WorldWideScience

Sample records for basin case study

  1. Neotectonic of subsiding basins : case of studies from Marañon and Beni basins, Peru and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    Climatic conditions make the fluvial processes very sensitive in the extended flood plain of subandean basins, giving typical morphostructures. Because of high subsidence rate, these basins are case for the understanding of neotectonics in subsiding basins. Recent anciente fluvial traces are used in combination with sub surface structures, neotectonic and seismotectonic data to study the neotectonic evolution of the Peruvian and Bolivian active foreland basins. These basins, the Marañon Basin...

  2. Some relationships between lithology, basin form and hydrology : a case study from the Thames Basin, UK

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomfield, J. P.; S. H. Bricker; Newell, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The role of lithology in influencing basin form and function is explored empirically by investigating correlations between a range of catchment variables, where the spatial unit of analysis is not surface catchments but lithologically coherent groundwater units. Using the Thames basin, UK, as a case study, nine groundwater units have been identified. Values for 11 hydrological and geomorphological variables, including rainfall, drainage density, Baseflow Index, aquifer porosity, storage coeff...

  3. River Sinuosity Classification - Case study in the Pannonian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovszki, J.; Székely, B.; Timár, G.

    2012-04-01

    A new evaluation method is proposed to classify the multiple window-size based sinuosity spectrum, in order to minimize the possible human interpretation error. If the river is long enough for the analysis, the classification could be similarly useful as the sinuosity spectrum is, but sometimes it is more straightforward. Furthermore, for the classification, we did not need the main parameters of the river, e.g. the bankfull discharge. The river sinuosity values were studied in the Pannonian Basin in order to reveal neotectonic influence on their abrupt changes. The map sheets of the Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire were used to digitize the natural, pre-regulation meandering river thalwegs. 28 rivers were studied, and the connection between the known fault lines and the river sinuosity changes was detected in 36 points, along 26 structural lines. An unsupervised ISOCLASS classification was carried out on these data, and the sinuosity values were divided into 5 classes. Because of the sinuosity calculation method, 25 kilometer-long river sections are missing at the two endpoints of the channel. So sometimes the displayed section of the river does not cross to the faults represented on the neotectonic map. In the other cases, where the faults are crossing the rivers, the results are corresponding with the results of the sinuosity spectrum: the river-points on the two sides of the faults belong to different classes. The connection between these fault lines and the change of river sinuosity classes was detected in 23 points, along 16 structural lines The research is made in the frame of project OTKA-NK83400 (SourceSink Hungary). The European Union and the European Social Fund also have provided financial support to the project under the grant agreement no. TÁMOP 4.2.1./B-09/1/KMR-2010-0003.

  4. Ensemble streamflow forecasting experiments in a tropical basin: The São Francisco river case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fernando Mainardi; Collischonn, Walter; Meller, Adalberto; Botelho, Luiz César Mendes

    2014-11-01

    The present study shows experiments of ensemble forecasting applied to a large tropical river basin, where such forecasting methodologies have many potential applications. The case study is the Três Marias hydroelectric power plant basin (Brazil), on the São Francisco river, where forecast results are particularly important for reservoir operation and downstream flood control. Results showed some benefits in the use of ensembles, particularly for the reservoir inflow on flooding events, and in comparison to the deterministic values given by the control member of the ensemble and by the ensemble mean. The study also discusses the improvements that must be tested and implemented in order to achieve better results, what is particularly important for the smaller basins within the study case. Despite the necessary improvements mentioned, the results suggest that benefits can result from the application of ensemble forecasts for hydropower plants with large basins within the Brazilian energy system.

  5. The Neuquén basin, Argentina: A case study in sequence stratigraphy and basin dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto C. Riccardi

    2006-01-01

    @@ As stated in one of the contributions to this volume, the Neuquen Basin-covering more than 160,000 km2 between c. 32° and 42° S and 68° and 71° W, and containing a Meso-zoic-Cenozoic sedimentary succession at least 7 km thick-is perhaps one of the most thoroughly prospected areas in Argentina. Its geological study goes back to the 19th Century, and shows an exponential increase throughout the 20th, when it became the main source of Argentine oil and gas production.

  6. THE FLOOD RISK IN THE IALOMITA RIVER BASIN CASE STUDY: THE JULY 1975 FLASH FLOOD

    OpenAIRE

    M. RETEGAN; MIHAELA BORCAN

    2014-01-01

    Te flood risk in the Ialomita river basin case study: the july 1975 flash flood. Since over the last four decades the Ialomita River Basin has been affected by several catastrophic hydrological events, of which the most important were the ones in 1975, 2001 and 2005, for a better management of the extreme situations generated by such episodes we propose a new methodology regarding the estimation of the flash-flood appearance potential in this particular river basin, as well as an analysis of ...

  7. Case study applications of the BASINS climate assessment tool (CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA report will illustrate the application of different climate assessment capabilities within EPA’s BASINS modeling system for assessing a range of potential questions about the effects of climate change on streamflow and water quality in different watershed settings and us...

  8. Operational river discharge forecasting in poorly gauged basins: the Kavango River basin case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Jensen, Iris Hedegaard; Guzinski, R.;

    2015-01-01

    Operational probabilistic forecasts of river discharge are essential for effective water resources management. Many studies have addressed this topic using different approaches ranging from purely statistical black-box approaches to physically based and distributed modeling schemes employing data...... assimilation techniques. However, few studies have attempted to develop operational probabilistic forecasting approaches for large and poorly gauged river basins. The objective of this study is to develop open-source software tools to support hydrologic forecasting and integrated water resources management in...... Africa. We present an operational probabilistic forecasting approach which uses public-domain climate forcing data and a hydrologic-hydrodynamic model which is entirely based on open-source software. Data assimilation techniques are used to inform the forecasts with the latest available observations...

  9. Multi-National River Basin Cooperation and Management Case Study: Senegal River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Ayaa, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    With increasing populations, urbanization and thus increasing demand for water, conflict on International River basins has been increasing over the years which has necessitated formation of International River frameworks to devise means of cooperation among the countries sharing the river basins. The main modes of cooperation in international river basins include allocating the waters of the river to the sharing countries such that each country manages its own water resources, or treating the...

  10. Operational river discharge forecasting in poorly gauged basins: the Kavango River Basin case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bauer-Gottwein

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Operational probabilistic forecasts of river discharge are essential for effective water resources management. Many studies have addressed this topic using different approaches ranging from purely statistical black-box approaches to physically-based and distributed modelling schemes employing data assimilation techniques. However, few studies have attempted to develop operational probabilistic forecasting approaches for large and poorly gauged river basins. This study is funded by the European Space Agency under the TIGER-NET project. The objective of TIGER-NET is to develop open-source software tools to support integrated water resources management in Africa and to facilitate the use of satellite earth observation data in water management. We present an operational probabilistic forecasting approach which uses public-domain climate forcing data and a hydrologic–hydrodynamic model which is entirely based on open-source software. Data assimilation techniques are used to inform the forecasts with the latest available observations. Forecasts are produced in real time for lead times of 0 to 7 days. The operational probabilistic forecasts are evaluated using a selection of performance statistics and indicators. The forecasting system delivers competitive forecasts for the Kavango River, which are reliable and sharp. Results indicate that the value of the forecasts is greatest for intermediate lead times between 4 and 7 days.

  11. BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft report supports application of two recently developed water modeling tools, the BASINS and WEPP climate assessment tools. The report presents a series of short case studies designed to illustrate the capabilities of these tools for conducting scenario based assessments...

  12. Sedimentary basin analysis using airborne gravity data: a case study from the Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyong; Liu, Yanxu; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhou, Xihua; Li, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the application of an airborne gravity survey to sedimentary basin analysis. Using high-precision airborne gravity data constrained by drilling and seismic data from the Bohai Bay Basin in eastern China, we interpreted faults, structural elements, sedimentary thickness, structural styles and local structures (belts) in the central area of the Basin by the wavelet transform method. Subsequently, these data were subtracted from the Bouguer gravity to calculate the residual gravity anomalies. On this basis, the faults were interpreted mainly by linear zones of high gravity gradients and contour distortion, while the sedimentary thicknesses were computed by the Euler deconvolution. The structural styles were identified by the combination of gravity anomalies and the local structures interpreted by the first vertical derivative of the residual gravity. The results showed evidence for seven faults, one sag and ten new local structure belts.

  13. Flash flood hazard mapping: a pilot case study in Xiapu River Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Da-wei Zhang; Jin Quan; Hong-bin Zhang; Fan Wang; Hong Wang; Xiao-yan He

    2015-01-01

    Flash flood hazard mapping is a supporting component of non-structural measures for flash flood prevention. Pilot case studies are necessary to develop more practicable methods for the technical support systems of flash flood hazard mapping. In this study, the headwater catchment of the Xiapu River Basin in central China was selected as a pilot study area for flash flood hazard mapping. A conceptual distributed hydrological model was developed for flood calculation based on the framework of t...

  14. 3D NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION ON SETTLING BASIN LAYOUT: A case study on Mai Khola Hydropower Project, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Bishwo Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    This study is about 3D Numerical Investigation of Settling basin layout by using numerical modeling program SSIIM. This study is carried out by using SSIIM windows version 1 (SSIIM 1.0). SSIIM is numerical modeling software, developed at NTNU by Professor Nils Reidar B. Olsen. This program has been used for investigation numerical modeling of hydraulic and sediment transport for different layouts geometry of settling basin.In this study a case study has carried out on settling basin layout of...

  15. 3D NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION ON SETTLING BASIN LAYOUT : A case study on Mai Khola Hydropower Project, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Bishwo Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    This study is about 3D Numerical Investigation of Settling basin layout by using numerical modeling program SSIIM. This study is carried out by using SSIIM windows version 1 (SSIIM 1.0). SSIIM is numerical modeling software, developed at NTNU by Professor Nils Reidar B. Olsen. This program has been used for investigation numerical modeling of hydraulic and sediment transport for different layouts geometry of settling basin.In this study a case study has carried out on settling basin layout of...

  16. Designing principles of an ecological water storage basin on coastal saline: a case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ping-ping; YIN Cheng-qing; QU Jiu-hui; ZHANG Guang-yun; FENG Wen-qing; LIU Jun-xin; ZHONG Zhi

    2005-01-01

    The degradation of water source environment becomes serious problems accompanying with rapid urbanization in China.Ecological engineering provides ecologically sound and cost-effective solution to solving this problem. As a case study, a 15 hm2 ecological water storage basin for a water plant was designed and constructed on the TEDA area in Tianjin City. Located on saline, the construction of this project has to face serious difficulties, such as high salinity, scarce seed banks of macrophytes, and strong winds. Freshwater replacement, soil emendation and macrophytes planting at the basinshore, wooden water breaker and plastic membrane installation and other measures were conducted for the assistance of plant community establishment. The result showed that the chloride concentration in the basin water decreased from 11600 mg/L to less than 100 mg/L, and the chloride content in the basin sediment decreased from 2.1% to0.35 % after freshwater soaking. The introduced macrophytes of 8 species all survived and 11 other macrophytes species were occurred in the basin. A new ecosystem was created with increased biological diversity in the original saline, and the water quality was improved. This ecological water storage basin also provided a pleasing landscape for local people.

  17. THE HUMAN RISKS CAUSED BY DEINDUSTRIALI-SATION. CASE STUDY: CERNA RIVER BASIN (HUNEDOARA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. SOFIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human Risks caused by deindustrialization. Case Study: Cerna River Basin (Hunedoara County. Industrial restructuring during economic transition has affected the population, causing loss of jobs, reduced income, increased poverty and emphasizing social inequalities and marginalization phenomenon. These have led to population decline, massive emigration, difficulties in finding a job as well as an increased incidence of certain diseases, negatively influencing socio-economic development of the area.

  18. Spatial Misfit in Participatory River Basin Management: Effects on Social Learning, a Comparative Analysis of German and French Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Barraqué

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of river basin management, as prescribed by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD, participatory structures are frequently introduced at the hydrological scale without fully adapting them to the decision-making structure. This results in parallel structures and spatial misfits within the institutional settings of river basin governance systems. By analyzing French and German case studies, we show how social learning (SL is impeded by such misfits. We also demonstrate that river basin-scale institutions or actors that link parallel structures are essential for promoting river basins as management entities, and for encouraging SL between actors at the river basin scale. In the multi-scale, multi-level settings of river basin governance, it is difficult to fully exclude spatial misfits. Thus, it is important to take our insights into account in the current transition of water management from the administrative to the hydrological scale to get the greatest benefit from SL processes.

  19. Regional Flood Frequency Analysis Utilizing L-Moments: A Case Study of Narmada Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Dubey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of flood frequency is needed for the designing of various hydraulic structures such as dam, spillways, barrage etc. Different approaches were presented which uses the conventional moments to extract order statistics such as mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis. Due to problems arising from data quality, such as short record and outliers, conventional moments are problematic. Hosking (1990 developed L-Moments which are linear combinations of order statistics. The main advantage of L-Moments over conventional moments is that they suffer less from the effects of sampling variability. They are more robust to outliers and virtually unbiased for small samples. In this study the L-Moments based method of Regional Flood Frequency Analysis is mentioned and Narmada Basin is considered as a case. The L-Moments have been used for parameter estimation of Generalized Extreme Value (GEV distribution. Regional flood frequency relationship for the chosen basin is developed utilizing GEV distribution. A relationship between mean annual flood and catchment area is obtained which is further employed to generate Regional Flood Formula for ungauged catchment of Narmada Basin. The developed Regional flood formula is used for T-Year return period flood estimation, knowing only one parameter i.e. catchment area of ungauged watershed.

  20. Simulation of the catastrophic floods caused by extreme rainfall events - Uh River basin case study

    OpenAIRE

    Pekárová, Pavla; Halmová, Dana; Mitková, Veronika

    2005-01-01

    The extreme rainfall events in Central and East Europe on August 2002 rise the question, how other basins would respond on such rainfall situations. Such theorisation helps us to arrange in advance the necessary activity in the basin to reduce the consequence of the assumed disaster. The aim of the study is to recognise a reaction of the Uh River basin (Slovakia, Ukraine) to the simulated catastrophic rainfall events from August 2002. Two precipitation scenarios, sc1 and sc2, were created. Th...

  1. Assessing water footprint at river basin level: a case study for the Heihe River Basin in northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water scarcity places considerable importance on the quantification of water footprint (WF at different levels. Despite progress made previously, there are still very few WF studies focusing on specific river basins, especially for those in arid and semi-arid regions. The aim of this study is to quantify WF within the Heihe River Basin (HRB, a basin located in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China. The findings show that the WF was 1768 million m3 yr−1 in the HRB over 2004–2006. Agricultural production was the largest water consumer, accounting for 96% of the WF (92% for crop production and 4% for livestock production. The remaining 4% was for the industrial and domestic sectors. The "blue" component of WF was 811 million m3 yr−1. This indicates a blue water proportion of 46%, which is much higher than the world average and China's average, which is mainly due to the aridness of the HRB and a high dependence on irrigation for crop production. However, even in such a river basin, blue WF was still smaller than green WF, indicating the importance of green water. We find that blue WF exceeded blue water availability during eight months per year and also on an annual basis. This indicates that WF of human activities was achieved at a cost of violating environmental flows of natural freshwater ecosystems, and such a WF pattern is not sustainable. Considering the large WF of crop production, optimizing the crop planting pattern is often a key to achieving more sustainable water use in arid and semi-arid regions.

  2. Assessing water footprint at river basin level: a case study for the Heihe River Basin in northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zeng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water scarcity places considerable importance on the quantification of water footprint (WF at different levels. Despite progress made previously, there are still very few WF studies focusing on specific river basins, especially for those in arid and semi-arid regions. The aim of this study is to quantify WF within the Heihe River Basin (HRB, a basin located in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China. The findings show that the WF was 1768 million m3 yr−1 in the HRB over 2004–2006. Agricultural production was the largest water consumer, accounting for 96% of the WF (92% for crop production and 4% for livestock production. The remaining 4% was for the industrial and domestic sectors. The "blue" (surface- and groundwater component of WF was 811 million m3 yr−1. This indicates a blue water proportion of 46%, which is much higher than the world average and China's average, which is mainly due to the aridness of the HRB and a high dependence on irrigation for crop production. However, even in such a river basin, blue WF was still smaller than "green" (soil water WF, indicating the importance of green water. We find that blue WF exceeded blue water availability during eight months per year and also on an annual basis. This indicates that WF of human activities was achieved at a cost of violating environmental flows of natural freshwater ecosystems, and such a WF pattern is not sustainable. Considering the large WF of crop production, optimizing the crop planting pattern is often a key to achieving more sustainable water use in arid and semi-arid regions.

  3. Separation of hydrograph components using stable isotopes case study: Guvenc basin, Ankara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a stable environmental isotope study was carried out from analysis of water samples collected from rainfall, runoff (total discharge), springs (subsurface flows), and wells (groundwater) between 1996-2000. The research site was Guvenc basin located near Yenimahalle-Ankara having a drainage area of about 16.125 km2 . There are many representative hydrologic basins established in Turkey by the General Directorate of Rural Services (GDRS). In these basins, the precipitation and runoff values are recorded continuously and relationship between these values are also investigated in the last ten-twenty years. Guvenc basin, the study area, is one of these representative basins. On this basin, a stream gaging, station and five rain gages have been installed to collect and analyze runoff and rainfall data. A small dam was constructed at the outlet of the basin to store and provide water for distribution to agricultural areas. The characteristics of precipitation data are collected at raingage station, installed near the runoff measuring. To monitor the groundwater isotopic composition regular samples are also collected from a dug well near runoff station

  4. Water Allocation Challenges in Rural River Basins: A Case Study from the Walawe River Basin,Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Weragala, D. K. Neelanga

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation evaluates the water allocation challenges in the rural river basins of the developing world, where demands are growing and the supply is limited. While many of these basins have yet to reach the state of closure, their water users are already experiencing water shortages. Agricultural crop production in rural river basins of the developing world plays a major role in ensuring food security. However, irrigation as the major water consumer in these basins has low water use eff...

  5. Case study on rehabilitation of a polluted urban water body in Yangtze River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Cheng, Shuiping; Li, Zhu; Guo, Weijie; Zhong, Fei; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-01

    In the past three decades, the fast development of economy and urbanization has caused increasingly severe pollutions of urban water bodies in China. Consequently, eutrophication and deterioration of aquatic ecosystem, which is especially significant for aquatic vegetation, inevitably became a pervasive problem across the Yangtze River Basin. To rehabilitate the degraded urban water bodies, vegetation replanting is an important issue to improve water quality and to rehabilitate ecosystem. As a case study, a representative polluted urban river, Nanfeihe River, in Hefei City, Anhui Province, was chosen to be a rehabilitation target. In October 2009 and May 2010, 13 species of indigenous and prevalent macrophytes, including seven species emergent, one species floating leaved, and five species submersed macrophytes, were planted along the bank slopes and in the river. Through 1.5 years' replanting practice, the water quality and biodiversity of the river had been improved. The concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4 (+)-N) declined by 46.0, 39.5, and 60.4 %, respectively. The species of macrophytes increased from 14 to 60, and the biodiversity of phytoplankton rose significantly in the river (p<0.05). The biomasses of zooplankton and benthos were also improved after the vegetation replanting. The study confirmed that vegetation replanting could alleviate the increasing water pollution and rehabilitate the degraded aquatic ecosystem. The case study would be an example for polluted urban waters restoration in the middle-downstream area of Yangtze River Base. PMID:23247519

  6. Analysis of efficiency of pollution reduction measures in rural basin using MIKE Basin model. Case study: Olšava River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiglová Jana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of testing the applicability of the MIKE Basin model for simulating the efficiency of scenarios for reducing water pollution. The model has been tested on the Olšava River Basin (520 km2 which is a typical rural region with a heterogeneous mix of pollution sources with variable topography and land use. The study proved that the model can be calibrated successfully using even the limited amount of data typically available in rural basins. The scenarios of pollution reduction were based on implementation and intensification of municipal wastewater treatment and conversion of arable land on fields under the risk of soil erosion to permanent grassland. The application of simulation results of these scenarios with proposed measures proved decreasing concentrations in downstream monitoring stations. Due to the practical applicability of proposed measures, these could lead to fulfilment of the water pollution limits required by the Czech and EU legislation. However, there are factors of uncertainty that are discussed that may delay or limit the effect of adopted measures in small rural basins.

  7. Flash flood hazard mapping: a pilot case study in Xiapu River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-wei Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flash flood hazard mapping is a supporting component of non-structural measures for flash flood prevention. Pilot case studies are necessary to develop more practicable methods for the technical support systems of flash flood hazard mapping. In this study, the headwater catchment of the Xiapu River Basin in central China was selected as a pilot study area for flash flood hazard mapping. A conceptual distributed hydrological model was developed for flood calculation based on the framework of the Xinanjiang model, which is widely used in humid and semi-humid regions in China. The developed model employs the geomorphological unit hydrograph method, which is extremely valuable when simulating the overland flow process in ungauged catchments, as compared with the original Xinanjiang model. The model was tested in the pilot study area, and the results agree with the measured data on the whole. After calibration and validation, the model is shown to be a useful tool for flash flood calculation. A practicable method for flash flood hazard mapping using the calculated peak discharge and digital elevation model data was presented, and three levels of flood hazards were classified. The resulting flash flood hazard maps indicate that the method successfully predicts the spatial distribution of flash flood hazards, and it can meet the current requirements in China.

  8. Impacts of Land Cover Changes on Hydrologic Responses: A Case Study of Chi River Basin, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homdee, Tipaporn; Pongput, Kobkiat; Kanae, Shinjiro

    Land use and land cover (LULC) have been continuously changing, through human activities, leading to variations in hydrological cycle. In this study, we applied SWAT model to investigate potential impacts of LULC on water budget of the Chi river basin in Thailand. Five plausible scenarios of land use change were evaluated, including an conversion of forested area, expansion of farmland, switching of rice paddy fields to energy crops and two scenarios involving conversion of farmland to rice and sugarcane plantation. The results indicated that different land use scenarios contributed to various effects in annual and seasonal water yield and evapotranspiration (ET). Conversion of forested area and farmland showed slightly small changes on water flows and ET. Substitution of paddy fields by sugarcane plantation showed clearly reduced water flows and increased ET by almost 5.0% in dry season. Particularly, in case of expansion of rice paddy fields to farmland, small changes occur on annual flow and ET but more significant effect occur on seasonal flows. The results showed decrease in ET by nearly 12.0%, leading to increase of water yield by up to 5.1% during dry season. Finally, conversion of farmland to sugarcane plantation for biofuel production showed significant effect on seasonal ET, mainly decreasing in dry season by 4.5 % but small changes were detected on water yields.

  9. USING THE FOURNIER INDEXES IN ESTIMATING RAINFALL EROSIVITY. CASE STUDY - THE SECAŞUL MARE BASIN

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    M. COSTEA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the Fournier Index in Estimating Rainfall Erosivity. Case Study - The Secaşul Mare Basin. Climatic aggressiveness is one of the most important factors in relief dynamic. Of all climatic parameters, rainfall is directly involved in versant dynamic, in the loss of soil quality and through pluvial denudation and the processes associated with it, through the erosivity of torrential rain. We analyzed rainfall aggressiveness based on monthly and annual average values through the Fournier's index (1970 and Fournier's index modified by Arnoldus (1980. They have the advantage that they can be used not only for evaluating the land susceptibility to erosion and the calculation of erodibility of land and soil losses, but also in assessing land susceptibility to sliding (Aghiruş, 2010. The literature illustrates the successful use of this index which provides a summary assessment of the probability of rainfall with significant erosive effects. The results obtained allow observation of differences in space and time of the distribution of this index.

  10. Pollution from animal husbandry in China: a case study of the Han River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Wu, Hongjuan

    2012-01-01

    Animal husbandry is one of the major agricultural pollution sources in China. The Xiangyang Reach of the Han River Basin was used as a case study to identify pollutants from animal rearing. The gross amount of pollutants from livestock and poultry rearing in the Xiangyang Reach was estimated using two empirical models with different data sets. The pig, cattle, sheep, and poultry population in 2009 amounted to 2.6, 0.6, 0.5, and 39.2 million head, respectively. The total annual pollutant loads generated from the feces and urine of livestock and poultry were 270,400 t of chemical oxygen demand; 228,900 t of biochemical oxygen demand; 26,500 t of ammonia nitrogen; 16,500 t of total phosphorus; and 63,900 t of total nitrogen. Approximately 12% of these pollutant loads were estimated to enter the Han River through the watershed outlet. Animal breeding has been one of the main pollution sources in this area, followed by domestic sewage and industrial wastewater. Cattle produced the most pollution, with the heaviest pollution load in downtown Xiangyang City. Several recommendations are presented to control the pollution caused by livestock and poultry breeding. PMID:22766880

  11. Geomechanical reservoir models. A case study from the Sirte Basin / Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, Andreas [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Frischbutter, Andreas [Wintershall Holding AG, Kassel (Germany); Tawengi, Khaeri Segayer [National Oil Company, Tripoli (Libya)

    2010-03-15

    Geomechanical reservoir models on the basis of numerical simulation techniques provide a tool for the prediction of tectonic stresses and fractures. The workflow to set up and calibrate a geomechanical reservoir model includes import of the subsurface geometry as well as assignment of mechanical properties and boundary conditions. If well data are available, calculated stresses and fractures can be calibrated against observed data. Modeling results are relevant for a variety of tasks ranging from borehole stability and fault slip analysis to planning of hydraulic fracs. Application to a data set from a reservoir in the Eastern Sirte basin of Libya illustrates the practical potential of the modelling approach. The case study shows that stress orientations including local perturbations can be predicted with considerable accuracy even if the reservoir and fault geometries are primarily derived from seismic data, i.e. if well data is sparse. By nature, fracture prediction is less robust as it has to build on several poorly constrained input parameters like magnitude and orientation of paleo-stresses, paleo-pore pressures and former rock mechanical properties. Consequently, sufficient well data with fracture orientations observed on borehole image logs are required to calibrate the geomechanical model and provide a reliable base for fracture prognoses in the inter-well space. (orig.)

  12. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: A case study for the Yellow River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, L.; M. M. Mekonnen; A. Y. Hoekstra

    2013-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green and blue water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water bal...

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, L.; M. M. Mekonnen; A. Y. Hoekstra

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t−1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the p...

  14. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, L.; M. M. Mekonnen; A. Y. Hoekstra

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996...

  15. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, L.; M. M. Mekonnen; A. Y. Hoekstra

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t−1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the p...

  16. Diacritical Seismic Signatures for Complex Geological Structures: Case Studies from Shushan Basin (Egypt and Arkoma Basin (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. Abdel-Fattah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic reflection techniques show an imperative role in imaging complex geological structures and are becoming more acceptable as data interpreting tools in 2D/3D view. These subsurface geological structures provide complex seismic signature due to their geometrical behavior. Consequently, it is extremely difficult to interpret these seismic sections in terms of subsurface configuration. The main goal of this paper is to introduce seismic attributes as a powerful tool to interpret complex geological structures in different geological settings. In order to image these complex geological features, multiple seismic attributes such as coherence and curvature have been applied to the seismic data generated over the Shushan Basin (Egypt and Arkoma Basin (USA. Each type of geological structure event usually generates a unique seismic “signature” that we can recognize and identify by using these seismic attributes. In Shushan Basin (Egypt, they provide a framework and constraint during the interpretation and can help prevent mistakes during a 3D structural modeling. In Arkoma Basin (USA, the seismic attributes results provide useful information for broader analyses of the complex structural relations in the region where the Ouachita orogenic belt intersects with the southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Finally, complex geological structures provide dramatically diacritical seismic signatures that can be easily interpreted by collaborating conventional seismic interpretation techniques with multiple seismic attributes.

  17. The Influence of Policy Discourses on multilevel water governance: a case study of the Equatorial Nile Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Hissen, Nina F.

    2014-01-01

    This research assesses how discourses on climate change and water security during policy making impact on actual water management, analysing the Equatorial Nile Basin and its riparian countries (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda and DR Congo) as a case study. The thesis looks at the significance of informal policy networks for water governance, and critically discusses the extent to which the framing of issues by these networks are reflected in the practical implementation of mul...

  18. Perched groundwater at the northwestern coast of Egypt: a case study of the Fuka Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mohamed; Bubenzer, Olaf

    2012-03-01

    Perched groundwater resources on the northwestern coast of Egypt have thus far been little studied. However, if replenished by rainwater, they can provide a considerable amount of renewable water, i.e., for sustainable irrigation. These resources are limited, show different salinity contents and are endangered by overuse, pollution and by the sea level rising in the context of global warming. This paper presents new climatic data, geomorphologic, geologic, geochemical and hydrological researches in combination with remote sensing and GIS applications from Fuka Basin. Fuka constitutes a special synclinal basin where the interbedded limestone and clays have been folded into gentle synclinal structures. Fractured Middle Miocene limestone represents the bearing formation for the perched groundwater. According to the hydrogeochemical analysis and the PHREEQC model, the aquifer is recharged during the winter season by rainwater from the surrounding tableland and the chemical evolution of the perched water is attributed to water-rock interaction and mixing of fresh water with sea water. The salinity of the perched water ranges from 2,126 to 2,644 mg/L whereas for the deep groundwater it reaches 9,800 mg/L. The study explores origin and potential of the perched groundwater of Fuka Basin and gives recommendations for a future sustainable use and further investigations.

  19. Prediction for Natural Recharging In Langat Basin and Ukm Campus as Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fawzi Al Ajlouni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Various water budget elements such as water supply to the, ground water recharge, and change in storage are predicted by Water Budget Method for a period of 2.5 years. The predicted water budget elements are evaluated by UKM Meteorological station data. The results show that the modelling undertaken is on the flow of the water and calculation of the water balance for the constructed wetlands using the water budget equation in order to determine the potential underground water resources of the UKM Bangi, Campus. The modeling will be based on the known geology of the area from previous research and Water availability from the known sources, e.g. Engineering and Golf lakes, which are being used as alternative water sources for the Campus. The volume of water that can be held by the UKM aquifer is about 1.4 million m3, which agrees with the estimate by JICA (2002 for the Langat river basin, that the recharging rate is 4.8% of the annual rainfall, from this study the recharging rate is 5% of the annual rainfall. The close approximation of the results for Langat Basin and UKM campus supports the contention that the UKM catchment is just a sub-catchment of the Langat River basin and should have similar properties.

  20. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, L.; M. M. Mekonnen; A. Y. Hoekstra

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t−1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996–2005. A...

