash Draw and at the WIPP site and older waters from the eastern two-thirds of the Capitan Limestone constitute one population, while unconfined groundwaters originating as observable modern surface recharge to alluvium, the near-surface Rustler in southwestern Nash Draw, and the Capitan in the Guadalupe Mountains (Carlsbad Caverns) constitute the other. The isotopic distinction suggests that Rustler groundwater in most of Nash Draw and at the WIPP site is not receiving significant modern meteoric recharge. A likely explanation for this distinction is that meteoric recharge to most of the Rustler and Capitan took place in the geologic past under climatic conditions significantly different from the present. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Relationships between basin architecture, basin closure, and occurrence of sulphide-bearing schists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliomäki, Henrik; Torvela, Taija; Moreau, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    We present field observations from the Palaeoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary Tampere palaeobasin, where the primary structures have been exceptionally well preserved. We use the observations to construct a new tectonic model for the southeastern margin of the Tampere basin during its inversion and...... subsequent closure. The observed volcano-sedimentary and structural features suggest a change in the local structural style from thick-skinned inversion to thin-skinned thrusting, in order to accommodate the crustal shortening during basin closure. Furthermore, it is suggested that there is a genetic...

  20. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeastern United States. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geology of the southeastern United States was studied to recommend areas that should be considered for field exploration in order to select a site for a radioactive waste repository. The region studied included the Piedmont Province, the Triassic Basins, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. This study was entirely a review of literature and existing knowledge from a geotechnical point of view and was performed by subcontractors whose individual reports are listed in the bibliography. No field work was involved. The entire study was geotechnical in nature, and no consideration was given to socioeconomic or demographic factors. These factors need to be addressed in a separate study. For all areas, field study is needed before any area is further considered. A total of 29 areas are recommended for further consideration in the Piedmont Province subregion: one area in Maryland, 8 areas in Virginia, 4 areas in North Carolina, 6 areas in South Carolina, and 10 areas in Georgia. Of the 14 exposed and 5 buried or hypothesized basins identified in the Triassic basin subregion, 6 are recommended for further study: one basin in Virginia, 3 basins in North Carolina, and 2 basins in South Carolina. Four potential candidate areas are identified within the Atlantic Coastal Plain subregion: one in Maryland, one in North Carolina, and 2 in Georgia

  1. Characterisation of submarine groundwater discharge offshore south-eastern Sicily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex approach in characterisation of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) off south-eastern Sicily comprising applications of radioactive and non-radioactive tracers, direct seepage measurements, geophysical surveys and a numerical modelling is presented. SGD fluxes in the Donnalucata boat basin were estimated by direct seepage measurements to be from 4 to 12 L s-1, which are comparable with the total SGD flux in the basin of 17 L s-1 obtained from radon measurements. The integrated SGD flux over the Donnalucata coast estimated on the basis of Ra isotopes was around 60 m3 s-1 per km of the coast. Spatial variations of SGD were observed in the Donnalucata boat basin, the average 222Rn activity concentration in seawater varied from ∼0.1 kBq m-3 to 3.7 kBq m-3 showing an inverse relationship with salinity. The continuous monitoring carried out at the site closest to the coast has revealed an inverse relationship of 222Rn activity concentration on the tide. The 222Rn concentrations in seawater varied from 2.3 kBq m-3 during high tides to 4.8 kBq m-3 during low tides, thus confirming an influence of the tide on submarine groundwater discharge. Stable isotopes (δ2H and δ18O) showed that SGD samples consist up to 50% of groundwater. Geo-electrical measurements showed a spatial variability of the salt/fresh water interface and its complex transformation in the coastal zone. The presented results imply that in the studied Donnalucata site there are at least two different sources of SGD, one superficial, represented by mixed fresh water and seawater, and the second one which originates in a deeper limestone aquifer

  2. Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Doty Mountain quadrangle, eastern Washakie basin, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Doty Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. Detailed measured sections are provided for the type sections of the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The data set was collected as part of a larger effort to acquire data on Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin. Regions in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin have potential for coal development and were considered previously for coal leasing by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

  3. Geospatial Data Used in Water-Level and Land-Subsidence Studies in the Mojave River and Morongo Groundwater Basins for 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins are in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in southern California. Ground-water from these basins supplies a...

  4. A new species of Cernotina (Trichoptera, Polycentropodidae) from the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Lourenço Dumas; Jorge Luiz Nessimian

    2011-01-01

    A new species of Cernotina (Trichoptera, Polycentropodidae) from the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, southeastern Brazil. Cernotina Ross, 1938, with 64 extant species, is a New World genus of caddisflies. In Brazil, there are 31 described species of which 28 are recorded from the Amazon basin. Cernotina puri sp. nov. is described and figured based on specimens collected in the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The new species can be distinguished by the shape of the interm...

  5. Inferred basement control of pervasive structural lineaments in southeastern Saskatchewan and their significance in petroleum exploration and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, L.; Mollard, J.

    1997-09-01

    The correlation of surface lineaments in southeastern Saskatchewan with subsurface lineaments and their relationship to the distribution of oil pools and fields was discussed. The mapping, compilation and synthesis of lineament datasets from the Williston Basin have shown good matching detail in both trend and areal distribution. Careful analysis and interpretation of the superimposed datasets is required to identify those trends and locations significant in oil and gas exploration.

  6. WATER TEMPERATURE, SALINITY, and HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE collected from R/V Point Sur in Entrance to the Gulf of California from 2013-04-19 to 2013-05-02 (NCEI Accession 0131072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrographic data were collected in Pescadero Basin (at the entrance to the Gulf of California) and subsequently along the West Coast of Baja California and...

  7. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, Steven

    1999-07-08

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steam was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objective of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  8. Th/U dating of Strombus bubonius-bearing marine terraces in southeastern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Carro, O.; Causse, C.; Goy, J.; Zazo, C.

    1986-07-01

    Single dates obtained on mollusk shells by the U-series nuclides method are highly unreliable, primarily because of the mobility of uranium isotopes. However, in several cases, a statistical approach was demonstrated to yield coherent chronologies in both continental and marine environments. The authors report on 34 new Th and U isotope measurements on Strombus Bubonius and Glycymeris glycymeris fossils from raised marine terraces in the Almeria area, southeastern Spain. The results yield a coherent chronology that indicates the presence of the warm water S. bubonius fauna in the Mediterranean basin. Reconsideration of the Tyrrhenian stratigraphy based on the presence of S. bubonius is thus required.

  9. Palaeomagnetic secular variation and relative field intensity in pleistocene lacustrine sediments in the U.S. great basin as chronologic tools for dating climate in western north America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Since the end of the 19th Century when first it was reported that large pluvial lakes formed during the Pleistocene in the U.S. Great Basin (Russell, 1885), the sediments deposited by some of those lakes have been used to study climate in western North America back about 3 m.y. (Smith et al., 1983, Morrison, 1991: many others). That research includes mineralogic, isotopic, geochemical, and sedimentologic data; radiometric dates; lacustrine fossils; volcanic ashes; and a record of long-term behaviour (secular variation) and excursions (Pringle Falls, Laschamp, and Mono Lake) of the palaeomagnetic field. In an attempt to establish an accurate chronology for the palaeoclimate in western North America during the past approximately 50,000 years, I will compare the records of palaeomagnetic directions for Pyramid Lake (the remnant of Lake Lahontan in northwestern Nevada)(Benson et al., 2008), Mono Lake (the remnant of Lake Russell in east-central California)(Lund et al., 1988; Zimmerman et al., 2006), and Searles Lake in the southeastern Great Basin (Liddicoat et al., 2008) with other records of palaeomagnetic field behaviour, especially the relative palaeomagnetic field intensity for the North and South Atlantic oceans (Laj et al., 2000; Stoner et al., 2004). This is possible because large- and small-scale fluctuations occur in the records that are distinctive and often are common to all.

  10. 75 FR 65624 - Southeastern Power Administration; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southeastern Power Administration; Notice of Filing October 19, 2010. Take... Southeastern Power Administration (Southeastern) Rate Order No. SEPA- 53, for the sale of power...

  11. 27 CFR 9.72 - Southeastern New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Southeastern New England... Southeastern New England. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Southeastern New England.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of...

  12. Adjoint tomography of the southern California crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Maggi, Alessia; Tromp, Jeroen

    2009-08-21

    Using an inversion strategy based on adjoint methods, we developed a three-dimensional seismological model of the southern California crust. The resulting model involved 16 tomographic iterations, which required 6800 wavefield simulations and a total of 0.8 million central processing unit hours. The new crustal model reveals strong heterogeneity, including local changes of +/-30% with respect to the initial three-dimensional model provided by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The model illuminates shallow features such as sedimentary basins and compositional contrasts across faults. It also reveals crustal features at depth that aid in the tectonic reconstruction of southern California, such as subduction-captured oceanic crustal fragments. The new model enables more realistic and accurate assessments of seismic hazard. PMID:19696349

  13. Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) General Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southeastern Library Network, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    The computer and telecommunications services of the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) are specified in this introduction to the Network. Since members of SOLINET may participate in the services of the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC), a description of these services is included. Membership requirements, fees and dues, and charges to SOLINET…

  14. Emerging Energy Alternatives for the Southeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanakos, E. K. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The proceedings of the first symposium on emerging energy alternatives for the Southeastern States are presented. Some topics discussed are: (1) solar energy, (2) wood energy, (3) novel energy sources, (4) agricultural and industrial process heat, (5) waste utilization, (6) energy conservation and (7) ocean thermal energy conversion.

  15. Southeastern Power Administration 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-12-29

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2008 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this document reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2007 and ending September 30, 2008. Southeastern marketed more than 4.5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 491 wholesale customers in ten southeastern states this past year. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $263 million. Drought conditions persisted in the southeastern region of the United States during FY 2008 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2008 totaled $91 million. Approximately $44 million of this amount was for replacement power which is paid only during adverse water conditions in order to meet our customers’ contract requirements. With the continued financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for these aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security programs continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) standards and requirements. In the coming year, Southeastern will continue open communication and cooperation with DOE, the Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Although competing uses of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency, Southeastern’s employees will meet these challenges and continue to provide reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E.Legg Administrator

  16. Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Groundwater in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. L.

    2011-12-01

    California's water resources are primarily from snowmelt runoff from the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains. Depending on the year, Sierra Nevada snowmelt provides seventy percent of the water resources needed to sustain urban, agricultural, ecological, and other sector needs. With increasing temperatures due to climate change the Sierra Nevada snowmelt is occurring earlier and with decreasing snow cover area. Such change may mimic drought scenarios and dramatically alter water resource availability and management in California. A fundamental requirement for drought water management is knowledge of the total groundwater resources and the rate in which it is depleted. Application of remote sensed Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data represents an important new approach toward quantifying these values. The primary uncertainties are the spatial scale required for an accurate GRACE analysis and an insufficient number and frequency of well observations for ground-truth. In this study, an initial quantification of long-term droughts - an analogue for climate change related snowpack reduction - has been performed to illustrate the potential for subsurface storage to limit the adverse impacts of drought and snowpack reduction on water supply in the California. This includes estimates of the impacts of changes in groundwater levels, surface supply, and crop water demands. Analysis of California Central Valley impacts of sustained droughts are based on a series of specified reductions in net surface flows corresponding to historical 30% (below average), 50% (dry), and 70% (critically dry) effective reduction, for periods ranging from 10 to 60 years, and applied to the California Department of Water Resource's California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model. The impacts of the droughts are modeled for four different regions in the Central Valley, including the Sacramento Basin, Eastside, the San Joaquin Basin, and the Tulare Basin. Results

  17. Teale California shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state...

  18. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  19. Extinct mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni) in Southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Jim I.; Agenbroad, Larry D.; Phillips, Arthur M.; Middleton, Larry T.

    1987-05-01

    The extinct Harrington's mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni Stock) is predominantly known from dry cave localities in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, in addition to two sites in the Great Basin, Nevada, and from San Josecito Cave, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A dry shelter in Natural Bridges National Monument, on the central Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah, preserves numerous remains of the extinct mountain goat in addition to pack rat middens. Remains from a 100-cm stratigraphic profile indicate that O. harringtoni lived on the plateau >39,800 yr B.P., the oldest directly dated find of extinct mountain goat. Plant macrofossils indicate that Engelmann's spruce ( Picea engelmannii), limber pine ( Pinus flexilis), rose ( Rosa cf. woodsii), and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) grew during the late Pleistocene where a riparian and a pinyon-juniper ( Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) community now predominates; Douglas fir are found only in mesic, protected, north-facing areas. Limber pine, Douglas fir, bark, and grasses were the major dietary components in the dung. A springtime diet of birch ( Betula) is determined from pollen clumps in dung pellets.

  20. Bacterial assemblages in rivers and billabongs of Southeastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, P I

    1991-12-01

    Billabongs, lentic waterbodies common to the floodplain of Australian rivers, differ considerably from the lotic riverine environment in terms of hydrology, physiochemical characteristics, and biological assemblages present. As little is known regarding the bacterial ecology of billabong habitats, a comparison was made of the bacterial assemblages in the water column of seven paired river/billabong sites in the Murray-Darling Basin of southeastern Australia. Billabongs supported larger populations of bacteria (1-157×10(9) cells liter(-1); 11-10,270 μg C liter(-1)) than did rivers (1-10×10(9) cells liter(-1); 6-143 μg C liter(-1)). Phospholipid analyses confirmed that billabongs (14-111 μg phospholipid fatty acid liter(-1)) had larger bacterial populations than rivers (billabongs (0.28-3.05 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1)) than rivers (0.05-0.62 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1)). Production calculated from the frequency of dividing cells confirmed this conclusion, and suggested bacterial production in some billabongs could exceed 100 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1). An INT-formazan method indicated that usually billabongs, and the cell-specific activity greater for billabong than river assemblages. The factors most likely to be responsible for the differences between the bacterial assemblages in rivers and billabongs relate to hydrological regime and the availability of organic carbon substrates. PMID:24194324

  1. Regional heat flow patterns in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorowicz, J. A.; Jessop, A. M.

    1981-04-01

    The regional geothermal pattern of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin has been studied using available temperature data from wells. Average heat conductivity for various geological formations has been estimated on the basis of net rock studies by Canadian Stratigraphie Services. These data and observations of temperature made in "shut-in holes" in some of the oil pools have been used in heat flow estimations by the Bullard method. The geothermal gradient and heat flow within the basin are exceptionally high in comparison with the other world wide Precambrian platform areas. Especially high geothermal gradient areas are found in the northwestern part of the Prairies Basin in Alberta and British Columbia and most of southeastern and southwestern Saskatchewan. Areas of low gradient are found mainly in the Disturbed Belt of the Foothills, southern and southeastern Alberta, and the Peace River area in British Columbia. Neither the analysis of regional heat conductivity distribution nor the heat generation distribution of the basement rock of the Prairies Basin evaluated on the basis of U, Th and K data after Burwash (1979), explain the observed heat flow patterns of the Prairies Basin. Comparison of heat flow patterns with some of the hydrogeological phenomena suggests the significant influence of fluid flow in the basin formations on geothermal features. Low geothermal gradient areas coincide with water recharge areas and high hydraulic head distribution regions. The phenomenon of upward water movement in the deep strata and downward flow through much of the Cenozoic and Mesozoic strata seems to control the regional heat flow distribution in the basin. The analyses of coal metamorphism in the upper and middle Mesozoic formations of the Foothills Belt and in the central Prairies Basin suggest that the pre-Laramide paleogeothermal heat flow distribution was different from the present one. It is very probable that the Foothills Belt area was characterized by a higher

  2. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Jaoquin Basin, California. Annual report, June 13, 1995--June 13, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.; Jenkins, C.; Sprinkel, D.; Swain, R.; Wydrinski, R.; Schamel, S.

    1998-09-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  3. Air quality forecasting system for Southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita Y.; Freitas, Edmilson Dias; Todesco, Enzo; Vara Vela, Angel; Ibarra, Sergio; Martins, Leila Droprinchinski; Martins, Jorge Alberto; Carvalho, Vanessa Silveira Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Southeastern Brazil, the most populous and developed region of the country, faces various environmental problems associated with the growth of its population in urban areas. It is the most industrialized area in the country, comprising the metropolitan areas of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, and other major cities. Air quality is a major concern, because the reported concentrations of certain regulated pollutants, typically ozone and fine particulate, have exceeded national standa...

  4. Southeastern Power Administration 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-12-28

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am proud to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2007 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this report reflects Southeastern’s programs, accomplishments, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2006 and ending September 30, 2007. Southeastern marketed more than 5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 492 wholesale Federal power customers in an 11-state marketing area in FY 2007. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $219 million. Drought conditions continued to plague the southeast region of the United States during 2007 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Southeastern purchased more than $40 million in replacement power to meet customer contract requirements to ensure the continued reliability of our nation’s power grid. With the financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, continued funding for capitalized equipment replacements at various Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security program continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and requirements. Plans for the upcoming year include communication and cooperation with DOE, Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our nation’s water resources. Competition for the use of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency. The employees at Southeastern will be proactive in meeting these challenges and providing reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

  5. Vinna Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honěk, J.; Franců, J.; Mikuláš, Radek; Pešek, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Tomanová-Petrová, P.

    Prague: Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 223-241 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10 degrees to 20 degrees API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources

  7. The Tenebrionidae of California: A Time Sensitive Snapshot Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Aalbu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to a diversity of habitats and its geologic history, the US state of California hosts a spectacular assemblage of darkling beetle species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. In addition to being part of the California Floristic Province, one of 34 global biodiversity hotspots identified by Conservation International, California also has additional areas which are parts of the Great Basin, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. California is divided into nine floristic regions. Each region is assessed in terms of faunal composition and endemism. A “snapshot” of our present knowledge of the Tenebrionidae indicates that 447 currently recognized species, representing 108 genera, occur in California of which one hundred and ninety are endemic. California is compared to other nearby regions in diversity and endemism. An analysis of currently valid species vs a more realistic species account based on unpublished records of likely synonyms and known species yet to be described in the scientific literature is presented. The California Floristic Region, rather than other more arid parts of California, has the highest number of total and endemic species. Because of their high diversity and endemism, tenebrionids could potentially provide a valuable tool for monitoring the environment for conservation purposes.