  1. Hydrogeochemistry of high iodine groundwater: a case study at the Datong Basin, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxia; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Zhang, Liping; Guo, Wei

    2013-04-01

    High iodine concentrations in groundwater have seldom been reported and there have been few systematic studies on high iodine groundwater worldwide. To better understand the sources and processes responsible for iodine enrichment in the groundwater of the Datong Basin, the hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater and geochemical features of aquifer sediments were studied. High iodine groundwater mainly occurs in the center of the Datong Basin with iodine concentrations ranging between 3.31 and 1890 μg L(-1). Most samples with iodine concentrations higher than 500 μg L(-1) are from wells with depths between 75 and 120 m. High pH and a reducing environment are favorable for iodine enrichment in the groundwater, with iodide as the dominant species that accounts for 63.2-99.3% of the total iodine. Sediment samples from a borehole specifically drilled for this study contain 0.18-1.46 mg kg(-1) iodine that is moderately correlated with total organic carbon (TOC). The results of sequential extraction experiments show that iodine is mostly bound to iron oxyhydroxides and organic matter in the sediments. The mobilization processes of iodine are proposed to include reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides and transformations among iodide, iodate and organic iodine driven by microbial activities under alkaline and reducing conditions. PMID:23478640

  2. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall and blue (from irrigation water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996–2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River Basin in the period considered. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis focused on the effects on water footprint estimates at basin level (in m3 t−1 of four key input variables: precipitation (PR, reference evapotranspiration (ET0, crop coefficient (Kc, and crop calendar. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the water footprint of crops to fractional changes of individual input variables. Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by crop calendar and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0 were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval. The effect of uncertainties in ET0 was dominant compared to that of precipitation. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±26% (at 95% confidence level. The sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types, with

  3. Assessment of bio-physical drought hazards. A case study of Karkheh River basin in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Bahareh; Abbaspour, Karim; Houshmand Kouchi, Delaram; Yang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Iran has been affected by frequent droughts. Climate change is expected to intensify the situation in the future. Extreme drought events have had serious impacts on hydrological and agricultural sector. Thus, identification of bio-physical drought hazard is critically important for formulating effective adaptive measures to improve water and food security. This study aims to investigate temporal and spatial pattern of drought hazards in meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural (inclusively biophysical) sectors in the Karkheh River Basin of Iran in the historical and future climate change context. To do so, drought hazard indices were built based on the severity and frequency of standardized precipitation index (SPI), standardized runoff index (SRI), and standardized soil moisture index (SSMI), which represent the three aspects of drought hazards. Variables required for calculating these indices were obtained from SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model constructed for the basin. The model was calibrated based on monthly runoff using the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) algorithm in SWAT-CUP. Based on the climate variability and drought analysis, three drought hazard classes, namely low, medium and high, were defined. This help identify how agricultural and hydrological sectors are related to meteorological droughts. Additionally, the bio-physical drivers of drought hazards were identified for each class. Comparing the results during historic and future scenarios revealed that the frequency of high- severity hazards will increase, whereas the same is not predicted for the area with medium hazard intensity. Inferred from findings of this study, the combined application of the SWAT model with bio-physical drought hazard concept helps better understanding of climate risks to water and food security. The developed approach is replicable at different scales to provide a robust planning tool for policy makers.

  4. GIS-based River Flood Hazard Mapping in Urban Area (A Case Study in Kayu Ara River Basin, Malaysia)

    OpenAIRE

    Behdokht Vosoogh; Ismail Abustan; Rozi bin Abdullah; Sina Alaghmand,

    2010-01-01

    In the past decades, thousands of lives have been lost, directly or indirectly, by flooding. In fact, of all natural hazards, floods pose the most widely distributed natural hazard to life today. Sungai Kayu Ara river basin which is located in the west part of the Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia was the case study of this research. In order to perform river flood hazard mapping HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS were utilized as hydrologic and hydraulic models, respectively. The generated river flood hazard was ba...

  5. Origin and Distribution Of Glacial Lakes: A Case Study In Tista Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Himalayan glaciers are experiencing retreat due to changes in the temperature and precipitation pattern. Retreating glaciers depending upon the underlying bed topography can cause lake formation near terminus. Therefore formation and draining of lakes in the glaciated terrain of Himalaya is commonly observed. However, few lakes became stable under suitable geomorphologic conditions and grow sufficiently large to threaten population and infrastructure in downstream. In this investigation changes in glacial lakes in Tista basin were studied using satellite images for a period between 1989 and 2010. The Tista basin in Sikkim covers approximately 7096 sq km area and the total glaciated area is 501± 29 sq km. During the period of investigation the lake area is increased from 6.6 ± 0.8 km2 to 9.6 ± 1.1 km2 due to formation of new lakes and also due to expansion of existing lake. Out of 23 lakes, 16 showed variable increase in area. We have also observed formation of stable proglacial lake due to coalescence of small supra glacial lakes on Changsang and South Lhonak Glacier. The size of lake near South Lhonak Glacier was increased from 18 to 126 ha from 1978 to 2014 (Figure). Therefore detail field investigations were carried out to understand volume and extent of ice in end moraine. The water volume was estimated as 53 million m3 using bathymetric survey and ice at the core of terminal moraines was mapped using resistivity survey. These investigations suggests a possibility of catastrophic outburst flood, if moraine dam breached under extreme weather conditions. Therefore, mitigation strategy is needed to improve safety of people living in the region. In addition, numerous remote sensing based investigations have mapped more than 300 lakes in the glaciated terrain in India, therefore, a national program to monitor glacier lakes and strategy to mitigate possible disaster is needed. Figure: Expansion of the lake near South Lhonak glacier from year 1990 to 2014.

  6. Effects of temperature on flood forecasting: analysis of an operative case study in Alpine basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Salandin, A.; Rabuffetti, D.; Montani, A.; Borgonovo, E.; Mancini, M.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years the interest in the forecast and prevention of natural hazards related to hydro-meteorological events has increased the challenge for numerical weather modelling, in particular for limited area models, to improve the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) for hydrological purposes. After the encouraging results obtained in the MAP D-PHASE Project, we decided to devote further analyses to show recent improvements in the operational use of hydro-meteorological chains, and above all to better investigate the key role played by temperature during snowy precipitation. In this study we present a reanalysis simulation of one meteorological event, which occurred in November 2008 in the Piedmont Region. The attention is focused on the key role of air temperature, which is a crucial feature in determining the partitioning of precipitation in solid and liquid phase, influencing the quantitative discharge forecast (QDF) into the Alpine region. This is linked to the basin ipsographic curve and therefore by the total contributing area related to the snow line of the event. In order to assess hydrological predictions affected by meteorological forcing, a sensitivity analysis of the model output was carried out to evaluate different simulation scenarios, considering the forecast effects which can radically modify the discharge forecast. Results show how in real-time systems hydrological forecasters have to consider also the temperature uncertainty in forecasts in order to better understand the snow dynamics and its effect on runoff during a meteorological warning with a crucial snow line over the basin. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are based on the 16 members of the meteorological ensemble system COSMO-LEPS (developed by ARPA-SIMC) based on the non-hydrostatic model COSMO, while the hydrological model used to generate the runoff simulations is the rainfall-runoff distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano.

  7. Sustainable development of living sources, case-study of Karkheh's Dam basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The watershed basins with a plain system has been recognized as the factors which has direct effect on environment and human life. The beginning source of disturbing natural basins is where the unnecessary demands appears. Because of increasing demand for food in future, there fore, with increasing destruction on environment in world wide activity, on the other hand, it force use improving new technique and systems to over-come our demands. This reason seems to be enough for use to grow our activity through sustainable development of living sources. The present paper try to define and Explain the sustainable development and permanent stability base on general characteristics of Karkheh's watershed basin

  8. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  9. Comparison of long-term geochemical interactions at two natural CO2-analogues : Montmiral (Southeast Basin, France) and Messokampos (Florina Basin, Greece) case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage is considered to be a viable strategy to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. When assessing the feasibility of current or future CO2 storage projects, mineral trapping within a reservoir is considered as a key mechanism for the permanent sequestration of CO2. There are many occurrences worldwide, where natural CO2 has been trapped in geological reservoirs. These natural CO2 analogues provide a unique opportunity to study the reactivity, due to CO2 interactions, which occurred in the reservoirs over a geologic timeframe. Therefore, the study of analogous natural CO2-rich reservoirs, which act as long-term laboratories, are an important part of the assessment of the long-term geochemical effects of geological CO2 storage. This paper referred to 2 natural CO2 sites studied under the Natural Analogues for the Storage of CO2 in the Geological Environment (NASCENT) Project. The Montmiral reservoir in France's Southeast Basin is a high-temperature and high-pressure reservoir at great depth (100 degrees C and 36 MPa). The Messokampos reservoir in Greece's Florina Basin is a shallow, low temperature and low-pressure reservoir (25 degrees C and 0.5 MPa). Both are sandstone reservoirs, and feldspar alteration is the key interaction in both cases between dissolved CO2, the formation water and the reservoir rock. Both natural analogues were studied in detail petrographically and through geochemical modelling in order to characterize and explain the water-rock-gas interactions in the different geological contexts. The purpose was to assess the consequences of these interactions on CO2 storage capacity and porosity of the host rock. It was concluded that the reservoir's temperature and pressure conditions determine the impact of CO2 interactions, with elevated temperatures significantly increasing the reaction rates of mineral-trapping reactions. This is particularly significant when choosing future CO2

  10. Comparison of long-term geochemical interactions at two natural CO{sub 2}-analogues : Montmiral (Southeast Basin, France) and Messokampos (Florina Basin, Greece) case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaus, I.; Le Guern, C.; Pauwels, H. [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres, Orleans (France); Pearce, J.; Shepherd, T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hatziyannis, G.; Metaxas, A. [Inst. of Geology and Mineral Exploration, Athens (Greece)

    2005-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and storage is considered to be a viable strategy to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. When assessing the feasibility of current or future CO{sub 2} storage projects, mineral trapping within a reservoir is considered as a key mechanism for the permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2}. There are many occurrences worldwide, where natural CO{sub 2} has been trapped in geological reservoirs. These natural CO{sub 2} analogues provide a unique opportunity to study the reactivity, due to CO{sub 2} interactions, which occurred in the reservoirs over a geologic timeframe. Therefore, the study of analogous natural CO{sub 2}-rich reservoirs, which act as long-term laboratories, are an important part of the assessment of the long-term geochemical effects of geological CO{sub 2} storage. This paper referred to 2 natural CO{sub 2} sites studied under the Natural Analogues for the Storage of CO2 in the Geological Environment (NASCENT) Project. The Montmiral reservoir in France's Southeast Basin is a high-temperature and high-pressure reservoir at great depth (100 degrees C and 36 MPa). The Messokampos reservoir in Greece's Florina Basin is a shallow, low temperature and low-pressure reservoir (25 degrees C and 0.5 MPa). Both are sandstone reservoirs, and feldspar alteration is the key interaction in both cases between dissolved CO{sub 2}, the formation water and the reservoir rock. Both natural analogues were studied in detail petrographically and through geochemical modelling in order to characterize and explain the water-rock-gas interactions in the different geological contexts. The purpose was to assess the consequences of these interactions on CO{sub 2} storage capacity and porosity of the host rock. It was concluded that the reservoir's temperature and pressure conditions determine the impact of CO{sub 2} interactions, with elevated temperatures significantly increasing the reaction rates of

  11. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t-1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River basin in the period considered. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the crop water footprint to fractional changes of seven individual input variables and parameters: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), crop calendar (planting date with constant growing degree days), soil water content at field capacity (Smax), yield response factor (Ky) and maximum yield (Ym). Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates related to uncertainties in four key input variables: PR, ET0, Kc, and crop calendar were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types. In general, the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by the crop calendar. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint is, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0was dominant compared to that of PR. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input

  12. Lithologic identification and characterization using ETM+ (Landsat 7. Study case of the Upsala glacier basin, Argentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lo Vecchio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study aims to evaluate and analyze digital image processing techniques applied to the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+, in order to demark and characterize the outcropping lithologies on the Upsala Glacier basin, Santa Cruz, Argentine Republic. The prolific technological and spatial development experienced in the last decades has given place to the generation, without precedents, of multiple remote sensors capable of capturing information of the terrestrial surface and also the improvement of digital image processing techniques and software; amongst them, the amazing possibilities in the detection and differentiation of diverse covers present on the terrestrial surface can be highlighted, such as glaciers, volcanoes, vegetation, soils, water, types of rock outcrops, etc. This situation improves mapping and monitoring of natural phenomenon in the Earth Sciences field. The proposed methodology includes radiometric corrections, elimination of unwanted covers, statistical evaluation in the combination of the most appropriate bands, application of the Z index, discretization of the statistical series, entailing tasks of spectral classification with field samples and a later validation. Valuable results were obtained by means of digital processing of images, that were validated yielding a 82% of accuracy in the proposed classification, which are good results taking into account the diversity of covers present and the lithological heterogeneity that makes up each pixel (30m. These results were also validated with existing geological maps, obtaining a good agreement.

  13. Towards an integrated analysis of rural systems: the case study of the Alento basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Giovanni; Salvia, Rosanna

    2014-05-01

    The role and the functions of rural areas are undergoing considerable change due to economic, social and environmental drivers. The outcome of the transformation is the production of highly heterogeneous landscapes, rural mosaics, which are home to varying degrees of intensity of land-use and processes of deactivation, abandonment and land degradation. The identification of rural mosaics has implications both for determining the impacts on the stock of connected natural resources and for defining measures and policies able to support the resilience of rural territories and the identification of sustainable strategies for development. The study proposes a methodology for the integrated analysis of the rural territory which combines the analysis of land cover dynamics, using GIS, with an assessment of socio-economic dynamics, reconstructed through the combined use of indicators and local history, and which is aware that the differences and peculiarities within rural territories are the result of actions taken over time and of the different adaptive strategies undertaken by communities operating in different fields, under the influence of specific ecologic and environmental conditions. The methodology, applied to a socio-ecological system which is representative of the Mediterranean basin, is proposed as a tool to support the territorialisation of polices, opening the process up to perspectives able to better comprehend the dynamic evolution of rural territories, internalising that evolution in the definition of the instruments and measures to adopt.

  14. Water Resources Management in the Lerma-Chapala Basin, Mexico: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamagna, Amy M.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    Water resources have become an increasingly important topic of discussion in natural resources and environmental management courses. To address the need for more critical thinking in the classroom and to provide an active learning experience for undergraduate students, we present a case study based on water competition and management in the…

  15. Implementation of the SWIM model at the meso-scale basin: the Malse case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košková, Romana; Hesse, C.; Němečková, Soňa; Krysanova, V.

    Vol. 9. Viena : European Geosciences Union, 2007. 03562. ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2007. 15.04.2007-20.04.2007, Vídeň] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300600602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : global changes * SWIM model * the Malse case study Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  16. Methods for dating very old groundwater: eastern and central Great Artesian Basin case study. Chapter 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Great Artesian Basin extends across 1.7 × 106 km2 or one fifth of the Australian continent. Annual rainfall ranges from 100 mm in the arid western parts to a maximum of 600 mm near the main recharge areas along the eastern basin margin. Average annual runoff is less than 10 mm and generally less than 5 mm. Ephemeral rivers dominate the land surface of the basin, except for a few perennial rivers in the most northern, tropical parts of the region. Most interior rivers drain into Lake Eyre (a dry salt pan at 12 m below sea level); however, the river waters often evaporate or infiltrate before reaching Lake Eyre because of the long distances. With little or no surface water present in the dry, hot and harsh climate of Australia’s interior, the ability of the early settlers to explore and exploit the resources of this region were limited.

  17. Theory of annual runoff evolution under natural-artificial dual mode and case study of Wuding River basin on the middle Yellow River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; WANG Chengming; WANG Jianhua; ZHOU Zuhao; CHEN Yiming

    2004-01-01

    Water cycling process in a river basin becomes more complicated because of the intensified impact by human activities. Study of the law of annual runoff evolution in a river basin is of great significance to quantitative analysis of the water resources condition in varied environment and prediction of the law of the water resources evolution in the future because year-based time span may best reflect the law of the water resources evolution driven by the nature and human activities in the river basin. This paper advances the theory of annual runoff evolution under natural-artificial dual mode based on the dual mode of the water resources evolution, and the theory is applied for the Wuding River Basin on the middle Yellow River as a case study. A thorough analysis of the precipitation-runoff relationship is made in the case of dynamic variation of ground surface conditions of the Wuding River basin, and the concept of water-soil conservation index area that indicates adoption of various measures for water and soil conservation to reflect ground surface conditions. Furthermore, precipitation-runoff empirical model is developed to reflect dynamic variation of the ground surface conditions of the river basin.The study may lay a solid foundation for the integrated theoretical platform of the law of the water resources evolution in the Yellow River basin and the dual model of the evolution.

  18. The hydrochemistry of a semi-arid pan basin case study: Sua Pan, Makgadikgadi, Botswana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents results on the fluid and salt chemistry for the Makgadikgadi, a substantial continental basin in the semi-arid Kalahari. The aims of the study are to improve understanding of the hydrology of such a system and to identify the sources of the solutes and the controls on their cycling within pans. Sampling took place against the backdrop of unusually severe flooding as well as significant anthropogenic extraction of subsurface brines. This paper examines in particular the relationship between the chemistry of soil leachates, fresh stream water, salty lake water, surface salts and subsurface brines at Sua Pan, Botswana with the aim of improving the understanding of the system's hydrology. Occasionally during the short wet season (December-March) surface water enters the saline environment and precipitates mostly calcite and halite, as well as dolomite and traces of other salts associated with the desiccation of the lake. The hypersaline subsurface brine (up to TDS 190,000 mg/L) is homogenous with minor variations due to pumping by BotAsh mine (Botswana Ash (Pty) Ltd.), which extracts 2400 m3 of brine/h from a depth of 38 m. Notable is the decrease in TDS as the pumping rate increases which may be indicative of subsurface recharge by less saline water. Isotope chemistry for Sr (87Sr/86Sr average 0.722087) and S (δ34S average 34.35) suggests subsurface brines have been subject to a lithological contribution of undetermined origin. Recharge of the subsurface brine from surface water including the Nata River appears to be negligible

  19. The hydrochemistry of a semi-arid pan basin case study: Sua Pan, Makgadikgadi, Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, Frank D. [Environmental and Geographical Science, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)], E-mail: frank.eckardt@uct.ac.za; Bryant, Robert G. [Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Department of Geography, Winter Street, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); McCulloch, Graham [Department of Zoology, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Spiro, Baruch [Department of Mineralogy, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Wood, Warren W. [Department of Geological Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    This study presents results on the fluid and salt chemistry for the Makgadikgadi, a substantial continental basin in the semi-arid Kalahari. The aims of the study are to improve understanding of the hydrology of such a system and to identify the sources of the solutes and the controls on their cycling within pans. Sampling took place against the backdrop of unusually severe flooding as well as significant anthropogenic extraction of subsurface brines. This paper examines in particular the relationship between the chemistry of soil leachates, fresh stream water, salty lake water, surface salts and subsurface brines at Sua Pan, Botswana with the aim of improving the understanding of the system's hydrology. Occasionally during the short wet season (December-March) surface water enters the saline environment and precipitates mostly calcite and halite, as well as dolomite and traces of other salts associated with the desiccation of the lake. The hypersaline subsurface brine (up to TDS 190,000 mg/L) is homogenous with minor variations due to pumping by BotAsh mine (Botswana Ash (Pty) Ltd.), which extracts 2400 m{sup 3} of brine/h from a depth of 38 m. Notable is the decrease in TDS as the pumping rate increases which may be indicative of subsurface recharge by less saline water. Isotope chemistry for Sr ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr average 0.722087) and S ({delta}{sup 34}S average 34.35) suggests subsurface brines have been subject to a lithological contribution of undetermined origin. Recharge of the subsurface brine from surface water including the Nata River appears to be negligible.

  20. Assessment of droughts at a continental scale under different climate change scenarios. Case study: La Plata Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo-Ward, Alvaro; Iglesias, Ana; Garrote, Luis; Bejarano, Maria Dolores; Asenjo, Victor; Bianucci, Paola

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we characterized and diagnosed the droughts across La Plata Basin for the reference (1961 - 2005) and future (2007 - 2040, 2041 - 2070 and 2071 - 2099) scenarios. La Plata Basin is located in the Centre-South of South America and comprises 3.174.229 km2 and five countries. Despite the significant impact of droughts on agriculture, cattle, water supply, natural water courses and wetlands, droughts are still difficult to predict in the region, both in time and space. We used the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) to characterize droughts based on Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) and Precipitation (P) at a monthly scale. PET and P were obtained for all 10 x 10 km-size cells within the basin by using the regional climatic model Eta, under the boundary conditions of the HadGEM2-ES model and the CO2 emissions scenario RCP 4.5. Cell to cell information was integrated into a sub-basin level in order to show and analyze the results. For each sub-basin, climate scenario, and temporal scale of SPEI (1, 3, 6 and 12 months), we identified the beginning of each drought, calculated its duration, magnitude, maximum and mean intensities, and the duration between drought events. Additionally, for each SPEI temporal scale and sub-basin, we described the spatial coverage of droughts for the temporal series of all climate scenarios. Spatially, we found a decrease of PET from North to South. Temporally, results showed a future increase of PET for the Paraguay river basin and upper Parana river basin but similar to present values for the remaining basin. Results showed that P will be similar in the future for the Paraguay river basin and upper Parana river basin, but will increase within the remaining basin. During the 2007 - 2040 scenario, we expect that the northern sub-basins suffer from several droughts while the southern ones have wetter climate with few short drought events. As we analyzed more distant future scenarios the wet climate

  1. Volcanic ash and its enigma: A case study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.

    An ash layer occurs between 10-35 cm depth in sediment cores from the Central Indian Ocean basin. Morphology, major, trace and rare earth element composition of glass shards from the ash layer suggest that the Youngest Toba Tuff of ~74 ka from...

  2. The use of remote sensing and geographic information systems for the evaluation of river basins: a case study for Turkey, Marmara River Basin and Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulugtekin, Necla; Balcik, Filiz Bektas; Dogru, Ahmet O; Goksel, Cigdem; Alaton, Idil Arslan; Orhon, Derin

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine sensitive river basins and specific areas that urgently need planning activities for sustainable resource and environmental management. In this context, a combination of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) were employed. For that purpose, a comprehensive overview of the current situation of Turkish river basins in terms of existing spatial data was provided and all tabular data gathered from the national authorities on regional basis was assessed in combination with the geometric data of Turkish river basins in a GIS environment. Considering the GIS studies that covered all 26 Turkish basins, the Marmara River Basin was selected as the model sensitive region and was studied in more detail by using 2000 dated Landsat 7 ETM mosaic satellite image. Results of this comprehensive study indicated that Istanbul, which is located in the basin under study and the largest metropolitan of Turkey, was determined as the most populated and urbanized area of the region. Istanbul was further examined to determine the expansion of urban areas over a time period of 16 years using Landsat images dated 1984, 1992 and 2000. Finally, interpretations were done by combining the demographic and statistical data on urban wastewater treatment plants to present the prevailing situation of the water treatment facilities in Istanbul. Our study not only delineated the importance of applying environmental policies correctly for the efficient installation and operation of urban wastewater treatment plants in Istanbul but also demonstrated that effective urban wastewater management is a nationwide problem in Turkey. PMID:19184706

  3. Calibration of a large-scale groundwater flow model using GRACE data: a case study in the Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Litang; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2015-11-01

    Traditional numerical models usually use extensive observed hydraulic-head data as calibration targets. However, this calibration process is not applicable in remote areas with limited or no monitoring data. This study presents an approach to calibrate a large-scale groundwater flow model using the monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data, which have been available globally on a spatial grid of 1° in the geographic coordinate system since 2002. A groundwater storage anomaly isolated from the terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomaly is converted into hydraulic head at the center of the grid, which is then used as observed data to calibrate a numerical model to estimate aquifer hydraulic conductivity. The aquifer system in the remote and hyperarid Qaidam Basin, China, is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of this approach. A groundwater model using FEFLOW is constructed for the Qaidam Basin and the GRACE-derived groundwater storage anomaly over the period 2003-2012 is included to calibrate the model, which is done using an automatic estimation method (PEST). The calibrated model is then run to output hydraulic heads at three sites where long-term hydraulic head data are available. The reasonably good fit between the calculated and observed hydraulic heads, together with the very similar groundwater storage anomalies from the numerical model and GRACE data, demonstrate that this approach is generally applicable in regions of groundwater data scarcity.

  4. Water Induced Hazard Mapping in Nepal: A Case Study of East Rapti River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, N.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents illustration on typical water induced hazard mapping of East Rapti River Basin under the DWIDP, GON. The basin covers an area of 2398 sq km. The methodology includes making of base map of water induced disaster in the basin. Landslide hazard maps were prepared by SINMAP approach. Debris flow hazard maps were prepared by considering geology, slope, and saturation. Flood hazard maps were prepared by using two approaches: HEC-RAS and Satellite Imagery Interpretation. The composite water-induced hazard maps were produced by compiling the hazards rendered by landslide, debris flow, and flood. The monsoon average rainfall in the basin is 1907 mm whereas maximum 24 hours precipitation is 456.8 mm. The peak discharge of the Rapati River in the year of 1993 at station was 1220 cu m/sec. This discharge nearly corresponds to the discharge of 100-year return period. The landslides, floods, and debris flows triggered by the heavy rain of July 1993 claimed 265 lives, affected 148516 people, and damaged 1500 houses in the basin. The field investigation and integrated GIS interpretation showed that the very high and high landslide hazard zones collectively cover 38.38% and debris flow hazard zone constitutes 6.58%. High flood hazard zone occupies 4.28% area of the watershed. Mitigation measures are recommendated according to Integrated Watershed Management Approach under which the non-structural and structural measures are proposed. The non-structural measures includes: disaster management training, formulation of evacuation system (arrangement of information plan about disaster), agriculture management practices, protection of water sources, slope protections and removal of excessive bed load from the river channel. Similarly, structural measures such as dike, spur, rehabilitation of existing preventive measures and river training at some locations are recommendated. The major factors that have contributed to induce high incidences of various types of mass

  5. Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

    2000-06-13

    The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

  6. Heat transfer and fluid flow modelling in supra-detachment basins: a case study of the Devonian basins of western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souche, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Andersen, T. B.; Medvedev, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Devonian basins of western Norway are supra-detachment basins located above a large crustal-scale detachment system, so-called the Nordfjord Sogn Detachment Zone. These basins are characterised by a thick succession (>10km) of siliciclastic sediments ranging in size from coarse conglomerates to fine grain sandstones and organized into narrow half-graben systems. Their architecture and geometry is closely controlled by the development of the coeval (i.e. Early to Middle Devonian) detachment acting as a normal fault/shear zone beneath the basins. The exhumation of rocks within the footwall of the detachment was subsequently followed by an increase of the geothermal gradient at the base of the sedimentary successions. Shear heating resulting from the intense rock deformation within the shear zone also played a role in increasing the temperature at the base of the basins. These two significant processes might have in turn contributed to the fluid mobility in the basins. In this study, we explore the feasibility of porous convection to occur spontaneously in sedimentary basins due to a regional increase of the geothermal gradient. Such process can be approximated by Darcy flow through porous media where the fluid density in the system might introduce a buoyancy-driven instability between lighter hot fluids at the base and denser cold fluids at the top of the basin. In geological systems porous flow might be inhibited by the closing of pores with depth, which leads to a reduced permeability and a limited amount of heat carrying fluids. Also, geological heterogeneities inherited from the layered structure of the sedimentary strata introduce large variations in the rock transport properties. We address these problems numerically by modelling heat and mass transport in porous media assuming quasi-incompressible Darcy flow. The fluid (water) density, viscosity, and specific heat are computed from the pore fluid pressure and the temperature. We investigate the onset of

  7. An integrated river basin planning approach – Nyando case study in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Njogu, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    The river basin has long been acknowledged as the appropriate unit of analysis for water resources management and has also been named by the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED 1992) as the logical unit for integrated water resources management in Agenda 21, chapter 18. The comprehensive methodology framework for analysis structures the decision making process, starting with the problem identification, through the weighing of various options to the f...

  8. Left Behind? A Case Study of Immobile Populations in the Senegalese River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Zickgraf, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The Senegalese River Basin has undergone environmental transformations in recent decades that, in combination with poor infrastructure and inadequate resources, has affected the livelihood strategies and mobility patterns of its residents. As a low-lying city near the mouth of the Senegal River, Saint-Louis is highly vulnerable to flooding. Furthermore, the vulnerability of the city can be attributed to coastal land degradation, high and increasing population density and inadequate infrastruc...

  9. Degradation of the riparian wetlands in the Lake Victoria basin - Yala swamp case study.

    OpenAIRE

    Thenya, Thuita; Wassmann, Reiner; Verchot, Louis; Mungai, David

    2006-01-01

    Land degradation is as a result of broad range of scales and factors, which include biophysical, climatic, demographic and socio-economic. The aim of this paper was to provide an analysis of wetland utilisation, ecosystem degradation and their effect on the Lake Victoria (Kenya) ecosystem. This involved analysis of socioeconomic and remote sensed data. The main sources of wetland degradation in the Lake Victoria basin were identified as (1) farming activities, (2) grazing and macrophyte harve...

  10. THE ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION MANAGEMENT Case Study -Trotus Hydrographic Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Maricica STOICA

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem approach proved to be the most efficient strategy for integrated management of soil, water and life which promotes conservation and sustainable use in an equitable application of the ecosystem approach helps to achieve a balance of natural components, socio-economic and weather and climate phenomena with adequate scientific methodologies multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary.Such an approach is now imposed on the European level in flood risk management, to make a river basin as th...

  11. High Resolution Integrated Hydrologic Modeling for Water Resource Management: Tahoe Basin Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S.; Niswonger, R. G.; Huntington, J. L.; Gardner, M.; Morton, C.; Maples, S.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G.

    2014-12-01

    Water resources in the high altitude, snow-dominated Tahoe basin are susceptible to long-term climate change and extreme climatic events due to large inter-annual climate variations. Lake Tahoe and its contributing watersheds exhibit high climatic (precipitation, temperature) and hydrologic (streamflow, evaporation) variation that exert significant control over regional water supply on annual and sub-annual timescales. To adequately quantify these controls, a high resolution (300m) physically based integrated surface and groundwater model, GSFLOW, of the Tahoe basin has been developed to identify key hydrologic mechanisms that explain recent changes in water resources of the region. The model is parameterized using geographical datasets and maintains a balance between (a) accurate representation of spatial (e.g., geology, streams, and topography) and hydrologic (groundwater, stream, lake, and wetland flows and storages) features, and (b) computational efficiency, which is a necessity for exploring critical vulnerabilities of water-supplies in the region. The calibrated model reproduces multiple observations of streamflow, snow water equivalent, satellite derived snow covered area, lake stage, and groundwater head. Climate input uncertainty was significantly decreased in the model through incorporating additional precipitation station data and helped improve model simulations of observed fluxes more than adjusting model parameters alone. The model simulates fluxes at the outlet of the watershed, but is also consistent at simulating streamflow at internal nodes. This integrated modeling framework helped assess both surface and groundwater resources in a coupled manner in the Tahoe basin.

  12. Effect of Land Use on Soil Properties in Debris Flow Bottomland: A Case Study at Xiaojiang Basin, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiuying; LI Fadong; LIU Mengyu; SONG Xianfang; OU Guoqiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of different land use on soil physics and nutrients properties of the debris flow bottomland, a case study at Daqing gully (in Xiaojiang Basin, Yunnan) was conducted in 2004. Soil samples were taken at depth of 0-10,10-20,20-40,40-60,60-80 cm under three land use patterns crop bottomland(CL), forest bottomland(FL), and barren bottomland(BL). The results showed that the developing bottomland to CL promoted soil toaccumulate total phosphorus (TP) and available phosphorus (AP), pH value transferred from neutral to alkalescency, and organic matter decreased significantly. Furthermore, the contents of total nitrogen (TN) and available nitrogen (AN) in CL were lower than that of FL and BL because the growth of crops consumed more nutrients in soil. The results also showed that the contents of TP, AP and available potassium (AK) in soil were positively correlated with soil particle.