  8. Hydrological modelling of the Iberá Wetlands in southeastern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimson, Rafael; Montroull, Natalia; Saurral, Ramiro; Vasquez, Pablo; Camilloni, Inés

    2013-10-01

    The Iberá Wetlands are one of the largest inland freshwater ecosystems in the world hosting several unique flora and fauna species. They are located in northeastern Argentina, a region in southeastern South America that experienced large positive precipitation trends during the last decades. The aim of this paper is to calibrate and evaluate a hydrological model on the Iberá basin in order to quantify the hydrologic impacts of potential regional temperature and precipitation variations in the context of climate change as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. For this purpose, a version of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model, accounting for the presence of lakes and Wetlands, was applied for the first time to the Iberá basin. Results show that the model can successfully simulate the main features of the system dynamics, including the daily mean streamflow of the Corriente River, the daily level of the Iberá Lake and the daily lake evaporation. Inclusion of the lake and Wetlands module improved the streamflow simulations. Sensitivity tests of the Iberá basin hydrology were performed by varying regional temperature and rainfall conditions according to the outputs of a set of climate models for three different time slices during the 21st century. These tests showed a strong dependence of the basin hydrology on the precipitation changes rather on the temperature ones.

  9. Comparison of metallogenic conditions for sandstone-type uranium deposit between Erlian basin of China and sedimentary basins of Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the study of metallogenic background and basic metallogenic characteristics,this paper summarizes the main ore-controlling factors of sandstone-type uranium deposits in Erlian basin of China and basins in southeastern Mongolia with the theory of sandstone-type uranium metallogeny,and systematically analyses similarities and differences between the two areas. The general similarities of tectonic attribute, basin type and scale, uranium source, and tectonic evolution in both areas are proposed in this paper, and also their obvious differences in uranium-hosting strata, late tectonic activity and regional uranium mineralization occurrences, especially in tectonic activity and ore-controlling sedimentary system are proposed. The authors believe that the two areas have approximate uranium-productive potentialities, and propose the importence of prospecting 'Sumin-river model' sandstone-type uranium deposit in Erlian basin in the future. (authors)

  10. Chemical evolution of the Salton Sea, California: Nutrient and selenium dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R.A.; Orem, W.H.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    The Salton Sea is a 1000-km2 terminal lake located in the desert area of southeastern California. This saline (???44 000 mg l-1 dissolved solids) lake started as fresh water in 1905-07 by accidental flooding of the Colorado River, and it is maintained by agricultural runoff of irrigation water diverted from the Colorado River. The Salton Sea and surrounding wetlands have recently acquired substantial ecological importance because of the death of large numbers of birds and fish, and the establishment of a program to restore the health of the Sea. In this report, we present new data on the salinity and concentration of selected chemicals in the Salton Sea water, porewater and sediments, emphasizing the constituents of concern: nutrients (N and P), Se and salinity. Chemical profiles from a Salton Sea core estimated to have a sedimentation rate of 2.3 mm yr-1 show increasing concentrations of OC, N, and P in younger sediment that are believed to reflect increasing eutrophication of the lake. Porewater profiles from two locations in the Sea show that diffusion from bottom sediment is only a minor source of nutrients to the overlying water as compared to irrigation water inputs. Although loss of N and Se by microbial-mediated volatilization is possible, comparison of selected element concentrations in river inputs and water and sediments from the Salton Sea indicates that most of the N (from fertilizer) and virtually all of the Se (delivered in irrigation water from the Colorado River) discharged to the Sea still reside within its bottom sediment. Laboratory simulation on mixtures of sediment and water from the Salton Sea suggest that sediment is a potential source of N and Se to the water column under aerobic conditions. Hence, it is important that any engineered changes made to the Salton Sea for remediation or for transfer of water out of the basin do not result in remobilization of nutrients and Se from the bottom sediment into the overlying water.

  11. Urgonian platform carbonates (Barremian-Early Aptian) of southeastern France: description of a new project and first data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, F.; Massonnat, G.; Föllmi, K.; Adatte, T.; Dumont, T.; Arnaud-Vanneau, A.; Virgone, A.; Arnaud, H.

    2012-04-01

    Urgonian platform carbonates are widespread in southeastern France. They were deposited along the northern Tethyan margin and bordered the Vocontian basin. They are predominantly composed of rudistic wackestone and bioclastic/ooid grainstone. The Urgonian Formation in southeastern France has been studied by various authors since 1847 (A. Orbigny, A. Arnaud-Vanneau, H. Arnaud, J. Charollais, B. Clavel, W. Kilian, J.P. Masse, R. Schroeder...). The goal of this project is to complement existing observations and produce a synthesis of the development of the Urgonian platform for the whole southeastern sector of France. This will be achieved by a sedimentological, palaeontological and stratigraphical study on 54 sections and dedicated wells, i.e., 2418 thin sections or 10.5 km of sections in total, through the entire Urgonian series, from the transgressive system track of Ba3 (early late Barremian) to the highstand system track of Ap2 (early Aptian). The sections and wells are located in five main sectors of southeastern France: Gard, Ardèche, Vercors, Vaucluse and Provence. A biostratigraphic chart relevant to all five sectors has been realized in order to correlate between the sections. In addition, the geochemistry (carbon and oxygen isotopes, whole-rock and clay mineralogies, and phosphorus contents) of five key sections (one in each main sector) has been analysed to evaluate palaeoenvironmental conditions and corroborate the stratigraphic correlation throughout southeastern France. An additional study will be performed on the global and regional geotectonic constellation during the late Barremian and the early Aptian, and finally a numerical model will be developed based on the stratigraphic correlation between the sections and consistent with their palaeoenvironmental and paleaoclimatic context. With this interdisciplinary approach, we hope to be able to reconstruct and understand the development of the Urgonian platform in terms of its palaeoenvironment, palaeo

  12. Reemerging Leptospirosis, California

    OpenAIRE

    Meites, Elissa; Jay, Michele T.; Deresinski, Stanley; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R.; Tompkins, Lucy; Smith, D. Scott

    2004-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a reemerging infectious disease in California. Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis throughout the world, though it is infrequently diagnosed in the continental United States. From 1982 to 2001, most reported California cases occurred in previously healthy young adult white men after recreational exposures to contaminated freshwater. We report five recent cases of human leptospirosis acquired in California, including the first documented common-source outbreak of hum...

  13. Using aromatic biological markers as a tool for assessing thermal maturity of source rocks in the campano-maastrichtian mamu formation, southeastern nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ogala, Jude E.; Akaegbobi, Mike I.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of aromatic biomarkers in coals and shales from five boreholes penetrating the Maastrichtian Mamu Formation of the Anambra Basin, southeastern Nigeria, were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometryto assess the thermal maturity and organic matter input. The study focused on the variations of the relative abundances of naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, and monaromatic and triaromatic steroids identified on the mass fragmentograms. Trimethylnaphthalene(...

  14. Alcohol Availability and Neighborhood Characteristics in Los Angeles, California and Southern Louisiana

    OpenAIRE

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Cohen, Deborah A.; Farley, Thomas A.; Scribner, Richard; Beighley, Christopher; Schonlau, Matthias; Robinson, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between alcohol availability types and community characteristics in randomly selected census tracts in Southern California and Southeastern Louisiana. Outlet shelf space and price by beverage type was collected from all off-sale alcohol outlets in 189 census tracts by trained research personnel. Three aspects of alcohol availability at the census tract level were considered—outlets per roadway mile, shelf space, and least price by be...

  15. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin basin, California. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-06-28

    This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. The producibility problems initially thought to be responsible for the low recovery in the Pru Fee property are: (a) the shallow dip of the bedding; (b) complex reservoir structure, (c) thinning pay zone; and (d) the presence of bottom water. The project is using tight integration of reservoir characterization and simulation modeling to evaluate the magnitude of and alternative solutions to these problems. Two main activities were brought to completion during the first quarter of 1996: (1) lithologic and petrophysical description of the core taken form the new well Pru 101 near the center of the demonstration site and (2) development of a stratigraphic model for the Pru Fee project area. In addition, the first phase of baseline cyclic steaming of the Pru Fee demonstration site was continued with production tests and formation temperature monitoring.

  16. Analysis on metallogenic conditions and prospect of sandstone-type uranium deposits in Longchuan basin western Yunnan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses geotectonics, geomorphologic landscape, and paleoclimate, uranium source, structural pattern and structural division of the Longchuan basin, lithologies and lithofaces of Upper Tertiary, hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry, concentration of uranium and deep information, compares the above information with that of U-productive Longchuanjiang basin, and analyzes the metallogenic conditions of sandstone-type uranium deposits. It is considered that the tectonic-erosion depressions located on the hanging wall of water-blocking faults in the southeastern uplifted zone of the Longchuan basin, and containing abundant organic matter and carbonaceous matter are the prospective areas for sandstone-type uranium deposits in Longchuan basin

  17. Cytogenetic and Molecular Data Demonstrate that the Bryconinae (Ostariophysi, Bryconidae) Species from Southeastern Brazil Form a Phylogenetic and Phylogeographic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travenzoli, Natália Martins; Silva, Priscilla Caroline; Santos, Udson; Zanuncio, José Cola; Oliveira, Claudio; Dergam, Jorge Abdala

    2015-01-01

    Brycon spp. occur in Neotropical watersheds to the west and east of the Andes, and as they are sensitive to anthropogenic changes, many these species are endangered in southeastern Brazil. Coastal rivers in southeastern Brazil are characterized by the presence of relatively few freshwater fish species and high endemism of this fauna. The objective of this study was to examine whether Brycon spp. occurring in the coastal basins of southeastern Brazil are monophyletic, using cytogenetic data, mitochondrial, and nuclear molecular markers. All the species showed a diploid number of 50 chromosomes, a conserved number within the subfamily Bryconinae. However, the karyotypic formulas were unique to most species, including Brycon devillei (26m+22sm+2st), Brycon ferox (26m+12sm+12st), Brycon insignis (22m+20sm+8st), Brycon opalinus, and Brycon vermelha (24m+20sm+6st), indicating the prevalence of pericentric and paracentric inversions in the chromosomal evolution of these species. All of them had nucleolar organizer regions in the first pair of subtelocentric chromosomes and no equilocal distribution of heterochromatin in the first pair of chromosomes of the karyotype. These two features, not seen in any other Brycon spp. examined to date, indicate that Bryconinae species from the Brazilian southeastern coastal basins, including the monotypic genus Henochilus, are monophyletic. Also, this is the first study that reports NOR location and C-banding patterns as synapomorphies for a Neotropical fish species group. The monophyly was also supported by a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA (16S), cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI), alpha-myosin (MYH6) genes and S72 intron molecular data. Our results partially corroborate the “Brycon acuminatus” group proposed by Howes in 1982: our proposed clade keeps B. devillei, B. ferox, and B. insignis; but it also includes B. opalinus, B. vermelha, and H. weatlandii whereas it excludes B. nattereri. The phylogeographic unit formed by

  18. California's congestion management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the hottest topics in transportation planning today is California's Congestion Management Program (CMP). California's program has been suggested as a model to the rest of the United States for addressing transportation problems and for conforming to the federal Clean Air Act. This article introduces California's Congestion Management Program, describes some problems related to California's CMP legislation, outlines the major CMP elements, and briefly explains the issue of the environmental impact of CMPs. This information might assist others in developing their own CMP programs

  19. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  20. Palaeontology, taxonomic revision and variability of some species of the genus Gassendiceras Bert et al., 2006 (Ammonitina, Upper Barremian) from southeastern Franc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Didier; Bersac, Stéphane; Delanoy, Gérard; Canut, Léon

    2013-09-01

    Bed-by-bed sampling of twelve Barremian sections in southeastern France from pelagic basin (Vocontian Basin) to neritic platforms (Arc of Castellane, Arc of Nice and Provencal Domain) has enabled the collection of isochronous samples of the ammonite genus Gassendiceras. Three poorly known species of the Toxancyloceras vandenheckei Zone (Upper Barremian) are revised: G. alpinum, G. multicostatum and G. hoheneggeri; two new species are described (G. rebouleti nov. sp. and G. bosellii nov. sp.). The intraspecific variability of particular species was recognised. This variability is between slender peramorphic and robust paedomorphic extreme morphologies, with the presence of all intermediates.

  1. Fall may be imminent for Kansas Cherokee basin coalbed gas output

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Newell K.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Kansas portion of the Cherokee basin, Southeastern Kansas, for 2008 was 49.1 bcf. The great majority of Cherokee basin gas production is now coal-bed methane (CBM). The major producers are Quest Energy LLC, Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. LLC, and Layne Energy Operating LLC. Most CBM in Southeastern Kansas is from Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian high-volatile B and A rank bituminous coals at 800 to 1,200 ft depth. Rates of decline for the CBM wells generally decrease the longer a well produces. A gentler collective decline of 13.8% is calculated by averaging the number of new producing wells in a given year with that of the previous year. By the calculations using the gentler overall 13.8% decline rate, if more than 918 successful CBM wells are drilled in 2009, then gas production will increase from 2008 to 2009.

  2. H2 fuelling infrastructure in Southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the local air agency covering the majority of southern California, and the entity legislatively responsible for bringing the region into compliance with the federal Clean Air standards by 2010. One of the tools used by the SCAQMD to accelerate achieving cleaner air is the funding of research, development, and demonstration projects for advanced, clean air technologies. One major focus has been on hydrogen and fuel cells for both stationary and mobile applications. The presentation will discuss the SCAQMD strategy and deployment efforts regarding the development and expansion of hydrogen fueling infrastructure in the South Coast Air Basin. (author)

  3. California's English Learner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

  4. The stratigraphic record of the Messinian salinity crisis in the northern margin of the Bajo Segura Basin (SE Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Soria Mingorance, Jesús Miguel; Caracuel Martín, Jesús Esteban; Yébenes Simón, Alfonso; Fernández Martínez, Juan (1945-); Viseras Alarcón, César

    2005-01-01

    The Bajo Segura Basin is a marginal basin of the Western Mediterranean located on the eastern end of the Betic Cordillera (southeastern Spain). Its Messinian and Pliocene stratigraphic record is divided into four allostratigraphic units, with bounding unconformities represented by erosional surfaces corresponding to palaeogeographic changes. The Messinian Unit I (MI) is composed of three depositional systems (fluvial, coastal lagoon, and shelf) which lateral facies changes, deposited...

  5. Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) in southeastern Oregon: A survey of historical localities, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Chistopher A.; Galvan, Stephanie K.; Adams, Michael J.; McCreary, Brome

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) occupies a large range in western North America and is comprised of at least three genetic units. Concern exists regarding the status of the Great Basin populations in Oregon, Idaho, and Nevada. We surveyed target and nearby alternate sites on public lands in southeastern Oregon where there was evidence that Columbia spotted frogs were historically present. We found the species at 59.5 percent (25 of 42) of target or nearby alternate sites. They were in 15 of 23 permanent streams and 8 of 13 intermittent streams. Our surveys do not provide evidence of widespread population losses in our sites. Interpretation of status of Columbia spotted frogs in this study is limited by a lack of precision in some of the historical locations and by our inability to determine if locations where only adults were indicated in the historical record once had breeding populations. Our results support the need for continued investigation of these populations.

  6. Th/U dating of Strombus bubonius-bearing marine terraces in southeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Carro, Odette; Causse, Christiane; Goy, José-Luis; Zazo, Cari

    1986-07-01

    Single dates obtained on mollusk shells by the U-series nuclides method are highly unreliable, primarily because of the mobility of uranium isotopes. However, in several cases, a statistical approach was demonstrated to yield coherent chronologies in both continental and marine environments. We report on 34 new Th and U isotope measurements on Strombus bubonius and Glycymeris glycymeris fossils from raised marine terraces in the Almeria area, southeastern Spain. The results yield a coherent chronology that indicates the presence of the warm water S. bubonius fauna in the Mediterranean basin at the end of the Mindel-Riss interglacial (18O stage 7) and during each high sea-level episode of the Riss-Würm interglacial (18O stage 5). Reconsideration of the Tyrrhenian stratigraphy based on the presence of S. bubonius is thus required. *Permanent address: Laboratoire de Geologic du Quaternaire, C.N.R.S., Luminy, Case 907, 13288 Marseille cedex 09, France

  7. Relation of peralkaline magmatism to heterogeneous extension during the Middle Miocene, southeastern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Volcanism migrated southward in the northern Basin and Range province in the Oligocene and early Miocene to produce voluminous calcalkaline silicic ash flow tuffs. Alkaline volcanism became dominant by middle Miocene (17-14 Ma) as smaller volumes of rhyolite-trachyte-basalt suites were erupted from the relatively small Kane Springs Wash caldera complex in southeastern Nevada. Only minor extension affected the Kane Wash area before the end of calcalkaline activity, but extension expressed by rate of progressive stratal tilt peaked (15-13.5 Ma) with peralkaline magmatism (14.7-14.4 Ma). Variations in distribution, degree, style, and timing of deformation demonstrate heterogeneous extension in the Kane Wash area. Only minor extension and tilting persisted post-middle Miocene (<12 Ma). All major eruptive sources overlap domains of rapid extension. -from Authors

  8. Resting cysts of freshwater dinoflagellates in southeastern Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) as proxies of cultural eutrophication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Francine M.G.; Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Ellegaard, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    in the relative abundances of these two cyst morphotypes were attributed primarily to cultural eutrophication related to land-use changes around Severn Sound over the last six centuries. Cysts of Peridinium willei, a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate species that occurs in a broad range of temperature, pH and nutrient......Resting cysts attributed to the freshwater dinoflagellate genus Peridinium were found in surface sediments from Severn Sound, southeastern Georgian Bay (Lake Huron, Laurentian Great Lakes of North America). Two distinct cyst morphotypes were present and they were assigned to Peridinium...... wisconsinense Eddy, 1930 and Peridinium willei Huitfeldt-Kaas, 1900 by establishing cyst–theca relationships through germinations and single-cell LSU rDNA analysis on an excysted cell of Peridinium willei. Sediments recovered from deep, sheltered portions of Severn Sound and restricted basins like Honey Harbour...

  9. The San Pedro Basin: A Case Study of US and Mexican Strategies to Connect Science to Societal Needs 1917

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Pedro River originates in northern Sonora near the town of Cananea and spans the U.S. – Mexico border into southeastern Arizona. The San Pedro Basin and perennial portions of its river support one of the most ecological diverse regions in the world. The regional groundwater aquifer which l...

  10. Redistribution of cesium-137 in southeastern watersheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples from 14 southeastern agricultural reservoirs and surface samples from representative soils from the contributing water shed areas were analyzed for 137Cs. The concentrations of 137Cs measured reflect the nature of the watershed, its cover, its use, and man's activities. Since the redistribution of 137Cs was assumed to result from soil erosion, recent erosion rates can be calculated from the measured 137Cs accumulations in sediments and from the decreases in the 137Cs calculated to have been deposited on upland soils. Measured concentrations of 137Cs ranged from 14 to 158 nCi/m2 in surface soils. As much as 525 nCi/m2 of 137Cs was measured in the deposited sediment profile. Watershed budgets for 137Cs were calculated for three representative watersheds using available sediment survey information and the measured 137Cs concentrations

  11. Census Snapshot: California

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in California. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in California. In many ways, the more than 107,000 same-sex couples living in California are similar to married coup...

  12. California Immigrants Today

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on the Mexico-origin component of the California immigrant population. Drawing on the results of field studies conducted throughout California and in west-central Mexico during the last ten years,the paper will describe how the profile of Mexican migration to California has changed since the 197Os, suggest explanations for these changes, and discuss their implications for public policy. Effects of the long-running economic crisis in Mexico and of the 1986 U.S. immigra-ti...

  13. The Rio Doce Orogeny, Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, M. C. Campos; Figueiredo, M. C. H.

    1995-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic-Eopaleozoic superposed orogenic system of Southeastern Brazil, which was active during the Brasiliano-Pan-African Cycle during the assembly of this sector of the Gondwana Supercontinent, includes distinct terranes such as the Guanhães, Curitiba, Apiaí-Guaxupé and Serra do Mar microplates and the Juiz de Fora Thrust Belt. These orogenic systems also affected the reworked border of the São Francisco Craton. The collisional or ocean plate subduction-controlled "Brasiliano I" Orogeny was responsible for the generation of fold belts along the southeastern border of the São Francisco Craton, the accretion of different microplates and the formation of a magmatic arc associated with the roots of a northwestward trending thrust belt. The "Brasiliano I" evolution occurred during the Neoproterozoic and by 600 Ma was already in a post-orogenic stage in the Apiaí-Guaxupé Microplate, with the intrusion of rapakivi-like granitoids. The Rio Doce Orogeny is best characterized in the Serra do Mar Microplate by a magmatic arc, active between 590 and 570 Ma, with batholithic calc-alkaline plutonism exhibiting subduction zone components and a chemical zonation indicative of northwestward subduction. The collisional stage (560-530 Ma) accounted for the accretion of the Serra do Mar Microplate to the former orogenic domains. Anatexis of mostly metasediments producing peraluminous migmatites and granites, began at the calc-alkaline magmatic arc stage and culminated during crustal thickening associated with the northwesterly piling-up of large thrust slices. The post-collisional plutonism (520-480 Ma) is characterized by plutons and dikes of mainly alkali-calcic granitoids enriched in incompatible elements.

  14. Teale Ground Water Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state...

  15. Teale Hydrologic Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state...

  16. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical

  17. California Data Exchange Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make July &28;Water Smart Month.&29; &28;Conserving ... Remote sensors today indicate that statewide, snowpack water content is 54 percent of ... California ranked first, along with Texas, on ...

  18. Earthquakes in Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in Southern California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Imperial Valley, 1979,...

  19. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the...

  20. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  1. Kelp distribution off California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set delineates kelp beds (Nereocystis leutkeana and Macrocystis spp.) along the Pacific Coast of California. Multiple years of kelp mapping data for the...

  2. California Harpoon Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data from harpoon vessels that fish within 200 miles of the California coast, from 1974 to present. The harpoon...

  3. California Watershed Hydrologic Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is intended to be used as a tool for water-resource management and planning activities, particularly for site-specific and localized studies requiring...

  4. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  5. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, 1998 and 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study for white-tailed deer, performed in 1998 and 2004 by the College of Veterinary Medicine of The University of Georgia.

  6. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Santee National Wildlife Refuge, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an unpublished report by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study of the Parasitology College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia....

  7. Permian Basin location recommendation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candidate study areas are screened from the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basin areas using data obtained from studies to date and criteria and specifications that consider: rock geometry; rock characteristics; human intrusion potential; surface characteristics; and environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Two preferred locations are recommended from among these areas for additional characterization to identify potential National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) salt repository sites. One location, in northeastern Deaf Smith County and southeastern Oldham County, is underlain by two salt units that meet the adopted screening specifications. The other location, in northcentral Swisher County, is underlain by one salt unit that meets the adopted screening specifications. Both locations have several favorable features, relative to surrounding areas, and no obviously undesirable characteristics. Both lie wholly on the Southern High Plains surface, are in relatively sparsely populated areas, contain no unique land use conflicts, and comprise large enough geographic areas to provide flexibility in site selection. Data gathered to date indicate that these locations contain salt units sufficient in thickness and in depth for the safe construction and operation of the underground facilities under consideration. 93 references, 34 figures, 6 tables

  8. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming

  9. Canal network effects on the water balance in southeastern Srem

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorić Enike

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research and analyses of the effects of a drainage canal network on the water balance of southeastern Srem. The paper was derived from a doctoral thesis which contains a detailed study of key components of the water balance of southeastern Srem, including actual amounts of water removed via the drainage canal network. A linear multiple regression model was used to establish an analytical relationship between the amounts of evacuated water (a dependent variab...

  10. Neogene-Quaternary evolution of the Tefenni basin on the Fethiye-Burdur fault zone, SW Anatolia-Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Rahmi; Aksarı, Süleyman

    2016-06-01

    The Fethiye-Burdur fault zone (FBFZ) is a complex belt of major break in the southwestern Anatolia. A number of basins occur within the FBFZ. The Tefenni basin is one of the NE-SW trending basins located in the central part of the FBFZ. The basin is 10-20 km wide and 60 km long. It contains two infills of fluvial, lacustrine and alluvial fan deposits from late Miocene to Recent. The older and folded infill rests on the pre-middle Miocene basement rocks with an angular unconformity and consists of fluvial and lacustrine sediments. The younger and undeformed Plio-Quaternary basin fill unconformably overlies the older basin fill and is composed predominantly of conglomerate, mudstone, silt, clay and recent basin floor sediments. The Tefenni basin is controlled by a series of NE-SW trending left lateral oblique-slip normal faults along its margins. The Tefenni and Mürseller faults bound the northwestern margin of the basin and the Kemer fault bounds the southeastern margin of the basin. The basin is also cut by NE-SW striking major and NW-SE, N-S and E-W striking small scale normal faults. Structural analyses in the basin show that NE-SW-trending contraction stress regime ended by Pliocene and was followed by NE-SW-trending extension from Pliocene onward.

  11. 75 FR 17031 - Grapes Grown in a Designated Area of Southeastern California and Imported Table Grapes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Register on August 3, 2009 (74 FR 38323). These smaller portions were needed to fill the... provision of the order, or any obligation imposed in connection with the order is not in accordance with law... the U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement, the embassies of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa...

  12. Measurement and interpretation of acidity in Southern California rainfall and aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    MORGAN, JAMES J.

    1980-01-01

    The long-term goal of this work is to assess the environmental significance of acidity transport in the Southern California region. There are three potentially important transport routes: wet flux of acidity to the surface of the basin; dry flux of acidity as aerosol deposition; absorption of acidic and basic gases at the basin surface. We view the research from two perspectives: (1) the overall mass balance aspect of sources and sinks for various acids and bases (nitric ...

  13. Long-term Lake Evaporation Measurements in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, N. L.; Cancelli, D. M.

    2007-05-01

    We report here for the first time the results of a long-term (37 months) campaign of lake evaporation measurements with the eddy-covariance (EC) method. The measurements were made at Furnas Lake, a large lake (1440 km2) in Southeastern Brazil (20° 44'S, 45° 58'W and 771.8 m ASL). Mean and maximum depths at the Maximum Normal Operating Level are 13 m and 90 m respectively. Taking advantage of a long drought during 2000--2001, a large metal tower was erected over the lake's dry bed. After the water level recovered, we were left with a stable platform for performing EC measurements in one of the lake's many basins. Fetch conditions over the prevailing wind directions were excellent (1000 m from the North, and more than 3000 m from the East), with the closest land at 420 m (from NE) and 440 m (from SW). Measurements included hourly means of water surface temperature, air temperature, specific humidity, downwelling solar radiation, net radiation, wind speed, and wind direction. 10-Hz eddy covariance measurements were made of turbulent fluctuations of 3 wind components, sonic virtual temperature, air temperature (with a fine-wire thermocouple) and of fluctuating specific humidity with a specially adapted capacitive hygrometer. The validation of this sensor to measure latent heat fluxes at high frequency was made on intensive field campaigns that deployed state-of-the art Ultra-Violet and Infra-Red fast-response hygrometers. Our data analysis indicates that atmospheric stability can be far from neutral, and that it plays a very important role in the mass-transfer and heat-transfer equations for the water vapor and sensible heat fluxes. We have also found that significantly different scalar roughenesses for water vapor and for sensible heat were necessary to calibrate properly the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST)-based transfer equations. Due to these differences, gradient-based Bowen ratios (as usually applied in the Energy Budget Bowen Ratio method in the absence

  14. The California Hazards Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, J. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    California's abundant resources are linked with its natural hazards. Earthquakes, landslides, wildfires, floods, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, severe storms, fires, and droughts afflict the state regularly. These events have the potential to become great disasters, like the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906, that overwhelm the capacity of society to respond. At such times, the fabric of civic life is frayed, political leadership is tested, economic losses can dwarf available resources, and full recovery can take decades. A patchwork of Federal, state and local programs are in place to address individual hazards, but California lacks effective coordination to forecast, prevent, prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from, the harmful effects of natural disasters. Moreover, we do not know enough about the frequency, size, time, or locations where they may strike, nor about how the natural environment and man-made structures would respond. As California's population grows and becomes more interdependent, even moderate events have the potential to trigger catastrophes. Natural hazards need not become natural disasters if they are addressed proactively and effectively, rather than reactively. The University of California, with 10 campuses distributed across the state, has world-class faculty and students engaged in research and education in all fields of direct relevance to hazards. For that reason, the UC can become a world leader in anticipating and managing natural hazards in order to prevent loss of life and property and degradation of environmental quality. The University of California, Office of the President, has therefore established a new system-wide Multicampus Research Project, the California Hazards Institute (CHI), as a mechanism to research innovative, effective solutions for California. The CHI will build on the rich intellectual capital and expertise of the Golden State to provide the best available science, knowledge and tools for

  15. Karst in evaporites in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permian evaporites in southeastern New Mexico include gypsum, anhydrite, and salt, which are subject to both blanket and local, selective dissolution. Dissolution has produced many hundreds of individual karst features including collapse sinks, karst valleys, blind valleys, karst plains, caves, and breccia pipes. Dissolution began within some formations during Permian time and has been intermittent but continual ever since. Karst features other than blanket deposits of breccia are not preserved from the early episodes of dissolution, but some karst features preserved today - such as breccia pipes - are remnants of karst activity that was active at least as early as mid-Pleistocene time. Rainfall was much more abundant during Late Pleistocene time, and many features visible today may have been formed then. The drainage history of the Pecos River is related to extensive karstification of the Pecos Valley during mid-Pleistocene time. Large-scale stream piracy and dissolution of salt in the subsurface resulted in major shifts and excavations in the channel. In spite of intensive groundwater studies that have been carried out in the region, major problems in near-surface evaporite karst remain to be solved. Among these are determination of recharge areas and time of recharge. 109 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab

  16. Seismic risk map for Southeastern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last few years, some studies regarding seismic risk were prepared for three regions of Brazil. They were carried on account of two basic interests: first, toward the seismic history and recurrence of Brazilian seismic events; second, in a way as to provide seismic parameters for the design and construction of hydro and nuclear power plants. The first seismic risk map prepared for the southeastern region was elaborated in 1979 by 6he Universidade de Brasilia (UnB-Brasilia Seismological Station). In 1981 another seismic risk map was completed on the basis of seismotectonic studies carried out for the design and construction of the Nuclear power plants of Itaorna Beach (Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro) by IPT (Mining and Applied Geology Division). In Brazil, until 1984, seismic studies concerning hydro and nuclear power plants and other civil construction of larger size did not take into account the seismic events from the point of view of probabilities of seismic recurrences. Such analysis in design is more important than the choice of a level of intensity or magnitude, or adoption of a seismicity level ased on deterministic methods. In this way, some considerations were made, concerning the use of seisms in Brazilian designs of hydro and nuclear power plants, as far as seismic analysis is concerned, recently altered over the current seismic risk panorama. (D.J.M.)

  17. Geolectrical methods applied on a contaminated site : the Entressen landfill case study (south-eastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Bottero, J.-Y.

    2003-04-01

    Redox potential is a controlling parameter in many contaminated site remediation technologies. Its knowledge is crutial to understand the contaminant plume development and risks for groundwater ressources. But, redox potential is very difficult to measure directlly in the field. A geophysical method that could determine the redox potential distribution in a contaminant plume would be particularly welcome. We believe that the self-potential method (SP) offers such a possibility. We performed extensive SP and electrical resistivity measurements downstream the Entressen landfill (south-eastern France in Provence). Thanks to the electrical resistivity tomographies, we obtained a 3D image of the aquifer datum. This image helps us to better understand the pattern of water flow through the channels, and to estimate the electrokinetic component of the SP signal. An important negative SP anomaly (-400 mV) is measured near the decantation basins of the landfill, suggesting an hypothetical leak of these basins. The polarity and the great amplitude of this anomaly indicate that the main component of the SP signal is due to electrochemical reactions such as oxido-reduction reactions. The comparison of the SP measurements and the geochemical data shows that the negative SP anomaly is correlated with the anaerobic zone of the contaminant plume. We believe that redox potential gradients in the contaminant plume generate a diffusion potential which is responsible for the SP anomaly. Microbial activity also plays a key role in all these processes.

  18. Assessing climate-sensitive ecosystems in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Jennifer; Beck, Scott; Pyne, Milo; Terando, Adam; Rubino, Matthew; White, Rickie; Collazo, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Climate change impacts ecosystems in many ways, from effects on species to phenology to wildfire dynamics. Assessing the potential vulnerability of ecosystems to future changes in climate is an important first step in prioritizing and planning for conservation. Although assessments of climate change vulnerability commonly are done for species, fewer have been done for ecosystems. To aid regional conservation planning efforts, we assessed climate change vulnerability for ecosystems in the Southeastern United States and Caribbean.First, we solicited input from experts to create a list of candidate ecosystems for assessment. From that list, 12 ecosystems were selected for a vulnerability assessment that was based on a synthesis of available geographic information system (GIS) data and literature related to 3 components of vulnerability—sensitivity, exposure, and adaptive capacity. This literature and data synthesis comprised “Phase I” of the assessment. Sensitivity is the degree to which the species or processes in the ecosystem are affected by climate. Exposure is the likely future change in important climate and sea level variables. Adaptive capacity is the degree to which ecosystems can adjust to changing conditions. Where available, GIS data relevant to each of these components were used. For example, we summarized observed and projected climate, protected areas existing in 2011, projected sea-level rise, and projected urbanization across each ecosystem’s distribution. These summaries were supplemented with information in the literature, and a short narrative assessment was compiled for each ecosystem. We also summarized all information into a qualitative vulnerability rating for each ecosystem.Next, for 2 of the 12 ecosystems (East Gulf Coastal Plain Near-Coast Pine Flatwoods and Nashville Basin Limestone Glade and Woodland), the NatureServe Habitat Climate Change Vulnerability Index (HCCVI) framework was used as an alternative approach for assessing

  19. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into comfortable use of…

  20. Morphologic characteristics and migration rate assessment of barchan dunes in the Southeastern Western Desert of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, M. A.; Refaat, A. A.; Abdel Wahed, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work explores the morphologic characteristics of aeolian dune sand in the southeastern part of Western Desert of Egypt. It aims to assess the movement of barchan dunes and evaluate their environmental influence on the Toshka Project. Morphometric investigation of barchan dunes in the Toshka area revealed that most barchans have high length/width (a/c) ratios (fat to pudgy), while one-fifth of the studied barchans have lower a/c ratios and so appear normal in their morphologic forms. Statistical analysis of the main parameters of barchan dunes in Toshka and other desert regions in the Kharga (Egypt), Kuwait, Southern Morocco, California and Southern Peru demonstrates that barchans of the Toshka area are distinctive in their appearance. They are characterized by distinct aspect with higher values of length and width and greater growth in height. The high-energy wind environment in addition to the large amount of drifting sand are principal factors responsible for the unique shape of Toshka barchans. The migration rate of barchan dunes in four chosen test locations, within the central and western Toshka area, ranges from about 3 to 10.82 m/year. The calculated average migration rate of these dunes is about 6 m/year in a SSW direction. Sand encroachment is more extensive in the central and western parts of the investigated Toshka area. Risk evaluation of sand dune movements in the southeastern part of the Western Desert points to medium to high sand encroachment risk values. These may represent serious hazards to the newly-established Toshka Project, threatening roads, as well as cultivated lands in the area.