  13. Using Geochemical Method to Distinguish Lateral Migration and Vertical Migration in Rifted Basin: A Case Study from Eastern Lujiapu Depression in the Kailu Basin, NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shuqing; HUANG Haiping; LIU Yuming

    2008-01-01

    Migration fractionation diagnosis is complicated in rifted basins where migration distance is generally short and lateral migration in sandy beds and vertical migration along faults are co-existed. Quantitative data from GC-MS analysis makes it possible to distinguish lateral and vertical migration effects. Oils discovered from the Jiaolige oilfield, eastern Lujiapu Depression are derived from single source rock with similar maturity, which is an ideal case to study the migration fractionation effects. Compositional differences among oils are largely caused by the migration fractionation either laterally in sand beds or vertically along the faults. Subtle maturity differences are assessed by the classic saturated hydrocarbon parameters which have certain influence on nitrogen compounds. In a certain maturity range, the ratios of shield and semi-shield isomers to the exposed isomers of alkylcarbazoles change with maturity in an opposite direction with migration fractionation, which may conceal the migration influence. However, migration and maturation have the same effects on absolute concentrations of aikylated carbazoles and benzocarhazole [a]/([a]+[c]) ratios, which provides an ideal tool for migration direction assessment. Continuous variations among different samples reflect increased migration distance in sandy beds, while abrupt changes may indicate the change of migration conduit systems. Integrated both geochemical interpretation and geological constrains, not only migration direction can be determined, but also the conduit systems through the sandy beds or the. faults can be recognized.

  14. Chemical characteristics of rainwater in Sichuan basin, a case study of Ya'an.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Chun; Zhang, Meng; Shu, Man; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Liu, Zi-Fang; Wang, Xian-Xiang; Zhao, Xiao-Qing

    2016-07-01

    Rainwater chemistry was investigated at a semi-rural site in Ya'an, Sichuan basin with rain samples collected from May 2013 to July 2014. The rainwater pH values ranged from 3.25 to 6.86, with an annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) of 4.38, and the acid rain frequency was 74 %. Such severe acidification, 15 % of the total events showed a pH below 4.0, attributed to the deficiency of Ca(2+), significant anthropogenic pollution contribution, and rainy pattern to this area. The annual VWM of total ions concentration was 477.19 μeq/L. NH4 (+) was the most abundant ionic species, followed by SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), Ca(2+), Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and F(-) in a descending order. The total ionic concentrations presented a seasonal trend of lower values in autumn and summer but higher ones in winter and spring. Based on enrichment factor, correlation analysis and principle component analysis, three factors were identified: factor 1 (NH4 (+), SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), K(+), and Cl(-), 47.45 % of the total variance) related to anthropogenic sources (coal/fuel combustion, biomass burning and agriculture), factor 2 (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and Cl(-), 34.01 % of the total variance) associated with natural sources, and factor 3 (H(+), 11.78 % of the total variance) related to free acidity. Back trajectory analysis indicates that the rainwater chemistry in Ya'an was mainly affected by regional air masses from Sichuan basin. Long-range transported air masses from southwest with heavy anthropogenic pollution increased the total ion concentration and acidity of rainwater. Considering its special topography, anthropogenic emissions from regional and long-range transport (especially from southwest) must be controlled effectively to improve the acid rain condition of non-urban areas in Sichuan basin. PMID:27000115

  15. Survey of artisanal fishing gear and craft. A case study of Kainji Lake lower basin, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ogundiwin, Damilare Ibukun

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable importance of artisanal fishing in Kainji Lake lower basin, knowledge about gear and craft being used is deficient and outdated. Little is also known as to why fishermen adopted the diverse fishing gear and craft they use in the Lake, as well as the relationship of these input factors to the socio-economic status of the fishermen and ecology of the lake. To address these issues, a survey of sixty (60) artisanal fishers and twelve (12) village leaders drawn from 12 sel...

  16. Estimation of flash floods in small ungauged basins in Slovakia: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavcova, Kamila; Horvat, Oliver; Kohnova, Silvia; Szolgay, Jan; Roncak, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the paper application of a methodology for analysis of flash flood events in several ungauged small basins in Slovakia was evaluated. The methodology proposed within the framework of the FP6 HYDRATE project (www.hydrate.tesaf.unipd.it) is based on the post-event surveying and hydrological modelling, using a spatially distributed hydrological model with a high spatial resolution of rainfall data and physiographical basin properties. Six large flash floods which occurred in Slovakia during the last 10 years were selected, with the emphasis on their extremity and different physical and geographical basins properties. The estimation of the maximum flood peaks and flood wave volumes was provided on the base of the post-event analysis after the flood events. The areas of channel's cross-profiles were measured for maximal water level, longitudinal slope of water level was approximated to the bottom slope and roughness was estimated according to the river banks and channel bottoms. Flow velocities were estimated using Chézy equation and Manning roughness coefficient. The reconstructed flood waves were compared with the simulated discharges using the distributed event-based rainfall-runoff model KLEM. The distributed hydrological model KLEM is based on the availability of raster information of the landscape's topography, soil and vegetation properties, and radar rainfall data. The SCS-Curve Number procedure is applied on a grid for the spatially-distributed representation of runoff-generating processes, a description of the drainage system response is used for representing the runoff's routing. Digital elevation models as well as soil, geology, land use and rainfall data for the basins were prepared in the grid form (resolution of 20 m). Radar rainfall data or maps of isohyets in 15-minutes time step or were used as input precipitation in the model. Comparison of the results achieved by the KLEM model and the post-event analysis for floods showed the consistency of

  17. Importance of isotope hydrology techniques in water resources management: A case study of the Makutupora basin in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makutupora groundwater basin has been the main source of water supply for Dodoma town since 1950s. the water is mainly used for domestic water supply to over one million inhabitants, for industrial purposes and livestock watering. Conventional hydrogeological investigations have been carried out in the basin to gather information on the groundwater potential of the basin to meet the ever-increasing demand for water. However, firm conclusions could not be reached with conventional methods. This paper highlights on the isotope techniques applied in an integrated manner with conventional hydrogeological methods to study the groundwater regime of the Makutupora basin. Results of isotope techniques have provided adequate information on recharge locations, recharge rates and age of groundwater in the basin, that is very important and open up prospects for further investigations using isotope techniques. The ongoing investigation in the basin regarding pollution and depletion of the groundwater resource, has not succeeded in defining specific pumping limits or groundwater protection zones. Isotope data are sought to provide a clear basis for regulatory and future groundwater management in the Makutupora basin. (author)

  18. Incorporating rainfall uncertainty in a SWAT model: the river Zenne basin (Belgium) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolessa Leta, Olkeba; Nossent, Jiri; van Griensven, Ann; Bauwens, Willy

    2013-04-01

    The European Union Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD) called its member countries to achieve a good ecological status for all inland and coastal water bodies by 2015. According to recent studies, the river Zenne (Belgium) is far from this objective. Therefore, an interuniversity and multidisciplinary project "Towards a Good Ecological Status in the river Zenne (GESZ)" was launched to evaluate the effects of wastewater management plans on the river. In this project, different models have been developed and integrated using the Open Modelling Interface (OpenMI). The hydrologic, semi-distributed Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is hereby used as one of the model components in the integrated modelling chain in order to model the upland catchment processes. The assessment of the uncertainty of SWAT is an essential aspect of the decision making process, in order to design robust management strategies that take the predicted uncertainties into account. Model uncertainty stems from the uncertainties on the model parameters, the input data (e.g, rainfall), the calibration data (e.g., stream flows) and on the model structure itself. The objective of this paper is to assess the first three sources of uncertainty in a SWAT model of the river Zenne basin. For the assessment of rainfall measurement uncertainty, first, we identified independent rainfall periods, based on the daily precipitation and stream flow observations and using the Water Engineering Time Series PROcessing tool (WETSPRO). Secondly, we assigned a rainfall multiplier parameter for each of the independent rainfall periods, which serves as a multiplicative input error corruption. Finally, we treated these multipliers as latent parameters in the model optimization and uncertainty analysis (UA). For parameter uncertainty assessment, due to the high number of parameters of the SWAT model, first, we screened out its most sensitive parameters using the Latin Hypercube One-factor-At-a-Time (LH-OAT) technique

  19. A STUDY OF THE REFERENCE CLIMATIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR IMPACT UPON THE HYDROLOGICAL REGIME. CASE STUDY: IALOMITA HYDROGRAPHIC BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Borcan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an analysis for the evolution and spatio-temporal variation of two climatic parameters (precipitation and evapotranspiration and one hydrological parameter (the flown water volume over a common period of time (1970-2007 in Ialomita Hydrographical Basin which has been recently affected by extended periods of drought. In achieving this aim we started our analysis from the equation of the water balance in a large hydrographical basin over a long period of time. Among the elements of this equation the amount of rainfall (precipitation and evapotranspiration are further called the reference climatic parameters since they are the ones that influence the volume of the surface run-off. The evolution of the above mentioned parameters has been accomplished by taking into account the recorded data from 6 meteorological and hydrological posts that can be considered characteristic for Ialomita River Basin. They have been used to identify the tendency of these reference climatic parameters and establish their influence upon the hydrological regime. The parallel study of these three parameters may offer valuable data upon their tight connection in a regional context.We often use the air temperature as an indicator of how comfortable we will feel when we are involved in sports or other physical activities. However, the air temperature is only one factor in the assessment of thermal stress. Human thermal comfort depends on environmental and personal factors. The four environmental factors are: airflow (wind, air temperature, air humidity, and radiation from the sun and nearby hot surfaces. The personal factors are the clothing being worn and the person's level of physical activity.

  20. Seismic data interpretation: a case study of southern sindh monocline, lower indus basin, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sindh monocline in Lower Indus Basin is an important oil and gas producing area of Pakistan where a large number of oil, gas and condensate fields have been discovered from structural traps. This research involves the interpretation of stratigraphic and structural styles of Sindh Monocline using 2D (Two-Dimensional) seismic reflection and well log. Four reflectors of different formations have been marked and were named as Reflector-1 as of Khadro Formation, Reflector-2 as Upper Goru Member, Reflector-3 as Lower Goru Formation and Reflector-4 as Chiltan Limestone. The average depth of Khadro Formation was marked at 449.0 m, Upper Goru Member at 968 m, Lower Goru Formation at 1938 m and Chiltan Limestone at 2943 m. Faults were marked on seismic sections which collectively form horsts and grabens which is the evidence of extensional tectonic in the area. Seismic interpretation was carried out through window based Kingdom Software. (author)

  1. Estimation of seismogenic source faults by seismic reflection profiling: case study of the Niigata Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tectonic evolution and geological features of the Niigata basin were explained with reference to historical major earthquakes in the area, which is compressed by the subducting Pacific plate and form fold-and-thrust belt. P-wave structures have been investigated since about 2009 using dense seismic velocity profiles, including sea areas. 18% of compression and sedimentation caused from subsidence happened in the northwest-southeast direction since 5 Ma in this area, and a complicated underground structure was composed. The inverted, failed rift structure and deep geometry of the active fault have been demonstrated well by CMP seismic reflection profiling and refraction tomography. This Miocene rift structure strongly controls the geometry of seismogenic source faults. (author)

  2. Mining and environment: a case study of the Lish-Gish basins of the eastern Himalayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper calls for attention to the effects of the unscientific quarrying operations in the coal-fields of the Lish-Gish Basin which have continued intermittently since 1896. The sudden abandonment of the mining operation in 1965, taking least concern of the scars formed due to the extraction of coal have disturbed the natural equilibrium in slopes. This has already taken its toll in the form of disastrous landslips. All these, in turn, incapacitate the rivers pouring in too much detritus which raise the river-beds alarmingly (50 cm. per year) and aggravate the flood situation in times of high rainfall. Immediate steps should therefore, be taken to prevent such unhealthy and destructive processes and specially, in view of the recent attempt by the government of West Bengal, to restart the quarry operations in near future, in order to cope with the longstanding fuel demand of the local inhabitants. (author). 7 refs

  3. Seismic Data Interpretation: A Case Study of Southern Sindh Monocline, Lower Indus Basin, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeer Ahmed Abbasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Sindh monocline in Lower Indus Basin is an important oil and gas producing area of Pakistan where a large number of oil, gas and condensate fields have been discovered from structural traps. This research involves the interpretation of stratigraphic and structural styles of Sindh Monocline using 2D (Two-Dimensional seismic reflection and well log. Four reflectors of different formations have been marked and were named as Reflector-1 as of Khadro Formation, Reflector-2 as Upper Goru Member, Reflector-3 as Lower Goru Formation and Reflector-4 as Chiltan Limestone. The average depth of Khadro Formation was marked at 449.0m, Upper Goru Member at 968m, Lower Goru Formation at 1938m and Chiltan Limestone at 2943m. Faults were marked on seismic sections which collectively form horsts and grabens which is the evidence of extensional tectonic in the area. Seismic interpretation was carried out through window based Kingdom Software

  4. A new framework to evaluate ecosystem health: a case study in the Wei River basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Xu, Zongxue; Zhan, Chesheng; Yin, Xuwang; Yu, Songyan

    2015-07-01

    water and watershed management of the Wei River basin, or even the Yellow River basin. PMID:26108745

  5. Biostratigraphy, sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the northern Danube Basin: Ratkovce 1 well case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybár Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ratkovce 1 well, drilled in the Blatné depocenter of the northern Danube Basin penetrated the Miocene sedimentary record with a total thickness of 2000 m. Biostratigraphically, the NN4, NN5 and NN6 Zones of calcareous nannoplankton were documented; CPN7 and CPN8 foraminifer Zones (N9, 10, 11 of the global foraminiferal zonation; and MMi4a; MMi5 and MMi6 of the Mediterranean foraminiferal zonation were recognized. Sedimentology was based on description of well core material, and together with SP and RT logs, used to characterize paleoenvironmental conditions of the deposition. Five sedimentary facies were reconstructed: (1 fan-delta to onshore environment which developed during the Lower Badenian; (2 followed by the Lower Badenian proximal slope gravity currents sediments; (3 distal slope turbidites were deposited in the Lower and Upper Badenian; (4 at the very end of the Upper Badenian and during the Sarmatian a coastal plain of normal marine to brackish environment developed; (5 sedimentation finished with the Pannonian-Pliocene shallow lacustrine to alluvial plain deposits. The provenance analysis records that the sediment of the well-cores was derived from crystalline basement granitoides and gneisses and from the Permian to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary cover and nappe units of the Western Carpathians and the Eastern Alps. Moreover, the Lower Badenian volcanism was an important source of sediments in the lower part of the sequence.

  6. Source rock evaluation with interpretation of wireline logs: a case study of lower indus basin, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualitative interpretation of the log data succeeds in translating the inherited log responses into organic content and source rock identification. The quantitative interpretation of the petrophysical parameters helped in determination of the total organic content and source rock potential. The criteria for distinguishing shale from sedimentary layers are low density, high sonic transit time, high porosity and high resistivity of shales. The responses of wireline logs in relation to the increasing of organic matter (OM) content is detected through crossplot technique. By this way, the organic matter is identified with increasing in gamma-ray values, sonic transit-time, neutron porosity, resistivity and with reduction in the formation bulk density. The open hole well log data (DLL, FDC, BHC and CNL) of SANN-1 well of Kirthar Trough, Southern Indus Basin (Sindh province) Pakistan, is utilized to determine the organic content of Lower Goru and Sember formations. In this paper, an attempt was made to establish a quantity correlation between standard well logs (sonic, density, neutron and resistivity) and total organic carbon by means of a technique called ?LogR. In calculating total organic carbon content (TOC), porosity/resistivity overlay technique was used. TOC measured by delta logR technique at depth interval between 3270 to 3585 meters yielded an average value of 2.78% for Lower Goru Formation and 3.31% for Sember formation. These values were in agreement with the reported values in the literature. (author)

  7. Evaluation of rock mass classification schemes: a case study from the Bowen Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Hebblewhite, Bruce; Mitra, Rudrajit

    2016-04-01

    The development of an accurate engineering geological model and adequate knowledge of spatial variation in rock mass conditions are important prerequisites for slope stability analyses, tunnel design, mine planning and risk management. Rock mass classification schemes such as Rock Mass Rating (RMR), Coal Mine Roof Rating (CMRR), Q-system and Roof Strength Index (RSI) have been used for a range of engineering geological applications, including transport tunnels, "hard rock" mining and underground and open-cut coal mines. Often, rock mass classification schemes have been evaluated on subaerial exposures, where weathering has affected joint characteristics and intact strength. In contrast, the focus of this evaluation of the above classification schemes is an underground coal mine in the Bowen Basin, central Queensland, Australia, 15 km east of the town of Moranbah. Rock mass classification was undertaken at 68 sites across the mine. Both the target coal seam and overlying rock show marked spatial variability in terms of RMR, CMRR and Q, but RSI showed limited sensitivity to changes in rock mass condition. Relationships were developed between different parameters with varying degrees of success. A mine-wide analysis of faulting was undertaken, and compared with in situ stress field and local-scale measurements of joint and cleat. While there are no unequivocal relationships between rock mass classification parameters and faulting, a central graben zone shows heterogeneous rock mass properties. The corollary is that if geological features can be accurately defined by remote sensing technologies, then this can assist in predicting rock mass conditions and risk management ahead of development and construction.

  8. Fuzzy partitioning systems for electrofacies classification: a case study from the Maracaibo Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finol, J.J.; Jing, X.D. [Imperial Coll., Centre for Petroleum Studies, London (United Kingdom); Guo, Y.K. [Imperial Coll., Dept. of Computing, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes a method of advanced data processing for the inverse problem of lithofacies prediction from well logs using fuzzy partitioning systems. A fuzzy partitioning system consists of a set of fuzzy If-Then rules of the form 'If bulk density ({rho}{sub b}) is low and neutron porosity ({phi}{sub CNL})is high Then classify pattern x=({rho}{sub b}{phi}C{sub NL}) as Facies F{sub i}' In this paper, we introduce an intelligent method for the problem of fuzzy rule generation based on fuzzy clustering. Fuzzy clustering is used to detect structures in the multidimensional space of the available well log readings. Each cluster detected is a potential fuzzy classification rule. By applying fuzzy validity measures an optimum number of fuzzy clusters can be found. Using this approach, the number of rules, the antecedent membership functions and other parameters that constitute the fuzzy partitioning system are derived in an automatic way. The aim is to find a minimum set of fuzzy classification rules that can correctly classify all log training patterns. Unlike traditional methods of predicting lithofacies, this approach does not require prior knowledge about the partitioning of the well log readings or any assumption of the facies probability densities. Computer simulations using selected well log responses and facies description from a Clastic and carbonate sequence in the Maracaibo Basin (western Venezuela) examine the performance of the fuzzy rule-based classification approach. The performance of the fuzzy classification method is evaluated against the facies classification results using conventional statistical analysis. (Author)

  9. River water quality in weathered limestone: A case study in upper Mahanadi basin, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Panigrahy; B C Raymahashay

    2005-10-01

    Stromatolitic limestone and calcareous shale belonging to Chattisgarh Supergroup of Proterozoic age dominate the upper part of the Mahanadi river basin.X-ray diffractogram (XRD)of limestone rocks show presence of a significant amount of calcite,dolomite and ankerite.Shales of various colours contain calcite and dolomite.It is observed that congruent dissolution of carbonate minerals in the Charmuria pure limestone has given rise to a typical karst topography.On the other hand, limestones are also seen to support red and black soil pro files.This indicates that the limestone bedrock undergoes a parallel incongruent weathering,which leaves a residue of decomposed rock. The XRD analyses reveal that the limestone soils thus formed contain an assemblage of quartz,clays and Fe-oxides.It is likely that the silicate component trapped during deposition of the stromatolitic limestone weathers incongruently resulting in diverse soil profiles.Carbonate and silicate mineral weathering schemes have been worked out to explain the soil formation,fixation of Al in clay minerals, and Fe in goethite.The water quality parameters such as Ca, Mg and HCO3 in the river water suggest under saturation with respect to calcite and dolomite.The mineral stability diagrams indicate that kaolinite and Ca-smectite are stable in the river water environment,hence they occur in suspended sediments and soils.The dominant influence of carbonate weathering on the water quality is observed even in the downstream part of the river outside the limestone terrain.

  10. Fluids and stress in fractured rocks: A case study with applications to hydrodynamic modelling (Lodeve Basin, South France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to stock nuclear waste safely in fractured rock or optimize the development and exploitation of hydrocarbons in fractured reservoirs the same fracture parameters have to be investigated through field studies. It is essential to define the relationships between tectonics, 3D fracture networks and fluid flow, as well as the effect of past stress states on the network evolution and the effect of the present-day stress state on hydrodynamics. A case study was carried out on a site of the COGEMA Uranium mine with a very high density of wells and galleries in a Permian silicoclastic basin. Fracturation on all scales from individual fractures (with their connectivity and hydraulic behaviour) to fracture network was described. A multidisciplinary approach was necessary to understand the importance of fluids and to upscale metric scale obsessations to the well identified fracture network: 3D organization and evolution of the fracture network under the influence of paleostress was obtained from tectonic analysis and response of the reservoir in terms of fracture dilatancy or closure to present day stress was characterized by in situ stress measurements; water geochemistry and hydrogeology showed the large scale flow pattern characterized by the presence of main drains and barriers; geophysical prospecting and study of gaseous emanations from the soil helped to localize the subsurface fracture pattern, especially dilatant fractures. All this data is used to build a 3D model of the fracture pattern and its flow networks

  11. Deriving Design Flood Hydrograph Based on Conditional Distribution: A Case Study of Danjiangkou Reservoir in Hanjiang Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Design flood hydrograph (DFH for a dam is the flood of suitable probability and magnitude adopted to ensure safety of the dam in accordance with appropriate design standards. Estimated quantiles of peak discharge and flood volumes are necessary for deriving the DFH, which are mutually correlated and need to be described by multivariate analysis methods. The joint probability distributions of peak discharge and flood volumes were established using copula functions. Then the general formulae of conditional most likely composition (CMLC and conditional expectation composition (CEC methods that consider the inherent relationship between flood peak and volumes were derived for estimating DFH. The Danjiangkou reservoir in Hanjiang basin was selected as a case study. The design values of flood volumes and 90% confidence intervals with different peak discharges were estimated by the proposed methods. The performance of CMLC and CEC methods was also compared with conventional flood frequency analysis, and the results show that CMLC method performs best for both bivariate and trivariate distributions which has the smallest relative error and root mean square error. The proposed CMLC method has strong statistical basis with unique design flood composition scheme and provides an alternative way for deriving DFH.

  12. A STUDY OF THE REFERENCE CLIMATIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR IMPACT UPON THE HYDROLOGICAL REGIME. CASE STUDY: IALOMITA HYDROGRAPHIC BASIN

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Borcan

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an analysis for the evolution and spatio-temporal variation of two climatic parameters (precipitation and evapotranspiration) and one hydrological parameter (the flown water volume) over a common period of time (1970-2007) in Ialomita Hydrographical Basin which has been recently affected by extended periods of drought. In achieving this aim we started our analysis from the equation of the water balance in a large hydrographical basin over a long period of time. Among the el...

  13. Relationship between rainfall and vegetation indexes in Burkina Faso: a case study of the Nakambe basin

    OpenAIRE

    Diello, Pierre; Mahé, Gil; Paturel, Jean-Emmanuel; Dezetter, Alain (ed.); Delclaux, François; Servat, Eric; Ouattara, F.

    2005-01-01

    This work deals with the problem of the use of remote sensing data derived from NOAA/AVHRR observations for monitoring the West African Sahel climatic variability. NDVI is widely used in hydrological and climatological research, and in the study of global climatic changes. The relationships between NDVI and climatic parameters are not well established yet and are the focus of many studies. The relationships between NDVI and rainfall were studied at a 10-day time step in the Nakambe River basi...

  14. GIS based quantitative morphometric analysis and its consequences: a case study from Shanur River Basin, Maharashtra India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Chaitanya B.; Moharir, Kanak

    2015-06-01

    A morphometric analysis of Shanur basin has been carried out using geoprocessing techniques in GIS. These techniques are found relevant for the extraction of river basin and its drainage networks. The extracted drainage network was classified according to Strahler's system of classification and it reveals that the terrain exhibits dendritic to sub-dendritic drainage pattern. Hence, from the study, it is concluded that remote sensing data (SRTM-DEM data of 30 m resolution) coupled with geoprocessing techniques prove to be a competent tool used in morphometric analysis and evaluation of linear, slope, areal and relief aspects of morphometric parameters. The combined outcomes have established the topographical and even recent developmental situations in basin. It will also change the setup of the region. It therefore needs to analyze high level parameters of drainage and environment for suitable planning and management of water resource developmental plan and land resource development plan. The Shanur drainage basin is sprawled over an area of 281.33 km2. The slope of the basin varies from 1 to 10 %, and the slope variation is chiefly controlled by the local geology and erosion cycles. The main stream length ratio of the basin is 14.92 indicating that the study area is elongated with moderate relief and steep slopes. The morphometric parameters of the stream have been analyzed and calculated by applying standard methods and techniques viz. Horton (Trans Am Geophys Union 13:350-361, 1945), Miller (A quantitative geomorphologic study of drainage basin characteristics in the clinch mountain area, Virginia and Tennessee Columbia University, Department of Geology, Technical Report, No. 3, Contract N6 ONR 271-300, 1953), and Strahler (Handbook of applied hydrology, McGraw Hill Book Company, New York, 1964). GIS based on analysis of all morphometric parameters and the erosional development of the area by the streams has been progressed well beyond maturity and lithology is

  15. Detecting land use changes affected by human activities using remote sensing (Case study: Karkheh River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Maddah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and abundant activities in order to achieve maximum well-being has forced human to make a lot of changes in the nature. These changes will be cost-effective when they have the minimum damage on the landscape. One of the activities that human did for obtaining the water and preventing flood was making the dam in the track of running water. Since the dam is established until its impoundment and after impoundment, the condition of ecosystem and the appearance of the upstream and downstream of the dam will undergo changes. In this study, using satellite data and remote sensing, these changes have been studied and the landuse changes in vegetation, arid land, water level and residential and non-residential lands is measured in 1998 and 2014 using Maximum Likelihood method and support vector machine.

  16. Aquifer recharge and contamination determination using environmental isotopes: Santiago basin, Chile: A study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive water level descends and nitrate and sulfate contamination have been recorded in Santiago Nor te aquifer since the last decade. This aquifer is almost completely covered by Santiago City which uses groundwater for drinking water, industrial, and commercial uses. Due to the semi-arid conditions of the area and the constant drought periods, groundwater constitutes an extremely important water resource. The accelerated urban growth of Santiago City over the past 30 years has produced impacts on the hydrological cycle and in the degradation of water quality. The impact may be related to the proportion and quality of groundwater recharge induced by urban activities. The study addresses the impact in quality and quantity that urban recharge has in the aquifer beneath the city. In terms of water management, the evaluation of the urban recharge with respect to natural recharge and the determination of the sources of contamination were the main goals of the study. The main results show that the most important natural recharge is associated to the coarse grain facies of the alluvial fan apex of Mapocho River and the local watersheds. The isotopic data shows a minor recharge from direct precipitation over the city. Toward the central sector of the study area, where the oldest part of the city is located and where highly permeable sandy gravel facies over an unconfined aquifer are present, an important source of recharge related to leakage from the drinking water and sewage systems was identified These leaking systems are mainly fed by imported water from another watershed located south of the study area. The distinctive chemical and isotopic signature of this source allows the evaluation of its impact in this area. The remediation of the aquifer will require the reduction of leakages of the water and sewage distribution systems. However, this solution may strongly affect the water balance in the aquifer. (author)

  17. Uranium Groundwater Monitoring and Seismic Analysis: A Case Study of the Gran Sasso Hydrogeological Basin, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletti, Marta; Plastino, Wolfango; Peresan, Antonella; Nisi, Stefano; Copia, Lorenzo; Panza, Giuliano F.; Povinec, Pavel P.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium groundwater anomalies, observed before the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6th, 2009) and before the seismic swarm, which occurred in the second half of 2010, represent a key geochemical signal of a progressive increase of deep fluids fluxes at middle-lower crustal levels associated with the geodynamics of the earthquake. In this paper, temporal variations of uranium groundwater are studied in association with the seismic pattern around Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS-INFN). The normalized seismic energy release and the number of earthquakes are analyzed in detail by means of monthly sliding time windows. They are compared with uranium anomalies to highlight any possible correlation.

  18. How do different parts of a basin contribute to discharge? Case study Rokytka Brook, Šumava Mts., Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Lukas; Kocum, Jan; Jansky, Bohumir; Sefrna, Ludek

    2015-04-01

    How do different parts of a basin contribute to discharge? Case study Rokytka Brook, Šumava Mts., Czech Republic Lukáš Vlček, Jan Kocum, Bohumír Janský, Luděk Šefrna Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Prague, Czech Republic Runoff formation is a very important issue within a flood protection and drought prevention. To solve this topic a lot of parameters, which affect the outflow, need to be known. Especially it is necessary to find out which part of a catchment contributes mostly to discharge during flood events or during drought periods. Optimal conditions for such a research are provided by our study in Šumava Mts., where a number of former floods has been created. In near future this area can play role within the water storage enhancement in SW Czech Republic during drought periods. Central part of Šumava Mts. is covered with peat bogs and other peaty soil types which are mostly supplied by rain water. This study takes place in the small catchment (1 km²) in Šumava Mts. It is created by 2 main slopes with different vegetation and soil coverage. First slope is covered by well-developed peat bog where 3 springs were found, the second slope is covered by dead spruce forest and soil type of entic Podzol, where one spring was found. Each specific part of the catchment was mapped and equipped by devices such as water level probe or tensiometers. Spring discharges and outflow have been observed. For consecutive analyses water silica, stable isotopes and temperature observations have been carried out as well. Results of this research should help to better understand the runoff process taking place in the core zone of Šumava Mts. Moreover it should improve a flood forecasting and the knowledge about retention ability of Czech mountains.