  1. California's Future Carbon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  2. GEMAS results from the Pannonian Basin - geochemical signatures in a transnational geological structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Edith; Jordan, Gyozo; Slaninka, Igor; Sorsa, Ajka; Gulan, Aleksandra; Gosar, Mateja; Hratovic, Hazim; Klos, Volodymyr

    2014-05-01

    The Pannonian Basin, also referred to as Carpathian Basin, has its geological origins in the Pannonian Sea which was part of the Parathetys Sea, from which it was separated around 10 Ma ago. It spreads over large part of the southeastern part of Central Europe. The centre of the Pannonian Basin is located in Hungary and extends to the adjoining countries Austria, Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. The basin is surrounded by the Carpathian Mountains, the Alps, the Dinarides and the Balkan mountains. The Pannonian Basin is filled by Molasse sediments, which were deposited during the Alpine orogenesis and originating from the rising Alpine and Carpathian Mountain chains. The orogenesis continued during the sedimentation into the Molasse basin. The tectonic movements resulted in several cycles of trans- and regressions of the Parathetys, the sedimentation of marine and freshwater sediments as well as a multitude of fractures and cleavages during the orogensis and the subsidence of different parts of the basin. Even if the Pannonian Basin was formed during a complex orogenesis, it can be regarded as a geo- and hydrodynamic unit. In accordance with the geological history, the soils in the Pannonian Basin developed on loose sediments - including significant loess deposits - and are dominated by soil types which also reflect the continental and steppe climate in this area - Planosols, Luvisols, Cambisols, Calcisols, Chernozems and Phaeozems. The basin is extensively used for agricultural purposes. The geochemical patterns Pannonian Basin are considerably different compared to its surroundings due to its geological development. The spatial distribution of some elements (REE (La, Ce), Y, Th, V, Cd, Pb) are clearly different inside and outside the basin area. For this transnational geological and geographical area, the GEMAS results are compiled and multivariate statistics are applied to find common geochemical signatures in relation

  3. Tectonics and sedimentation in the Curitiba Basin, south of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamuni, Eduardo; Ebert, Hans Dirk; da Silva Borges, Mauricio; Hasui, Yociteru; Costa, João Batista Sena; Salamuni, Riad

    2003-03-01

    The Curitiba Basin, Paraná, lies parallel to the west side of the Serra do Mar range and is part of a continental rift near the Atlantic coast of southeastern Brazil. It bears unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sediments divided in two formations: the lower Guabirotuba Formation and the overlying Tinguis Formation, both developed over Precambrian basement. Field observations, water well drill cores, and interpretations of satellite images lead to the inference that regional tectonic processes were responsible for the origin of the Basin in the continental rift context and for morphotecatonic evolution through block tilting, dissection, and erosion. The structural framework of the sediments and the basement is characterized by NE-SW-trending normal faults (extensional tectonic D 1 event) reactivated by NE-SW-trending strike-slip and reverse oblique faults (younger transtensional tectonic D 2' to transpressional tectonic D 2″ event). This tectonic event, which started in the Paleogene and controlled the basin geometry, began as a halfgraben and was later reactivated as a pull-apart basin. D 2 is a neotectonic event that controls the current morphostructures. The Basin is connected to the structural rearrangement of the South American platform, which underwent a generalized extensional or trantensional process and, in late Oligocene, changed to a compressional to transpressional regime.

  4. Nitrogen inputs, ouptut, and retention in a coastal suburban basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, W. H.; Daley, M. L.; Gettel, G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the biogeochemistry of suburban basins is becoming increasingly important due to the rapidly accelerating suburban sprawl in many parts of the US. In southeastern New Hampshire, population density is expected to increase by 50% over 20 years, and most of the development will occur as low-density suburban home lots with wells and on-site waste disposal. We measured the N inputs, outputs, and loss/storage in a 470 sq km basin, the Lamprey River of coastal New Hampshire. Atmospheric deposition and food imported into the basin were both significant inputs, and totaled 13 kg/ha/yr. Output was 0.6 kg/ha/yr, for a net loss/retention of 95% of inputs. Net retention among various sub-watersheds of the Lamprey ranged from 50 to 98%. Because the Lamprey river basin contains a high proportion of wetlands (14% wetlands and open water), has some water courses that undergo periodic oxygen depletion, and has high levels of dissolved organic carbon in surface waters (6 mg/l), in-stream and wetland denitrification may be a major loss pathway for N in the basin. Results from a study of riparian zone biogeochemistry suggest that riparian denitrification may also be a significant loss pathway. Accelerating suburbanization may greatly increase N delivery to the coast if it shortens hydrologic flow paths and decreases wetland coverage while increasing N inputs.

  5. California Indian Food and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  6. Scales of Sovereignty: the Search for Watershed Democracy in the Klamath Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Sarna-Wojcicki, Daniel Reid

    2015-01-01

    AbstractScales of Sovereignty: the Search for Watershed Democracy in the Klamath BasinbyDaniel Reid Sarna-WojcickiDoctor of Philosophy in Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor David Winickoff, ChairThis dissertation examines the politics of knowledge in collaborative watershed governance institutions of the Klamath River Basin of Northern California and Southern Oregon. The waters of the Klamath are shared between farmers, fisherfolk, indigeno...

  7. SOUTH WARNER WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Weldin, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral appraisal utilized geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data and an examination of mining claims in the South Warner Wilderness, California. Results of this study indicate that little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources exists within the area. Small veins of optical quality calcite occur on the east side of the area but, are not considered a resource.

  8. Architecture, tectonics and subsidence mechanisms of the Focsani Depression - southeastern Carpathians bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapoanca, M.; Bertotti, G.; Matenco, L.; Garcia-Castellanos, D.; Cloetingh, S.; Dinu, C.

    2003-04-01

    ARCHITECTURE, TECTONICS AND SUBSIDENCE MECHANISMS OF THE FOCSANI DEPRESSION SOUTHEASTERN CARPATHIANS BEND M. Tarapoanca (1, 2), G. Bertotti (3), L. Matenco (2, 4), D. Garcia-Castellanos (3), S. Cloetingh (3), C. Dinu (4) (1) S.C. Prospectiuni S.A., Romania, (2) Netherlands Research Centre for Integrated Solid Earth Sciences, email: mtarapoanca@yahoo.com, (3) Vrije Universiteit, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, The Netherlands, (4) Bucharest University, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, Romania In front of the SE Carpathians Bend a very deep basin (Focşani Depression) developed in Miocene to recent times. An important part of the subsidence in Focşani Depression (FD) occurred after the main stages of thrusting in the Carpathians. Apparently, the basin lies in the “wrong” place and evolved in the “wrong” time. Around 13 km-thick Badenian-to-Quaternary (<16.5 Myr) sediments were deposited in the central part of the FD. During Badenian (16.5-13 Myr), the foreland (S-ward Trotuş fault) underwent NE-SW extension and NW-trending basins opened in the eastern Moesian platform. A NW-SE-oriented area of subsidence stretched from Transylvanian basin through the FD to the SE of the Moesian platform while thrusting was going on in the East-European/Scythian platform, East Carpathians and Getic Depression. Starting with the Sarmatian (13-10 Myr) the FD depocenter moved out of the Carpathian belt coeval with the exhumation of South and central-northern East Carpathians. The basin enlarged and was tilted toward the belt. The tilting was accompanied by dextral shearing mainly along Intramoesian and Peceneaga-Camena faults. After Sarmatian times, subsidence occurred practically only to the S-SE of Trotus fault. During Meotian-Pontian (10-5 Myr) the subsidence slowed down in the FD and strongly increased afterwards. This subsidence amplification has been accompanied by normal faulting and shearing in Moesian platform. The western margin of FD has undergone E

  9. Paleomagnetic evidence for Post-Jurassic stability of southeastern Mexico: Maya Terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Jose C.; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Helsley, Charles E.

    1990-05-01

    The tectonic evolution of southeastern Mexico has been a subject of major controversy, not only in regard to past geometry but also in the timing of proposed geological events as well. For the past 10 years, most, if not all, investigators agree that the Gulf of Mexico Basin was formed by Late Jurassic time and that the Maya Terrane was in its current location prior to the Cretaceous. In order to gain further insight into the drift history of the Maya Terrane we have undertaken a paleomagnetic study of the uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous (Tithonian-lower Neocomian?) San Ricardo Formation in southeastern Mexico, at 93.7°W, 16.8°N. The sampling site is located east of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, on the southwest side of the Maya block, at the base of the Yucatan Peninsula. A suite of 133 samples was collected in stratigraphic succession from a 114-m-thick sequence of red shales and sandstones near Cintalapa, Chiapas, Mexico. After progressive thermal demagnetization of all samples at six steps from 350°C to 630°C, 89 samples were selected for final paleopole analysis on the basis of their magnetic stability. Four different polarity intervals were observed, the sequence being from bottom to top: N, R, N, R which assists in the assessment of the reliability of the observations. The mean pole position obtained, 160.0°E, 69.8°N, agrees with the mean pole position of the upper part of the Morrison Formation of Colorado, a unit of virtually identical age. These results indicate that no discernible rotation or displacement of the Maya block has occurred since at least early Neocomian times.

  10. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating from granitoids in southern basement of Songliao basin: Constraints on ages of the basin basement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO FuHong; XU WenLiang; YANG DeBin; PEI FuPing; LIU XiaoMing; HU ZhaoChu

    2007-01-01

    Seven LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb datings from granitoids in the southern basement of the Songliao basin were done in order to constrain the ages of the basin basement. The cathodoluminescence (CL) images of the zircons from seven granitoids indicate that they are euhedral-subhedral ones with striped absorption and obvious oscillatory zoning rims. The dating results show that a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age is 236±3 Ma for quartz diorite (sample No.T6-1) located in the western slope of the basin, that weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages are 319±1 Ma (2126 m) and 361±2 Ma (1994 m) for diorite (sample No.YC1-1) and granite (sample No.YC1-2) located in northern part of southeastern uplift of the basin, respectively, and that weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages are 161±5 Ma, 165±2 Ma, 165±1 Ma and 161±4 Ma for samples Q2-1, SN121, SN122, and SN72 granitoids located in southern part of southeastern uplift of the basin, respectively. The statistical results of ages suggest that the middle Jurassic granitoids constitute the main part of basement granitoids, and that the Hercynian and Indo-Sino magmatisms also occur in the basin basement. It is implied that the Songliao basin should be a rift one formed in the intracontinent or active continental margin settings in the late Mesozoic after the Middle Jurassic orogeny took place.

  11. The Role of Rift Obliquity in Formation of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Scott Edmund Kelsey

    The Gulf of California illustrates how highly oblique rift geometries, where transform faults are kinematically linked to large-offset normal faults in adjacent pull-apart basins, enhance the ability of continental lithosphere to rupture and, ultimately, hasten the formation of new oceanic basins. The Gulf of California rift has accommodated oblique divergence of the Pacific and North America tectonic plates in northwestern Mexico since Miocene time. Due to its infancy, the rifted margins of the Gulf of California preserve a rare onshore record of early continental break-up processes from which to investigate the role of rift obliquity in strain localization. Using new high-precision paleomagnetic vectors from tectonically stable sites in north-central Baja California, I compile a paleomagnetic transect of Miocene ignimbrites across northern Baja California and Sonora that reveals the timing and distribution of dextral shear associated with inception of this oblique rift. I integrate detailed geologic mapping, basin analysis, and geochronology of pre-rift and syn-rift volcanic units to determine the timing of fault activity on Isla Tiburon, a proximal onshore exposure of the rifted North America margin, adjacent to the axis of the Gulf of California. The onset of strike-slip faulting on Isla Tiburon, ca. 8 - 7 Ma, was synchronous with the onset of transform faulting along a significant length of the nascent plate boundary within the rift. This tectonic transition coincides with a clockwise azimuthal shift in Pacific-North America relative motion that increased rift obliquity. I constrain the earliest marine conditions on southwest Isla Tiburon to ca. 6.4 - 6.0 Ma, coincident with a regional latest Miocene marine incursion in the northern proto-Gulf of California. This event likely flooded a narrow, incipient topographic depression along a ˜650 km-long portion of the latest Miocene plate boundary and corresponds in time and space with formation of a newly

  12. Radiometric dating of Precambrian rock in Smaaland southeastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dating of zircons with the U-Pb method in southeastern Sweden gives ages of 1837 Ma on volcanics, considered as postorogenic to the Svecokarelian, and 1825 Ma on an arkose (possibly a sheared synorogenic granite). These figures coincide with previous U-Pb ages in southeastern Sweden. Zircons from an older preorogenic gneis and a metasediment do not fit a U-Pb discordia line but imply a previous history back to 2500 Ma ago. Zircons from a dike porphyry intruding the younger volcanics do not yield a meaningful age, probably due to contamination. When compiling the presented U-Pb data with previous Rb-Sr and K-Ar ages the orogenic activity from synorogenic through postorogenic times seems to be continuous in southeastern Sweden. (authors)

  13. Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.L.; Dale, L.L.; Brush, C.; Vicuna, S.; Kadir, T.N.; Dogrul, E.C.; Chung, F.I.

    2009-05-15

    A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustain California during extended dry periods.

  14. Assessment of Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Resources: Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) is an important TPS identified in the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Appalachian basin province (Milici and others, 2003). The TPS is named for the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale, which is the primary source rock, and for multiple lower Paleozoic sandstone and carbonate units that are the important reservoirs. Upper Cambrian through Upper Silurian petroleum-bearing strata that constitute the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS thicken eastward from about 2,700 ft at the western margin of the Appalachian basin to about 12,000 ft at the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin. The Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS covers approximately 170,000 mi2 of the Appalachian basin from northeastern Tennessee to southeastern New York and from central Ohio to eastern West Virginia. The boundary of the TPS is defined by the following geologic features: (1) the northern boundary (from central Ontario to northeastern New York) extends along the outcrop limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone; (2) the northeastern boundary (from southeastern New York, through southeastern Pennsylvania-western Maryland-easternmost West Virginia, to northern Virginia) extends along the eastern limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (3) the southeastern boundary (from west-central and southwestern Virginia to eastern Tennessee) extends along the eastern limit of the Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (4) the southwestern boundary (from eastern Tennessee, through eastern Kentucky, to southwestern Ohio) extends along the approximate facies change from the Trenton Limestone with thin black shale interbeds (on the east) to the equivalent Lexington Limestone without black shale interbeds (on the west); (5) the northern part of the boundary in southwestern Ohio

  15. Specific features of Bazhenov suite sediments in south-eastern Nurolsk sedimentary basin (Tomsk Oblast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedolivko, N.; Perevertailo, T.; Cunyi, Li; Abramova, R.

    2015-11-01

    The specific sediment features in Georgiev (J3kmgr), Bazhenov (J3vbg) and Kulomzin (K1bkl) suites, exposed by drilling in the S-E Nurolsk depression (Tomsk Oblast), were defined and described via petrographic, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence-microscopy analysis methods. The classification of agrillites was identified, the structure-texture features, composition, voids and bitumen types and their distribution were determined. It was defined that Bazhenov suite argillites are characteristic of fine-dispersion, high biogenic silica content and scattered organic matter, enriched multi-composite syngenetic bitumen (from light to resin- asphaltine), as well as fractured surface where the migration of light bitumen occurs.

  16. Groundwater vulnerability and recharge or palaeorecharge in the Southeastern Chad Basin, Chari Baguirmi aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopes and major chemical elements have been used to investigate present or ancient groundwater renewal in the multilayered aquifer of the Chari-Baguirmi plain, South of Lake Chad. On the Western side, recharge mainly occurs from the Chari River during the flood period. Within the Ndjamena area, the rise of the piezometric level in the contaminated subsurface zone provokes an increase in nitrate concentrations. Rainfall recharge is mainly located close to the outcropping basement, i.e. on the Eastern side of the area and does not occurs in the central part of the plain where groundwater also presents a stronger evaporative signature. This supports the hypothesis attributing a major role to evaporation processes in the formation of piezometric depressions in the Sahel zone. There is no evidence of present day or ancient water recharge from Lake Chad. (author)

  17. Southeastern Aleutian Basin (Bogoslof Island) Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1402, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  18. Characterizing rainfall parameters which influence erosivity in southeastern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out to characterize some selected parameters which influence rainfall erosivity in southeastern Nigeria. Rainfall amount, distribution, duration, intensity, storm types, energy loads and frequency of rain events in the region were studied using data from stations located in three major agroecological zones. Raindrop size and detaching capacity were evaluated in one of the stations for two months. The mean annual rainfall erosivity values for southeastern Nigeria point to the fact that rainfall tend to be highly erosive. 25 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Southeastern Regional Environmental Characterization Report: executive summary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Executive Summary of the final ''Southeastern Regional Environmental Characterization Report'' (RECR) is issued primarily for public information purposes and provides a general overview of the report. The complete RECR presents available regional environmental information pertinent to siting a repository or high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in central Maryland; noncoastal Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina; and northern Georgia. For each of the states within the Southeastern Region, information is provided on the environmental disqualifying factors and the environmental regional screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening

  20. The foreign investments phenomena in south-eastern European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The south-eastern Europe countries have all the common history of the communism policy and economy, which from the foreign investments perspective meant a radical approach, which promoted a nationalism view against foreign capital interference. Similar to China, perhaps India and other countries, the governments of the south-eastern Europe’s countries expressed a rejection to foreign investments, emphasizing the negative effects of such operations, arguing that any foreign capital inflow is followed by a foreign capital outflow which at the end will destabilize the balance of external payments and will overall result in no favorable effect upon the economy of their countries.