  19. Using of Spatial multi criteria evaluation for landslide zoning Case study Malach Aram basin -north of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi-Nezamabad, A.; Hoseini Sarrafi, N.; Sadat Mousavi, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    Land slide is one of the major disasters which usually happens in specific area and causes different kinds of financial damage and loss of lives. Different places in IRAN are susceptible for occurring landslide. The study area, Malach Aram basin in Ramian County which is located in north part of Iran, is extended about 3500 hectare. Ever different methods are using for zoning and evaluation this natural disaster. Spatial multi criteria evaluation (SMCE) is a structure that implements statistical analysis of multi criteria evaluation on the Georefrence data. This model can be implemented on the GIS software, Ilwis and ArcGIS are major software for running this study. With defining criterion and sub criteria that are effective in occurring landslide and also specifying in groups and inter groups weight of values on the data layers and defining objectives in this classification and with using different effective criteria that are related to this issue, landslide zoning in the case study area has been prepared. The most important criteria that have been used for running this model are Topography, Slope, Aspect, Hillshade,landuse, climate (mouthy, seasonal and annual precipitation during 15 years ago from 2001 until 2007), state of earth dynamic ( earthquake density, distance of faults and others factors), state of existing flora ( density and percentage flora, kind of specious) geomorphology (geomorphology unit , landforms and fancies geomorphologic). After running the this model, output of this model is classification and part of area defined with height potential of landslide occurring. Output of classification landslide zoning with survey GPS pointes that defined real position landslide used in artificial neural network with supervised learning (Multi-Layer Perceptions) . Recently have defined that 5 area of total of suitable area with height potential landslide occurring are important areas with highly positional landslide occurring. Key words: Land slide- Natural

  20. Models for Initial Allocation of Emission Permits in a River Basin During Industrial Development: A Case Study of Huaihe River Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shutong; Huang Xianjin; Cheng Xushui; Wan Yi; Ma Tianqi

    2010-01-01

    At present,water pollutant emission trading plays an increasingly important role in pollution control in many foreign countries,and its pilot studies and demonstration have also been started in China.In order to solve the problem of initial allocation of emission permits: premise and basis of emission trading in a river basin,basic principles on initial allocation of actual emission permits in China are put forward.And it is thought that local development stage of industry should be taken into full account for initial allocation model of emission permits.There are five different allocation models in different development stages of industry,including models like distribution according to needs,improved same-rate reduction,performance,integration and environmental capacity,etc.The initial allocation of emission permits in various basins should choose a suitable model in accordance with their respective development stages.It is suggested in this article that integrated allocation model should be a main choice for current development stage of industry in China.

  1. Natural and human forcing in recent geomorphic change; case studies in the Rio de la Plata basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonachea, Jaime; Bruschi, Viola M; Hurtado, Martín A; Forte, Luis M; da Silva, Mario; Etcheverry, Ricardo; Cavallotto, José L; Dantas, Marcilene F; Pejon, Osni J; Zuquette, Lázaro V; Bezerra, Maria Angélica de O; Remondo, Juan; Rivas, Victoria; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Fernández, Gema; Cendrero, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    An analysis of geomorphic system's response to change in human and natural drivers in some areas within the Río de la Plata basin is presented. The aim is to determine whether an acceleration of geomorphic processes has taken place in recent years and, if so, to what extent it is due to natural (climate) or human (land-use) drivers. Study areas of different size, socio-economic and geomorphic conditions have been selected: the Río de la Plata estuary and three sub-basins within its watershed. Sediment cores were extracted and dated ((210)Pb) to determine sedimentation rates since the end of the 19th century. Rates were compared with time series on rainfall as well as human drivers such as population, GDP, livestock load, crop area, energy consumption or cement consumption, all of them related to human capacity to disturb land surface. Data on river discharge were also gathered. Results obtained indicate that sedimentation rates during the last century have remained essentially constant in a remote Andean basin, whereas they show important increases in the other two, particularly one located by the São Paulo metropolitan area. Rates in the estuary are somewhere in between. It appears that there is an intensification of denudation/sedimentation processes within the basin. Rainfall remained stable or varied very slightly during the period analysed and does not seem to explain increases of sedimentation rates observed. Human drivers, particularly those more directly related to capacity to disturb land surface (GDP, energy or cement consumption) show variations that suggest human forcing is a more likely explanation for the observed change in geomorphic processes. It appears that a marked increase in denudation, of a "technological" nature, is taking place in this basin and leading to an acceleration of sediment supply. This is coherent with similar increases observed in other regions. PMID:20381129

  2. Differences in sedimentary filling and its controlling factors in rift lacustrine basins, East China: A case study from Qikou and Nanpu sags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua WANG; Shu JIANG; Chuanyan HUANG; Hua JIANG; Huajun GAN

    2011-01-01

    The riff lacustrine basin is characterized by a variety of sediment sources, multiple sedimentary systems,and complex filling, and its sediment supply is largely influenced by climate change. The sedimentary filling and its controlling factors have always been the focuses in basin analysis. This paper first reviews the recent advancement in riff lacustrine basin investigations with an emphasis on the structural controlling on lacustrine configuration, accommodation, and directly structural controlling on basin filling characteristics. The paleogeography resulted from spatial configuration of structural styles, and the sediment supplies synergically determine the types and distribution of depositional systems. The sedimentary filling characteristics of the fourth-order sequence record the evolution of cyclic climate. The case studies are followed on the basis of the sedimentary filling analysis in typical Nanpu sag and Qikou sag in Huanghua riff lacustrine basins in East China. The comparison of sedimentary fillings within sequence stratigraphic frameworks in the two sags shows the different episodic tectonic activities, and their resulting structural frameworks mainly controlled the different sequence stratigraphic developments, their internal architectures, and depositional systems distribution. Qikou sag has more complicate sedimentary filling controlled by episodic activities of boundary and intrabasin secondary faults and sediment supplies. Based on the studies from our own and the formers, we suggest that the sedimentary filling study in rift lacustrine basin should be under the guidance of sequence stratigraphy, use high resolution seismic and all available geological data, combine tectonic evolution and structural styles to build the sequence framework, and then reconstruct the paleo-structure and paleogeography. Studying the relationship between paleogeography and paleosedimentary filling can favor the understanding of the characteristics of sedimentary

  3. Mapping of groundwater quality in the Turonian aquifer of Oum Er-Rabia Basin, Morocco: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2006-08-01

    This study takes the groundwater of the Moroccan limestone aquifer of Oum Er-Rabia as an example of statistical and cartographical approaches in water resources management. Statistical analyses based on frequency distribution and PCA methods revealed the homogeneity of waters with the existence of abnormal points and have helped to assess correlations between the studied variables. The mapping approach illustrated that waters are influenced by the lithology of the surrounding rocks and are of Ca Mg HCO3, Ca Mg Cl SO4, and mixed types according to the Piper classification. The quality of water is of high to medium, north of the basin, but it is of medium to bad, NE and south, due to excessive contents of chloride, sulfate and nitrate. According to the US Salinity Laboratory classification, water used for irrigation in the eastern and the southern parts of the basin should take into consideration the drainage conditions, the nature of plants and the addition of gypsum doses.

  4. Association between Changing Mortality of Digestive Tract Cancers and Water Pollution: A Case Study in the Huai River Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyan Ren; Xia Wan; Fei Yang; Xiaoming Shi; Jianwei Xu; Dafang Zhuang; Gonghuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the ever-increasing cancer mortality and water pollution is an important public concern in China. This study aimed to explore the association between serious water pollution and increasing digestive cancer mortality in the Huai River Basin (HRB) in China. A series of frequency of serious pollution (FSP) indices including water quality grade (FSPWQG), biochemical oxygen demand (FSPBOD), chemical oxygen demand (FSPCOD), and ammonia nitrogen (FSPAN) were used to characte...

  5. Interbasinal marker intervals——A case study from the Jurassic basins of Kachchh and Jaisalmer, western India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANDEY; Dhirendra; Kumar; FüRSICH; Franz; Theodor

    2009-01-01

    The Kachchh Basin and the Jaisalmer Basin are two neighboring Mesozoic sedimentary basins at the western margin of the Indian craton. The Jurassic succession of the Kachchh Basin is more complete and more fossiliferous than that of the Jaisalmer Basin. Consequently, intrabasinal correlation of the sedimentary units has been possible in the Kachchh Basin, but not in the Jaisalmer Basin. However, some marker beds existing in the Kachchh Basin can be recognized also in the Jaisalmer Basin. Ammonite evidence shows that they are time-equivalent. The following four units form marker intervals in both basins: (1) the pebbly rudstone unit with Isastrea bernardiana and Leptosphinctes of the Kaladongar Formation (Kachchh Basin) and the Isastrea bernardiana-bearing rudstone of the Jaisalmer Formation (Jaisalmer Basin) both represent transgressive systems tract deposits dated as Late Bajocian; (2) bioturbated micrites with anomalodesmatan bivalves within the Goradongar Yellow Flagstone Member (Kachchh Basin) and bioturbated units in the Fort Member (Jaisalmer Basin) represent maximum flooding zone deposits of the Middle to Late Bathonian; (3) trough-crossbedded, sandy packto grainstones of the Raimalro Limestone Member (Kachchh Basin) and the basal limestone-sandstone unit of the Kuldhar section of the Jaisalmer Formation (Jaisalmer Basin) correspond to Late Bathonain transgressive systems tract deposits; and (4) ferruginous ooid-bearing carbonates with hardgrounds of the Dhosa Oolite member (Kachchh Basin) and the middle part of the Jajiya Member (Jaisalmer Basin) are Oxfordian transgressive systems tract deposits. The fact that in both basins similar biofacies prevailed during certain time intervals demonstrates a common control of their depositional history. As the two basins represent different tectonic settings, the most likely controlling factors were the relative sea-level changes produced by eustatic processes, a common subsidence history of the northwestern margin of

  6. Modelling and simulation of compressible fluid flow in oil reservoir: a case study of the Jubilee Field, Tano Basin (Ghana)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil extraction represents an important investment and the control of a rational exploitation of a field means mastering various scientific techniques including the understanding of the dynamics of fluids in place. This thesis presents a theoretical investigation of the dynamic behaviour of an oil reservoir during its exploitation. The study investigated the dynamics of fluid flow patterns in a homogeneous oil reservoir using the Radial Diffusivity Equation (RDE) as well as two phase oil-water flow equations. The RDE model was solved analytically and numerically for pressure using the Constant Terminal Rate Solution (CTRS) and the fully implicit Finite Difference Method (FDM) respectively. The mathematical derivations of the models and their solution procedures were presented to allow for easy utilization of the techniques for reservoir and engineering applications. The study predicted that the initial oil reservoir pressure will be able to do the extraction for a very long time before any other recovery method will be used to aid in the extraction process depending on the rate of production. Reservoir simulation describing a one dimensional radial flow of a compressible fluid in porous media may be adequately performed using ordinary laptop computers as revealed by the study. For the simulation of MATLAB, the case of the Jubilee Fields, Tano Basin was studied, an algorithm was developed for the simulation of pressure in the reservoir. It ensues from the analysis of the plots of pressure vrs time and space that the Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA) was duly followed. The approximate solutions of the analytical and numerical solutions to the Radial Diffusivity Equation (RDE) were in excellent agreement, thus the reservoir simulation model developed can be used to describe typical pressure-time relationships that are used in conventional Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA). The study was extended to two phase oil-water flow in reservoirs. The flow of fluids in multi

  7. Participatory Planning for the improvement of water management in uncertain conditions: Case study of the Souss-Massa basin in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Yasmina; Lahlou, Ouiam; Slimani, Imane; Joyce, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Due to its geographical location and to the natural features of its climate, Morocco is known as a drought prone and water scarce country. However, the country now faces, in the current context of Climate Change, an increasing and alarming water scarcity due to the combined effects of a strong decline of precipitations and a growing pressure on water resources induced by the economic development and demographic growth. Aware of this pressing issue, Morocco implemented a national water strategy based on the decentralization of water management at the river basin level and the establishment of Integrated Water Resources Management master plans for each basin. Unfortunately, these plans often underestimate the impact of uncertainty and this may lead to inefficient and unsustainable water management strategies. In this context, the aim of this study is to develop an innovative approach for robust decision making in uncertain conditions by coupling the WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning System) model and the "XLRM" robust decision making framework to support the evaluation of management options and promote long-term sustainable integrated water management strategies at the basin level. The Souss-Massa basin, located in the south-western part of the country was retained as a case study because of its strategic importance but also because it now faces, as a consequence of the irrational use of water resources during the last decades significant water resources management challenges mainly due to the overexploitation of ground water resources, the increased of water demand due to the irrigation development, the urban and industrial growth and the expansion of tourism. Thus, in this study, a three step methodology was developed. First, the WEAP model were developed and calibrated for the Souss-Massa basin. In a second step, a XLRM participatory workshop gathering the basin main stakeholders were organized in order to identify the EXogenous factors (key uncertainties

  8. Determination of paleo-pressure for a natural gas pool formation based on PVT characteristics of fluid inclusions in reservoir rocks--A case study of Upper-Paleozoic deep basin gas trap of the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI; Jingkui; XIAO; Xianming; LIU; Dehan; SHEN; Jiagui

    2004-01-01

    It has been proved to be a difficult problem to determine directly trapping pressure of fluid inclusions. Recently, PVT simulation softwares have been applied to simulating the trapping pressure of petroleum inclusions in reservoir rocks, but the reported methods have many limitations in practice. In this paper, a method is suggested to calculating the trapping pressure and temperature of fluid inclusions by combining the isochore equations of a gas-bearing aqueous inclusion with its coeval petroleum inclusions. A case study was conducted by this method for fluid inclusions occurring in the Upper-Paleozoic Shanxi Formation reservoir sandstones from the Ordos Basin. The results show that the trapping pressure of these inclusions ranges from 21 to 32 MPa, which is 6-7 MPa higher than their minimum trapping pressure although the trapping temperature is only 2-3℃ higher than the homogenization temperature. The trapping pressure and temperature of the fluid inclusions decrease from southern area to northern area of the basin.The trapping pressure is obviously lower than the state water pressures when the inclusions formed. These data are consistent with the regional geological and geochemical conditions of the basin when the deep basin gas trap formed.

  9. A revision of communication strategies for effective disaster risk reduction: A case study of the South Durban basin, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Skinner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study examined how effective forms of communication are, or could be, impacting themore traditional forms of emergency and disaster management communication throughthe print and electronic media and how an integrated communication strategy involving allstakeholders could prove to be successful. This study was of an exploratory and descriptivenature, using a case study of the South Durban basin to demonstrate how media analysis,community discussions and internal and external evaluations of current practices in use bymajor industrial players in the basin has thus far failed to reach its full potential for effectivedisaster risk reduction. Strongly emerging from this study was the finding that, as a resultof these evaluations, new systems are now being planned to incorporate social media as anintegral part of an overall communication strategy, which could have far-reaching implicationsfor corporate communicators and strategic planners.

  10. Lake Victoria basin in Kenya: A potential case study for the Joint WHO/UNEP/IAEA project on assessment and management of health and environmental risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern is arising about pollution in Lake Victoria, the largest of the East African Great Lakes. Lake Victoria is at a cross-roads: it could become an ecological disaster, or it can provide a model of enlightened environmental planning. A comprehensive environmental assessment wiht a consequent action plan will be required to locate, monitor, control and, ultimately, diminish the sources of contamination to prevent further environmental degradation in the Lake Victoria Basin. While such a project must ultimately explore basin-wide problems of industrial development, deforestation, soil erosion, desertification, over-cropping, overgrazing, and population growth, a more limited project to begin some integrated assessment which focuses on industrial effluents from existing and future industrial activities in the river basins, and on pollutants from agricultural run-off within Kenya is proposed. The region is a limited, well-defined area hydrologically. Limiting the case study to the area within Kenya results in a politically unified region also. The region is impacted by industrial effluents superimposed on the problems of rapid population growth, fishing pressure, and expansion of farming into marginal lands with resulting deforestation and agricultural run-off. There are several, currently unrelated, projects on environmental risk assessment and management in the region which could be incorporated into the case study. A Government of Kenya agency with responsibility for coordination of environmental risk assessment and management, the Lake Basin Development Authority, already exists and is seeking outside assistance. It is far better to begin with a limited, practical first step which could eventually fold into a more comprehensive, basin-wide planning program. (author)

  11. Pasco Basin hydrometeorological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides detailed precipitation and evapotranspiration distributions for the Pasco Basin for use in groundwater recharge calculations. The results are shown on precipitation and evapotranspiration distribution maps. The parameters, calculation methods, sensitivity determinations, and fitting methods used in the development of these maps are also discussed

  12. Reducing the basin vulnerability by land management practices under past and future climate: a case study of the Nam Ou River Basin, Lao PDR

    OpenAIRE

    M. Maharjan; Babel, M.S.; Maskey, S

    2014-01-01

    This research evaluates different land management practices for the Nam Ou River Basin in Northern Laos for reducing vulnerability of the basin due to erosion and sediment yield under existing and future climate conditions. We use climate projection data (precipitation and temperature) from three general circulation models (GCMs) for three greenhouse gas emission scenarios (GHGES), namely B1, A1B and A2 and three future periods, namely 2011–2030, 2046–2065 a...

  13. Impacts of Land Use on Surface Water Quality in a Subtropical River Basin: A Case Study of the Dongjiang River Basin, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Ding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between land use and surface water quality is necessary for effective water management. We estimated the impacts of catchment-wide land use on water quality during the dry and rainy seasons in the Dongjiang River basin, using remote sensing, geographic information systems and multivariate statistical techniques. The results showed that the 83 sites can be divided into three groups representing different land use types: forest, agriculture and urban. Water quality parameters exhibited significant variations between the urban-dominated and forest-dominated sites. The proportion of forested land was positively associated with dissolved oxygen concentration but negatively associated with water temperature, electrical conductivity, permanganate index, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and chlorophyll-a. The proportion of urban land was strongly positively associated with total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen concentrations. Forested and urban land use had stronger impacts on water quality in the dry season than in the rainy season. However, agricultural land use did not have a significant impact on water quality. Our study indicates that urban land use was the key factor affecting water quality change, and limiting point-source waste discharge in urban areas during the dry season would be critical for improving water quality in the study area.

  14. Radioactivity in the environment: a case study of the Puerco and Little Colorado River Basins, Arizona and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, written for the nontechnical reader, summarizes the results of a study from 1988-91 of the occurrence and transport of selected radionuclides and other chemical constituents in the Puerco and Little Colorado River basins, Arizona and New Mexico. More than two decades of uranium mining and the 1979 failure of an earthen dam containing mine tailings released high levels of radionuclides and other chemical constituents to the Puerco River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River. Releases caused public concern that ground water and streamflow downstream from mining were contaminated. Study findings show which radioactive elements are present, how these elements are distributed between water and sediment in the environment, how concentrations of radioactive elements vary naturally within basins, and how levels of radioactivity have changed since the end of mining. Although levels of radioactive elements and other trace elements measured in streamflow commonly exceed drinking-water standards, no evidence was found to indicate that the high concentrations were still related to uraniurn mining. Sediment radioactivity was higher at sample sites on streams that drain the eastern part of the Little Colorado River basin than that of samples from the western part. Radioactivity of suspended sediment measured in this study, therefore, represents natural conditions for the streams sampled rather than an effect of mining. Because ground water beneath the Puerco River channel is shallow, the aquifer is vulnerable to contamination. A narrow zone of ground water beneath the Puerco River containing elevated uranium concentrations was identified during the study. The highest concentrations were nearest the mines and in samples collected in the first few feet beneath the streambed. Natuxal radiation levels in a few areas of the underlying sedimentary aquifer not connected to the Puerco River also exceeded water quality standards. Water testing would enable those residents

  15. Identifying stakeholder-relevant climate change impacts: a case study in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, K.; Graves, D.; Hardiman, Jill M.; Hatten, James R.; Mastin, Mark C.; Mesa, Matthew G.; Montag, J.; Nieman, Timothy; Voss, Frank D.; Maule, Alec G.

    2014-01-01

    Designing climate-related research so that study results will be useful to natural resource managers is a unique challenge. While decision makers increasingly recognize the need to consider climate change in their resource management plans, and climate scientists recognize the importance of providing locally-relevant climate data and projections, there often remains a gap between management needs and the information that is available or is being collected. We used decision analysis concepts to bring decision-maker and stakeholder perspectives into the applied research planning process. In 2009 we initiated a series of studies on the impacts of climate change in the Yakima River Basin (YRB) with a four-day stakeholder workshop, bringing together managers, stakeholders, and scientists to develop an integrated conceptual model of climate change and climate change impacts in the YRB. The conceptual model development highlighted areas of uncertainty that limit the understanding of the potential impacts of climate change and decision alternatives by those who will be most directly affected by those changes, and pointed to areas where additional study and engagement of stakeholders would be beneficial. The workshop and resulting conceptual model highlighted the importance of numerous different outcomes to stakeholders in the basin, including social and economic outcomes that go beyond the physical and biological outcomes typically reported in climate impacts studies. Subsequent studies addressed several of those areas of uncertainty, including changes in water temperatures, habitat quality, and bioenergetics of salmonid populations.

  16. Application of MODIS Products to Infer Possible Relationships Between Basin Land Cover and Coastal Waters Turbidity Using the Magdalena River, Colombia, as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrinan, Max Jacobo Moreno; Cordova, Africa Flores; Olivares, Francisco Delgado; Irwin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Basin development and consequent change in basin land cover have been often associated with an increased turbidity in coastal waters because of sediment yield and nutrients loading. The later leads to phytoplankton abundance further exacerbating water turbidity. This subsequently affects biological and physical processes in coastal estuaries by interfering with sun light penetration to coral reefs and sea grass, and even affecting public health. Therefore, consistent estimation of land cover changes and turbidity trend lines is crucial to design environmental and restoration management plans, to predict fate of possible pollutants, and to estimate sedimentary fluxes into the ocean. Ground solely methods to estimate land cover change would be unpractical and traditional methods of monitoring in situ water turbidity can be very expensive and time consuming. Accurate monitoring on the status and trends of basin land cover as well as the water quality of the receiving water bodies are required for analysis of relationships between the two variables. Use of remote sensing (RS) technology provides a great benefit for both fields of study, facilitating monitoring of changes in a timely and cost effective manner and covering wide areas with long term measurements. In this study, the Magdalena River basin and fixed geographical locations in the estuarine waters of its delta are used as a case to study the temporal trend lines of both, land cover change and the reflectance of the water turbidity using satellite technology. Land cover data from a combined product between sensors Terra and Aqua (MCD12Q1) from MODIS will be adapted to the conditions in the Magdalena basin to estimate changes in land cover since year 2000 to 2009. Surface reflectance data from a MODIS, Terra (MOD09GQ), band 1, will be used in lieu of in situ water turbidity for the time period between 2000 and present. Results will be compared with available existing data.

  17. Evaluation of the Impacts of Land Use on Water Quality: A Case Study in The Chaohu Lake Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Huang; Jinyan Zhan; Haiming Yan; Feng Wu; Xiangzheng Deng

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the land use type and water quality. There have been some researches on this relationship from the perspective of the spatial configuration of land use in recent years. This study aims to analyze the influence of various land use types on the water quality within the Chaohu Lake Basin based on the water quality monitoring data and RS data from 2000 to 2008, with the small watershed as the basic unit of analysis. The result...

  18. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: South Columbia Basin Irrigation District, Pasco, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, L.

    1980-05-01

    The case study concerns two modern human uses of the Columbia River - irrigation aimed at agricultural land reclamation and hydroelectric power. The Grand Coulee Dam has become synonomous with large-scale generation of hydroelectric power providing the Pacific Northwest with some of the least-expensive electricity in the United States. The Columbia Basin Project has created a half-million acres of farmland in Washington out of a spectacular and vast desert. The South Columbia River Basin Irrigation District is seeking to harness the energy present in the water which already runs through its canals, drains, and wasteways. The South District's development strategy is aimed toward reducing the costs its farmers pay for irrigation and raising the capital required to serve the remaining 550,000 acres originally planned as part of the Columbia Basin Project. The economic, institutional, and regulatory problems of harnessing the energy at site PEC 22.7, one of six sites proposed for development, are examined in this case study.

  19. Reducing the basin vulnerability by land management practices under past and future climate: a case study of the Nam Ou River Basin, Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maharjan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluates different land management practices for the Nam Ou River Basin in Northern Laos for reducing vulnerability of the basin due to erosion and sediment yield under existing and future climate conditions. We use climate projection data (precipitation and temperature from three general circulation models (GCMs for three greenhouse gas emission scenarios (GHGES, namely B1, A1B and A2 and three future periods, namely 2011–2030, 2046–2065 and 2080–2099. These large resolution GCM data are downscaled using the Long Ashton Research Station-Weather Generator (LARS-WG. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, which is a process based hydrological model, is used to simulate discharge and sediment yield and a threshold value of annual sediment yield is applied to identify vulnerable sub-basins. Results show that the change in the annual precipitation is expected to be between −7.60 to 2.64% in 2011–2030, −8.98 to 11.85% in 2046–2065, and −11.04 to 25.84% in 2080–2099. In the meantime, the changes in mean monthly temperature vary from 0.3 to 1.3 °C in the 2011–2030, 1.3 to 2.9 °C in the 2046–2065 and 1.9 to 4.9 °C in the 2080–2099. Five sub-basins are identified vulnerable (critical under the current climate. Our results show that terracing is the most effective land management practice to reduce sediment yield in these sub-basins followed by strip-cropping and filter strip. Appropriate land management practices applied under future climate scenarios show significant reduction in sediment yield (i.e. up to the tolerance limit except for some sub-basins. In these exceptional sub-basins, designing an optimum combination of management practices is essential to reduce the vulnerability of the basin.

  20. Decadal Climate Information Needs of Stakeholders for Decision Support in Water and Agriculture Production Sectors: A Case Study in the Missouri River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, V. M.; Knutson, C.; Rosenberg, N.

    2012-12-01

    Many decadal climate prediction efforts have been initiated under the World Climate Research Programme's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5. There is considerable ongoing discussion about model deficiencies, initialization techniques, and data requirements, but not much attention is being given to decadal climate information (DCI) needs of stakeholders for decision support. We report the results of exploratory activities undertaken to assess DCI needs in water resources and agriculture sectors, using the Missouri River Basin (the Basin) as a case study. This assessment was achieved through discussions with 120 representative stakeholders. Stakeholders' awareness of decadal dry and wet spells and their societal impacts in the Basin is established; and stakeholders' DCI needs and potential barriers to their use of DCI are enumerated. We find that impacts, including economic impacts, of DCV on water and agricultural production in the Basin are distinctly identifiable and characterizable. Stakeholders have clear notions about their needs for DCI and have offered specific suggestions as to how these might be met. But, while stakeholders are eager to have climate information, including decadal climate outlooks (DCOs), there are many barriers to the use of such information. The first and foremost is that the credibility of DCOs is yet to be established. Secondly, the nature of institutional rules and regulations, laws, and legal precedents that pose obstacles to the use of DCOs must be better understood and means to modify these, where possible, must be sought. For the benefit of climate scientists, these and other stakeholder needs will also be articulated in this talk. We are engaged in a project to assess simulation and hindcast skills of DCV phenomena and their associations with hydro-meteorological variability in the Basin in the HadCM3, GFDL-CM2.1, NCAR CCSM4, and MIROC5 global coupled models participating in the WCRP's CMIP5 project. Results from this project

  1. The Importance of Water Temperature Fluctuations in Relation to the Hydrological Factor. Case Study – Bistrita River Basin (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojoc Gianina Maria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in most components of the climate over the past 50 years, including air and water temperature, is a real phenomenon, as attested by the numerous specialized researches according to IPCC (2013. The water temperature is one of the most important climatic components in analyzing the hydrological regime of the Bistrita River (Romania. The thermal regime of the Bistrita River basin and the frost phenomena associated with the risk factor are particularly important and frequently appear in this area. In recent years, under the Siret Water Basin Administration, this parameter was permanently monitored, so we could do an analysis, which shows that the water temperature fluctuations, influenced by air temperature, lead to the emergence of the ice jam phenomenon. The present study aims to analyze the water temperature, as compared to the air temperature, and the effect of these components on the liquid flow regime (the values were recorded at the hydrological stations on the main course of the Bistrita River. The negative effects resulted from the ice jam phenomenon require developing methods of damage prevention and defense. The frost phenomena recorded after the construction of the Bicaz dam are analyzed in this article

  2. Comparison of Statistical Downscaling Methods for Monthly Total Precipitation: Case Study for the Paute River Basin in Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Campozano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Downscaling improves considerably the results of General Circulation Models (GCMs. However, little information is available on the performance of downscaling methods in the Andean mountain region. The paper presents the downscaling of monthly precipitation estimates of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis 1 applying the statistical downscaling model (SDSM, artificial neural networks (ANNs, and the least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM approach. Downscaled monthly precipitation estimates after bias and variance correction were compared to the median and variance of the 30-year observations of 5 climate stations in the Paute River basin in southern Ecuador, one of Ecuador’s main river basins. A preliminary comparison revealed that both artificial intelligence methods, ANN and LS-SVM, performed equally. Results disclosed that ANN and LS-SVM methods depict, in general, better skills in comparison to SDSM. However, in some months, SDSM estimates matched the median and variance of the observed monthly precipitation depths better. Since synoptic variables do not always present local conditions, particularly in the period going from September to December, it is recommended for future studies to refine estimates of downscaling, for example, by combining dynamic and statistical methods, or to select sets of synoptic predictors for specific months or seasons.

  3. Groundwater flow and transport modeling: A case study of alluvial aquifer in the Tuul River Basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandar, Enkhbayar; Carrera, Jesús; Nemer, Buyankhishig

    2016-04-01

    The Tuul River basin is located northern Mongolia. It includes Ulaanbaatar city, which hosts 48% of Mongolian population. Water supply to the city relies exclusively on groundwater withdrawn from alluvial aquifers along the Tuul River Basin. Water demand of the city has increased recently as a result of rapid industrial development and population growth due to migration from rural areas. The aim of this study is to characterize the aquifer by integrating existing data in a flow model. Unfortunately, existing data are not sufficient for unequivocal identification of model parameters (groundwater recharge, permeability, lateral inflow, etc.). Fluctuations of water temperature have been recognized as a natural tracer that may be used for hydrogeological characterization and model calibration. Temperatures within the aquifer are affected by the temperature of inflowing water as well as by conduction from the soil surface, which we suspect may control aquifer temperatures. Properly acknowledging these fluctuations would require a three dimensional model. Instead, we propose a semianalytical solution based on the use of memory and influence functions.

  4. Impacts of forest changes on hydrology: a case study of large watersheds in the upper reach of Yangtze River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, X; Liu, S; Wei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the effects of forest changes on hydrology in large watersheds is important for designing forest or land management and adaptation strategies for watershed ecosystem sustainability. Minjiang River watershed located in the upper reach of the Yangtze River Basin plays a strategic role in environmental protection and economic and social wellbeing for both the watershed and the entire Yangtze Basin. The watershed lies in the transition zone from Sichuan Basin to Qinghai-Tibet Pla...

  5. Interannual variability of regional evapotranspiration under precipitation extremes: A case study of the Youngsan River basin in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngkeun; Ryu, Youngryel; Jeon, Soohyun

    2014-11-01

    Understanding basin-scale evapotranspiration (ET) is an important issue for the management of regional water resources, especially with the recent trend of intensified precipitation (P). This study assessed the spatial and temporal variations of regional ET in response to P extremes, for various types of land-cover across the Youngsan River basin in Korea. The spatial distribution of monthly P and ET from 2001 to 2009 were estimated using rainfall records from 40 weather stations located across the basin and a satellite-derived, process-based ET model Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS) (Ryu et al., 2011), respectively. The study periods were focused on the recent years with abnormally large, small and normal P, which were identified from anomalies in the z-sores of long-term (1973-2011) rainfall records. The variation of regional ET was assessed in terms of: (1) the controlling factors, using the statistics of related meteorological and geographical data, (2) a water-energy balance, using Budyko's framework, and (3) the water balance of four selected watersheds in the region, using the partitioning of annual P into ET and riverflow discharge (Q). The total annual ET of this region decreased in abnormally large-P year and increased in small-P year, because the ET in July to August (which accounts for more than 36% of annual ET) was limited by the available energy rather than available water due to the summer monsoon. In terms of land cover types, forests showed larger interannual variability in ET than paddy fields or cropland, with the differences in ET between large and small-P years being 108 and 82 mm yr-1, respectively. The sensitivity of annual ET to P extremes was significantly related to the leaf area index (LAI), rather than soil properties, topography, or specific land-cover type (p < 0.05, generalized linear model). However, the interannual variations of ET were not large (15-18%) compared to those of annual P (51-62%) and Q (108-232%) during 2002

  6. Quantifying and identifying the sources of fine sediment input in a typical Mongolian river basin, the Kharaa River case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuring, Phillip

    2013-04-01

    Mongolia is facing a tremendous change of land-use intensification due to expansions in the agricultural sector, an increase of cattle and livestock and a growth of urban settlements by migration of the rural population to the cities. With most of its area located in a semiarid to arid environment, Mongolia is vulnerable to climatic changes that are expected to lead to higher temperatures and increased evapotranspiration. It is expected that this may lead to unfavorable changes in surface water quality caused by increased nutrients and sediment bound pollutants emissions. Increased fine sediment load is associated with nutrient, heavy metal and pollutant input and therefore affects water quality. Previous studies using radionuclide fallout isotope sediment source fingerprinting investigations identified riverbank erosion as the main source of suspended sediment in the Kharaa River. Erosion susceptibility calculations in combination with suspended sediment observations showed strong seasonal and annual variabilities of sediment input and in-stream transport, and a strong connection of erosional behaviour with land-use.The objective of this study is to quantify the current water quality threats by fine sediment inputs in the 15,000 km2 Kharaa River basin in Northern Mongolia by delineating the sources of the fine sediments and estimating the sediment budget.To identify the spatial distribution of sediment sources within the catchment, more than 1000 samples from the river confluences at the outlet of each sub basin into the main tributary were collected during 5 intensive grab sediment sampling campaigns in 2009-11. The fine sediment fraction (<10μm) has been analysed using geochemical tracer techniques for spatial source identification, based on major elements (e.g. Si, Al, Mg, Fe, Na, K, P) and trace elements (e.g. Ba, Pb, Sr, Zn). The contribution of suspended sediment of each sub basin in the main tributary has been evaluated with help of a mixing model. To

  7. GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling for Landslide Hazard Assessment: A Case Study in Upper Minjiang River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wenlan; ZHOU Qigang; ZHANG Baolei; ZHOU Wancun; LI Ainong; ZHANG Haizhen; XIAN Wei

    2006-01-01

    By analyzing the topographic features of past landslides since 1980s and the main land-cover types (including change information) in landslide-prone area, modeled spatial distribution of landslide hazard in upper Minjiang River Basin was studied based on spatial analysis of GIS in this paper. Results of GIS analysis showed that landslide occurrence in this region closely related to topographic feature. Most areas with high hazard probability were deep-sheared gorge. Most of them in investigation occurred assembly in areas with elevation lower than 3 000 m, due to fragile topographic conditions and intensive human disturbances. Land-cover type, including its change information, was likely an important environmental factor to trigger landslide. Destroy of vegetation driven by increase of population and its demands augmented the probability of landslide in steep slope.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Driving Factors of Grassland Degradation: A Case Study in Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current literature suggests that grassland degradation occurs in areas with poor soil conditions or noticeable environmental changes and is often a result of overgrazing or human disturbances. However, these views are questioned in our analyses. Based on the analysis of satellite vegetation maps from 1984, 1998, and 2004 for the Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia, China, and binary logistic regression (BLR analysis, we observe the following: (1 grassland degradation is positively correlated with the growth density of climax communities; (2 our findings do not support a common notion that a decrease of biological productivity is a direct indicator of grassland degradation; (3 a causal relationship between grazing intensity and grassland degradation was not found; (4 degradation severity increased steadily towards roads but showed different trends near human settlements. This study found complex relationships between vegetation degradation and various microhabitat conditions, for example, elevation, slope, aspect, and proximity to water.

  9. Quantitative analysis of driving factors of grassland degradation: a case study in Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yichun; Sha, Zongyao

    2012-01-01

    Current literature suggests that grassland degradation occurs in areas with poor soil conditions or noticeable environmental changes and is often a result of overgrazing or human disturbances. However, these views are questioned in our analyses. Based on the analysis of satellite vegetation maps from 1984, 1998, and 2004 for the Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia, China, and binary logistic regression (BLR) analysis, we observe the following: (1) grassland degradation is positively correlated with the growth density of climax communities; (2) our findings do not support a common notion that a decrease of biological productivity is a direct indicator of grassland degradation; (3) a causal relationship between grazing intensity and grassland degradation was not found; (4) degradation severity increased steadily towards roads but showed different trends near human settlements. This study found complex relationships between vegetation degradation and various microhabitat conditions, for example, elevation, slope, aspect, and proximity to water. PMID:22619613

  10. Evaluation of drought indices at interannual to climate change timescales: a case study over the Amazon and Mississippi river basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Joetzjer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study compares three meteorological drought indices (scPDSI, SPI and SPEI respectively and their ability to account for the variations of annual mean river discharge on both interannual and climate change timescales. The Standardized Runoff Index (SRI is used as a proxy of river discharge. The Mississippi and Amazon river basins provide two contrasted testbeds for this analysis. All meteorological drought indices are derived from monthly 2-meter temperature and/or precipitation, using either gridded observations or outputs of a global climate model. The SPI based solely on precipitation is not outperformed by the SPEI (accounting for potential evapotranspiration and the scPDSI (based on a simplified water balance at detecting interannual SRI variations. Under increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, the simulated response of the areal fraction in drought is highly index-dependent, suggesting that more physical water balance models are needed to account for the impact of global warming on hydrological droughts.

  11. Does internal climate variability overwhelm climate change signals in streamflow? The upper Po and Rhone basin case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatichi, S., E-mail: simone.fatichi@ifu.baug.ethz.ch; Rimkus, S.; Burlando, P.; Bordoy, R.

    2014-09-15

    Projections of climate change effects in streamflow are increasingly required to plan water management strategies. These projections are however largely uncertain due to the spread among climate model realizations, internal climate variability, and difficulties in transferring climate model results at the spatial and temporal scales required by catchment hydrology. A combination of a stochastic downscaling methodology and distributed hydrological modeling was used in the ACQWA project to provide projections of future streamflow (up to year 2050) for the upper Po and Rhone basins, respectively located in northern Italy and south-western Switzerland. Results suggest that internal (stochastic) climate variability is a fundamental source of uncertainty, typically comparable or larger than the projected climate change signal. Therefore, climate change effects in streamflow mean, frequency, and seasonality can be masked by natural climatic fluctuations in large parts of the analyzed regions. An exception to the overwhelming role of stochastic variability is represented by high elevation catchments fed by glaciers where streamflow is expected to be considerably reduced due to glacier retreat, with consequences appreciable in the main downstream rivers in August and September. Simulations also identify regions (west upper Rhone and Toce, Ticino river basins) where a strong precipitation increase in the February to April period projects streamflow beyond the range of natural climate variability during the melting season. This study emphasizes the importance of including internal climate variability in climate change analyses, especially when compared to the limited uncertainty that would be accounted for by few deterministic projections. The presented results could be useful in guiding more specific impact studies, although design or management decisions should be better based on reliability and vulnerability criteria as suggested by recent literature. - Highlights:

  12. Does internal climate variability overwhelm climate change signals in streamflow? The upper Po and Rhone basin case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projections of climate change effects in streamflow are increasingly required to plan water management strategies. These projections are however largely uncertain due to the spread among climate model realizations, internal climate variability, and difficulties in transferring climate model results at the spatial and temporal scales required by catchment hydrology. A combination of a stochastic downscaling methodology and distributed hydrological modeling was used in the ACQWA project to provide projections of future streamflow (up to year 2050) for the upper Po and Rhone basins, respectively located in northern Italy and south-western Switzerland. Results suggest that internal (stochastic) climate variability is a fundamental source of uncertainty, typically comparable or larger than the projected climate change signal. Therefore, climate change effects in streamflow mean, frequency, and seasonality can be masked by natural climatic fluctuations in large parts of the analyzed regions. An exception to the overwhelming role of stochastic variability is represented by high elevation catchments fed by glaciers where streamflow is expected to be considerably reduced due to glacier retreat, with consequences appreciable in the main downstream rivers in August and September. Simulations also identify regions (west upper Rhone and Toce, Ticino river basins) where a strong precipitation increase in the February to April period projects streamflow beyond the range of natural climate variability during the melting season. This study emphasizes the importance of including internal climate variability in climate change analyses, especially when compared to the limited uncertainty that would be accounted for by few deterministic projections. The presented results could be useful in guiding more specific impact studies, although design or management decisions should be better based on reliability and vulnerability criteria as suggested by recent literature. - Highlights:

  13. Propagation of a fold-and-thrust belt vs. timing of flexural basin formation: a case-study in the Betics (Gibraltar Arc System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro; Torvela, Taija; Exposito, Inmaculada; Balanya, Juan Carlos; Diaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Barcos, Leticia; Crespo-Blanc, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic load associated to the progressive fold-and-thrust belt (FTB) building in the external zones of orogens commonly leads to the lower plate lithosphere flexure, subsequent foreland basin formation, and syn-sedimentary deposits. In this contribution, we focus on a case-study situated in the northern branch of the Gibraltar Arc System. The interpretation of seismic sections together with updated structural data from the Subbetic FTB, formed by paleomargin deposits detached from the South Iberian basement, and the central to eastern Guadalquivir foreland basin, permit us to characterize the variations of deformational style across the Subbetic and the spatial and temporal relationships between the Subbetic and the foreland basin infill, in particular in terms of migration of the FTB deformation front. From the most internal FTB to foreland basin, various structural styles have been characterized: (1) The inner FTB is formed by buckle folds, WSW-ENE striking, kilometre-scale and non-cylindrical, controlled by a detachment within Triassic evaporites. (2) The central FTB is characterized by a thrust system, detached also in Triassic evaporites and whose direction varies from NE-SW to E-W towards a more external position. Ramp geometries and associated fault-bend folds show that this thrust system has N-ward vergence. Syn-compressional Serravallian to Langhian sediments deposited during the back and fore-thrusting permit to constrain the age of the deformation. (3) The frontal FTB is characterised by a tectonically complex area without dominant vergence. The Subbetic competent rocks are surrounded by a clayey matrix, attributed to Langhian-Serravallian age. Finally, seismic lines in the Guadalquivir foreland basin show that the Langhian-Serravallian units were thrust onto a younger Tortonian to Messinian, post-deformational sequence. Our data suggest that the compressional deformation observed in the inner and central FTB corresponds mostly with a Lower to Middle

  14. Coupling meteorological and hydrological models to evaluate the uncertainty in runoff forecasting: the case study of Maggiore Lake basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Rabuffetti, D.; Mancini, M.

    2009-04-01

    observed data to run the control simulations were supplied by ARPA-Piemonte. The study is focused on Maggiore Lake basin, an alpine basin between North-West of Italy and Southern Switzerland; results and statistical testing of the re-analyses shown in this presentation, are subdivided for each of three smaller sub-basins: Toce, Ticino and Maggia, in order to demonstrate the research progress on coupling meteorological and hydrological models in particular orographic features. It is presented how the meteorological forecasts are efficient into hydrological forecasting system, how the ensemble predictions are powerful to evaluate the uncertainty of the QPF which affects the QDF and the whole hydro-meteorological alert system for a mountain catchment. Further, in order to control the quality of the hydrological predictions in the short and medium term, statistical methods are used to calculate how the skill scores can be applied for hydrological applications and how the ensemble forecasts can help the users for decision making in management situations. Two significant events are analysed in order to compare the behaviour of the model driven by different weather scenarios: one convective in June that has yielded a high peak flow and one light stratiform in November that has been studied for the snow melt temperature which has affected the liquid precipitation and therefore the forecasted runoff. It is shown how the entire rainfall, the liquid precipitation and the runoff change in function of an areal the sub-basin scale, in order to understand where the errors are more frequently encountered.

  15. Impacts of forest changes on hydrology: a case study of large watersheds in the upper reach of Yangtze River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Cui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the effects of forest changes on hydrology in large watersheds is important for designing forest or land management and adaptation strategies for watershed ecosystem sustainability. Minjiang River watershed located in the upper reach of the Yangtze River Basin plays a strategic role in environmental protection and economic and social wellbeing for both the watershed and the entire Yangtze Basin. The watershed lies in the transition zone from Sichuan Basin to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with a size of 24 000 km2. Due to its strategic significance, severe historic deforestation and high sensitivity to climate change, the watershed has long been one of the highest priority watersheds in China for scientific research and resource management. The purpose of this review paper is to provide a state-of-the-art summary on what we have learned from several recently-completed research programs (one of them known as "973 of the China National Major Fundamental Science" with funding of $3.5 million USD in 2002 to 2008. This summary paper focused on how land cover or forest change affected hydrology at both forest stand and watershed scales in this large watershed. Inclusion of two different spatial scales is useful because the results from a small spatial scale (e.g. forest stand level can help interpret the findings at a large spatial scale. Our review suggests that historic forest harvesting or land cover change has caused significant water increase due to reduction of forest canopy interception and evapotranspiration caused by removal of forest vegetation at both spatial scales. The impact magnitudes caused by forest harvesting indicate that the hydrological effects of forest or land cover changes can be as important as those caused by climate change, while the opposite impact directions suggest their offsetting effects on water yields in the Minjiang River watershed. In addition, different types of forests have different magnitudes of ET

  16. Impacts of forest changes on hydrology: a case study of large watersheds in the upper reach of Yangtze River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X.; Liu, S.; Wei, X.

    2012-05-01

    Quantifying the effects of forest changes on hydrology in large watersheds is important for designing forest or land management and adaptation strategies for watershed ecosystem sustainability. Minjiang River watershed located in the upper reach of the Yangtze River Basin plays a strategic role in environmental protection and economic and social wellbeing for both the watershed and the entire Yangtze Basin. The watershed lies in the transition zone from Sichuan Basin to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with a size of 24 000 km2. Due to its strategic significance, severe historic deforestation and high sensitivity to climate change, the watershed has long been one of the highest priority watersheds in China for scientific research and resource management. The purpose of this review paper is to provide a state-of-the-art summary on what we have learned from several recently-completed research programs (one of them known as "973 of the China National Major Fundamental Science" with funding of 3.5 million USD in 2002 to 2008). This summary paper focused on how land cover or forest change affected hydrology at both forest stand and watershed scales in this large watershed. Inclusion of two different spatial scales is useful because the results from a small spatial scale (e.g. forest stand level) can help interpret the findings at a large spatial scale. Our review suggests that historic forest harvesting or land cover change has caused significant water increase due to reduction of forest canopy interception and evapotranspiration caused by removal of forest vegetation at both spatial scales. The impact magnitudes caused by forest harvesting indicate that the hydrological effects of forest or land cover changes can be as important as those caused by climate change, while the opposite impact directions suggest their offsetting effects on water yields in the Minjiang River watershed. In addition, different types of forests have different magnitudes of ET with old-growth natural

  17. A study case of Baranca drainage basin flash-floods using the hydrological model of Hec-Ras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritina HALIUC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the floods which occurred within Romanian territory stand as proof for the increased frequency of the extreme hydrological hazards which have negative effects on the normal pathway of the human-beings activities. The technological progress among with the increased frequency of floods events are the base for the development of informational programs for the analysis, simulation and flood management. The Baranca brook which drains a considerable part of Zamostea village (Romania was used as a pilot drainage basin for the flash-flood simulation using the Hec-Ras program and the Arcgis extension, HecGeo-Ras. The flash-floods that occurred in the summer of 2010 were used to validate the results of the simulation. Between 28.06.2010 – 29.06.2010, two flash-floods occurred in the Baranca drainage basin with a discharge oscillated between 10m3 and 70m3, a water extent which covered an area of 5.14 km2 and a depth ranging between 0.3-3m. The programs are capable to simulate the water flow and to investigate the floodway encroachments in the study area. The damages evaluated in the field along with the program’s results reveal the fact that more than half of the built-up areas of Zamostea village are established along brooks, within the floodplain area. What is more, after the 2010 floods, the expension of the habitable area was not detained by the water danger, many houses are still built on the floodplain. The programs used, taking an acceptable margin of error, may be integrated into any flood management strategy or in any watershed plan and may provide the necessary support for mitigating the risks associated with floods

  18. Impacts of climate change on streamflows under RCP scenarios: A case study in Xin River Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; You, Qinglong; Chen, Changchun; Ge, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Researchers often examine hydro-climatological processes via Global Circulation Model (GCM) and hydrological model, which have been shown to benefit water resources management and prediction, especially at the basin scale. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Statistical Downscaling Method (SDSM) were integrated and applied to estimate streamflows in the Xin River Basin, China, based on climate change scenarios downscaled from different GCMs (BCC-CSM1.1, CanESM2, and NorESM1-M) under three Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Results confirmed that the calibrated SWAT model accurately depicts hydrological processes features at daily, monthly, and yearly scales. Three GCMs based on the calibrated SDSM showed that temperature is continually increasing in the region, however, future precipitation is highly complex and uncertain; there were significant differences among various GCM RCP scenarios. The average of the precipitation in three models showed slight and steady increase trends under RCP2.6 and RCP4.5, but a significant increase under the RCP8.5 scenario. The ensemble average of streamflow in GCMs demonstrated that many RCPs significantly decrease from May to June but increase from August to September relative to the baseline period. The ensemble mean of the multi-GCM indicated that future streamflows under RCP2.6 and RCP4.5 scenarios will be closer to the current streamflow volume. Many RCPs also revealed a significant increase in monthly streamflow dispersion coefficient in October, reflecting a tendency for drought and flood events in that month. The BCC-CSM1.1 and NorESM1-M models showed that streamflows are higher than the baseline with median probability in the future. The low monthly streamflow (10th percentile) processes for each GCM were altogether similar to the baseline, whereas the high monthly streamflows (90th percentile) showed various levels of disparity compared to the baseline.

  19. Agro-Ecological Analysis for the EU Water Framework Directive: An Applied Case Study for the River Contract of the Seveso Basin (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchi, Stefano; La Rosa, Daniele; Pileri, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The innovative approach to the protection and management of water resources at the basin scale introduced by the European Union water framework directive (WFD) requires new scientific tools. WFD implementation also requires the participation of many stakeholders (administrators, farmers and citizens) with the aim of improving the quality of river waters and basin ecosystems through cooperative planning. This approach encompasses different issues, such as agro-ecology, land use planning and water management. This paper presents the results of a methodology suggested for implementing the WFD in the case of the Seveso river contract in Italy, one of the recent WFD applications. The Seveso basin in the Lombardy region has been one of the most rapidly urbanizing areas in Italy over the last 50 years. First, land use changes in the last 50 years are assessed with the use of historical aerial photos. Then, elements of an ecological network along the river corridor are outlined, and different scenarios for enhancing existing ecological connections are assessed using indicators from graph theory. These scenarios were discussed in technical workshops with involved stakeholders of the river contract. The results show a damaged rural landscape, where urbanization processes have decimated the system of linear green features (hedges/rows). Progressive reconnections of some of the identified network nodes may significantly increase the connectivity and circuitry of the study area.

  20. Responses of streamflow to climate change in the northern slope of Tianshan Mountains in Xinjiang: A case study of the Toutun River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI WeiHong; CHEN YaNing; HAO XingMing; HUANG Xiang; CHEN YaPeng

    2007-01-01

    A case study on the responses of streamflow to climate change in the Toutun River basin was carried out based on data analysis of streamflow, precipitation, and temperatures during the past 50 years.Temporal series of the streamflow change in the Toutun River basin was analyzed and tested using the Mann-Kendall nonparametric test. Results revealed that the annual runoff of the Toutun River had been in a monotonic decreasing trend for the past 50 years. Compared with the 1950s and 1960s, the annual runoff in the 1990s decreased by 4.0×105 m3 and 7.2×105 m3. The precipitation did not show monotonic trend during the past 50 years, but the annual temperature increased by 1.12℃ since the 1950s. Further data analysis indicated that the monthly runoff of the Toutun River decreased significantly from August to October, with precipitation displaying the similar pattern of seasonal change. Analysis suggests that the reduction of streamflow in the Toutun River basin is possibly caused by the seasonal change of precipitation, especially the precipitation reduction in summer, and temperature increases.

  1. Necessity and feasibility for an ET-based modern water resources management strategy: A case study of soil water resources in the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The necessity and feasibility of an ET-based modern water resources management was analyzed to improve assessment of critical water resources scarcity in the region/basin. This analysis was based on the whole water cycle process and its analysis object is evapotranspiration (ET), a main consumption component in the water resources dynamic transformation process. A case study was undertaken by selecting soil water resources in the Yellow River Basin and employing the WEP-L distributed hydrological model with physics mechanisms. This paper discusses the amount and consumption efficiency of soil-water resources according to completely simulated results of water cycle elements throughout the basin. Results indicate that it is important for the ET-based modern water resources management strategy to alleviate water resources scarcity because it may not only avoid unused water wasting but also improve water use efficiency. Therefore, an ET-based modern water resources management scheme is a good complement to the traditional water resources demand management system.

  2. Modelling Surface Water Dynamics (SWD) on Large River Basin Scale from Space: A Case Study for the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimhuber, V.; Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, increasing demands on water resources along with climate variability and change have led to alarming declines and deterioration of terrestrial surface water resources. The usage of earth-observation data and techniques for modeling SWD and its drivers represents a promising approach for sustainable management and restoration of surface water resources across broad geographic regions. The main objective of this research was to model SWD with a focus on floods, observed in 25 years of Landsat imagery (1986 - 2011), across a large and highly regulated river basin, the MDB in Australia. SWD were modelled as a function of river flow and spatially explicit time-series data on soil moisture (Climate Change Initiative active passive microwave), evapotranspiration (Australian Water Resources Assessment land surface model) and rainfall (gauge-based). To enable a consistent modeling approach within the complex hydrological structure of the river basin, a unique spatial modeling framework was developed based on a fully directed and connected stream network, a categorization of the basin into floodplain and non-floodplain area and a regular grid of 10 by 10 km cells. Based on this framework, SWD on local floodplain units were successfully related to flow data from connected gauges by quantifying the lag time for each cell. Dynamic regression models of SWD were fitted locally for floodplains in each grid cell, with an average adjusted r2 above 0.7. Validation against 10 years of test data that was left out for model fitting showed that the models can predict the test data with an average r2 of 0.7, which makes them suitable for improving the ongoing management and allocation of environmental flows in the MDB. The models also revealed the relative importance of local climate conditions for SWD, with increased importance of soil moisture, evapotranspiration and rainfall in arid regions, in proximity to headwater catchments and on slow-draining floodplains.

  3. [Hydrochemical Characteristics and Influencing Factors in Different Geological Background: A Case Study in Darongjiang and Lingqu Basin, Guangxi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping-an; Yu, Shi; Mo, Fu-zhen; He, Shi-yi; Lu, Ju-fang; Yuan, Ya-qiong

    2016-01-15

    The observation and sampling were carried out in May 2013 to April 2014 in a hydrological year for two river basins with different geological background in upstream of Li river basin. The seasonal variations of river water chemistry and its main influencing factors were discussed in this paper. The results showed that the hydrochemistry types of both Darongjiang basin with 9% of carbonates and Lingqu basin with nearly 50% of carbonates in area belonged to Ca-HCO3 type. Ca2+ and HCO3- were the main cations and anions. The main ion concentrations were higher in winter and lower in summer, affected by the change of the flow. Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3- were mainly sourced from the weathering of carbonates by carbonic acid. The weathering of carbonates by sulfuric acid and the weathering of silicate rocks also had contribution to the river water chemistry. In addition, comparing to the Lingqu basin, the contribution of the weathering of carbonates was much more than the percent of carbonates area, because the carbonate rocks were eroded by the allogenic water. On the other hand, K+, Na+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-) were mainly affected by the atmospheric precipitation and human activities. Comparing to the Darongjiang Basin, the effects of human activities on the changes of K+, Na+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-) were more significant in Lingqu Basin. PMID:27078949

  4. The economic value of drought information for water management under climate change: a case study in the Ebro basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Quiroga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Drought events in the Mediterranean are likely to increase in frequency, duration and intensity due to climate change, thereby affecting crop production. Information about drought is valuable for river basin authorities and the farmers affected by their decisions. The economic value of this information and the resulting decisions are of interest to these two stakeholder groups and to the information providers. Understanding the dynamics of extreme events, including droughts, in future climate scenarios for the Mediterranean is being improved continuously. This paper analyses the economic value of information on drought events taking into account the risk aversion of water managers. We consider the effects of drought management plans on rice production in the Ebro river basin. This enables us to compute the willingness to compensate the river basin authority for more accurate information allowing for better decision-making. If runoff is reduced, river basin planners can consider the reduction of water allocation for irrigation in order to eliminate the risk of water scarcity. Alternately, river basin planners may decide to maintain water allocation and accept a reduction of water supply reliability, leaving farmers exposed to drought events. These two alternatives offer different risk levels for crop production and farmers' incomes which determine the value of this information to the river basin authority. The information is relevant for the revision of River Basin Management Plans of the Water Framework Directive (WFD within the context of climate change.

  5. Institutional Arrangements for River Basin Management: A Case Study of Comparison between the United States and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Gang-yan

    2007-01-01

    This note compares institutional arrangements for water resources management in two river basins, namely, those of the Susquehanna River in the United States and the Yangtze River in China. The Susquehanna River Basin Commission is composed of the US federal government and the three states of New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland through which the Susquehanna River passes. Under the authority of the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, the Commission deals with water resources problems throughout its vast drainage area. In contrast, the Changjiang(Yangtze River) Water Resources Commission (CWRC) lacks relative effectiveness in mobilizing provincial governments in transboundary water resources management.

  6. Association between Changing Mortality of Digestive Tract Cancers and Water Pollution: A Case Study in the Huai River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Ren

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the ever-increasing cancer mortality and water pollution is an important public concern in China. This study aimed to explore the association between serious water pollution and increasing digestive cancer mortality in the Huai River Basin (HRB in China. A series of frequency of serious pollution (FSP indices including water quality grade (FSPWQG, biochemical oxygen demand (FSPBOD, chemical oxygen demand (FSPCOD, and ammonia nitrogen (FSPAN were used to characterize the surface water quality between 1997 and 2006. Data on the county-level changing mortality (CM due to digestive tract cancers between 1975 and 2006 were collected for 14 counties in the study area. Most of investigated counties (eight with high FSPWQG (>50% distributed in the northern region of the HRB and had larger CMs of digestive tract cancers. In addition to their similar spatial distribution, significant correlations between FSP indices and CMs were observed by controlling for drinking water safety (DWS, gross domestic product (GDP, and population (POP. Furthermore, the above-mentioned partial correlations were clearly increased when only controlling for GDP and POP. Our study indicated that county-level variations of digestive cancer mortality are remarkably associated with water pollution, and suggested that continuous measures for improving surface water quality and DWS and hygienic interventions should be effectively implemented by local governments.

  7. Association between changing mortality of digestive tract cancers and water pollution: a case study in the Huai River Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyan; Wan, Xia; Yang, Fei; Shi, Xiaoming; Xu, Jianwei; Zhuang, Dafang; Yang, Gonghuan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the ever-increasing cancer mortality and water pollution is an important public concern in China. This study aimed to explore the association between serious water pollution and increasing digestive cancer mortality in the Huai River Basin (HRB) in China. A series of frequency of serious pollution (FSP) indices including water quality grade (FSPWQG), biochemical oxygen demand (FSPBOD), chemical oxygen demand (FSPCOD), and ammonia nitrogen (FSPAN) were used to characterize the surface water quality between 1997 and 2006. Data on the county-level changing mortality (CM) due to digestive tract cancers between 1975 and 2006 were collected for 14 counties in the study area. Most of investigated counties (eight) with high FSPWQG (>50%) distributed in the northern region of the HRB and had larger CMs of digestive tract cancers. In addition to their similar spatial distribution, significant correlations between FSP indices and CMs were observed by controlling for drinking water safety (DWS), gross domestic product (GDP), and population (POP). Furthermore, the above-mentioned partial correlations were clearly increased when only controlling for GDP and POP. Our study indicated that county-level variations of digestive cancer mortality are remarkably associated with water pollution, and suggested that continuous measures for improving surface water quality and DWS and hygienic interventions should be effectively implemented by local governments. PMID:25546281

  8. Validation of ETWatch using field measurements at diverse landscapes: A case study in Hai Basin of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bingfang; Yan, Nana; Xiong, Jun; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Zhu, Weiwei; Stein, Alfred

    2012-05-01

    SummaryThe latent heat of evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role for water resource management in water scarcity areas. Compared to the water balance method or to in situ measurements, an operational integrated monitoring method of regional surface ET from remote sensing data is a potentially useful approach to achieve water saving. This study presents new algorithms for the aerodynamic roughness length for complex landscape, for gap filling for cloud days, and for data fusion at different resolutions, based on the Penman-Monteith equation. It also presents an improved algorithm for ET calculation with remotely sensed data for clear days. Algorithms were integrated into the ETWatch. The research objective was to present the enhanced features of the ETWatch algorithm and its validation in the 320,000 km2 Hai Basin in Northern China. This area faces serious over-exploitation of groundwater. ET was modeled and extensive field campaigns were done to collect data on soil moisture depletion, lysimeter measurements, eddy covariance measurements, and water balance calculations at diverse landscapes. The overall deviation for individual fields on a seasonal basis was 12% and decreased to 6% for an annual cycle. For larger areas, the deviation was 3% for an annual cycle. These levels of deviation are within the error bands for in situ measurements. The study concludes that data sets from ETWatch are able to aid consumptive water use reduction management in the study area.

  9. Genetic analysis of five sedentary fish species in middle Laranjinha River (upper Paraná River basin): A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantine-Silva, W; Ferreira, D G; Nascimento, R H C; Fracasso, J F; Conte, J E; Ramos, F P; Carvalho, S; Galindo, B A

    2015-01-01

    Most studies of diversity and genetic structure in neotropical fish have focused on commercial species from large rivers or their reservoirs. However, smaller tributaries have been identified as an important alternative migratory route, with independent pools of genetic diversity. In this context, the present study aimed to evaluate genetic diversity and structure in five neotropical fish species from a region of Laranjinha River in the upper Paraná River basin. PCR-RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) markers were used to characterize around 40 individuals of each species distributed upstream and downstream of Corredeira Dam that interrupts the river. The descriptive index of genetic diversity (P = 30.5-82%; HE 0.122-0.312) showed that the populations have acceptable levels of genetic diversity. The values for Nei's genetic distance (DN min 0.0110 and max 0.0306) as well as the genetic structure index and the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA, ϕST min 0.0132 and max 0.0385) demonstrated low, but significant levels of genetic structure. Bayesian analysis of assignment found two k clusters, including several individuals with mixed ancestry for all populations from the five species analyzed. These findings along with historical data on rainfall and the low dimensions of the dam studied here support the hypothesis that periodic floods enable the transit of individuals between different localities mitigating the differentiation process between populations. PMID:26782514

  10. Operational problems of wastewater treatment plants in Thailand and case study: wastewater pollutionproblems in Songkhla Lake Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Panalee Chevakidagarn

    2006-01-01

    By surveying 63 central municipal wastewater treatment plants throughout Thailand, it was found that about 80 percent of them did not function as expected (Pollution Control Department, 2004). Most of the problems were inadequate performance and operational problems. Concerning the Songkhla Lake Basin, there are 2 central municipal wastewater treatment plants serving only 7 percent of the basin population. These two plants were not designed for nutrient removal which is similar to most indust...