  1. Southeastern Regional Geologic Characterization Report. Executive summary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Executive Summary of the final Southeastern Regional Geologic Characterization Report (RGCR) is issued primarily for public information purposes, and provides a general overview of the report. The complete RGCR presents available regional geologic information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in central Maryland; noncoastal Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina; and northern Georgia. For each of the states within the Southeastern Region, information is provided on the geologic disqualifying factor and the geologic regional screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening

  2. Central Coast Region South District Basin Planning & Habitat Mapping Project

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Jessica; Casagrande, Julie; Watson, Fred

    2008-01-01

    This is a report to the California Department of Fish and Game. Between 2003 and 2008, the Foundation of CSUMB produced fish habitat maps and GIS layers for CDFG based on CDFG field data. This report describes the data entry, mapping, and website construction procedures associated with the project. Included are the maps that have been constructed. This report marks the completion of the Central Coast region South District Basin Planning and Habitat Mapping Project. (Document contains 40 pages)

  3. Exploration of the South-Eastern Alps lithosphere with 3D refraction seismics project Alp 2002 – data acquisition in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gosar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Using combined seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection method project Alp 2002 explored the contact zone between South-Eastern Alps, Dinarides and Pannonian basin. In a network of 12 profiles of 4100 km total length, which are spread over seven countries,1055 portable seismographs were deployed and 31 strong (300 kg explosions fired. In Slovenia 127 seismographs were deployed along five profiles totalling 575 km and two explosions fired near Vojnik and Gradin. The collected data will allow construction of athree-dimensional model of the lithosphere and will contribute to the understanding of the tectonics and geodynamics at the junction of European, Adriatic and Tisza plates.

  4. Oceanographic data collected during the Sanctuary Quest: Investigating Marine Sanctuaries 2002 on NOAA Ship McArthur in North Pacific Ocean, California coast from 2002-04-24 to 2002-06-20 (NCEI Accession 0072307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. coast from southern California to Washington state features vast areas of submerged mountain ranges, canyons, plateaus, volcanoes, basins, rocky outcrops,...

  5. L'évolution paléoenvironnementale des faunes de poissons du Crétacé supérieur du bassin du Tafilalt et des régions avoisinantes (Sud-Est du Maroc) : implications paléobiogéographiquesPalaeoenvironmental evolution of the fish assemblages from the Late Cretaceous of the Tafilalt basin and surrounding areas, southeastern Morocco: palaeogeographical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, Lionel; Boudad, Larbi; Duffaud, Sylvain; Kabiri, Lahcen; Le Lœuff, Jean; Rouget, Isabelle; Tong, Haiyan

    2001-11-01

    A critical revision of published data along with new field data allow to draw up the succession of the fish faunas from the Lower Cenomanian to the Lower Turonian in the Tafilalt basin and surrounding areas (southeast Morocco). The analysis of these faunas shows changes from freshwater to marine palaeoenvironments. The palaeogeographic distribution of some taxa is discussed. It shows that the crossing of strictly freshwater organisms between Africa and South America was likely impossible at the time of the formation of the deposits resting around the Tafilalt basin and named 'Kem Kem beds'. The Cenomano-Turonian transgression reached the Erfoud-Errachidia carbonate platform from the Central Tethys, and then connected the central Atlantic.

  6. Rock mechanics evaluation of potential repository sites in the Paradox, Permian, and Gulf Coast Basins: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and thermomechanical analyses of a conceptual radioactive waste repository containing commercial and defense high-level wastes and spent fuel have been performing using finite element models. The thermal and thermomechanical responses of the waste package, disposal room, and repository regions were evaluated. four bedded salt formations, in Davis and Lavender Canyons in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah and in Deaf Smith and Swisher counties in the Permian Basin of northwestern Texas, and three salt domes, Vacherie Dome in northwestern Louisiana and Richton and Cypress Creek Domes in southeastern Mississippi, located in the Gulf Coast Basin, were examined. In the Paradox Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was much greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closure was less than 10 percent after 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Permian Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Gulf Coast Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. No significant thermomechanical perturbation of the overlying geology was observed. 40 refs., 153 figs., 32 tabs

  7. Is deforestation driving Southeastern Amazonia's hydrological transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M. E.; Lee, E.; Farinosi, F.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Pereira, F. F.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in forest cover are critical for the maintenance of the hydrological cycle in tropical forests and surrounding landscapes. Most evidence suggesting impacts of deforestation on river flows comes from local scale and short duration experiments, but these are largely prohibited in vast and inaccessible areas of the Amazon. Although rainfall-runoff models are commonly used to scale up deforestation effects to regional scales and multidecadal time ranges, most of these models assume static land use/land cover, excluding temporal variability in human disturbance in decadal long simulations. This presentation will present a study carried out in the Tapajos River in Brazil, a large basin in southeast Amazonia, where we aim to understand the role of human disturbance and vegetation dynamics on river flows. This study analyzed spatial and temporal trends in observed rainfall, forest cover, and river flow indicators for 1970s to 2000s. During this period, no significant changes occur in total annual rainfall, while over 140,000 km2 (35% of original cover) of forest were cleared. Contrary to the expected response following deforestation, 90-day minimum river flows showed a significant decrease though most gauges in the basin. In order to isolate deforestation effects, two contrasting scenarios were computed at a daily scale using the Ecosystem Demography Model 2 in combination with a water flow routing scheme; the first scenario incorporated natural disturbance resembling 1970 forest conditions, while the second scenario incorporated both natural and human disturbance (aka., land use conversion), the later as observed annually from the 1970s to the 2000s. We estimated that deforestation began affecting dry season flows in the early 1990s once less than 10% of the original forest cover was lost. Also, a potential effect of deforestation on the timing of rainfall-flow responses was also detected in the lower river gauges. While the estimated effects on timing are also

  8. Accounting for California Water

    OpenAIRE

    Escriva-Bou, Alvar; McCann, Henry; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay; Gray, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding California’s water balance sheet—how much there is, who has claims to it, and what is actually being “spent”—is key to effectively managing the state’s limited water supply in support of a healthy economy and environment. The latest drought has spotlighted serious gaps in California’s water accounting system. California is a large, geographically diverse state, and its water systems are physically interconnected and institutionally fragmented. Water infrastructure connects the s...

  9. Development of An Integrated Hydrologic Model in Yolo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y.; Taghavi, A.; Stevenson, M.; Najmus, S.

    2006-12-01

    To more efficiently use the Cache Creek flows and the groundwater basin as the sources of water supply and to restore the riparian ecosystem along the Cache Creek, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (YCFCWCD) in Woodland, California plans to conduct the Cache Creek Groundwater Recharge and Recovery Program (CCGRRP). The concept of this program is to operate the groundwater basin to induce greater amounts of groundwater recharge from Cache Creek directly along the creek and to increase the recharge even further by diverting rainy season water at the District's Capay Diversion Dam into the West Adams Canal to a few recharge basins outside the active channel of Cache Creek. Besides the CCGRRP, cities of Woodland and Davis are in the process of conducting groundwater management plans, and the stakeholders in Yolo County developing a long-term integrated regional water management plan (IRWMP) for the entire county. To effectively evaluate the benefits and impacts of CCGRRP, local groundwater management plans, and the Yolo County IRWMP, the Integrated Groundwater and Surface water Model (IGSM) was applied to the Yolo groundwater basin. The IGSM is a comprehensive integrated hydrologic model that simulates both surface water and groundwater flow systems, including rainfall-runoff, soil moisture accounting and unsaturated flow, crop consumptive module, stream-aquifer interaction, and groundwater flow. The finite element code was originally developed in 1990 for the California Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board. The IGSM code has subsequently been applied to more than 25 groundwater basins in California and other states. The model code has been peer reviewed and upgraded throughout its application to various projects, with the latest upgrade in 2004, as part of the application to the Stony Creek Fan area of Sacramento Valley. The Yolo County IGSM (YCIGSM) was calibrated against the historical (1970

  10. The impact of Kuroshio water on the source water of the southeastern Taiwan Strait:numerical results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wenzhou; ZHUANG Xuefen; CHEN Chentung Arthur; HUANG Tinghsuan

    2015-01-01

    Model output from a Pacific basin-wide three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model during the period of 1991 to 2008 was used to investigate the impact of Kuroshio water on the source water of the southeastern Taiwan Strait. Based on the characteristic salinities of both Kuroshio water and the South China Sea water, a Kuroshio impact index (KII) was designed to measure the degree of impact. The KII correlates significantly with the northeast-southwest component of wind stress, but the former lags the latter by approximately two months. The correlation coefficient between them increases from 0.267 4 to 0.852 9, with a lag time increasing from 0 to 63 days. The impact of Kuroshio Water is greater in winter and spring than in summer and autumn. At the interannual time scale, El Niño and La Niña events play an important role in impacting the KII. During El Niño events, more Kuroshio water contributes to the source water of the southeastern Taiwan Strait. Conversely, during La Niña events, less Kuroshio water contributes to the source water.

  11. Some Spatial Aspects of Southeastern United States Climatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Peter T.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the climatology of an eight-state region in the southern and southeastern United States. Discusses general controls of climate and spatial patterns of various climatic averages. Examines mapped extremes as a means of fostering increased awareness of the variability that exists for climatic conditions in the region. (CMK)

  12. Rabies in the insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Uieda

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the first recorded case of rabies in the insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis in the State of S. Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. The infected bat was found in the afternoon while hanging on the internal wall of an urban building. This observation reinforces the notion as to the caution one must exercise regarding bats found in unusual situations.

  13. Economics of conservation systems research in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of conservation systems in crop production is not a new concept in the southeastern United States. In 1978, researchers from across the Southeast met in Griffin, Georgia for the first annual Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference. Four of the ten presentations specifically men...

  14. Rabies in the insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uieda Wilson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first recorded case of rabies in the insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis in the State of S. Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. The infected bat was found in the afternoon while hanging on the internal wall of an urban building. This observation reinforces the notion as to the caution one must exercise regarding bats found in unusual situations.

  15. Effects of organophosphorus insecticides on sage grouse in southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, L.J.; Staley, C.S.; Henny, C.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Craig, T.H.; Craig, E.H.; Halford, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Unverified reports indicated die-offs of sage grouse have occurred since the 1970s in southeastern Idaho. Some verification that organophosphorus insecticides were involved was obtained in 1981 and 1983. A radio telemetry study indicated that dimethoate was responsible for most mortality. Methamidophos also acounted for mortality. Sage grouse populations may be adversely affected by organophosphorus insecticides.

  16. Social Compact in Electricity Privatization in Southeastern Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Darendeliler, Zeynep; Aydin, Cansu

    2015-01-01

    About 70 percent of electricity users in Southeastern Turkey are not used to paying for electricity, partially due to the protracted situation of conflict and lack of trust between citizens and the government in the region. Historic tension throughout the 1990s caused an inability for the government to invest in electricity infrastructure and has resulted in low service quality. A large po...

  17. Assessing Li and other leachable geochemical proxies for paleo-salinity in lake sediments from the Mono Basin, CA (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahajpal, Rahul; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Datta, Saugata; Hemming, N. Gary; Hemming, Sidney R.

    2011-12-01

    Regional climate-driven hydrological changes are accompanied by salinity changes in closed basin lakes. We have investigated acid leachable Li, along with other leachable ions including Mg, Ca and Sr, as geochemical proxies of salinity in lake sediments in the Mono Basin, California. All the elements in the acid leachable suite show a strong correlation with paleo-lake level estimates based on physical and stratigraphic evidence. The CaCO 3 content of lake sediments, which has been shown to be a reliable proxy for lake level changes in the Mono basin and the adjoining Owens Lake basin, corresponds well with our acid-leachable proxy data.

  18. Determination of Heterogeneity by High-Resolution Seismic Reservoir Characterization in the Heavy Oil Temblor Reservoir of Coalinga Field, California

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Sailendra Nath

    2005-01-01

    The research focuses on analysis and subsurface imaging of siliciclastics rocks on steam-affected 3D poststack seismic data, merged from different vintages, from the Temblor Formation in the Coalinga heavy oil reservoir in the San Joaquin basin, California. The objective was identification, delineation, and demarcation of reservoir heterogeneities by seismostratigraphic and seismogeomorphic analysis. The proximity of the San Andreas Transforms greatly controlled basin evolution and ca...

  19. Oral bacterial microbiota and traumatic injuries of free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines, Chelidae in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno O. Ferronato

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 and 2007, we collected free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus, from two anthropogenically altered rivers in southeastern Brazil. Oral microbiological samples were taken for isolation of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria; a physical examination was performed;and we evaluated possible effects on the turtles’ health. Twenty-nine species of bacteria were isolated in Piracicaba River turtles (n=10, and twenty-four species in Piracicamirim stream turtles (n=8, most of them gram-negative. In both sites, potential pathogens for reptiles were: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter agglomerans, Citrobacter freundii, and Bacillus sp. Although boatpropeller lesions were common on the carapace of the turtles, we have not found turtles with signs of clinical diseases. The oral bacterial microbiota of P. geoffroanus inhabiting the Piracicaba River basin are composed of a diverse microbe spectrum, and long-term studies of the effects of pollution and traumatic injuries on this population and its microbial flora are warranted.

  20. Archean inheritance in zircon from late Paleozoic granites from the Avalon zone of southeastern New England: an African connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartman, R.E.; Don, Hermes O.

    1987-01-01

    In southeastern New England the Narragansett Pier Granite locally intrudes Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks of the Narragansett basin, and yields a monazite UPb Permian emplacement age of 273 ?? 2 Ma. Zircon from the Narragansett Pier Granite contains a minor but detectable amount of an older, inherited component, and shows modern loss of lead. Zircon from the late-stage, aplitic Westerly Granite exhibits a more pronounced lead inheritance -permitting the inherited component to be identified as Late Archean. Such old relict zircon has not been previously recognized in Proterozoic to Paleozoic igneous rocks in New England, and may be restricted to late Paleozoic rocks of the Avalon zone. We suggest that the Archean crustal component reflects an African connection, in which old Archean crust was underplated to the Avalon zone microplate in the late Paleozoic during collision of Gondwanaland with Avalonia. ?? 1987.

  1. Sedimentary basin analysis and petroleum potential of the Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in Korea.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jin-Dam; Kwak, Young-Hoon; Bong, Pil-Yoon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Since 1992 sedimentary basin analysis to assess petroleum potential of the Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Korean onshore and continental shelf have been carried out. The Cretaceous non-marine strata mainly occupy the Gyeongsang Basin in southeastern part of the Korean Peninsula and small basins such as Haenam and Gyeokpo depressions in western coastal areas. The Tertiary strata are mostly distributed in Domi, Cheju, Socotra subbasins, and Okinawa Trough in the South Continental Shelf, and Kunsan and Heuksan basins in the West. The basin evolution and petroleum potential for each basins are characterized as follow. The Cretaceous Gyeongsang sediments were deposited in three subbasins including Milyang, Euisung and Yongyang subbasins. The black shales in Nakdong and Jinju formations are interpreted to contain abundant organic matter during the deposition, thermal maturity reaching up to the zone of dry gas formation. Because porosity and permeability are too low, the sandstones can act as a tight gas reservoir rather than conventional oil and gas reservoir. The latest Cretaceous strata of Haenam and Kyeokpo depressions in western coastal area are correlated into the Yuchon Volcanic Group of the Gyeongsang Basin. Petroleum potential of the Early Cretaceous basin in the West Continental Shelf could be relatively high in terms of sedimentary basin filled with thick lacustrine sediments. The Kunsan basin in the West Continental Shelf originated in the Early Cretaceous time expanded during the Paleocene time followed by regional erosion at the end of Paleocene on which Neogene sediment have been accumulated. The Paleocene-Eocene sublacustrine shales may play an major role as a source and cap rocks. South Continental Shelf Basin is subdivided by Cheju subbasin in the center, Socotra Subbasin to the west, Domi Subbasin to the northeast and Okinawa Trough to the East. The potential hydrocarbon traps associated with anticline, titled fault blocks, fault, unconformity

  2. Research to More Effectively Manage Critical Ground-Water Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, James

    2008-01-01

    As the regional management agency for two of the most heavily used ground-water basins in California, the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) plays a vital role in sheparding the water resources of southern Los Angeles County. WRD is using the results of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies to help more effectively manage the Central and West Coast basins in the most efficient, cost-effective way. In partnership with WRD, the USGS is using the latest research tools to study the geohydrology and geochemistry of the two basins. USGS scientists are: *Drilling and collecting detailed data from over 40 multiple-well monitoring sites, *Conducting regional geohydrologic and geochemical analyses, *Developing and applying a computer simulation model of regional ground-water flow. USGS science is providing a more detailed understanding of ground-water flow and quality. This research has enabled WRD to more effectively manage the basins. It has helped the District improve the efficiency of its spreading ponds and barrier injection wells, which replenish the aquifers and control seawater intrusion into the ground-water system.

  3. The role of tropical modes of variability in recent rainfall deficits across the Murray-Darling Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbal, B.; Hendon, H.

    2011-12-01

    Southeastern Australia has been experiencing ongoing rainfall deficits since 1997. The spatial extent of the current drought closely corresponds to those regions where rainfall is influenced by interannual variations in the intensity of the subtropical ridge. An upward trend in the intensity of the subtropical ridge thus provides an explanation for the recent rainfall deficit. The possibility that slow variations in tropical modes of variability that are known to influence rainfall in the region, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, may have contributed to southeastern Australia rainfall deficits is investigated using a tripole sea surface temperature index. This index takes into account key influences on Australian climate from variations in both the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The tripole index correlates well with rainfall variations across southeastern Australia on interannual to decadal time scales in winter and spring but not in autumn when most of the recent rainfall deficits have occurred. The influence of tropical sea surface temperature (SST) variations associated with the tripole on southeastern Australian rainfall is explained in terms of Rossby wave propagation, which helps us to understand why the impact is stronger in the southern half of the Murray-Darling Basin and why there is no relationship in autumn. On the basis of the linear relationship between the tripole SST variation and rainfall across the Murray-Darling Basin, we conclude that tropical SSTs have not contributed to the observed rainfall deficiencies in southeast Australia since 1997 but did contribute to the 1935-1945 rainfall deficits.