  11. A Climate Change Screening Tool for Assessment of Adaptation in Water Sector: a case study in the Haihe River Basin(China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Jinxia; Zhang, Yongyong

    2009-04-01

    The impending of climate changes has already presented risks to the efficiency and effectiveness of development investments globally. In order to minimize negative impacts and maximize opportunities, adaptations to climate changes play a crucial role in development planning and project management increasingly. But before the adaptation designing and implementation, it should be evaluated. An interdisciplinary screening frame work was developed to evaluate the adaptations in this paper. It includes 6 parts, which are project description, problems analysis, identifying climate-sensitive components, semi-quantitative analysis, benefit-cost analysis and multi criteria analysis. In this paper, we selected the "Water Conservation Project of China" funded by World Bank as case study. One of the main objectives of this project is to reduce the scarcity in Haihe River Basin in North China. The applying of modified CAPSIM-PODIUM illustrated, in 2030, climate change will significantly impact on water demand, supply and scarcity in Haihe River Basin. To rebalance the water scarcity caused by climate change, a mixing price policy, which is easier to bring into effect than other price policy was selected. The result of evaluation showed it will be both economic efficiency based on benefit-cost analysis, and technologic possible when we take irrigation efficiency into consideration in future. For "do nothing policy" is also a choice responding to climate change, we used multi criteria analysis, which is an important compensation of Benefit-Cost analysis , to compare it with "mix water pricing policy". The score of "mix water pricing policy" was higher than "do nothing policy" in this case study, which means it's a feasible policy to reduce water scarcity caused by economic development and climate change in Haihe River Basin.

  12. Land use changes assessment using spatial data: Case study in Cong river basin - Thai Nguyen City - Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu

    Land use changes are being interested in most countries, especially in developing countries. Because land use changes always impacts on sustainable development not only in a region or a country but also in whole the world. Viet Nam is a developing country, in the last 10 years, land uses have rapidly changed in most provinces. Many of agriculture areas, forest areas have changed for various purposes as urban sprawl, establishing new industrial parks, public areas, mining and other land uses relate to human activities or economic function associated with a specific piece of land. Beside efficiencies of economic and society, then environment issues have been threatening serious pollution, are from land use changes. Remote sensing images application on studying land use changes, has been done in many countries around the world, and has brought high efficiencies. However, this application is still very new and limited in Viet Nam due to lacking of materials, tools, experts of remote sensing. This study used spatial data as Landsat TM images, SPOT5 images and land use planning maps to rapidly assess on happenings of land uses in the period 2000 -2010 in Cong river basin (Thai Nguyen City, Viet Nam), and to forecast the changes of land uses in the period 2010 - 2020. The results had a good accuracy and to be important references for authorities, policy makers in local land use.

  13. Contamination of nitrate in groundwater and its potential human health: a case study of lower Mae Klong river basin, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsanit, Jaturong; Teartisup, Piyakarn; Kerdsueb, Prapeut; Tharnpoophasiam, Prapin; Worakhunpiset, Suwalee

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater is a worldwide problem especially in agricultural countries. Environmental factors, such as land-use pattern, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity, affect the level of contamination. Exposure to high levels of nitrate in groundwater may contribute to adverse health effects among residents who use groundwater for consumption. This study aimed to determine the relationship between nitrate levels in groundwater with land-use pattern, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity, in Photharam District, Ratchaburi Province, lower Mae Klong basin, Thailand. Health risk maps were created based on hazard quotient to quantify the potential health risk of the residents using US Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) health risk assessment model. The results showed the influence of land-use patterns, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity on nitrate contamination. It was found that most of the residents in the studied area were not at risk; however, a groundwater nitrate monitoring system should be implemented. PMID:25874425

  14. Development and Evaluation of a River-Basin-Scale High Spatio-Temporal Precipitation Data Set Using the WRF Model: A Case Study of the Heihe River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoduo Pan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To obtain long term accurate high resolution precipitation for the Heihe River Basin (HRB, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model simulations were performed using two different initial boundary conditions, with nine microphysical processes for different analysis parameterization schemes. High spatial-temporal precipitation was simulated from 2000 to 2013 and a suitable set of initial, boundary, and micro parameters for the HRB was evaluated from the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research project and Chinese Meteorological Administration data at hourly, daily, monthly, and annual time scales using various statistical indicators. It was found that annual precipitation has gradually increased over the HRB since 2000. Precipitation mostly occurs in summer and is higher in monsoon-influenced areas. High elevations experience winter snowfall. Precipitation is higher in the eastern upstream area than in the western upstream, area; however, the converse occurs in winter. Precipitation gradually increases with elevation from 1000 m to 4000 m, and the maximum precipitation occurs at the height of 3500–4000 m, then the precipitation slowly decreases with elevation from 4000 m to the top over the Qilian Mountains. Precipitation is scare and has a high temporal variation in the downstream area. Results are systematically validated using the in situ observations in this region and it was found that precipitation simulated by the WRF model using suitable physical configuration agrees well with the observation over the HRB at hourly, daily, monthly and yearly scales, as well as at spatial pattern. We also conclude that the dynamic downscaling using the WRF model is capable of producing high-resolution and reliable precipitation over complex mountainous areas and extremely arid environments. The downscaled data can meet the requirement of river basin scale hydrological modeling and water balance analysis.

  15. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  16. An agricultural drought index to incorporate the irrigation process and reservoir operations: A case study in the Tarim River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zehua; Hao, Zhenchun; Shi, Xiaogang; Déry, Stephen J.; Li, Jieyou; Chen, Sichun; Li, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    To help the decision making process and reduce climate change impacts, hydrologically-based drought indices have been used to determine drought severity in the Tarim River Basin (TRB) over the past decades. As the major components of the surface water balance, however, the irrigation process and reservoir operations have not been incorporated into drought indices in previous studies. Therefore, efforts are needed to develop a new agricultural drought index, which is based on the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model coupled with an irrigation scheme and a reservoir module. The new drought index was derived from the simulated soil moisture data from a retrospective VIC simulation from 1961 to 2007 over the irrigated area in the TRB. The physical processes in the coupled VIC model allow the new agricultural drought index to take into account a wide range of hydrologic processes including the irrigation process and reservoir operations. Notably, the irrigation process was found to dominate the surface water balance and drought evolution in the TRB. Furthermore, the drought conditions identified by the new agricultural drought index presented a good agreement with the historical drought events that occurred in 1993-94, 2004, and 2006-07, respectively. Moreover, the spatial distribution of coupled VIC model outputs using the new drought index provided detailed information about where and to what extent droughts occurred.

  17. Transition of fertilizer application and agricultural pollution loads: a case study in the Nhue-Day River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, P H; Harada, H; Fujii, S; Lien, N P H; Hai, H T; Anh, P N; Tanaka, S

    2015-01-01

    Rapid socio-economic development in suburban areas of developing countries has induced changes in agricultural waste and nutrient management, resulting in water pollution. The study aimed at estimating agricultural nutrient cycles and their contribution to the water environment. A material flow model of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was developed focusing on agricultural activities from 1980 to 2010 in Trai hamlet, an agricultural watershed in Nhue-Day River basin, Vietnam. The model focused on the change in household management of human excreta and livestock excreta, and chemical fertilizer consumption. The results showed that the proportion of nutrients from compost/manure applied to paddy fields decreased from 85 to 41% for both N and P between 1980 and 2010. The nutrient inputs derived from chemical fertilizer decreased 6% between 1980 and 2000 for both N and P. Then, these nutrients increased 1.4 times for N and 1.2 times for P from 2000 to 2010. As of 2010, the total inputs to paddy fields have amounted to 435 kg-N/ha/year and 90 kg-P/ha/year. Of these nutrient inputs, 40% of N and 65% of P were derived from chemical fertilizer. Thirty per cent (30%) of total N input was discharged to the water bodies through agricultural runoff and 47% of total P input accumulated in soil. PMID:26398021

  18. Confluence Dynamics in an Ephemeral Gully Basin (A Case Study at Rangamati, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravat Kumar Shit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite many efforts over the last decades to understand confluence angles of rill or gully, they remain unclear. This paper presents the results of gully confluence angles developed at Rangamati ephemeral gully basin of Paschim Medinipur District, West Bengal in India. The confluence angles are monitored for 3 years (2007-2009 and gradient, discharge and stream power of both parent and tributary stream are measured at each junction. Calibrating the data to existing models shows that Optimal Confluence model (Roy, 1983 is better applicable to the present study where average value of symmetry ratio becomes, 0.300 and the value of exponent ‘x’ becomes -0.20. The plot experiment at laboratory under simulated rain shows the tendency of Tran’s link development and downward migration of the lower most junctions due to availability of maximum discharge under constant slope condition. In the situation of homogeneous soil resistance, equal distributed rain and general gradient, local variation of energy is observed due to localized erosion or deposition and associated local variation of gradient in micro scale. Angles of junction are changed in response to the variation of gradient (S, discharge (Q and Sediment Yield (SY. These changes are episodic in nature and so no average rate can be estimated. The junction migrates both upstream and downstream depending on the relative importance of deposition, erosion and associated change in junction angle.

  19. Quantification and multivariate analysis of water erosion in the Mediterranean region. A case study of the Isser basin. northern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggane, Houari; Boutoutaou, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    In the Mediterranean region, the specifisity of erosion stems from a particularly contrasted climate, drought, and from summer and autumn severe thunderstorms. The process of erosion generates substantial loss of soil and affects any kind of crop. The adopted approach aims to establish regression models in order to highlight the relationship between solid and liquid flows at four measurement stations in the Isser catchement area, northern Ageria. The Power Model seems to explain this relationship. The quantification and temporal analysis of solid matter transport showed that the rates of erosion are high along the study area. The annual mean solid matter transport for the whole basin is about 2 200 t/km2.year, of which the main part is recorded in autumn during peak flows. The different factors involved in the process of water erosion are determined in advance in order to establish a model between the predictand variable, which is the specific erosion, and other predictors. Besides, a functional relationship has been highlighted between water erosion and the mean slope, the drainage density and the lithology index.

  20. Assessment of Groundwater Quality Using Gis: A Case Study of Walayar Watershed, Parambikulam-Aliyar-Palar Basin, Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balathandayutham

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Good groundwater quality is essential for crop yield, soil productivity and environmental protection. Suitability of groundwater for irrigation purposes is determined by its geochemistry. Groundwater geochemistry explains links between chemical composition of groundwater and subsurface geological and non-geological pollutants. Subsurface rock formations control the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation. The ground water samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters like Electrical Conductivity (EC, Hydrogen ion concentration (pH, Bicarbonate (HCO3-, Calcium (Ca2+, Magnesium (Mg2+, Sodium (Na+, Potassium (K+, Sulphate (SO42-, Nitrate (NO3-, and Chloride (Cl-. Inverse distance weighted method of the Geographical Information Systems is used to prepare the distribution map of physio-chemical parameters of groundwater while overlay method is used to assess spatial, temporal changes and prepare groundwater quality zones of Walayar watershed in Parambikulam-Aliyar-Palar basin situated in Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu, India. The results of study show that the quality of groundwater varies both spatially and temporally in Walayar watershed. The groundwater samples in some of the wells showed deviation from water quality standards indicating groundwater contamination. Hence, proper care must be taken to avoid any contamination of groundwater and its quality be monitored periodically.

  1. Cation exchange capacity (Qv) estimation in shaly sand reservoirs: case studies in the Junggar Basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Mao, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Zhong-Chun; Luo, Xing-Ping; Deng, Ren-Shuang; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Ren, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Cation exchange capacity (Qv) is a key parameter in resistivity-based water saturation models of shaly sand reservoirs, and the accuracy of Qv calculation is crucial to the prediction of saturations of oil and gas. In this study, a theoretical expression of Qv in terms of shaly sand permeability (Kshaly-sand), total porosity (ϕt), and salinity of formation water (S) is deduced based on the capillary tube model and the physics volume model. Meanwhile, the classical Schlumberger-Doll research (SDR) model has been introduced to estimate Kshaly-sand. On this basis, a novel technique to estimate Qv from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs is proposed, and the corresponding model is also established, whose model parameters are calibrated by laboratory Qv and NMR measurements of 15 core samples from the Toutunhe formation of the Junggar Basin, northwest China. Based on the experimental data sets, this technique can be extended to reservoir conditions to estimate continuous Qv along the intervals. The processing results of field examples illustrate that the Qv calculated from field NMR logs are consistent with the analyzed results, with the absolute errors within the scope of  ±0.1 mmol cm-3 for the majority of core samples.

  2. Subtle traps prediction using sequence stratigraphy and 3D seismic technology: A case study from Qikou depression in Huanghua basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Ning-bo; DAI Ta-gen; PENG Sheng-lin

    2005-01-01

    Forecasting subtle traps by sequence stratigraphy and 3D seismic data is a sensitive topic in hydrocarbon exploration. Research on subtle traps by geophysical data is the most popular and difficult. Based on the sufficiently drilling data, log data, core data and 3D seismic data, sediment sequence of Qikou depression, Huanghua basin was partitioned by using sequence stratigraphy theory. Each sediment sequence system mode was built. Sediment faces of subtle traps were pointed out. Dominating factors forming subtle traps were analyzed. Sandstone seismic rock physics and its response were studied in Tertiary System. Sandstone geophysical response and elastic modulus vary laws with pressure, temperature, porosity, depth were built. Experimental result and practice shows that it is possible using seismic information forecasting subtle traps. Integrated using geology, log, drilling data, special seismic processing technique, interpretation technique, high precision horizon calibration technique, 3D seismic visualizing interpretation, seismic coherence analysis, attribute analysis, logging-constrained inversion, time frequency analysis, subtle trapsobject is identified and interpreted. Finally, advantage object of subtle trap in this area was determined. Bottomland sand stratigraphic and lithologic reservoirs in Qinan slope zone have been founded by means of high resolution 3D seismic data field technique, high resolution 3D seismic data processing technique and seismic wave impendence inversion technique.

  3. The Mackenzie Basin impacts study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989, a commitment was made to begin development of a framework for an integrated regional impact assessment of global warming scenarios in the Mackenzie Basin, the most populated region of Canada's north. The project, called Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS), is led by a multidisciplinary working group from government and non-governmental organizations with interests in the Basin. Objectives of MBIS include defining the direction and magnitude of regional-scale impacts of global warming scenarios on the physical, biological, and human systems of the Basin. MBIS will also identify regional sensitivities to climate, inter-system linkages, uncertainties, policy implications, and research needs. MBIS research activities as of March 1992 are outlined and policy concerns related to global warming are listed. Two new methodologies are being developed by MBIS to address particular economic and policy concerns: a socio-economic resource accounting framework and an integrated land assessment framework. Throughout MBIS, opportunities will be presented for western science and traditional native knowledge to be integrated

  4. Water resources under future scenarios of climate change and biofuel development: A case study for Yakima River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Y. K.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biofuel has become an important renewable energy source with a potential to help mitigate climate change. However, agriculture productivity and its potential use for sustainable production of biofuel are strongly dependent on climate and water conditions that may change in response to future changes in climate and/or socio-economic conditions. For instant in 2012, the US has experienced the most severe drought that results in a 12% decrease in corn production - the main feedstock used for biofuel in US - indicating the vulnerability of biofuel development and policies to change in climate and associated extreme weather conditions. To understand this interrelationship and the combined effects of increased biofuel production and climate change on regional and local water resources, we have applied a SWAT watershed model which integrates future scenarios of climate change and biofuel development and simulates the associated impacts on watershed hydrology, water quality, soil erosion, and agriculture productivity. The study is applied to the Yakima River basin (YRB), which has higher biomass resources in Washington State and represents a region where forestry and agriculture intersect with considerable water shortage as well as spatial variations in annual precipitation. Unlike earlier studies, which commonly define biofuel and climate change scenarios independently, in this study the decision on alternative biofuel feedstock mixes and associated change in land use and management take into account the anticipated climate change. The resulted spatial and temporal distributions of water budget, nutrient loads, and sediment erosion is analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of biofuel policies under constraints of climate change and water resources in the region.

  5. Effect of Agricultural Activity on River Water Quality: A Case Study for the Lower Colorado River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Adusumilli, Naveen C.; Ronald D. Lacewell; Rister, M. Edward; Woodard, Joshua D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigates the effect of a change in cropping pattern involving expanded acres of crops for biofuel feedstock, on the discharge of nutrients to rivers. Annual data from 1968-2008 on stream flow, cropped acres, and precipitation for Wharton County, Texas are used. A positive impact of increased corn acreage over this period on river discharge is identified.

  6. Isotopic and sedimentological clues to productivity change in Late Riphean Sea: A case study from two intracratonic basins of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P P Chakraborty; A Sarkar; S K Bhattacharya; P Sanyal

    2002-12-01

    Enriched 13C/12 ratios with 13C ∼3‰ (w.r.t PDB) of two Late Riphean (∼700-610Ma) intracratonic carbonate successions viz., Bhander Limestone of Vindhyan Basin and Raipur Limestone of Chattisgarh Basin suggest higher organic productivity during this period. This view is supported by sedimentological evidence of higher biohermal growth and consequent increase in depositional relief in the low gradient ramp settings inferred for these basins. Oxygen isotope analysis of these carbonates show distinct segregation between enriched deeper water carbonate mudstone and depleted shallow water stromatolite facies that received fresh water influx. This shows that facies-specific analyses can be useful in understanding the depositional setting of these sediments.

  7. Improving the surface-ground water interactions in the Community Land Model: Case study in the Blue Nile Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di D.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Wang, Guiling; Moges, Semu; Zampieri, Matteo

    2014-10-01

    Soil moisture is a key water cycle parameter known to interact with atmospheric processes. Arguably, land surface models that simulate land surface processes and surface fluxes to the atmosphere do not capture adequately the spatial variability of soil moisture, particularly over areas with complex topography. In this study, version 3.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM3.5) is applied with a new parameterization in an effort to correct the spatial bias of soil moisture and understand the consequential effects on the simulated water cycle fluxes and states in the Blue Nile Basin. This parameterization accounts for a groundwater recharge term from surface water, a process that is not included in CLM, providing an effective two-way interaction scheme between rivers and groundwater. Using satellite soil moisture data, this parameterized term is shown to have a positive correlation to contributing area, defined at each model grid cell and representing the number of grid cells that drain to that local grid cell. With the new parameterization applied to CLM, soil moisture, soil temperature, evapotranspiration flux, water table depth, and vegetation water content all showed significant differences from the control CLM run (without the parameterization) at or above the 95% confidence level. The differences in the spatial distribution of these variables are expected to affect precipitation simulations from regional climate modeling. As the Blue Nile is a region that has one of the greatest interannual and seasonal precipitation variability globally, the ability to predict this variability is essential for optimal reservoir operations including buffering of water resources during times of drought.

  8. Quantification of Environmental Flow Requirements to Support Ecosystem Services of Oasis Areas: A Case Study in Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xue

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a wide range of quantitative research on the identification of environmental flow requirements (EFRs has been conducted. However, little focus is given to EFRs to maintain multiple ecosystem services in oasis areas. The present study quantifies the EFRs in oasis areas of Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, Northwest China on the basis of three ecosystem services: (1 maintenance of riverine ecosystem health, (2 assurance of the stability of oasis–desert ecotone and riparian (Tugai forests, and (3 restoration of oasis–desert ecotone groundwater. The identified consumptive and non-consumptive water requirements are used to quantify and determine the EFRs in Qira oasis by employing the summation and compatibility rules (maximum principle. Results indicate that the annual maximum, medium, and minimum EFRs are 0.752 × 108, 0.619 × 108, and 0.516 × 108 m3, respectively, which account for 58.75%, 48.36%, and 40.29% of the natural river runoff. The months between April and October are identified as the most important periods to maintain the EFRs. Moreover, the water requirement for groundwater restoration of the oasis–desert ecotone accounts for a large proportion, representing 48.27%, 42.32%, and 37.03% of the total EFRs at maximum, medium, and minimum levels, respectively. Therefore, to allocate the integrated EFRs, focus should be placed on the water demand of the desert vegetation’s groundwater restoration, which is crucial for maintaining desert vegetation to prevent sandstorms and soil erosion. This work provides a reference to quantify the EFRs of oasis areas in arid regions.

  9. Water quality of fresh water bodies in the lower Volta Basin: a case study of Lakes Kasu and Nyafie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was carried out on water from lakes Kasu and Nyafie, two of the fresh water bodies situated near Asutsuare, an agricultural town in the lower Volta basin of Ghana to determine the level of water quality parameters. To be able to this, water samples were taken from designated points in both lakes. Sampling was done over a period of seven months (January to July) and the determination of the water quality parameters was carried out using GEMS Water Operational Guide as well as APHA’s Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater. The parameters measured were; temperature, pH, dissolve oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, dissolved solids and total solids. Others were nutrients and ions such as; nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, chlorides, sodium and potassium. The rest came under hardness of water, such as calcium, magnesium and total hardness. Though most of the values of the parameters fall within the acceptable limits of WHO values for potable water, turbidity values i.e. 68.0 NTU (Kasu) and 25.2 NTU (Nyafie) as well as BOD values of 73.8 mg/L for Kasu and 49.7 mg/L for Nyafie, were far beyond the WHO guideline limits (5 NTU – turbidity and < 3 mg/L – BOD) for drinking water, thereby reducing the potability, recreational and aesthetic values of the water in these lakes. Also, despite the fact that the mean DO values for the lakes (5.4 mg/L for Nyafie and 7.0 mg/L for Kasu) fall short of the WHO minimum value of 8.0 mg/L, the lakes cannot be said to be polluted to signal the unset of eutrophication. (au)

  10. Eco-hydrological effects of stream-aquifer water interaction: A case study of the Heihe River Basin, northwestern China

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yujin; Xie, Zhenghui; Yu, Yan; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Linying; Jia, Binghao; Qin, Peihua; Chen, Yaning

    2016-01-01

    A scheme describing the process of stream-aquifer interaction was incorporated into the land model CLM4.5 to investigate the effects of stream water conveyance over riparian banks on ecological and hydrological processes. Two groups of simulations for five typical river cross-sections in the middle reaches of the arid zone Heihe River Basin were conducted. The simulated riparian ...

  11. The San Pedro Basin: A Case Study of US and Mexican Strategies to Connect Science to Societal Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R. L.; Goodrich, D. C.; Browning-Aiken, A.; Richter, H.; Varady, R.; Shuttleworth, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    The San Pedro River originates in northern Sonora near the town of Cananea and spans the U.S. - Mexico border into southeastern Arizona. The San Pedro Basin and perennial portions of its river support one of the most ecological diverse regions in the world. The regional groundwater aquifer which largely supports perennial flow and the associated riparian ecosystem is the primary water source for a number of communities, and for the Cananea copper mine in Sonora, which produces roughly two to three percent of the world's copper, and Ft. Huachuca, a major military installation in Arizona and the largest employer of southern Arizona. This presentation will discuss strategies and efforts over the past decade on both sides of the border to link hydrological, ecological and social sciences to aid elected officials and decision-makers in managing the basin, its growing population, and the water it so vitally depends upon. The disparate legal, cultural, economic and scientific environments, as well as the unequal degrees of decentralization and regional autonomy on the two sides of the border have resulted in distinct concerns and approaches to water resource management and varying rates of success. In the Sonoran portion of the basin water quality is the primary concern and in Arizona, water quantity is the major concern. The paper will report on sustained binational efforts and constraints encountered by researchers at the University of Arizona's NSF-funded SAHRA project and several NOAA-supported efforts in the basin region.

  12. The San Pedro Basin: A Case Study of US and Mexican Strategies to Connect Science to Societal Needs 1917

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Pedro River originates in northern Sonora near the town of Cananea and spans the U.S. – Mexico border into southeastern Arizona. The San Pedro Basin and perennial portions of its river support one of the most ecological diverse regions in the world. The regional groundwater aquifer which l...

  13. Challenges of linking scientific knowledge to river basin management policy: AquaTerra as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, A.; Rijnveld, M.

    2007-01-01

    The EU Project AquaTerra generates knowledge about the river-soil-sediment-groundwater system and delivers scientific information of value for river basin management. In this article, the use and ignorance of scientific knowledge in decision making is explored by a theoretical review. We elaborate o

  14. Hydrological modeling and climate change impacts in an agricultural semiarid region. Case study: Guadalupe River basin, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Navarro, Eugenio; Hallack-Alegría, Michelle; Martínez-Pérez, Silvia;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In northern Mexico, water resources management has become a challenging task, aggravated by the vulnerability of this region to climate change. The semiarid Guadalupe River Basin is under additional pressure due to wine production and drinking water supply. We have applied the SWAT model...

  15. Prediction of future hydrological regimes in poorly gauged high altitude basins: the case study of the upper Indus, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bocchiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the mountain regions of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Himalaya (HKH the "third polar ice cap" of our planet, glaciers play the role of "water towers" by providing significant amount of melt water, especially in the dry season, essential for agriculture, drinking purposes, and hydropower production. Recently, most glaciers in the HKH have been retreating and losing mass, mainly due to significant regional warming, thus calling for assessment of future water resources availability for populations down slope. However, hydrology of these high altitude catchments is poorly studied and little understood. Most such catchments are poorly gauged, thus posing major issues in flow prediction therein, and representing in facts typical grounds of application of PUB concepts, where simple and portable hydrological modeling based upon scarce data amount is necessary for water budget estimation, and prediction under climate change conditions. In this preliminarily study, future (2060 hydrological flows in a particular watershed (Shigar river at Shigar, ca. 7000 km2, nested within the upper Indus basin and fed by seasonal melt from major glaciers, are investigated.

    The study is carried out under the umbrella of the SHARE-Paprika project, aiming at evaluating the impact of climate change upon hydrology of the upper Indus river. We set up a minimal hydrological model, tuned against a short series of observed ground climatic data from a number of stations in the area, in situ measured ice ablation data, and remotely sensed snow cover data. The future, locally adjusted, precipitation and temperature fields for the reference decade 2050–2059 from CCSM3 model, available within the IPCC's panel, are then fed to the hydrological model. We adopt four different glaciers' cover scenarios, to test sensitivity to decreased glacierized areas. The projected flow duration curves, and some selected flow descriptors are evaluated. The uncertainty of the

  16. Prediction of future hydrological regimes in poorly gauged high altitude basins: the case study of the upper Indus, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bocchiola

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the mountain regions of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Himalaya (HKH the "third polar ice cap" of our planet, glaciers play the role of "water towers" by providing significant amount of melt water, especially in the dry season, essential for agriculture, drinking purposes, and hydropower production. Recently, most glaciers in the HKH have been retreating and losing mass, mainly due to significant regional warming, thus calling for assessment of future water resources availability for populations down slope. However, hydrology of these high altitude catchments is poorly studied and little understood. Most such catchments are poorly gauged, thus posing major issues in flow prediction therein, and representing in fact typical grounds of application of PUB concepts, where simple and portable hydrological modeling based upon scarce data amount is necessary for water budget estimation, and prediction under climate change conditions. In this preliminarily study, future (2060 hydrological flows in a particular watershed (Shigar river at Shigar, ca. 7000 km2, nested within the upper Indus basin and fed by seasonal melt from major glaciers, are investigated.

    The study is carried out under the umbrella of the SHARE-Paprika project, aiming at evaluating the impact of climate change upon hydrology of the upper Indus river. We set up a minimal hydrological model, tuned against a short series of observed ground climatic data from a number of stations in the area, in situ measured ice ablation data, and remotely sensed snow cover data. The future, locally adjusted, precipitation and temperature fields for the reference decade 2050–2059 from CCSM3 model, available within the IPCC's panel, are then fed to the hydrological model. We adopt four different glaciers' cover scenarios, to test sensitivity to decreased glacierized areas. The projected flow duration curves, and some selected flow descriptors are evaluated. The uncertainty of

  17. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of low-permeability oil-shales - Case study from HaShfela sub-basin, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Gersman, Ronen

    2016-09-01

    Low permeability rocks are of great importance given their potential role in protecting underlying aquifers from surface and buried contaminants. Nevertheless, only limited data for these rocks is available. New appraisal wells drilled into the oil shale unit (OSU) of the Mt. Scopus Group in the HaShfela sub-basin, Central Israel, provided a one-time opportunity for detailed study of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of this very low permeability unit. Methods used include: slug tests, electrical logs, televiewer imaging, porosity and permeability measurements on core samples, chemical analyses of the rock column and groundwater analyses. Slug tests yielded primary indication to the low permeability of the OSU despite its high porosity (30-40%). Hydraulic conductivities as low as 10-10-10-12 m/s were calculated, using both the Hvorslev and Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos decoding methods. These low conductivities were confirmed by direct measurements of permeability in cores, and from calculations based on the Kozeny-Carman approach. Storativity was found to be 1 · 10-6 and specific storage - 3.8 · 10-9 m-1. Nevertheless, the very limited water flow in the OSU is argued to be driven gravitationally. The extremely slow recovery rates as well as the independent recovery of two adjacent wells, despite their initial large head difference of 214 m, indicate that the natural fractures are tight and are impermeable due to the confining stress at depth. Laboratory measured permeability is similar or even higher than the field-measured values, thereby confirming that fractures and bedding planes do not form continuous flow paths. The vertical permeability along the OSU is highly variable, implying hydraulic stratification and extremely low vertical hydraulic conductivity. The high salinity of the groundwater (6300-8000 mgCl/L) within the OSU and its chemical and isotopic compositions are explained by the limited water flow, suggesting long residence time of the water

  18. Uncertainty assessment of carbon dioxide storage capacity evaluation in deep saline aquifer:a case study in Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage techniques (CCS) are one of the effective measures for reduction Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere to mitigate the global warming. Among the Carbon dioxide geological storage options, deep saline aquifers offer the largest storage potential and are widely distributed throughout the Earth. Implementation of carbon dioxide capture and geological storage to reduce greenhouse gas emissions requires carbon dioxide storage capacity in deep saline aquifers. The storage capacity estimation depends on the storage trapping mechanisms and the availability, resolution and certainty of data. There are five different types of trapping mechanisms in deep saline aquifers namely structural and stratigraphic trapping, residual gas trapping, solubility trapping, mineral trapping and hydrodynamic trapping in which storage capacity by solubility trapping is the largest. The carbon dioxide storage capacities in deep saline aquifer can be evaluated by the method recommended by Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), which mainly depends on the area of study area, thickness and porosity of sandstone, density and carbon dioxide content (mass fraction) in formation water at initial and saturated state. Hydrogeological parameters in aquifer are uncertainty because of uncertainty of measurement and the spatial variety, which leads evaluation uncertainty of carbon dioxide storage capacity. In this paper, acceptance of evaluated carbon dioxide storage capacity in deep saline aquifer caused by hydrological parameters was discussed based on geostatistical methods and stochastic simulation. The stratum named Yaojialing group in the center depressed area of Songliao Basin was chosen as study area because of the rich data. The porosity of sandstone, thickness ration of sandstone to stratum and the total dissolved solid in formation water were regarded as the main source of the uncertainty of carbon dioxide storage capacity evaluation in deep saline

  19. Modeling and analysis of Soil Erosion processes by the River Basins model: The Case Study of the Krivacki Potok Watershed, Montenegro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujacic, Dusko; Barovic, Goran; Mijanovic, Dragica; Spalevic, Velibor; Curovic, Milic; Tanaskovic, Vjekoslav; Djurovic, Nevenka

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to study soil erosion processes in one of Northern Montenegrin watersheds, the Krivacki Potok Watershed of the Polimlje River Basin, using modeling techniques: the River Basins computer-graphic model, based on the analytical Erosion Potential Method (EPM) of Gavrilovic for calculation of runoff and soil loss. Our findings indicate a low potential of soil erosion risk, with 554 m³ yr‑1 of annual sediment yield; an area-specific sediment yield of 180 m³km-2 yr‑1. The calculation outcomes were validated for the entire 57 River Basins of Polimlje, through measurements of lake sediment deposition at the Potpec hydropower plant dam. According to our analysis, the Krivacki Potok drainage basin is with the relatively low sediment discharge; according to the erosion type, it is mixed erosion. The value of the Z coefficient was calculated on 0.297, what indicates that the river basin belongs to 4th destruction category (of five). The calculated peak discharge from the river basin was 73 m3s-1 for the incidence of 100 years and there is a possibility for large flood waves to appear in the studied river basin. Using the adequate computer-graphic and analytical modeling tools, we improved the knowledge on the soil erosion processes of the river basins of this part of Montenegro. The computer-graphic River Basins model of Spalevic, which is based on the EPM analytical method of Gavrilovic, is highly recommended for soil erosion modelling in other river basins of the Southeastern Europe. This is because of its reliable detection and appropriate classification of the areas affected by the soil loss caused by soil erosion, at the same time taking into consideration interactions between the various environmental elements such as Physical-Geographical Features, Climate, Geological, Pedological characteristics, including the analysis of Land Use, all calculated at the catchment scale.

  20. How to solve the technical problems in CBM development: A case study of a CBM gas reservoir in the southern Qinshui Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The low average single-well production, resulting in low economic benefit, has become the main bottleneck of CBM development in China. In view of this issue, through case study of a CBM gas reservoir in the southern Qinshui Basin, we summarized the present status of CBM technology and development there and also pointed out some major problems in CBM development: (1 the engineering technology for the CBM development needs to adapt to the particular geological characteristics; (2 a large number of inefficient zones still exist in mature blocks in the southern Qinshui Basin; (3 single-well production can not be effectively enhanced only by increasing the fracturing scale; (4 the production of multi-lateral wells is higher, but the fulfillment rate of production capacity overall is still low; and (5 on-site management lacks scientific evidence. On this basis, we present the following suggestions for subsequent coalbed gas development: (1 the production construction mode should be changed, and the fulfillment rate of production capacity construction should be improved; (2 CBM geological research should be improved and well types and locations should be designed reasonably and scientifically; (3 main technologies should be built in a dialectical thinking mode; (4 horizontal well design should be optimized to improve the applicability of relevant technologies; (5 fracturing mode should be changed to improve single-well production; and (6 the drainage technology should be changed to improve economic efficiency.

  1. The limits of integrated water resources management: a case study of Brazil’s Paraíba do Sul River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ioris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition to water sustainability involves challenging questions about problem assessment, stakeholder involvement, and response coordination. To overcome these difficulties, new approaches have been developed to inform regulatory changes and to help to improve the level of water sustainability. One of the preferred methods is integrated water resources management (IWRM that combines different aspects and a plurality of goals associated with water use and conservation. However, important obstacles remain in the way of IWRM and, ultimately, water sustainability. A case study in the Paraíba do Sul River Basin in the southeastern region of Brazil illustrates the multiple barriers to appropriate integration of socioeconomic considerations into the sustainable management of water systems. The opportunity to improve environmental conditions and to engage local stakeholders has been frustrated by the contradictory directions of regulatory reforms. On one hand, IWRM-informed policies have introduced flexible instruments of water regulation and pushed for the reorganization of the river-basin committee. On the other hand, the focus has been restricted to technical and managerial solutions that tend to ignore the influence of social inequalities and political asymmetries and, as a consequence, undermine water sustainability.

  2. A new method of rainfall temporal downscaling: a case study on sanmenxia station in the Yellow River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, G. F.; Qin, D. Y.; Ye, R; Guo, Y. X.; Wang, H.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed hydrological models are effective tools for Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB). The rainfall input uncertainty is an important source of hydrological model uncertainty. With the improvement of hydrological model accuracy, the requirements of the accuracy of input data are correspondingly improved. Daily rainfall data is the most common data that the researchers can get, however this cannot satisfy the requirement of hydrological simulation. Therefore, researche...

  3. Application of artificial neural networks in hydrological modeling: A case study of runoff simulation of a Himalayan glacier basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A. M.; Narain, A.; Pandey, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    The simulation of runoff from a Himalayan Glacier basin using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is presented. The performance of the ANN model is found to be superior to the Energy Balance Model and the Multiple Regression model. The RMS Error is used as the figure of merit for judging the performance of the three models, and the RMS Error for the ANN model is the latest of the three models. The ANN is faster in learning and exhibits excellent system generalization characteristics.

  4. Palm oil production in Peruvian Amazon Basin. A case study of current effects and emerging localized alternatives in Loreto district

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Charlotte Bratberget

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of palm oil production in the Peruvian Amazon basin was carried out in a systemic way, as part of a whole, with its complexities. With an agroecological perspective, the social, ecological and economic effects of this production are discussed. Additionally, alternatives that could better fulfil the necessities of farmers were explored. The oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, originally from West Africa, is a common plant in an enormous industry that is extensive in South East Asia, ma...

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Driving Factors of Grassland Degradation: A Case Study in Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yichun; Sha, Zongyao

    2012-01-01

    Current literature suggests that grassland degradation occurs in areas with poor soil conditions or noticeable environmental changes and is often a result of overgrazing or human disturbances. However, these views are questioned in our analyses. Based on the analysis of satellite vegetation maps from 1984, 1998, and 2004 for the Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia, China, and binary logistic regression (BLR) analysis, we observe the following: (1) grassland degradation is positively correlated ...

  6. Confluence Dynamics in an Ephemeral Gully Basin (A Case Study at Rangamati, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India)

    OpenAIRE

    Pravat Kumar Shit; Ramkrishna Maiti

    2013-01-01

    Despite many efforts over the last decades to understand confluence angles of rill or gully, they remain unclear. This paper presents the results of gully confluence angles developed at Rangamati ephemeral gully basin of Paschim Medinipur District, West Bengal in India. The confluence angles are monitored for 3 years (2007-2009) and gradient, discharge and stream power of both parent and tributary stream are measured at each junction. Calibrating the data to existing models shows that Optimal...

  7. Household adaptation strategies to floods.The case study of the Bečva river basin, the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duží, Barbora; Vikhrov, Dmytro; Stojanov, Robert; Jakubínský, Jiří

    Brno: Global change research centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i, 2013 - (Stojanov, R.; Žalud, Z.; Cudlín, P.; Farda, A.; Urban, O.; Trnka, M.), s. 77-82 ISBN 978-80-904351-8-6. [Global Change and Resilience. Brno (CZ), 22.05.2013-24.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : climate extremes * floods * adaptation * coping * Bečva basin * local knowledge Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  8. Analysis on Landscape Ecological Risk of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateaus: A Case Study on Niyang River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiaorong; ZHONG Xianghao; CHEN Xinwu

    2006-01-01

    Taking Niyang River Basin as an example,applying with the indices of landscape pattern,the indices of ecological risk of ecosystems are calculated in this paper,which takes the value of ecological loss of main ecosystem as the evaluation standard and takes into account the impacts of probability or the velocity of main hazards and event of the ecosystem.And the grades of ecological risk are assessed.According to the results of assessment,the ecological risk grades of the basin are divided into five classes.From the first grade risk to the fifth grade risk,the values of regional risk indices gradually reduce.The first grade risk areas mainly distribute in Niyang river and its branches downstream and the surrounding areas of main towns.And the basin area of non-valley region and the headstream regions of the branches are the fifth grades risk areas.This evaluation results provide the basis to the regional sustainable development.

  9. Spatio-temporal optimization of agricultural practices to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of agriculture management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the agriculture sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the continuous change in one region with seasonal agricultural practices have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in agricultural management practices. A number of common best agricultural practices have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the agricultural production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics

  10. Integrating Global Satellite-Derived Data Products as a Pre-Analysis for Hydrological Modelling Studies: A Case Study for the Red River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs Simons

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With changes in weather patterns and intensifying anthropogenic water use, there is an increasing need for spatio-temporal information on water fluxes and stocks in river basins. The assortment of satellite-derived open-access information sources on rainfall (P and land use/land cover (LULC is currently being expanded with the application of actual evapotranspiration (ETact algorithms on the global scale. We demonstrate how global remotely sensed P and ETact datasets can be merged to examine hydrological processes such as storage changes and streamflow prior to applying a numerical simulation model. The study area is the Red River Basin in China in Vietnam, a generally challenging basin for remotely sensed information due to frequent cloud cover. Over this region, several satellite-based P and ETact products are compared, and performance is evaluated using rain gauge records and longer-term averaged streamflow. A method is presented for fusing multiple satellite-derived ETact estimates to generate an ensemble product that may be less susceptible, on a global basis, to errors in individual modeling approaches. Subsequently, monthly satellite-derived rainfall and ETact are combined to assess the water balance for individual subcatchments and types of land use, defined using a global land use classification improved based on auxiliary satellite data. It was found that a combination of TRMM rainfall and the ensemble ETact product is consistent with streamflow records in both space and time. It is concluded that monthly storage changes, multi-annual streamflow and water yield per LULC type in the Red River Basin can be successfully assessed based on currently available global satellite-derived products.

  11. Evaluation of oasis ecosystem risk by reliability theory in an arid area: A case study in the Shiyang River Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-de; LI Zi-zhen; WANG Ji-quan

    2007-01-01

    Ecosystem risk is a new concept in understanding environmental problems. Studying and developing quantitative methods for regional ecosystem risk analysis is very important. In this study, some new indicators and methods for measuring oasis ecosystem risk are established using reliability theory. These indicators are linked to water resource, which is the key restricting factor in arid area oasis ecosystems. They have clear meanings and can also be compared in different arid area oases. A case study in the Liangzhou oasis of the Shiyang River Basin shows how to calculate these ecosystem risk indicators. The results of the case study are as follows: the reliability indicator, risk indicator, stability indicator, and integrated loss indicator of the Liangzhou oasis are 0.686, 0.334, 0.743, and 0.301, respectively. This means that the reliability degree of the oasis's ecosystem safety is 68.3%; the degree of risk that it is unsafe is 33.4%; the stability degree is 74.3%; and 30.1% of the oasis's area is supported by over-exploiting underground water and damaging the lower reaches of the ecosystem. This result can be used as a guide in controlling and managing ecosystem risk in the research area.

  12. The harmony between the natural and anthropogenic environments within the natural parks. Case study- The Viseu river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei SIMA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available By definition a natural park is a protected area designed to protect and conserve the natural environment in which the interaction between human activities and nature createda unique area, of significant environmental and cultural value and with great biodiversity.The main purpose of these natural parks is to maintain the harmony between humans and nature by protecting the biological diversity of the habitats and the environment. In recent years both the natural and anthropic areas of the Vişeu Basin have been greatly damaged by extreme hydric phenomenon caused by the chaotic deforestation of the area, increased precipitation, high pluvio-nival regime and the accentuated asymmetry of the basin itself. By developing certain hydrographical installations and conserving the protected areas a balance can be reached between the natural harmony and the strict necessities of the anthropic habitats. The first priority of this developing is theenvironmental legislation and biodiversity protection.

  13. Tracing sources of suspended sediment in river basins: a case study of the River Culm, Devon, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the source of the suspended sediment transported by a river is becoming an increasingly important requirement in sediment investigations. Such information is difficult to assemble by means of traditional monitoring strategies, but the 'fingerprinting' technique offers considerable potential. The use of composite 'fingerprints' in combination with a multivariate mixing model can provide a basis for determining the relative importance of both individual areas of a catchment and specific source types. The results of applying this approach to the 276-km2 basin of the River Culm in Devon, UK are presented. A suite of nine fingerprint properties was employed. These included the concentrations of three radionuclides (137Cs, 210Pb and 226Ra), four mass-specific mineral magnetic parameters, and organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations. This permitted the relative contributions of seven source types to be established. These source types represented material derived from the surface of cultivated and pasture areas on each of the three main rock types and material eroded from channel banks. By collecting samples of suspended sediment at different times during individual floods, it was possible to document changes in the relative contributions of the various sources during each flood in response to runoff source and travel times. Although the multivariate fingerprint approach has a number of limitations, it also has considerable potential as a means of tracing sources of suspended sediment within a large drainage basin. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  14. Fracture Distribution Characteristics within Low-Permeability Reservoirs:Cases Studies from Three Types of Oil-bearing Basins,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Lianbo

    2006-01-01

    The permeability or/and porosity in low-permeability reservoirs mainly depends on fracture system.Wthin this kind of low-permeability reservior, fractures play a very important role on exploration and development. Because there are so many differences, such as basin properties and tectonic characteristics,among the eastern, western and central basins, the types and distribution characteristics of fractures are also obviously different. Quantitative information on fracture distribution is very important. Through the contrastive study of 7 oilfield, the differences and distribution characteristics of fractures in three types of oil-bearing basins are summarized.Due to the different geological conditions and stress state during the formation of fractures, the fracture systems in three types of basins are also different. Fractures are mainly composed of tectonic fractutres related to normal faultes in eastern basins, related to folds and reverse faultes in western basins, and regional fractures which widely distributed not only in outcrops but also at depth of the relatively undeformed strata in central basins. So, besides jointed-fractures, we can often see faulted-fractures similar to normal faults in eastern basins and similar to reverse faults in western basins.According to statistical data, fracture spacing generally has a lognormal distribution and is linearly proportional to layer thickness. The development degree of fractures is controlled by lithology, bed thickness,sedimentary microfacies and faults or folds, etc. The permeability, aperture and connectedness of fractures are related to the modern stress field. Though there are 3-4 sets of fractures in a oilfield, the fractures parallel to the maximum principal stress direction are main for the pattern arrangement of low-permeability reservoirs.

  15. Assessment Fargas and BLM Models for Identification of Erosion Degree and Critical Sediment Sources (Case Study: Aghbolagh Drainage Basin, Hashtrood City)

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Abdi; Aliasghar Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the different areas in drainage basin (as a natural planning unit) for occurring the sedimentation and its severity in different phases of basic studies has been always one of the most important purposes of the natural resources experts. For achieving to this purpose some experimental models has been presented that Some of them have high efficiency and others have weaknesses. Fargas and BLM models are used in this research and they are run in Aghbolagh drainage basin in ...

  16. Socio-hydrology and the science-policy interface: a case study of the Saskatchewan River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, P.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-04-01

    While there is a popular perception that Canada is a water-rich country, the Saskatchewan River basin (SRB) in Western Canada exemplifies the multiple threats to water security seen worldwide. It is Canada's major food-producing region and home to globally significant natural resource development. The SRB faces current water challenges stemming from (1) a series of extreme events, including major flood and drought events since the turn of the 21st century, (2) full allocation of existing water resources in parts of the basin, (3) rapid population growth and economic development, (4) increasing pollution, and (5) fragmented and overlapping governance that includes the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, various Federal and First Nations responsibilities, and international boundaries. The interplay of these factors has increased competition for water across economic sectors and among provinces, between upstream and downstream users, between environmental flows and human needs, and among people who hold different values about the meaning, ownership, and use of water. These current challenges are set in a context of significant environmental and societal change, including widespread land modification, rapid urbanization, resource exploitation, climate warming, and deep uncertainties about future water supplies. We use Sivapalan et al.'s (2012) framework of socio-hydrology to argue that the SRB's water security challenges are symptoms of dynamic and complex water systems approaching critical thresholds and tipping points. To Sivapalan et al.'s (2012) emphasis on water cycle dynamics, we add the need for governance mechanisms to manage emergent systems and translational science to link science and policy to the socio-hydrology agenda.

  17. Seasonal climate signals from multiple tree ring metrics: A case study of Pinus ponderosa in the upper Columbia River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Matthew P.; Wise, Erika K.

    2016-04-01

    Projected changes in the seasonality of hydroclimatic regimes are likely to have important implications for water resources and terrestrial ecosystems in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The tree ring record, which has frequently been used to position recent changes in a longer-term context, typically relies on signals embedded in the total ring width of tree rings. Additional climatic inferences at a subannual temporal scale can be made using alternative tree ring metrics such as earlywood and latewood widths and the density of tree ring latewood. Here we examine seasonal precipitation and temperature signals embedded in total ring width, earlywood width, adjusted latewood width, and blue intensity chronologies from a network of six Pinus ponderosa sites in and surrounding the upper Columbia River Basin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. We also evaluate the potential for combining multiple tree ring metrics together in reconstructions of past cool- and warm-season precipitation. The common signal among all metrics and sites is related to warm-season precipitation. Earlywood and latewood widths differ primarily in their sensitivity to conditions in the year prior to growth. Total and earlywood widths from the lowest elevation sites also reflect cool-season moisture. Effective correlation analyses and composite-plus-scale tests suggest that combining multiple tree ring metrics together may improve reconstructions of warm-season precipitation. For cool-season precipitation, total ring width alone explains more variance than any other individual metric or combination of metrics. The composite-plus-scale tests show that variance-scaled precipitation reconstructions in the upper Columbia River Basin may be asymmetric in their ability to capture extreme events.

  18. Socio-hydrology and the science-policy interface: a case study of the Saskatchewan River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gober

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available While there is popular perception that Canada is a water-rich country, the Saskatchewan River Basin (SRB in Western Canada exemplifies the multiple threats to water security seen worldwide. It is Canada's major food-producing region and home to globally-significant natural resource development. The SRB faces current water challenges stemming from: (1 a series of extreme events, including major flood and drought events, since the turn of the 21st century, (2 full allocation of existing water resources in parts of the Basin, (3 rapid population growth and economic development, (4 increasing pollution, and (5 fragmented governance that includes the Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, various Federal and First Nations responsibilities, and international boundaries. The interplay of these factors has increased competition for increasingly scarce water resources across economic sectors and among provinces, between upstream and downstream users, between environmental flows and human needs, and among people who hold different values about the meaning, ownership, and use of water. These current challenges are set in a context of significant environmental and societal change, including widespread land modification, climate warming, and deep uncertainties about future water supplies. We outline the geographic setting of the SRB and its environmental history, and then discuss the major challenges to water security from: (1 environmental change, (2 rapid growth and economic development, and most importantly, (3 a governance model unsuited to managing complex and uncertain water systems. We conclude with a discussion of the emerging field of socio-hydrology and what it can contribute to knowledge translation, water management, policy, and governance in the SRB and worldwide.

  19. An hourly solar radiation model under actual weather and terrain conditions: A case study in Heihe river basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an hourly incident solar radiation model, which could be used to estimate long-term global radiation, direct radiation and diffuse radiation with high spatial and temporal resolution under its de facto weather and terrain in large regions. The model is based on parameterized radiation transfer theory, and has referred to some data from the NCEP/NCAR (National Centers Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) and some information about topography. The model was successfully used to calculate hourly instantaneous solar irradiance by a spatial resolution of 1kmx1km in Alberts projection, in the Heihe river basin with a drainage area of 130,000km2 in 2002. Now that only observed global radiation data at three automatic stations is available in Heihe river basin, global radiation at the three stations is used to validate the model. The three automatic stations are deployed in the mountain (Xishui), in the oasis (Linze), and in the desert area (Erjinaqi), respectively. The measured hourly instantaneous global radiation data do not comply with the calculated series at Xishui, with a determination coefficient R2=0.71. While at Linze and Erjinaqi stations, the determination coefficients are 0.90 and 0.91, respectively. The main reason why large errors are observed at Xishui station is that total cloud percent data from the NCEP/NCAR do not have a high spatial and temporal resolution. Also the spatial resolution of the observed data is not consistent with the calculated values. According to the model numerical test, topography is an important factor affecting model results on uneven land surfaces. Besides, in arid desert regions with even land surfaces, the 6 hourly model results agree with NCEP/NCAR global radiation data and measured data well

  20. Hydrological changes in the U.S. Northeast using the Connecticut River Basin as a case study: Part 1. Modeling and analysis of the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Dana; Wang, Guiling

    2014-11-01

    Increase of precipitation intensity is the most definite and detectable hydrological consequence of a warmer climate. Among all U.S. regions, the Northeast has witnessed the strongest increase of extreme precipitation in the past five decades. This study examines the impact of climate changes during 1950-2011 on hydrological processes in the Northeast using the Connecticut River Basin as a case study. In addition to precipitation and river discharge data from observations, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model is used to derive hydrological variables for which long-term observational data are not readily available. Our results show a clear increase of precipitation intensity, with substantial increase in both the number of days with greater than 10 mm precipitation and the simple daily intensity index. From 1950 to 2011, extreme precipitation amount (which is the total amount of precipitation from the upper 1% of daily precipitation) increased substantially, by 240% relative to the 1950 level. The weight of extreme precipitation as a fraction of total precipitation also increased, from about 10.6% in the 1950s to 30.4% in the 2000s. Despite the increase of precipitation extremes, the consecutive dry days experienced a slight decrease. Mean trend analysis shows indications of increasing precipitation amount, increasing discharge, increasing runoff ratios, increasing soil moisture, and a negligible evapotranspiration trend. Our simulations suggest that the basin is entering a wetter regime more subject to meteorological flood conditions than to drought conditions. A companion paper will investigate how these trends may persist or differ in the mid-21st century under continued warming.

  1. Transport of Saharan dust from the Bodélé Depression to the Amazon Basin: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ben-Ami

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Through long-range transport of dust, the Sahara desert supplies essential minerals to the Amazon rain forest. Since Saharan dust reaches South America mostly during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the dust sources active during winter are the main contributors to the forest. Given that the Bodélé depression area in Southwestern Chad is the main winter dust source, a close link is expected between the Bodélé emission patterns and volumes and the mineral supply flux to the Amazon.

    Until now, the particular link between the Bodélé and the Amazon forest was based on sparse satellite measurements and modeling studies. In this study, we combine a detailed analysis of space-borne and ground data with reanalysis model data and surface measurements taken in the Central Amazon during the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08 in order to explore the validity and the nature of the proposed link between the Bodélé depression and the Amazon forest.

    This case study follows the dust events of 11–16 and 18–27 February 2008, from the emission in the Bodélé over West Africa, the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean, to the observed effects above the Amazon canopy about 10 days after the emission. The dust was lifted by surface winds stronger than 14 m s−1, usually starting early in the morning. The lofted dust mixed with biomass burning aerosols over Nigeria, was transported over the Atlantic Ocean, and arrived over the South American continent. The top of the aerosol layer reached above 3 km, and the bottom merged with the marine boundary layer. The arrival of the dusty air parcel over the Amazon forest increased the average concentration of aerosol crustal elements by an order of magnitude.

  2. Transport of North African dust from the Bodélé depression to the Amazon Basin: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ben-Ami

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Through long-range transport of dust, the North-African desert supplies essential minerals to the Amazon rain forest. Since North African dust reaches South America mostly during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the dust sources active during winter are the main contributors to the forest. Given that the Bodélé depression area in southwestern Chad is the main winter dust source, a close link is expected between the Bodélé emission patterns and volumes and the mineral supply flux to the Amazon.

    Until now, the particular link between the Bodélé and the Amazon forest was based on sparse satellite measurements and modeling studies. In this study, we combine a detailed analysis of space-borne and ground data with reanalysis model data and surface measurements taken in the central Amazon during the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08 in order to explore the validity and the nature of the proposed link between the Bodélé depression and the Amazon forest.

    This case study follows the dust events of 11–16 and 18–27 February 2008, from the emission in the Bodélé over West Africa (most likely with contribution from other dust sources in the region the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean, to the observed effects above the Amazon canopy about 10 days after the emission. The dust was lifted by surface winds stronger than 14 m s−1, usually starting early in the morning. The lofted dust, mixed with biomass burning aerosols over Nigeria, was transported over the Atlantic Ocean, and arrived over the South American continent. The top of the aerosol layer reached above 3 km, and the bottom merged with the boundary layer. The arrival of the dusty air parcel over the Amazon forest increased the average concentration of aerosol crustal elements by an order of magnitude.

  3. An interactive web-GIS tool for risk analysis: a case study in the Fella River basin, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Z. C.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M. H.; van Westen, C. J.; Hussin, H. Y.; Ciurean, R. L.; Frigerio, S.; Pasuto, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of an interactive web-GIS tool for risk analysis of natural hazards, in particular for floods and landslides, based on open-source geospatial software and technologies. The aim of the presented tool is to assist the experts (risk managers) in analysing the impacts and consequences of a certain hazard event in a considered region, providing an essential input to the decision-making process in the selection of risk management strategies by responsible authorities and decision makers. This tool is based on the Boundless (OpenGeo Suite) framework and its client-side environment for prototype development, and it is one of the main modules of a web-based collaborative decision support platform in risk management. Within this platform, the users can import necessary maps and information to analyse areas at risk. Based on provided information and parameters, loss scenarios (amount of damages and number of fatalities) of a hazard event are generated on the fly and visualized interactively within the web-GIS interface of the platform. The annualized risk is calculated based on the combination of resultant loss scenarios with different return periods of the hazard event. The application of this developed prototype is demonstrated using a regional data set from one of the case study sites, Fella River of northeastern Italy, of the Marie Curie ITN CHANGES project.

  4. An interactive web-GIS tool for risk analysis: a case study in the Fella River Basin, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. C. Aye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype of an interactive web-GIS tool for risk analysis of natural hazards, in particular for floods and landslides, based on open-source geospatial software and technologies. The aim of the presented tool is to assist the experts (risk managers in analysing the impacts and consequences of a certain hazard event in a considered region, providing an essential input to the decision making process in the selection of risk management strategies by responsible authorities and decision makers. This tool is based on the Boundless (OpenGeo Suite framework and its client side environment for prototype development, and it is one of the main modules of a web-based collaborative decision support platform in risk management. Within this platform, the users can import necessary maps and information to analyse areas at risk. Based on provided information and parameters, loss scenarios (amount of damages and number of fatalities of a hazard event are generated on-the-fly and visualized interactively within the web-GIS interface of the platform. The annualized risk is calculated based on the combination of resultant loss scenarios with different return periods of the hazard event. The application of this developed prototype is demonstrated using a regional data set from one of the case study sites, Fella River of North Eastern Italy, of the Marie Curie ITN CHANGES project.

  5. Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of the Water Resources Supply-Demand System: A Case Study in Haihe River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongli Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between water resources supply and demand is very complex and exhibits nonlinear characteristics, which leads to fewer models that can adequately manage the dynamic evolution process of the water resources supply-demand system. In this paper, we propose a new four-dimensional dynamical model to simulate the internal dynamic evolution process and predict future trends of water supply and demand. At the beginning, a new four-dimensional dynamical model with uncertain parameters is established. Then, the gray code hybrid accelerating genetic algorithm (GHAGA is adopted to identify the unknown parameters of the system based on the statistic data (1998–2009. Finally, the dynamical analysis of the system is further studied by Lyapunov-exponent, phase portraits, and Lyapunov exponent theory. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed water resources supply-demand system is in a steady state and is suitable for simulating the dynamical characteristics of a complex water supply and demand system. According to the trends of the water supply and demand of several nonlinear simulation cases, the corresponding measures can be proposed to improve the steady development of the water resources supply-demand system.

  6. Log evaluation of a coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir: a case study in the southern Qinshui basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Hou; Changchun, Zou; Zhaohui, Huang; Liang, Xiao; Yuqing, Yang; Guohua, Zhang; Wenwen, Wang

    2014-02-01

    Proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability are the most important parameters for CBM reservoir evaluation. Based on the analysis of the conventional well log response of the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin of China, regression analysis is used to establish the prediction models of the components of proximate analysis. The Langmuir rank equation is used to calculate the gas content. Variable matrix density is used to evaluate the total porosity. Based on the dual lateral log interaction method, a fracture porosity estimation model is established and the coal fracture permeability is predicted by using the Faivre-Sibbit method in the two CBM seams. Comparisons between the estimated and measured data of proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability indicate that the established models are credible. The absolute errors between the estimated moisture (Mad), ash (Aad), volatile (Vdaf), fixed carbon (FCad) and the measured results of coal in two coal seams are less than 0.41%, 9.47%, 3.61% and 9.41%, respectively. The absolute errors between the estimated and measured gas content are less than 4.05 cm3 g-1. The absolute errors of estimated total porosity and the analysed results of coal are less than 0.84%. Field samples show that Mad, Aad and Vdaf are less than 1.00%, 10.00%-25.00% and 10.00-15.00%, respectively, in the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin. The FCad is close to 70.00%. The gas content ranges from 7.00 cm3 g-1 to 20.00 cm3 g-1 in the no. 3 coal seam and from 10.00 cm3 g-1 to 30.00 cm3 g-1 in the no. 15 coal seam. The total porosity is close to 5.50% and the fracture porosity is generally less than 2.50%. Fracture permeability is mainly distributed from 0.001 to 10 mD. The results indicate that the conventional well logs are effective in CBM reservoir evaluation.