  4. Variations in Moho and Curie depths and heat flow in Eastern and Southeastern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The Eastern and Southeastern Asian regions witness the strongest land-ocean and lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. The extreme diversity of geological features warrants a unified study for a better understanding of their geodynamic uniqueness and/or ubiquity from a regional perspective. In this paper we have explored a large coverage of potential field data and have detected high resolution Moho and Curie depths in the aforementioned regions. The oldest continental and oceanic domains, i.e. the North China craton and the Pacific and Indian Ocean have been found thermally perturbed by events probably linked to small-scale convection or serpentinization in the mantle and to numerous volcanic seamounts and ridges. The thermal perturbation has also been observed in proximity of the fossil ridge of the western Philippine Sea Basin, which shows anomalously small Curie depths. The western Pacific marginal seas have the lowest Moho temperature, with Curie depths generally larger than Moho depths. The contrary is true in most parts of easternmost Eurasian continent. Magmatic processes feeding the Permian Emeishan large igneous province could have also been genetically linked to deep mantle/crustal processes beneath the Sichuan Basin. The regionally elongated magnetic features and small Curie depths along the Triassic Yangtze-Indochina plate boundary suggest that the igneous province could be caused by tectonic processes along plate margins, rather than by a deep mantle plume. At the same time, we interpret the Caroline Ridge, the boundary between the Pacific and the Caroline Sea, as a structure having a continental origin, rather than as hotspot or arc volcanism. The surface heat flow is primarily modulated by a deep isotherm through thermal conduction. This concordance is emphasized along many subduction trenches, where zones of large Curie depths often correspond with low heat flow. Local or regional surface heat flow variations cannot be faithfully used in inferring

  5. Obesity in California, 2012 and 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These data are from the 2013 California Dietary Practices Surveys (CDPS), 2012 California Teen Eating, Exercise and Nutrition Survey (CalTEENS), and 2013 California...

  6. California community water systems inventory dataset, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains information about all Community Water Systems in California. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW) Water Quality...

  7. Melo carboniferous basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is about of the Melo carboniferous basin which limits are: in the South the large and high Tupambae hill, in the west the Paraiso hill and the river mountains, in the North Yaguaron river basin to Candidata in Rio Grande del Sur in Brazil.

  8. Holocene dynamics of vegetation change in southern and southeastern Brazil is consistent with climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jackson Martins; Behling, Hermann; Giesecke, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    At mid to high northern latitudes postglacial vegetation change has often occurred synchronously over large regions triggered mainly by abrupt climate change. Based on 19 pollen diagrams from southern and southeastern Brazil we explore if similar synchronicities in vegetation change were also characteristic for the vegetation dynamics in low latitudes. We used sequence splitting to detect past vegetation change in the pollen diagrams and computed principal curves and rates of change to visually evaluate the changes in composition and dynamics. The results show that vegetation change occurred mostly during the second half of the Holocene with distinct episodes of change. The character of vegetation change is generally consistent with shifts to wetter conditions and agrees with inferred shifts of the South American Monsoon. Speleothems as well as the titanium record from the Cariaco Basin indicate several episodes of rapid shifts in the precipitation regime, which are within the dating uncertainty of the here detected periods of vegetation change (8900, 5900, 2800, 1200 and 550 cal yrs BP). Our results indicate that low latitude vegetation composition follows precession forcing of the hydrology, while change is often triggered and synchronized by rapid climate change much like in high and mid latitudes. Pollen diagrams document changes in the abundance of individual taxa and changes in the amount of woodland cover, while small compositional changes indicate a regional stability of vegetation types during the Holocene.

  9. Distribution and sources of organic matter in sediments of the south-eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeikaitė-Nikienė, Nijolė; Lujanienė, Galina; Malejevas, Vitalijus; Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Garnaga-Budrė, Galina; Stankevičius, Algirdas

    2016-05-01

    Temporal and spatial distribution of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) as well as its sources in the south-eastern Baltic Sea were investigated. Organic matter was characterized by the organic carbon content, δ13C and δ15N signatures and C/N ratios. The sampling was performed in the coastal, offshore areas and in the Curonian Lagoon in the period from May 2012 to September 2014. The average elemental (C/N ~ 6.4) and isotopic composition (δ13C from - 29.6‰ to - 24.9‰) of SOM suggested that during most of the year it was composed of both freshwater and marine phytoplanktonic material. Elevated δ15N values (average ranging from 5.6‰ to 6.7‰) were detected in SOM from the Curonian Lagoon. This most likely reflected the increased isotopic signal of the Nemunas River (δ15N ~ 8‰) derived from the anthropogenic input in the basin area. At the Baltic Sea offshore sites, SOM had lower δ15N values (δ15N ~ 3.5‰ on average), indicating phytoplankton blooms. A two-end member mixing model based on the carbon stable isotopic composition showed that a large proportion (~ 90%) of SOM in the northern part of the Curonian Lagoon was of the freshwater origin. The allochthonous organic matter accounted for about 47% of SOM in the studied Baltic Sea area with the highest contribution (about 75%) within the Curonian Lagoon plume zone in the coastal waters.

  10. Modeling River Hydrologic Regime and Spawning of Migratory Catfishes in Southeastern Peruvian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, C. M.; Waylen, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Seasonal hydrologic conditions and catfish larvae production were evaluated in the Madre de Dios River in order to determine whether environmental conditions influence the reproductive activity of a group of large, commercially important catfishes, in the Southeastern Peruvian Amazon. A simple stochastic model of floods is presented to describe the influence of the natural high flow regime on observed patterns of catfish larvae release and drifting. Daily river stage records at Puerto Maldonado are related to weekly larval catches to determine the association between flood and spawning events. On the basis of hydroclimatologic characteristics of Andean- Amazon regions, available long-term historical rainfall records are employed to approximate the likely inter- annual variability of floods within this Amazon headwater basin. Major larval drift appeared associated with stages of over the 5 m, or "Biologic Hydrologic Significant Events" (BSE), which act as triggers, or a reasonable surrogates, for spawning responses of these species. The timing of BSEs, estimated from the historical rainfall records, appear to be uniformly distributed during the rain season and their inter-arrival times exponential. These observations provided the basis of the stochastic model describing the likelihood of volumes of larvae releases from the headwater region to lowland Amazon. The ecologically significant role of the hydroclimatology of this region in the complete life cycle of this important Amazon fish resource is illustrated.

  11. Trace fossil assemblages in the tide-dominated estuarine system: Ameki Group, south-eastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwenye, O. C.; Nichols, G.; Okogbue, C. O.; Mode, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    A systematic ichnological analysis with sedimentological study of the Eocene Ameki Group in south-eastern Nigeria, was conducted to infer depositional and biogenic processes operating during basin fill, identify discontinuities using substrate controlled ichnofacies, and identify the paleocological conditions that affected the diversity of the trace fossils. The Ameki Group represents a tide-dominated estuarine system characterised by a range of trace fossils assemblages. Eighteen individual ichnogenera and nineteen ichnospecies observed in the study area, were grouped into six recurring ichnofacies namely Scoyenia, Psilonichnus, Skolithos, Cruziana, Glossifungites and Teredolites. Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies are predominant in the estuarine deposits indicating that the sedimentary successions of the Eocene are dominantly of moderate to high energy marginal marine environments. The estuarine deposits (senus stricto) were controlled by low to fluctuating salinity levels, high sedimentation rate and fluctuating hydrodynamic energy. These resulted in the occurrence of low diversity of Scoyenia and Teredolites ichnofacies and low to moderate ichnodiversity of mixed Skolithos and depauperate Cruziana ichnofacies. Low levels of dissolved oxygen in quiescent water-embayment (open estuarine) resulted in low diversity of impoverished Cruziana ichnofacies. Glossifungites ichnofacies marked an amalgamated sequence boundary/marine flooding and an initial flooding surface at the base of the tidally influenced fluvial deposits.

  12. Vertical deformation of lacustrine shorelines along breached relay ramps, Catlow Valley fault, southeastern Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael C.; Dawers, Nancye H.

    2016-04-01

    Vertical deformation of pluvial lacustrine shorelines is attributed to slip along the Catlow Valley fault, a segmented Basin and Range style normal fault in southeastern Oregon, USA. The inner edges of shorelines are mapped along three breached relay ramps along the fault to examine the effect of fault linkage on the distribution of slip. Shoreline inner edges act as paleohorizontal datums so deviations in elevation from horizontal, outside of a 2 m error window, are taken to be indications of fault slip. The sites chosen represent a spectrum of linkage scenarios in that the throw on the linking fault compared to that on the main fault adjacent to the linking fault varies from site to site. Results show that the maturity of the linkage between segments (i.e. larger throw on the linking fault with respect to the main fault) does not control the spatial distribution of shoreline deformation. Patterns of shoreline deformation indicate that the outboard, linking, and/or smaller ramp faults have slipped since the shorelines formed. Observations indicate that displacement has not fully localized on the linking faults following complete linkage between segments.

  13. Spatial and temporal pattern of erosion in the Three Rivers Region, southeastern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Fellin, Maria Giuditta; Herman, Frédéric; Willett, Sean D.; Wang, Wei; Maden, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Convergence and collision between India and Eurasia have produced the Tibetan Plateau, which stands 5 km high over a region of 3 million km2. Its southeastern margin lies in the restraining bend between the Sichuan basin and the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. In this region three parallel rivers, the Salween, the Mekong and the Yangtze, carve gorges up to 3 km deep. Along the longitudinal profiles, large-scale knickzones, defined by very high steepness, correspond to the gorges of the Salween and Mekong. The Yangtze, instead, has a nearly linear profile upstream from its first big bend. New low-temperature thermochronometric data reveal a complex pattern of erosion in the Three Rivers Region. From the Salween in the west to the Yangtze in the east the magnitude and rate of erosion decrease. From south-to-north erosion rates exhibit variable gradients in space and time. Along the Salween and the Mekong a northward increase of erosion rate is followed by a decrease with additional distance to the north. Variations of erosion rate in time are characterized by a deceleration along the Salween and a general deceleration with local acceleration along the Mekong. This pattern, together with river profile analysis, is best explained by active coupling between tectonics and river incision related to the indentation and northward migration of the corner of the Indian continent.

  14. Palynostratigraphy, palynofacies and palaeoenvironment of deposition of Selandian to Aquitanian sediments, southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Kingsley K.; Umeji, Obianuju P.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of outcrop sections along the Onitsha-Awka transect in the Niger Delta Basin southeastern Nigeria was undertaken to assess the palynological composition, palynofacies and palaeoenvironment of deposition. Stratigraphic ranges of palynomorphs suggest an age of Selandian to Aquitanian. The palynological composition is marked by abundance of dinoflagellate cysts in the Imo Formation (Selandian to Thanetian), dominance of spores and pollen over dinoflagellate cysts in the Nanka Formation (Ypresian to Bartonian), and overwhelming amounts of spore and pollen in the Ogwashi Formation (Pariabonian to Aquitanian). Palynofacies content shows dominance of structureless organic matter in the Imo Formation, few phytoclasts in the Nanka Formation and maximum phytoclast amounts in the Ogwashi Formation. Thanetian to Ypresian boundary was marked by the mixing of older Palaeocene and younger Eocene microfossils, decrease of microflora towards the end of Palaeocene and the evolution of abundant and more diverse Eocene taxa. The Imo Formation was deposited in middle to outer neritic zone based on abundance of gonyaulacacean cysts. However, peridiniacean and terrestrial microflora extend the deposition range to shallow waters of inner neritic and coastal zone. Increase in diversity and abundance of terrestrial palynomorphs over marine palynomorphs assemblages in the overlying Nanka Formation suggest deposition under alternating coastal and inner neritic conditions while the Ogwashi Formation records oscillating coastal plain and brackish water depositional conditions. The palaeoenvironments illustrate that general retrogradation was followed by progradation of the delta during the Cenozoic.

  15. K Basin safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall

  16. K Basin safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  17. Reconnaissance water-balance study of Lake Gregory, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaughy, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made to determine the magnitude and distribution of the surface-water inflow and outflow (water balance) of the Lake Gregory basin in southern California. Data were collected from April 1979 through June 1981. Runoff during the study period varied greatly with the majority of inflow occurring between December and May of each year. During 1980 and 1981 (through July 1981) precipitation totals at Lake Gregory were the maximum and minimum for the 19-year period of record. The average annual precipitation for the 3-year period 1979-81 was 47.4 inches, almost 10 inches greater than the long-term average, 1962-81, of 37.8 inches. Surface-water runoff in the Lake Gregory basin is highly dependent on annual precipitation, and total outflow for the 1980 water year and partial total for the 1981 (through June) water year was 7,230 acre-feet and 400 acre-feet, respectively. (USGS)

  18. California's geothermal resource potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    According to a U.S. Geological Survey estimate, recoverable hydrothermal energy in California may amount to 19,000 MW of electric power for a 30-year period. At present, a geothermal installation in the Geysers region of the state provides 502 MWe of capacity; an additional 1500 MWe of electric generating capacity is scheduled to be in operation in geothermal fields by 1985. In addition to hydrothermal energy sources, hot-igneous and conduction-dominated resources are under investigation for possible development. Land-use conflicts, environmental concerns and lack of risk capital may limit this development.

  19. Iso-Naakkima, a circular structure filled with Neoproterozoic sediments, Pieksämäki, southeastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elo, S.

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A circular Bouguer gravity anomaly with a minimum of -4.0 mGal and halfamplitude width of 2 km was recognized at Lake Iso-Naakkima (62°11'N, 27°09'E, southeastern Finland. The gravity low is associated with subdued aeromagnetic signature and notable airborne and ground electromagnetic anomalies that indicate low bedrock resistivity. The drilling record beneath the recent (Quaternary glacial sediments, 25-40 m thick, reveals a 100 m thick sequence of unmetamorphosed shale, siltstone, quartz sandstone, kaolinitic clay and conglomeratic sandstone that rest on a weathered mica gneiss basement. The upward fining sequence is characterized by red colour, high kaolinite content, and tilted, distorted and brecciated beds. According to the geophysical modelling the diameter of the whole basin is 3 km and that of the sedimentary rocks 2 km, and the depth is 160 m. Shock lamellas in quartz clasts of the basal conglomeratic sandstone, almost omnipresent kink banding in micas of the rocks beneath the basin floor and the occurrence of polymictic dike breccia in the underlying mica gneiss suggest shock metamorphism. It was concluded that the basin originated by a meteorite impact. However, the impact-generated rocks were subsequently eroded before the sedimentation and only minor marks of shock metamorphism were preserved. Lateritic weathering took place prior to deposition of the sediments. Quartz sandstone and siltstone are interpreted as fluvial deposits and the thinly laminated shales as transgressi ve lacustrine or lagoonal deposits. The microfossil assemblage in the shale includes sphaeromorphs of acritarchs from Late Riphean (Neoproterozoic. Postdepositional subsidence of the Iso-Naakkima basin, shown by tilted sediments, preserved the sequence from further erosion.

  20. California Tiger Salamander Range - CWHR [ds588

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model...

  1. California Fish Passage Assessment Database [ds69

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Passage Assessment Database shapefile contains locations of known and potential barriers to salmonid migration in California streams with additional information...

  2. Giant Reed Distribution - Northern California [ds333

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Arundo Distribution layer is a compilation of Arundo donax observations in northern and central California, obtained from several sources, including Arundo...

  3. Mediterranean fruit fly preventative release programme in southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    adjacent areas in Mexico are developing an area-wide pink bollworm eradication programme that will use sterile moths as its primary management tool. In 1993, CDFA found itself faced with a Medfly situation that required a change in the methodology used to eradicate such Medfly infestations were eradicated from California. Medfly infestations had been found each year since 1987 with the number of wild Medflies detected decreasing only after a large aerial malathion and bait spray programme in 1989-90 (Dowell et al. 1999). Four hundred wild Medfly adults were trapped in 39 cities in five southern California counties in 1993; these finds represented 35 discrete core infestations whose treatment boundaries were merging together as had been seen in 1989-90 (Dowell and Penrose 1995, Penrose 1996). In response, the USDA formed an international Medfly science advisory panel to help develop a proactive approach to dealing with Medfly invasions in southern California. Based on advice from this panel, the CDFA /USDA/County Agricultural Commissioners (CAC) began a Medfly sterile release programme on 1 March 1994 over a 3,791 km2 area of the Los Angeles basin to eradicate extant Medfly infestations. This basin-wide programme used the continuous release of 96,500 sterile Medflies per km2 per week for a two-year period. The release rate was the upper limit of that used successfully in Mexico in their Medfly eradication/exclusion programme (Schwarz et al. 1989). Prior to the start of the basin-wide programme, ground sprays of malathion and bait were applied to all hosts within a 200 m radius of all fly finds. The basin-wide programme was designed to eradicate all extant Medfly infestations, and to prevent new infestations from becoming established (Dowell and Penrose 1995). The capture of wild Medflies within the treatment boundaries dropped from 400 in 1993 to no wild Medflies in 1995. In 1996, a single, unusually desiccated, undyed male Medfly was trapped the day after the programme

  4. Experts Question California's Algebra Edict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Business leaders from important sectors of the American economy have been urging schools to set higher standards in math and science--and California officials, in mandating that 8th graders be tested in introductory algebra, have responded with one of the highest such standards in the land. Still, many California educators and school…

  5. Resource Cards on California Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This convenient spiral-bound volume contains the latest data on school finance as well as information on students, teachers, and California's accountability system. The 37-card 2007 edition provides fingertip access to the latest information about California's education system. They are separated into sections that cover related topics. Each…

  6. Female Superintendent Longevity in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, through narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), the leadership evolution of five female superintendents in California with longevity of 5 or more years in their current school district positions. The research question addressed was, "How do California female superintendents evolve to…

  7. Hydrogen energy system in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiences on the use of hydrogen as a clean burning fuel in California and results of the South Coast Air Quality Management district tests using hydrogen as a clean burning environmentally safe fuel are given. The results of Solar Hydrogen Projects in California and recent medical data documentation of human lung damage of patients living in air polluted urban areas are summarized

  8. Crustal and upper-mantle structure of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau from joint analysis of surface wave dispersion and receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkui; Zhang, Shuangxi; Wang, Fang; Wu, Tengfei; Qin, Weibing

    2016-03-01

    Researches on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau provide important insights into the tectonic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we have constructed a high-resolution 3D shear-wave velocity model through joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion data. The crustal thickness and Poisson's ratio models are first determined by H-k stacking of receiver functions. The crustal thickness changes from 30 km in the south to 62 km in the north, presenting strong lateral variations. The fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave dispersion data spanning periods from 8 to 65 s were then jointly used to constraint the absolute shear-wave velocity. The shear-wave velocity structure shows lateral variations. There are low velocity zones distributed in the crust and upper mantle. Two continuously distributed low velocity zones are clearly presented in the middle-to-lower crust, which extend from north toward southeast and southwest, respectively, joining together in southern Yunnan. In this study, we deduced the migration model of soft materials in middle-to-lower crust in southeastern Tibetan Plateau, which explains that the resistance from Sichuan Basin separates the flowing materials from Tibetan Plateau into southeast and northwest branches. They flow along the west margin of Sichuan Basin and then extrude out from northeastern and southeastern Tibetan Plateau respectively. The southeast branch is blocked and cannot flow in the entire crust. It is limited in a certain range of depths and channels. The two low velocity zones in this study possibly present two flow channels of the middle-to-lower crustal materials extruded from the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Evidence for Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in California?s Central Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The California Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented a program to assess the susceptibility of groundwater resources. Advanced techniques such as groundwater age dating using the tritium-helium method, extensive use of oxygen isotopes of the water molecule ((delta)18O) for recharge water provenance, and analysis of common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-low levels are applied with the goal of assessing the contamination vulnerability of deep aquifers, which are frequently used for public drinking water supply. Over 1200 public drinking water wells have been tested to date, resulting in a very large, tightly spaced collection of groundwater ages in some of the heavily exploited groundwater basins of California. Smaller scale field studies that include shallow monitoring wells are aimed at assessing the probability that nitrate will be transported to deep drinking water aquifers. When employed on a basin-scale, groundwater ages are an effective tool for identifying recharge areas, defining flowpaths, and determining the rate of transport of water and entrained contaminants. De-convolution of mixed ages, using ancillary dissolved noble gas data, gives insight into the water age distribution drawn at a well, and into the effective dilution of contaminants such as nitrate at long-screened production wells. In combination with groundwater ages, low-level VOCs are used to assess the impact of vertical transport. Special studies are focused on the fate and transport of nitrate with respect to vulnerability of aquifers in agricultural and formerly agricultural areas

  10. Evidence for Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in California?s Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Leif, R; Esser, B K; Singleton, M J

    2005-12-13

    The California Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented a program to assess the susceptibility of groundwater resources. Advanced techniques such as groundwater age dating using the tritium-helium method, extensive use of oxygen isotopes of the water molecule ({delta}{sup 18}O) for recharge water provenance, and analysis of common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-low levels are applied with the goal of assessing the contamination vulnerability of deep aquifers, which are frequently used for public drinking water supply. Over 1200 public drinking water wells have been tested to date, resulting in a very large, tightly spaced collection of groundwater ages in some of the heavily exploited groundwater basins of California. Smaller scale field studies that include shallow monitoring wells are aimed at assessing the probability that nitrate will be transported to deep drinking water aquifers. When employed on a basin-scale, groundwater ages are an effective tool for identifying recharge areas, defining flowpaths, and determining the rate of transport of water and entrained contaminants. De-convolution of mixed ages, using ancillary dissolved noble gas data, gives insight into the water age distribution drawn at a well, and into the effective dilution of contaminants such as nitrate at long-screened production wells. In combination with groundwater ages, low-level VOCs are used to assess the impact of vertical transport. Special studies are focused on the fate and transport of nitrate with respect to vulnerability of aquifers in agricultural and formerly agricultural areas.

  11. 1991 : California gas wars explode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2008-06-15

    In 1991, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) made an attempt to make the California energy market more competitive and targeted the long-standing relationship between gas producers in Alberta and California's gas distributor Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E). The utility's buying division, Alberta and Southern Gas, had offered a new contract to Alberta producers that would have resulted in a 25 per cent price reduction. The market represented $1 billion annual revenue for Alberta producers, with 40 per cent of Canadian gas exports going to California. The former chief economist with the United States Senate Energy Committee estimated that Alberta producers were overcharging California ratepayers by $250 million per year. Other key events in 1991 included the National Energy Board's announcement that it would move its headquarters to Calgary, and Nova Corporation sold its 43 per cent stake in Husky Oil. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  12. Wada basin boundaries and basin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusse, H.E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    In dynamical systems examples are common in which two or more attractors coexist, and in such cases the basin boundary is nonempty. We consider a two-dimensional diffeomorphism F (that is, F is an invertible map and both F and its inverse are differentiable with continuous derivatives), which has at

  13. Progress in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gipe, P.

    1990-01-01

    Though the wind energy continues to take it on the chin in the rough and tumble of California's celebrity politics, several indicators are pointing toward a modest revival. First several new reports laud wind energy at good sites as now competitive with conventional sources. Second, utility subsidiaries are signaling their approval by cautiously venturing into the technology. Also, technological refinements and reorganizations continue while a demand for new generating capacity may be developing in the state. Three new reports all paint a picture of wind energy finally coming of age. The California Energy Commission's most recent Energy Technology Status report says that wind-generated electricity is competitive with coal, oil, gas, and most other technologies. Similarly, a staff report found that after tallying the economic, social, and environmental costs, wind was one of the least cost sources of new generation. Most recently the Electric Power Research Institute's Journal reported the wind energy, at about 8 cents/k Wh, is equivalent to generation from conventional sources.

  14. Preliminary Geologic Map of the San Fernando 7.5' Quadrangle, Southern California: A Digital Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerkes, R.F., (compiler)

    1997-01-01

    The city of San Fernando sits atop a structurally complex, sedimentologically diverse, and tectonically evolving late Tertiary-Quaternary basin situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The surrounding San Fernando Valley (SFV) contains the headwaters of the Los Angeles River and its tributaries. Prior to the advent of flood control, the valley floor was composed of active alluvial fans and floodplains. Seasonal streams emanating from Pacoima and Big Tujunga Canyons drain the complex western San Gabriel Mountains and deposit coarse, highly permeable alluvium that contains generally high-quality ground water. The more shallow western part derives mainly from Tertiary and pre-Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and is underlain by less permeable, fine-grained deposits containing persistent shallow ground water and poorer water quality. Home of the 1971 San Fernando and the 1994 Northridge earthquakes, the SFV experienced near-record levels of strong ground motion in 1994 that caused widespread damage from strong shaking and ground failure. A new map of late Quaternary deposits of the San Fernando area shows that the SFV is a structural trough that has been filled from the sides, with the major source of sediment being large drainages in the San Gabriel Mountains. Deposition on the major alluvial fan of Tujunga Wash and Pacoima Wash, which issues from the San Gabriel Mountains, and on smaller fans, has been influenced by ongoing compressional tectonics in the valley. Late Pleistocene deposits have been cut by active faults and warped over growing folds. Holocene alluvial fans are locally ponded behind active uplifts. The resulting complex pattern of deposits has a major effect on liquefaction hazards. Young sandy sediments generally are highly susceptible to liquefaction where they are saturated, but the distribution of young deposits, their grain size characteristics, and the level of ground water all are complexly dependent on the tectonics of the valley

  15. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes of Permo-Carboniferous sandstones in central Inner Mongolia, China: Implications for provenance and tectonic evolution of the southeastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Ke; Yu, Haifei; Wu, Tairan

    2016-03-01

    The tectonic setting of the southeastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) during the Late Paleozoic has been debated for many years. Provenance analysis of Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary rocks can effectively address this issue. In this study, eight sandstone samples were collected for zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses combined with petrographic analysis. Framework petrography and zircon morphology suggest that the samples were from recycled orogen of an igneous origin. Carboniferous rocks, with a significant age peak at 432 Ma and εHf (t) values of - 9.0 to 13.6, were mainly derived from Early to Mid-Paleozoic magmatic rocks and deposited in a piedmont zone, namely, the margin of an inland sea. Permian rocks, mostly with age peaks at 445 Ma and/or 280 Ma and εHf (t) values of - 25.2 to 11.4, dominantly originated from a pre-existing Early to Mid-Paleozoic magmatic arc and Late Paleozoic igneous rocks. These rocks formed in restricted basins of the piedmont and intermountain zones. Based on zircon spectral discrimination, sedimentary environmental analysis, and previous studies, this study supports the interpretation that the southeastern CAOB entered stages of extension and rifting during the Late Paleozoic. In the end, this study proposes a tectonic-paleogeographic reconstruction to explain the tectonic evolution of the southeastern CAOB and the exhumation-transportation-deposition processes between the basins and ranges developed in this orogen.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. PMID:26774058

  17. Ecosystem vulnerability to climate change in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Costanza, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Two recent investigations of climate-change vulnerability for 19 terrestrial, aquatic, riparian, and coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States have identified a number of important considerations, including potential for changes in hydrology, disturbance regimes, and interspecies interactions. Complementary approaches using geospatial analysis and literature synthesis integrated information on ecosystem biogeography and biodiversity, climate projections, vegetation dynamics, soil and water characteristics, anthropogenic threats, conservation status, sea-level rise, and coastal flooding impacts. Across a diverse set of ecosystems—ranging in size from dozens of square meters to thousands of square kilometers—quantitative and qualitative assessments identified types of climate-change exposure, evaluated sensitivity, and explored potential adaptive capacity. These analyses highlighted key gaps in scientific understanding and suggested priorities for future research. Together, these studies help create a foundation for ecosystem-level analysis of climate-change vulnerability to support effective biodiversity conservation in the southeastern United States.

  18. Analysis of Climate Change in Southeastern Bulgaria and Northwestern Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of climate change in two neighbor regions in Bulgaria and Turkey was done. Annual and seasonal variability of air temperature and precipitation in Southeastern Bulgaria and Northwestern Turkey during the period 1961-2000 was studied. Different sources were used to complete the required input weather data. For assessing climate trends some techniques such as anomalies, polynomial, linear fit, moving average as well as the Mann-Kendall test were applied. Drought episodes during the late 20th century in the selected regions were defined and discussed. Climate change scenarios for the 21st century (e.g. 2020, 2050, 2080) were also created for Southeastern Bulgaria and Northwestern Turkey. HadCM3 scenarios (including A2 and B2 IPCC SRES emission scenarios) with high resolution (10'x 10') were applied for this purpose. A special attention was paid on the projected precipitation. (Author)

  19. Geothermometric evaluation of geothermal resources in southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, G.; Mattson, E. D.; McLing, T. L.; Palmer, C. D.; Smith, R. W.; Wood, T. R.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water from oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from chemical composition of thermal waters in southeastern Idaho using an inverse geochemical modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. The temperature estimates in the region varied from moderately warm (59 °C) to over 175 °C. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho, resulted in the highest reservoir temperature estimates in the region.

  20. INTERNET ADDICTION IN BALKAN AND SOUTH-EASTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis PETASAKIS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Internet has increased dramatically in recent years. Although there is no standardized definition of Internet addiction, there is acknowledgement among researchers that this phenomenon does exist. In this study, we identify various similarities and differences among people in the Balkan and South-Eastern European countries about Internet addiction. There are many factors such as cultural differences, gender differences, psychosocial variables, computer attitudes and time.We present the experience from studies concerning Internet addiction in all over the world. A specific research with the use of Young's 20-scale was also conducted in five Balkan and South-Eastern European countries (Republic of Moldova, Romania, Republic of Bulgaria, Hellenic Republic, Republic of Cyprus.The findings are interesting. Although there is a need for Interest using, there are also cases where the addiction, dependence and abuse is apparent.

  1. Reserves in western basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W. [Scotia Group, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  2. Karyotype of three Lonchophylla species (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) from Southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Brunna; Novaes, Roberto Leonan Morim; Aguieiras,Marcia; Souza, Renan de França; Esbérard, Carlos Eduardo Lustosa; Geise,Lena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lonchophylla Thomas, 1903 is a Neotropical bat genus that comprises 12 species, with little cytogenetic information available. Here we present the description of the karyotype of three species collected in Southeastern Brazil. Lonchophylla bokermanni Sazima, Vizotto & Taddei, 1978, Lonchophylla dekeyseri Taddei, Vizotto & Sazima, 1983, and Lonchophylla peracchii Dias, Moratelli & Esberard, 2013 showed the same diploid number 2n = 28 and the same autosomal fundamental number FNa = 50,...

  3. Stratigraphy and Tectonics of Southeastern Serenitatis. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results of investigations of returned Apollo 17 samples, and Apollo 15 and 17 photographs have provided a broad data base on which to interpret the southeastern Serenitatis region of the moon. Although many of the pre-Apollo 17 mission interpretations remain valid, detailed mapping of this region and correlation with earth-based and orbital remote-sensing data have resulted in a revision of the local mare stratigraphy.

  4. PROFIT MAXIMIZATION AS A MANAGEMENT GOAL ON SOUTHEASTERN MONTANA RANCHES

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Basudeb; Lacey, John R.; Workman, John P.; Siddoway, Francis H.

    1984-01-01

    While tests of producer rationality defined as conformity to the rules of profit maximization (or a similar postulate) for less developed countries are numerous, such tests for high-income countries are rare. This study investigates the extent of rationality observed in the production behavior of ranchers in southeastern Montana. The procedure used is that of Wise, Yotopoulos, and Nugent, based on a profit-maximizing production model. The data were collected by personal interviews for 69 ranc...

  5. Range Expansion of Metcalfa pruinosa (Homoptera: Fulgoroidea) in Southeastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Preda; Marius Skolka

    2011-01-01

    The citrus flatid planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, a Nearctic species of Fulgoroidea: Flatidae, was accidentally introduced in Europe, first in Italy in the late 1970’s. In a few decades, Metcalfa pruinosa has spread over most of Europe, finally reaching the Black Sea coast in 2009. Hundreds of individuals of different life stages were observed for the first time in the southeastern part of Romania throughout the summer of 2009 on several host plants: Hibiscus sy...

  6. Dynamic Factor Demands for Aggregate Southeastern United States Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Timothy G.; Monson, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    A four equation input demand system for aggregate Southeastern United States agriculture consistent with dynamic optimizing behavior is specified and estimated. Labor and materials are considered as variable inputs while land and capital are treated as quasi-fixed inputs. It is found that the adjustment rates for capital and land differ considerably and are interdependent. Further, the data appear consistent with the existence of an aggregate production technology and the hypothesized optimiz...

  7. A case control study of fowl pox in southeastern Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, David M.; Martin, S Wayne

    1990-01-01

    An outbreak of fowl pox, which occurred in south-eastern Ontario between July 1988 and April 1989, was investigated in the spring of 1989 to determine factors associated with the spread of the disease. Clinical fowl pox was confirmed on five farms (cases). Twenty-seven farms, out of 35 egg producers with quota from Durham region to Northumberland county, provided information as controls. Bivariate analyses were performed on mail survey data using Fisher's exact test and odds ratios. Although ...

  8. INTERNET ADDICTION IN BALKAN AND SOUTH-EASTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis PETASAKIS; Athanasios MANDILAS; Stavros VALSAMIDIS

    2012-01-01

    The use of Internet has increased dramatically in recent years. Although there is no standardized definition of Internet addiction, there is acknowledgement among researchers that this phenomenon does exist. In this study, we identify various similarities and differences among people in the Balkan and South-Eastern European countries about Internet addiction. There are many factors such as cultural differences, gender differences, psychosocial variables, computer attitudes and time. We presen...

  9. THE POTENTIAL FOR SUPPLY MANAGEMENT OF SOUTHEASTERN SWEET ONIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Epperson, James E.; Huang, Wan-Tran

    1994-01-01

    The degree of effectiveness of a marketing order limiting shipments was examined by simulating prices, shipments, and total revenue. The results suggest that a supply management marketing order would be beneficial to Southeastern sweet onion producers. These findings reinforce the importance of a marketing plan for achieving price and revenue goals over the course of a shipping season. Optimal control appears appropriate as a tool to determine intraseasonal shipment goals for a number of comm...

  10. SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA FARM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 2002 ANNUAL REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Nordquist, Dale W.; Westman, Lorin L.; Kent D. Olson

    2003-01-01

    The average net farm income was $64,666 for the 54 farms included in the 2002 annual report of the Southeastern Minnesota Farm Business Management Association. This was an increase of 6% from 2001. While gross cash farm income increased by 10%, total cash operating expenses increased substantially more, by 19%. This increase in expenses was offset by an increase in the value of inventories resulting primarily from higher crop yields and higher crop prices. As in previous years, the income lev...

  11. Zika Virus Emergence in Mosquitoes in Southeastern Senegal, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo, Diawo; Sall, Amadou A; Diagne, Cheikh T.; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Buenemann, Michaela; Weaver, Scott C.; Diallo, Mawlouth

    2014-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV; genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) is maintained in a zoonotic cycle between arboreal Aedes spp. mosquitoes and nonhuman primates in African and Asian forests. Spillover into humans has been documented in both regions and the virus is currently responsible for a large outbreak in French Polynesia. ZIKV amplifications are frequent in southeastern Senegal but little is known about their seasonal and spatial dynamics. The aim of this paper is to describe the spat...

  12. Basin Hopping Graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharik, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo; Stadler, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    folding free energy landscape, however, can provide the relevant information. Results We introduce the basin hopping graph (BHG) as a novel coarse-grained model of folding landscapes. Each vertex of the BHG is a local minimum, which represents the corresponding basin in the landscape. Its edges connect...... basins when the direct transitions between them are “energetically favorable”. Edge weights endcode the corresponding saddle heights and thus measure the difficulties of these favorable transitions. BHGs can be approximated accurately and efficiently for RNA molecules well beyond the length range...

  13. Sensitivity of streamflow to climate change in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, T.; Carlisle, D.; Wolock, D.; McCabe, G. J.; Wieczorek, M.; Howard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Trends of decreasing snowpack and increasing risk of drought are looming challenges for California water resource management. Increasing vulnerability of the state's natural water supplies threatens California's social-economic vitality and the health of its freshwater ecosystems. Despite growing awareness of potential climate change impacts, robust management adaptation has been hindered by substantial uncertainty in future climate predictions for the region. Down-scaled global climate model (GCM) projections uniformly suggest future warming of the region, but projections are highly variable with respect to the direction and magnitude of change in regional precipitation. Here we examine the sensitivity of California surface water supplies to climate variation independently of GCMs. We use a statistical approach to construct predictive models of monthly streamflow based on historical climate and river basin features. We then propagate an ensemble of synthetic climate simulations through the models to assess potential streamflow responses to changes in temperature and precipitation in different months and regions of the state. We also consider the range of streamflow change predicted by bias-corrected downscaled GCMs. Our results indicate that the streamflow in the xeric and coastal mountain regions of California is more sensitive to changes in precipitation than temperature, whereas streamflow in the interior mountain region responds strongly to changes in both temperature and precipitation. Mean climate projections for 2025-2075 from GCM ensembles are highly variable, indicating streamflow changes of -50% to +150% relative to baseline (1980-2010) for most months and regions. By quantifying the sensitivity of streamflow to climate change, rather than attempting to predict future hydrologic conditions based on uncertain GCM projections, these results should be more informative to water managers seeking to assess, and potentially reduce, the vulnerability of surface

  14. Uranium investigations in southeastern Alaska. Geologic report 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive mineral deposits at 14 localities in Southeastern Alaska are discussed to assist in the exploration for uranium. These areas, visited during the 1970 field season, were selected because of known or reported radioactivity and (or) favorable geology. Vein deposits and nonmarine Tertiary sandstones were examined. Radiometric surveys were made on foot, and small areas were mapped to show the spatial relationship between radioactivity and certain ore deposits. Previously unreported low radioactive anomalies were found at several localities, but none of the deposits was indicated to be of commercial grade. Slightly radioactive sandstones were found at Port Camden and on the west side of Zarembo Island. Radioactive pegmatites at Endicott Arm and elsewhere in Southeastern Alaska do not appear to have commercial possibilities, but may serve as guides to mineralization. Geochemical stream-sediment samples were collected at most of the localities examined. A total of 205 samples were taken. Results of atomic absorption analyses are given for copper, lead and zinc. Strong geochemical anomalies were found at William Henry Bay and Kook Lake. The best guides for uranium exploration in Southeastern Alaska are soda-rich granite and the ores and gangue minerals frequently associated with uranium. These include minerals containing copper, silver, cobalt and molybdenum, and hematite and fluorite. There is some indication that unusual amounts of uranium minerals are present in zones peripheral to major copper districts

  15. Mechanism of the Spring Persistent Rains over southeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN RiJin; WU GuoXiong

    2007-01-01

    The Spring Persistent Rains (SPR) in the areas to the south of middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River or over southeastern China (SEC) is a unique synoptic and climatic phenomenon in East Asia. This study reveals a possible mechanism responsible for the climatic cause of SPR formation through climatic mean data analysis and sensitive numerical model experiments. SEC is located at the downstream of the southwesterly velocity center (SWVC) which lies on the southeastern flank of the Tibetan Plateau (TP). As a result, there are strong southwesterly wind velocity convergence and moisture convergence over SEC. This is the immediate climatic cause of SPR formation. In spring, the seasonal evolution of the southwesterly velocity consists with the surface sensible heating over southeastern TP, indicating that the formation of SPR is related to not only the southwesterly wind of mechanical deflected flow of TP, but also the southwesterly wind of thermal-forced cyclonic low circulation. Sensitive numerical experiments demonstrate that, without TP, both SWVC and the SPR rain belt will disappear. The southwesterly wind velocity increases almost linearly with the amount of the total diabatic heating with TP rising. Therefore, SWVC is the result of the mechanical forcing and thermal forcing of TP. All these strongly suggest that the presence of TP plays a primary role in the climatic formation of SPR.

  16. Evolution of the Northeast German Basin — inferences from a 3D structural model and subsidence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, M.; Bayer, U.

    1999-11-01

    A 3D structural model of the Northeast German Basin was evaluated with special emphasis on its evolution as an intracontinental depression. The study includes investigations on subsidence history and structural setting of the basin. Thickness evolution and calculated tectonic subsidence volumes of Permian to Quaternary sediments in the Northeast German Basin indicate that the subsidence history was related to five stages of basin evolution which differ in their subsidence mechanisms. For the initial rift phase in the Late Carboniferous to Early Permian, a dominant thermal event and subordinate horizontal stresses were indicated by thickness variation evolution and by structural evidence. The main part of basin subsidence occurred in a NW-SE-oriented basin in the subsequent phase of thermal relaxation with maximum subsidence from Early Permian (Rotliegend) to Middle Triassic (Muschelkalk). From Middle Triassic the thermal subsidence pattern was superposed by further tectonic events. In the Middle Triassic regional extension led to a reconfiguration of the southern part of the basin, where new NNE-SSW-trending troughs (Rheinsberg and Gifhorn Troughs) developed. In the Jurassic the northwestern part of the basin was uplifted while in the south the Keuper subsiding areas continued to sink and NW-SE-trending depressions, related to salt margins, became important. Differentiation continued into Cretaceous times when regional compression caused uplift of the southeastern part of the basin and basin margins. A final subsidence phase occurred in the Cenozoic. This was accompanied by intensive salt movement. Recent basin configuration reflects the superposition of structural elements resulting from different evolution stages. The main structural characteristics of the basin are: (1) a vertical tectonic zonation in a pre-Zechstein succession, which lacks significant internal structures, and a strongly deformed post-Zechstein succession, which was decoupled due to the thick

  17. 长江流域1961-2002年极端降水特征%Changing features of extreme precipitation in the Yangtze River basin during 1961-2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张增信; 张强; 姜彤

    2007-01-01

    The total precipitation of the highest 1 day, 3 day, 5 day and 7 day precipitation amount (R1D, R3D, R5D and R7D) in the Yangtze River basin was analyzed with the help of linear trend analysis and continuous wavelet transform method. The research results indicated that: 1) Spatial distribution of R1D is similar in comparison with that of R3D, R5D and R7D. The Jialingjiang and Hanjiang river basins are dominated by decreasing trend, which is significant at >95% confidence level in Jialingjiang River basin and insignificant at >95% confidence level in Hanjiang River basin. The southern part of the Yangtze River basin and the western part of the upper Yangtze River basin are dominated by significant increasing trend of R1D extreme precipitation at >95% confidence level. 2) As for the R3D, R5D and R7D, the western part of the upper Yangtze River basin is dominated by significant increasing trend at >95% confidence level. The eastern part of the upper Yangtze River basin is dominated by decreasing trend, but is insignificant at >95% confidence level. The middle and lower Yangtze River basin is dominated by increasing trend, but insignificant at >95% confidence level. 3)The frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events are intensified over time. Precipitation anomalies indicated that the southeastern part, southern part and southwestern part of the Yangtze River basin are dominated by positive extreme precipitation anomalies between 1993-2002 and 1961-1992. The research results of this text indicate that the occurrence probability of flash flood is higher in the western part of the upper Yangtze River basin and the middle and lower Yangtze River basin, esp. in the southwestern and southeastern parts of the Yangtze River basin.

  18. Early Mesozoic basin aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Early Mesozoic basin aquifers in the states of Massachusettes, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland,...

  19. Mitigation : Closed Basin Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The upcoming meeting on waterfowl mitigation for the Closed Basin Project will have several people talk about possible changes to the waterfowl mitigation program....

  20. Tulare Basin protection plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Tulare Basin Protection Plan has been initiated by The Nature Conservancy to elucidate the problems and opportunities of natural diversity protection....

  1. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062/Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  3. The Ebro river basin

    OpenAIRE

    Darbra Roman, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    River basins worldwide are under pressure from economic activities. In Europe, the two main factors hindering the achievement of good chemical and ecological status of European river basins are pollution, mainly coming from agriculture, and hydromorphology (e.g. for navigation, hydroelectricity and flood control). The economic activities affect the chemical and ecological status of rivers, lakes and groundwater and deplete available soil, sediments and water resources. The w...

  4. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Miller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s, transport, and storage within the Mkabela basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of southeastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses.

    The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants.

    Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within both wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from the basin was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during low- to moderate flood

  5. A spatially distributed energy balance snowmelt model for application in mountain basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D.; Domingo, J.; Susong, D.; Link, T.; Garen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Snowmelt is the principal source for soil moisture, ground-water re-charge, and stream-flow in mountainous regions of the western US, Canada, and other similar regions of the world. Information on the timing, magnitude, and contributing area of melt under variable or changing climate conditions is required for successful water and resource management. A coupled energy and mass-balance model ISNOBAL is used to simulate the development and melting of the seasonal snowcover in several mountain basins in California, Idaho, and Utah. Simulations are done over basins varying from 1 to 2500 km2, with simulation periods varying from a few days for the smallest basin, Emerald Lake watershed in California, to multiple snow seasons for the Park City area in Utah. The model is driven by topographically corrected estimates of radiation, temperature, humidity, wind, and precipitation. Simulation results in all basins closely match independently measured snow water equivalent, snow depth, or runoff during both the development and depletion of the snowcover. Spatially distributed estimates of snow deposition and melt allow us to better understand the interaction between topographic structure, climate, and moisture availability in mountain basins of the western US. Application of topographically distributed models such as this will lead to improved water resource and watershed management.Snowmelt is the principal source for soil moisture, ground-water re-charge, and stream-flow in mountainous regions of the western US, Canada, and other similar regions of the world. Information on the timing, magnitude, and contributing area of melt under variable or changing climate conditions is required for successful water and resource management. A coupled energy and mass-balance model ISNOBAL is used to simulate the development and melting of the seasonal snowcover in several mountain basins in California, Idaho, and Utah. Simulations are done over basins varying from 1 to 2500 km2, with

  6. Seismicity of the Paradox Basin and the Colorado Plateau interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Waste Terminal Storage Program site qualification criteria require that a nuclear waste repository be located so that ground motion associated with the maximum credible and maximum probable earthquakes or other earthquake-associated effects will not have an unacceptable adverse impact on system performance. To determine whether a potential repository site located in the Paradox salt formation in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah satisfies these criteria, seismological studies were undertaken by Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) in March 1978. These studies included: (1) analysis of historical seismicity; (2) analysis of contemporary seismicity and tectonics of both the Paradox Basin and surrounding Colorado Plateau, including an extensive program of microearthquake monitoring; (3) evaluation of the Paradox Basin crustal structure; (4) evaluation of mining-induced seismicity; and (5) characterization of design-related earthquake-induced ground motions pertinent to a potential repository site through studies of attentation and subsurface ground motions. A detailed discussion of the results of the seismological studies performed through December 1980 is contained in WCC (1982). The purpose of this topical report is to update and summarize the studies on the local, regional, and mining-induced seismicity conducted through December 1982. The limitations of any interpretations are also discussed and additional information that remains to be acquired is identified. 56 references, 45 figures, 4 tables

  7. Strike-slip faulting in the Inner California Borderlands, offshore Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kell, A. M.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), offshore of Southern California, modern dextral strike-slip faulting overprints a prominent system of basins and ridges formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Geodetic data indicate faults in the ICB accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation; however, the hazard posed by the ICB faults is poorly understood due to unknown fault geometry and loosely constrained slip rates. We present observations from high-resolution and reprocessed legacy 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection datasets and multibeam bathymetry to constrain the modern fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We use a sequence stratigraphy approach to identify discrete episodes of deformation in the MCS data and present the results of our mapping in a regional fault model that distinguishes active faults from relict structures. Significant differences exist between our model of modern ICB deformation and existing models. From east to west, the major active faults are the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon, Palos Verdes, San Diego Trough, and San Clemente fault zones. Localized deformation on the continental slope along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends results from geometrical complexities in the dextral fault system. Undeformed early to mid-Pleistocene age sediments onlap and overlie deformation associated with the northern Coronado Bank fault (CBF) and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, we interpret the northern CBF to be inactive, and slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Holocene active Palos Verdes fault are unwarranted. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) and San Clemente fault have robust linear geomorphic expression, which suggests that these faults may accommodate a significant portion of modern ICB slip in a westward temporal migration of slip. The SDTF offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the

  8. Response to state comments on the revised draft Southeastern Regional Characterization Reports for the Crystalline Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to respond to the comments received from the states of the Southeastern Region on the revised draft Southeastern Regional Characterization Reports (RCRs). The responses in this document indicate the manner in which the suggestions or comments received have been considered in modifying the revised draft Southeastern RCRs. Both general comments related to the overall Crystalline Repository Project (CRP) and comments on specific sections of the RCRs are addressed. This document responds to Southeastern State comments on both the revised draft Southeastern Regional Geologic Characterization Report (RGCR) and the revised draft Southeastern Regional Environmental Characterization Report (RECR)

  9. Differential responses of seabirds to environmental variability over 2 years in the continental shelf and oceanic habitats of southeastern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Kokubun, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Dale M.; Sato, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Akinori; Will, Alexis P.; Kitaysky, Alexander S.; Watanuki, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal sea-ice cover has been decreasing in the southeastern Bering Sea shelf, which might affect ecosystem dynamics and availability of food resources to marine top predators breeding in the region. In this study, we investigated the foraging responses of two seabird species, surface-foraging red-legged kittiwakes Rissa brevirostris (hereafter, RLKI) and pursuit-diving foraging thick-billed murres Uria lomvia (TBMU) to different marine environmental conditions over 2 years. At-sea distributions of RLKI and TBMU breeding on St. George Island, the largest seabird colony in the region, were recorded using GPS loggers, and blood samples were taken to examine their physiological condition and isotopic foraging niche in a given year. Between the study years, winter ice retreated earlier and summer water temperatures were relatively warmer in 2014 compared to those in 2013. RLKI foraging occurred mostly over the oceanic basin in both years. TBMU, however, foraged mostly over the shelf but showed a relatively higher use of the shelf break and oceanic basin in 2013. The foraging distances from the colony peaked at 250-300 km in 2013 and bimodally at 150-250 and 300-350 km in 2014 for RLKI and tended to be farther in 2013 compared to those in 2014 for TBMU. Plasma levels of corticosterone did not differ between the years in RLKI but differed in TBMU, showing higher levels of physiological stress incurred by murres in 2013, the year of relatively cooler sea surface temperatures with later sea-ice retreat. δ13N (a proxy of trophic level of prey) did not differ between the years in either RLKI or TBMU. These results suggest that the response of ecosystem dynamics to climate variability in the southeastern Bering Sea may differ between the ocean basin and continental shelf regions, which, in turn, may generate differential responses in seabirds relying on those habitats for foraging.

  10. DS796 California Groundwater Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates the State into one of three groundwater based polygon units: (1) those areas defined as alluvial...

  11. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. Invertebrate diversity in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile displays mean invertebrate diversity within 5 minute grid cells. The Shannon Index of diversity was calculated from Southern California Coastal Water...

  13. Chukar Range - California [ds570

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This layer was created from regional biologist input on paper maps. All paper maps were collected and sent to a single Research Analyst to digitize. Some liberties...

  14. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  15. Flight tracks, Northern California TRACON

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the records of all the flights in the Northern California TRACON. The data was provided by the aircraft noise abatement office...

  16. Bathymetry--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Bolinas, California (raster data file is included in...

  17. Bathymetry--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pacifica, California. The raster data file is included in...

  18. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  19. Miocene detachment faulting predating EPR propagation: Southern Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Anna; Geoffroy, Laurent; Authemayou, Christine; Bellon, Hervé; Graindorge, David; Pik, Raphaël.

    2016-05-01

    At the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, we characterize the onshore structures and kinematics associated with crustal necking leading up to the Pliocene breakup and early East Pacific Rise seafloor spreading. From a combination of tectonic field investigations, K-Ar and cosmogenic isotope dating and geomorphology, we propose that the Los Cabos block represents the exhumed footwall of a major detachment fault. This north trending detachment fault is marked by a conspicuous low-dipping brittle-ductile shear zone showing a finite displacement with top to the SE ending to the ESE. This major feature is associated with fluid circulations which led to rejuvenation of the deformed Cretaceous magmatic rocks at a maximum of 17.5 Ma. The detachment footwall displays kilometer-scale corrugations controlling the present-day drainage pattern. This major detachment is synchronous with the development of the San José del Cabo Basin where syntectonic sedimentation took place from the middle Miocene to probably the early Pliocene. We propose that this seaward dipping detachment fault accommodates the proximal crustal necking of the Baja California passive margin, which predates the onset of formation of the East Pacific Rise spreading axis in the Cabo-Puerto Vallarta segment. Our data illustrate an apparent anticlockwise rotation of the stretching direction in Baja California Sur from ~17 Ma to the Pliocene.

  20. Convective upwelling in the mantle beneath the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Savage, Brian

    2009-11-26

    In the past six million years, Baja California has rifted obliquely apart from North America, opening up the Gulf of California. Between transform faults, seafloor spreading and rifting is well established in several basins. Other than hotspot-dominated Iceland, the Gulf of California is the only part of the world's seafloor-spreading system that has been surrounded by enough seismometers to provide horizontal resolution of upper-mantle structure at a scale of 100 kilometres over a distance great enough to include several spreading segments. Such resolution is needed to address the long-standing debate about the relative importance of dynamic and passive upwelling in the shallow mantle beneath spreading centres. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to image the shear velocity in the upper 200 kilometres or so of the mantle. Low shear velocities similar to those beneath the East Pacific Rise oceanic spreading centre underlie the entire length of the Gulf, but there are three concentrated locations of anomalously low velocities spaced about 250 kilometres apart. These anomalies are 40 to 90 kilometres beneath the surface, at which depths petrological studies indicate that extensive melting of passively upwelling mantle should begin. We interpret these seismic velocity anomalies as indicating that partial melting triggers dynamic upwelling driven by either the buoyancy of retained melt or by the reduced density of depleted mantle. PMID:19940924