  7. Log evaluation of a coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir: a case study in the southern Qinshui basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability are the most important parameters for CBM reservoir evaluation. Based on the analysis of the conventional well log response of the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin of China, regression analysis is used to establish the prediction models of the components of proximate analysis. The Langmuir rank equation is used to calculate the gas content. Variable matrix density is used to evaluate the total porosity. Based on the dual lateral log interaction method, a fracture porosity estimation model is established and the coal fracture permeability is predicted by using the Faivre–Sibbit method in the two CBM seams. Comparisons between the estimated and measured data of proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability indicate that the established models are credible. The absolute errors between the estimated moisture (Mad), ash (Aad), volatile (Vdaf), fixed carbon (FCad) and the measured results of coal in two coal seams are less than 0.41%, 9.47%, 3.61% and 9.41%, respectively. The absolute errors between the estimated and measured gas content are less than 4.05 cm3 g−1. The absolute errors of estimated total porosity and the analysed results of coal are less than 0.84%. Field samples show that Mad, Aad and Vdaf are less than 1.00%, 10.00%–25.00% and 10.00–15.00%, respectively, in the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin. The FCad is close to 70.00%. The gas content ranges from 7.00 cm3 g−1 to 20.00 cm3 g−1 in the no. 3 coal seam and from 10.00 cm3 g−1 to 30.00 cm3 g−1 in the no. 15 coal seam. The total porosity is close to 5.50% and the fracture porosity is generally less than 2.50%. Fracture permeability is mainly distributed from 0.001 to 10 mD. The results indicate that the conventional well logs are effective in CBM reservoir evaluation. (paper)

  8. Management of a toxic cyanobacterium bloom (Planktothrix rubescens) affecting an Italian drinking water basin: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogialli, Sara; Nigro di Gregorio, Federica; Lucentini, Luca; Ferretti, Emanuele; Ottaviani, Massimo; Ungaro, Nicola; Abis, Pier Paolo; Cannarozzi de Grazia, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    An extraordinary bloom of Planktothrix rubescens, which can produce microcystins (MCs), was observed in early 2009 in the Occhito basin, used even as a source of drinking water in Southern Italy. Several activities, coordinated by a task force, were implemented to assess and manage the risk associated to drinking water contaminated by cyanobacteria. Main actions were: evaluation of analytical protocols for screening and confirmatory purpose, monitoring the drinking water supply chain, training of operators, a dedicated web site for risk communication. ELISA assay was considered suitable for health authorities as screening method for MCs and to optimize frequency of sampling according to alert levels, and as internal control for the water supplier. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method able to quantify 9 MCs was optimized with the aim of supporting health authorities in a comprehensive risk evaluation based on the relative toxicity of different congeners. Short, medium, and long-term corrective actions were implemented to mitigate the health risk. Preoxidation with chlorine dioxide followed by flocculation and settling have been shown to be effective in removing MCs in the water treatment plant. Over two years, despite the high levels of cyanobacteria (up to 160 × 10(6) cells/L) and MCs (28.4 μg/L) initially reached in surface waters, the drinking water distribution was never limited. PMID:23167492

  9. Hydrogeochemical data as a tool for exploration and mapping: a case study from part of Afikpo Basin southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Kalu K; Akaolisa, Casmir C Z

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen (14) characters from six (6) water samples collected from springs, ponds, and streams located in Lower Cretaceous sedimentary area of Afikpo Basin have been analyzed. These include pH, turbidity, conductivity, total dissolved solid, hardness, Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-), and Na+. These sediments, which are Turonian and Coniacian in age, are subdivided into two by a basic rock dyke. Results of the analyses show clearly that the Turonian sediments, intruded by dolerite, have net Fe2+, HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Cl-, and SO4(2-) concentration while those from the younger Coniacian sediment have net higher amounts of K+, Na+, and Mn2+. The overriding mafic minerals in the basic intrusive rock possibly led to higher leaching into ground water system near it. On the other hand, the presence of feldsparthic to kaolinitic sands of the younger Coniacian units led to higher K+ and Na+ matter in the water from these zones. The formations dip away from the older sediments. Concentrations of these characters are within acceptable drinking water standards by World Health Organization but noticeable anomalous zones for Fe2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ are zones of basic rock suites. Areas with greater Na+ and K+ are traceable to sandy units. It is thus concluded that more analysis of surface, subsurface, and pond water samples can be utilized for minerals search and geological mapping. At this stage, it forms a veritable reconnaissance tool. PMID:19105037

  10. Rainfall and runoff regime trends in mountain catchments (Case study area: the upper Hron River basin, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahušiaková Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of trends and causes of changes of selected hydroclimatic variables influencing the runoff regime in the upper Hron River basin (Slovakia. Different methods for identifying trends in data series are evaluated and include: simple mass curve analysis, linear regression, frequency analysis of flood events, use of the Indicators of Hydrological Alteration software, and the Mann-Kendall test. Analyses are performed for data from two periods (1931-2010 and 1961-2010. The changes in runoff are significant, especially in terms of lower QMax and 75 percentile values. This fact is also confirmed by the lower frequency and extremity of flood events. The 1980s are considered a turning point in the development of all hydroclimatic variables. The Mann-Kendall test shows a significant decrease in runoff in the winter period. The main causes of runoff decline are: the considerable increase in air temperature, the decrease in snow cover depth and changes in seasonal distribution of precipitation amounts.

  11. Technical difficulties of logging while drilling in carbonate reservoirs and the countermeasures: A case study from the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Sichuan Basin, carbonate reservoirs are characterized by deep burial depth and strong heterogeneity, so it is difficult to conduct structure steering, pore space reservoir tracking and trajectory control in the process of geosteering logging while drilling. In this paper, a series of corresponding techniques for structure, reservoir and formation tracking were proposed after analysis was conducted on multiple series of carbonate strata in terms of their geologic and logging response characteristics. And investigation was performed on the adaptabilities of the following logging technologies to geosteering while drilling, including gamma ray imaging while drilling, resistivity imaging while drilling, density imaging while drilling, gamma ray logging while drilling, resistivity logging while drilling, neutron logging while drilling and density logging while drilling. After while drilling information was thoroughly analyzed, the logging suites for four common types of complicated reservoirs (thin layered reservoirs, thick massive reservoirs, denuded karst reservoirs and shale gas reservoirs were optimized, and five logging combinations suitable for different formations and reservoirs were proposed, including gamma ray logging + porosity + resistivity imaging, gamma ray logging + resistivity imaging, gamma ray logging + porosity + resistivity logging, gamma ray imaging + resistivity logging, and gamma ray logging. Field application indicates that it is of great reference and application value to use this method for the first time to summarize logging while drilling combinations for different types of carbonate reservoirs.

  12. Case Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proven options available to Sri Lanka for large scale electricity generation in the future are coal-fired thermal, oil-fired thermal and Nuclear. Four case studies for groups participated are indicated. Case study for group 1 is comparison of the three options by taking into consideration the capital and recurrent expenditure involved. Environmental effects of the three options are also given. Case study for group 2 is economic comparison of three renewable energy based power generation system. Case study for group 3 is based on energy conservation, efficiency, improvement and demand management. Assuming that a continuous saving of 20 MW of demand from 1996 onwards is effective two projects are suggested to achieve this result. Case study for group 4 is a feasibility study for hydro power development of the Kukule Ganga (river) in Sri Lanka. Participants are required to evaluate one of the three optional development concepts which are technically feasible

  13. Late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial tableland formation in an intra-mountainous basin in a tectonically active mountain belt ― A case study in the Puli Basin, central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chia-Han; Lüthgens, Christopher; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Reimann, Tony; Frechen, Manfred; Böse, Margot

    2016-01-01

    The morphology in Taiwan is a product of high tectonic activity at the convergent margin and East Asian monsoon climate. Tablelands are prominent geomorphic features in the Puli Basin in central Taiwan. These tablelands provide an archive to understand links between past climatic evolution and tectonic events resulting in the formation of the present-day landforms. To establish a geochronological framework for the alluvium underlying the tablelands in the Puli Basin, optically stimulated luminescence dating was applied to obtain burial ages. The numerical data indicate an accumulation phase of alluvial fans in the Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene transition. The study area in the Taomi River catchment, an obvious longer precursor of the Taomi River, originating from west of the Yuchih Basin, transported the sediments forming the present-day southern tablelands. During the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, the climate changed to wetter and warmer conditions, so that slope processes might have changed and an increasing transport in the fluvial system was stimulated. Fluvial and fan terraces in other river catchments in Taiwan also indicate a period of increased fluvial transport and deposition. A geomorphic evolution model in the Puli Basin is reconstructed on the basis of the chronological framework and of sedimentological features. Fluvial processes controlled by climatic change and accompanied by tectonic activities have created the diverse topography in the Puli Basin.

  14. Ecohydrological effects of stream-aquifer water interaction: a case study of the Heihe River basin, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yujin; Xie, Zhenghui; Yu, Yan; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Linying; Jia, Binghao; Qin, Peihua; Chen, Yaning

    2016-06-01

    A scheme describing the process of stream-aquifer interaction was combined with the land model CLM4.5 to investigate the effects of stream water conveyance over riparian banks on ecological and hydrological processes. Two groups of simulations for five typical river cross sections in the middle reaches of the arid-zone Heihe River basin were conducted. The comparisons between the simulated results and the measurements from water wells, the FLUXNET station, and remote sensing data showed good performance of the coupled model. The simulated riparian groundwater table at a propagation distance of less than 1 km followed the intra-annual fluctuation of the river water level, and the correlation was excellent (R2 = 0.9) between the river water level and the groundwater table at the distance 60 m from the river. The correlation rapidly decreased as distance increased. In response to the variability of the water table, soil moisture at deep layers also followed the variation of river water level all year, while soil moisture at the surface layer was more sensitive to the river water level in the drought season than in the wet season. With increased soil moisture, the average gross primary productivity and respiration of riparian vegetation within 300 m from the river in a typical section of the river increased by approximately 0.03 and 0.02 mg C m-2 s-1, respectively, in the growing season. Consequently, the net ecosystem exchange increased by approximately 0.01 mg C m-2 s-1, and the evapotranspiration increased by approximately 3 mm day-1. Furthermore, the length of the growing season of riparian vegetation also increased by 2-3 months due to the sustaining water recharge from the river. Overall, the stream-aquifer water interaction plays an essential role in the controlling of riparian hydrological and ecological processes.

  15. Exposure risk of young population to lead: A case study in Le'an River Basin in Jiangxi Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanxin; Li, Qi; Wang, Hui; Wang, Bin; Lu, Qun; Yan, Zhenghong; Ding, Aizhong

    2016-02-01

    Blood lead (Pb) level of children has widely been attracting public concern in China, particularly in the sites near mining or industrial areas. However, the policies about how to efficiently reduce the Pb intake of children are still under discussion. We collected six food types based on the local dietary habits and soils from Dexing, Leping, and Poyang Counties situated along the Le'an River Basin from upstream to downstream, and their Pb contents were analyzed. A Monte Carlo model was used to simulate the dietary chronic daily intake of Pb (CDIPb) from various foods and ingested soil by hand-to-mouth activities and its non-carcinogenic risk to children indicated by hazard quotient (HQ). Only in the rural area of Dexing, its soil and vegetables both had higher Pb content than the national tolerance limits of China, resulting its the highest CDIPb among all the areas. The Pb contents of the six food types and soils in other sites were overall below the limits. Vegetables and rice accounted for from 63% (Leping, urban) to 85% (Dexing, rural) of the total CDIPb and ingested soil overall took up ∼6%. In the rural area, Dexing had the highest proportion (82.8%) of children with HQ > 1, followed by Leping (36.1%) and Poyang (27.7%). Different order was found in the urban areas, i.e. Dexing (46.7%) > Poyang (41.0%) > Leping (26.4%). Vegetables and rice were overall the two major contributors to the total CDI of Pb, which should be focused on to control the Pb intake by the local children, especially for those living in the rural area of Dexing County. PMID:26681548

  16. Analysis of land cover change impact on flood events using remote sensing, GIS and hydrological models: a case study of the Nyando River Basin in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, land cover changes in the Nyando River basin (3500 km2) of Kenya were analyzed and their impact of floods quantified. Three Landsat satellite images for 1973, 1986 and 2000 were acquired, processed and classified based on seven major land cover classes prevalent in the basin using a hybrid of supervised and non supervised classification procedures. The detected land cover changes, together with a DEM and a soil map of the basin, were then used to estimate physically based parameters for the selected hydrological models. The models were then used to estimate local and flood peak discharges and volumes arising from selected storm events for each state of the classified land cover dataset. To further understand how changes in the land cover may impact on the flood hydrology, three scenarios that represent quite extreme alternatives were formulated to study the possible bandwidth during floods. Land cover classification results revealed immense land degradation over the span of study. Forests reduced by an area of 488 km2 representing a 20% decline, while agricultural fields expanded by 581 km2 representing a 16% increase over the same period of time (1973-2000). Hydrological modeling results indicated that the basin underwent significant increase in the peak discharge value. The flood peak discharges in the whole basin were noted to have increased by at least 16% over the period of 1973 -2000.Flood volumes were also noted to have increased by at least 10% over the same period of time. (author)

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Sustainable Development and Eco-Environmental Carrying Capacity in Water-Deficient Regions:A Case Study in the Haihe River Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-gen; LUO Yu-zhou; ZHANG Ming-hua; XIA Jun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of development sustainability could be a challenge to regional management and planning, especially for areas facing great risks of water shortage. Surface-water decline and groundwater over-pumping have caused serious environmental problems and limited economic development in many regions all around the world. In this paper, a framework for quantitatively evaluating development sustainability was established with water-related eco-environmental carrying capacity (EECC) as the core measure. As a case study, the developed approach was applied to data of the Haihe River Basin, China, during 1998 through 2007. The overall sustainable development degree (SDD) is determined to be 0.39, suggesting that this rate of development is not sustainable. Results of scenario analysis revealed that overshoot, or resource over-exploitation, of the Basin’s EECC is about 20% for both population and economy. Based on conditions in the study area in 2007, in order to achieve sustainable development, i.e., SDD>0.70 in this study, the EECC could support a population of 108 million and gross domestic product (GDP) of 2.72 trillion CNY. The newly developed approach in quantifying eco-environmental carrying capacity is anticipated to facilitate sustainable development oriented resource management in water-deifcient areas.

  18. The effect of hydrocarbons on the microstructural evolution in rock salt: a case study on hydrocarbon bearing Ara salt from the South Oman Salt Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmatz, Joyce; Urai, Janos L.; Wübbeler, Franziska M. M.; Sadler, Marc

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that dilatant deformation promotes the incorporation of hydrocarbons into typically low permeable rock salt (Schoenherr et al., 2007). However, there is not much knowledge on subsequent mechanisms related to recrystallization processes, which cause morphological and chemical changes of the carbonic inclusions. This work aims to contribute to an increased understanding of fluid inclusion dynamics related to grain boundary migration recrystallization and hence to facilitate the interpretation of complex microstructures in recrystallized, multiphase salt rocks. In this case study we investigate hydrocarbon-impregnated salt from the Cambrian Ara Group in the South Oman Salt Basin. The samples were cored from cm-m thick anhydrite-salt sequences overlying hydrocarbon bearing carbonate stringers in 3300 m depth. The anhydrite layers consist mainly of fine-grained anhydrite, which contains calcite, dolomite, and olivine inclusions. Solid bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon phases are observed in between the anhydrite grains and along cracks. Anhydrite layers host salt veins, which contain fragments of anhydrite. These fragments do not differ in composition or structure from the host material and the related vein microstructures indicate crack-seal mechanisms. Halite in the salt layers is almost entirely recrystallized with solid inclusions consisting of anhydrite, calcite, dolomite and olivine with hydrocarbon-coatings present inside grains and along grain boundaries. Solid inclusions cause pinning indicated by a decreased recrystallized grain size and by the presence of grains with preserved substructures representing earlier deformation phases. We observe two types of carbonic inclusions: I) solid bitumen coatings along grain boundaries and microcracks, interpreted to be incorporated into the salt in an overpressure state that allowed dilatancy of the salt, and II) less degraded, liquid hydrocarbons along grain boundaries in the vicinity of the anhydrite

  19. Role of Pb mining in Contamination of Groundwater and Surface water, Case study: Bastam drainage basin, Northeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, Abdolreza

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater will normally look clear and clean because the ground naturally filters out particulate matter. But, natural and human-induced chemicals can be found in groundwater. As groundwater flows through the ground, metals such as Lead and Cd are dissolved and may later be found in high concentrations in the water. Because water is "Universal Solvent" it can contain lots of dissolved chemicals. And since groundwater moves through rocks and subsurface soil, it has a lot of opportunity to dissolve substances as it moves. For that reason, groundwater will often have more dissolved substances than surface water will. Bastam watershed with ca 1250 km2 area and ca 600 km stream networks, contains around 100 spring, ca 300 irrigation wells, and ca 100 Qanat ( one of a series of well-like vertical shafts, connected by gently sloping tunnels). This watershed is one of the largest drainage basins in northeastern Iran and also it provides drinking water for 3 town and several villages. An abandoned Pb mine located at northwest of this watershed. To determine contamination of these metals in groundwater and surface water, 8 water samples around this mine, from wells, springs and streams were collected and analyzed for heavy metal (Pb, Cd, and Zn) by AAs method. Pb, Cd, and Zn concentration in these samples are range of 0.11 to 0.18 mg/L, 0.010 to 0.021 mg/L, and 0.0079 to 0.0485 mg/L respectively. Comparison between these results and regulation guidelines of WHO, and United State EPA, reveal high level concentration of Pb and Cd in groundwater and surface water in this water resources. Based on regulation guidelines of WHO maximum contaminant level (MCL) for lead, and Cadmium are 0.015 mg/L, and 0.005 mg/L respectively. As a result, these water resource are affected by high level contaminate of Pb (ca 10 fold of WHO regulation guideline) and Cd (ca 3 fold of WHO regulation guidelines) maybe derived from Galena and other Pb rock minerals from this mining area. To reduce

  20. Pricing or Quota? A Solution to Water Scarcity in Oasis Regions in China: A Case Study in the Heihe River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjun Shi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The conflict between increasing water demand and limited water resources has become a serious threat to oasis regions in China. Solutions to water scarcity have to curb overall water demands, especially reducing agricultural water use. Price control and quantitative control are the two most commonly applied policy instruments for water demand management. This paper used a bio-economic model (BEM to examine the shadow price of water resources and to investigate farmers’ response to water demand management policies in water scarce regions based on a study in the Heihe River Basin in northwest China. The results indicate that farmers are not very responsive to changes in water price, because it is currently far below the shadow price of water resources in most irrigation zones. A reduction of agricultural water demand could occur only with a large rise in the water price. In comparison, a quantitative control measure is more effective at reducing water use. Concerning the effects on farm income, a price control will cost much more than a quantitative control to save the same volume of water. Hence, a water quota is a more suitable choice for the purpose of reducing agricultural water use, while minimizing farm income loss in the region of this case study.

  1. Designing and assessing weather-based financial hedging contracts to mitigate water conflicts at the river basin scale. A case study in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Laura; Denaro, Simona; Kern, Jordan; Giuliani, Matteo; Castelletti, Andrea; Characklis, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Growing water demands and more frequent and severe droughts are increasingly challenging water management in many regions worldwide, exacerbating water disputes and reducing the space for negotiated agreements at the catchment scale. In the lack of a centralized controller, the design and deployment of coordination and/or regulatory mechanisms is a way to improve system-wide efficiency while preserving the distributed nature of the decision making setting, and facilitating cooperation among institutionally independent decision-makers. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in index-based insurance contracts as mechanisms for sharing hydro-meteorological risk in complex and heterogeneous decision making context (e.g. multiple stakeholders and institutionally independent decision makers). In this study, we explore the potential for index-based insurance contracts to mitigate the conflict in a water system characterized by (political) power asymmetry between hydropower companies upstream and farmers downstream. The Lake Como basin in the Italian Alps is considered as a case study. We generated alternative regulatory mechanisms in the form of minimum release constraints to the hydropower facilities, and designed an insurance contract for hedging against hydropower relative revenue losses. The fundamental step in designing this type of insurance contracts is the identification of a suitable index, which triggers the payouts as well as the payout function, defined by strike level and slope (e.g., euros/index unit). A portfolio of index-based contracts was designed for the case study and evaluated in terms of revenue floor, basis risk and revenue fluctuation around the mean, both with and without insurance. Over the long term, the insurance proved to be capable to keep the minimum revenue above a specified level while providing a greater certainty on the revenue trend. This result shows the possibility to augment farmer's supply with little loss for hydropower

  2. On the investigation of the performances of a DEM-based hydrogeomorphic floodplain identification method in a large urbanized river basin: the Tiber river case study in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Fernando; Biscarini, Chiara; Di Francesco, Silvia; Manciola, Piergiorgio

    2013-04-01

    Floodplains are critical landscape features for their importance in both ecohydrological and socio-economic terms. River valleys are, in fact, the domain where the interdependence of the complex human-environmental interface is more significant. Riparian zones, along perennial channels, where the frequency of saturation is high and most flooding occurs, are also the areas where urban areas and infrastructures (e.g. highways, bridges, railways, etc) are more present. This is mainly due to geomorphologic conditions since those areas are predominantly flat and easier to develop. One of the more challenging issues under changing climatic, environmental and human drivers for implementing efficient current and future urban plans is to accurately and timely identify, map and characterize the potential flooding scenarios of floodplains. This is currently achieved by implementing detailed topographic, hydrologic and hydraulic studies for flood modeling and mapping for different frequencies (i.e. return time), but those activities are rarely implemented at the large (river basin) scale for their economic cost and time of implementation. In addition to that, flood map updating is not as frequent as needed for following the rapid changing land use conditions. As a result, it is very often the case that urban plans are based on heterogeneous and discontinuous flood map information. Nevertheless, several recent researches demonstrated the potential for the use of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to define the floodplain feature by means of automated hydrogeomorphic methods. This means identifying the flood prone area by filtering potentially inundated cells by implementing proper morphological and hydrological analyses. In this work we implemented the flooplain identification model proposed by Nardi et al. (WRR, 2006) which automatically extract the river network and estimate flood water levels according to a predefined scaling Leopold law. Inundated areas are

  3. Analysis on the economic valuation of ecosystem services : a case study on LuGu Lake basin

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is an empirical investigation and application of conomic valuation of ecosystem in Lugu Lake, southern China. Ecosystem Services (ES) and their quantitative assessment have become one of ecological economics research focuses since 1997, especially the Economic Valuation of Ecosystem Services (EVES). An essential reason of the controversies is they are reviewed from different study angles. Different disciplinary paradigms lead to the debate that whether EVES study is necessary...

  4. Engaging Remote Sensing and Citizen Science into Water Quality Monitoring: A Case Study in Nhue-Day River Basin, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Van Le, Khoa; Minkman, Ellen; Nguyen Thi Phuong, Thuy; Rutten, Martine; Bastiaanssen, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing and citizen science can be utilized to fulfill the gap of conventional monitoring methods. However, how to engage these techniques, principally taking advantage of local capacities and of globally accessible data for satisfying the continuous data requirements and uncertainties are exciting challenges. Previous studies in Vietnam showed that official documents regulated towards responding the vital need of upgrading national water monitoring infrastructures do not put the huge potentials of free satellite images and crowd-based data collection into account, this factor also limits publications related to these techniques. In this research, a new water monitoring approach will be developed friendly with areas suffering poor quality monitoring works. Particularly, algorithms respecting to the relationship between temperature, total suspended sediment (TSS), chlorophyll and information collected by sensors onboard Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 MSI satellites are built in the study area in Northern Vietnam; additionally, undergraduate student volunteers were sent to the sites with all the measurement activities are designed to coincide with the time when the study area captured by the satellites to compare the results. While conventional techniques are proving their irreplaceable role in the water monitoring network, the utilization of remote sensing techniques and citizen science in this study will demonstrate highly supportive values, saving monitoring costs and time; advantaging local human resources to science; providing an inclusive assessment of water quality changes along with land-use change in the study area, these approaches are excellent alternatives to meet the demand of real-time, continuous data nationwide.

  5. Assessment Fargas and BLM Models for Identification of Erosion Degree and Critical Sediment Sources (Case Study: Aghbolagh Drainage Basin, Hashtrood City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Abdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the different areas in drainage basin (as a natural planning unit for occurring the sedimentation and its severity in different phases of basic studies has been always one of the most important purposes of the natural resources experts. For achieving to this purpose some experimental models has been presented that Some of them have high efficiency and others have weaknesses. Fargas and BLM models are used in this research and they are run in Aghbolagh drainage basin in Hashtrood town, East Azarbayjan province with 7.8 km2 area. Fargas model includes only two factors, the rock type erosivity and drainage density in the every rock unit, whereas BLM model includes seven factors; the surface erosion, the litter cover, the rock cover on the surface, the affection of destruction on the surface, the surface rill erosion, the affection of the sedimentation due to the water flow and the amplification of gully erosion. The objective of this research is the handling of these two models for different phases of basic studies in the study area. The results of two models showed, in Fargas model 3.67% area of the basin has high erosion, 14.26% area of the basin has severe erosion and 81.04% has very severe erosion and in BLM model 42.97% area of the basin has moderate erosion and 24.93% has high erosion, therefore 52.85% of the study area in Fargas and BLM models has concurrence in the erosion severity.

  6. Impact of urbanization on rainfall-runoff processes: case study in the Liangshui River Basin in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongxue; Zhao, Gang

    2016-05-01

    China is undergoing rapid urbanization during the past decades. For example, the proportion of urban population in Beijing has increased from 57.6 % in 1980 to 86.3 % in 2013. Rapid urbanization has an adverse impact on the urban rainfall-runoff processes, which may result in the increase of urban flood risk. In the present study, the major purpose is to investigate the impact of land use/cover change on hydrological processes. The intensive human activities, such as the increase of impervious area, changes of river network morphology, construction of drainage system and water transfer, were considered in this study. Landsat TM images were adopted to monitor urbanization process based on Urban Land-use Index (ULI). The SWMM model considering different urbanized scenarios and anthropogenic disturbance was developed. The measured streamflow data was used for model calibration and validation. Precipitation with different return periods was taken as model input to analyse the changes of flood characteristics under different urbanized scenarios. The results indicated that SWMM provided a good estimation for storms under different urbanized scenarios. The volume of surface runoff after urbanization was 3.5 times greater than that before urbanization; the coefficient of runoff changed from 0.12 to 0.41, and the ratio of infiltration decreased from 88 to 60 %. After urbanization, the time of overland flow concentration increased while the time of river concentration decreased; the peak time did not show much difference in this study. It was found that the peak flow of 20-year return-period after urbanization is greater than that of 100-year return-period before urbanization. The amplification effect of urbanization on flood is significant, resulting in an increase of the flooding risk. These effects are especially noticeable for extreme precipitation. The results in this study will provide technical support for the planning and management of urban storm water and the

  7. Research on Nonpoint Source Pollution Assessment Method in Data Sparse Regions: A Case Study of Xichong River Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xing Liu; Donglong Li; Hongbo Zhang; Shixiang Cai; Xiaodong Li; Tianqi Ao

    2015-01-01

    The NPS pollution is difficult to manage and control due to its complicated generation and formation mechanism, especially in the data sparse area. Thus the ECM and BTOPMC were, respectively, adopted to develop an easy and practical assessment method, and a comparison between the outputs of them is then conducted in this paper. The literature survey and field data were acquired to confirm the export coefficients of the ECM, and the loads of TN and TP were statistically analyzed in the study a...

  8. EvaluationofLandCoverChangesRemoteSensingTechnique (Case Study: Hableh Rood Subwatershed of ShahrabadBasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Abolfathi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing population and increasing socio-economic necessities creates a pressure on land use/land cover. Nowadays, land use change detection using remote sensing data provides quantitative and timely information for management and evaluation of natural resources. This study investigates the land use changes in part of Hableh Rood Watershed of Iran using Landsat 7 and 8 (Sensor ETM+ and OLI images between 2001 and 2013. Supervised classification was used for classification of Landsat images. Four land use classes were delineated including rangeland, irrigated farming and plantations land, and dry farming lands,urban. Visual interpretation, expert knowledge of the study area and ground truth information accumulated with field works to assess the accuracy of the classification results. Overall accuracy of 2001 and 2013 image classification was 81.48 (Kappa coefficient: 0.7340 and 87.04 (Kappa coefficient: 0.7841, respectively. The results showed considerable land cover changes for the given study area. Land cover change detection showed that in a period of 12 years, 277.57 hectares of dry farming lands and 340 hectares of dense range have been lost. But, 341 hectares for low dense range, 280 hectares for semi dense range and 1.4 hectares for urban areas, have been added in area.

  9. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform

  10. Research on Nonpoint Source Pollution Assessment Method in Data Sparse Regions: A Case Study of Xichong River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The NPS pollution is difficult to manage and control due to its complicated generation and formation mechanism, especially in the data sparse area. Thus the ECM and BTOPMC were, respectively, adopted to develop an easy and practical assessment method, and a comparison between the outputs of them is then conducted in this paper. The literature survey and field data were acquired to confirm the export coefficients of the ECM, and the loads of TN and TP were statistically analyzed in the study area. Based on hydrological similarity, runoff data from nearby gauged sites were pooled to compensate for the lack of at-site data and the water quality submodel of BTOPMC was then applied to simulate the monthly pollutant fluxes in the two sections from 2010 to 2012. The results showed agricultural fertilizer, rural sewage, and livestock and poultry sewage were the main pollution sources, and under the consideration of self-purification capacity of river, the outputs of the two models were almost identical. The proposed method with a main thought of combining and comparing an empirical model and a mechanistic model can assess the water quality conditions in the study area scientifically, which indicated it has a good potential for popularization in other regions.

  11. Sustainable development around the Lake Victoria basin, part 1, : a case study of farmers'perception of the VI Agroforestry Project Masaka/Rakai, Uganda, from a gender perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Sara

    2004-01-01

    During the years the awareness of gender issues has increased in the international arena and the importance of including gender aspects in development projects has been emphasised. This Master’s thesis is based on a case study of the VI Agroforestry Project (VIAFP) in Uganda and is one of the two subprojects of the study Sustainable development around the Lake Victoria basin, with the purpose to investigate the importance of local anchoring and active participation in the work towards sustain...

  12. From geodiversity and biodiversity through geoheritage to geoconservation; case study for the Dębnica River drainage basin (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Małgorzata; Najwer, Alicja; Borysiak, Janina; Gudowicz, Joanna; Zwoliński, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    The poster presents the geodiversity of morphogenetically youngest Polish areas, which are a part of the North European Plain. The representative study area was the Dębnica River catchment (200 square km), which includes postglacial landforms. The geodiversity is presented spatially, using the spatial units map, varied in terms of their geodiversity indicator. The indicator was determined by a geoinformation analysis, using the quality classification method, and it captures the landscape complexity. The factor maps relating to landform energy, selected geomorphometric parameters, landforms, lithology and hydrography were taken into consideration. The set of factor maps includes also the map of the syngenetic type of real vegetation, as well as land cover and land use maps. The data were extracted from the digital elevation model (DTED 2) and digital geomorphological, geological and hydrographic maps in a scale of 1:50,000. The data on land cover and land use were extracted from the CORINE Land Cover 2006 database. Details were added to the data using field mapping at a scale of 1:50,000, for the period 2012-2014. Spontaneous real vegetation was diagnosed using the phytosociological method, simultaneously with the field mapping procedure. Unified spatial units were assigned for each factor map. Relationships between the geodiversity and biodiversity were established, based on the calculated correlation coefficients. The spatial units which were varied in terms of geodiversity and biodiversity are presented on the final map. The map shows areas of very high geodiversity and biodiversity, which are the hotspots for the local natural and cultural geoheritage. Various geoconservation methods of such areas were also suggested in the study.

  13. Multi-scale constraints of sediment source to sink systems in frontier basins: a forward stratigraphic modeling case study of the Levant region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawie, Nicolas; Deschamps, Remy; Granjeon, Didier; Nader, Fadi-Henri; Gorini, Christian; Müller, Carla; Montadert, Lucien; Baudin, François

    2015-04-01

    Recent scientific work underlined the presence of a thick Cenozoic infill in the Levant Basin reaching up to 12 km. Interestingly; restricted sedimentation was observed along the Levant margin in the Cenozoic. Since the Late Eocene successive regional geodynamic events affecting Afro-Arabia and Eurasia (collision and strike slip deformation)induced fast marginal uplifts. The initiation of local and long-lived regional drainage systems in the Oligo-Miocene period (e.g. Lebanon versus Nile) provoked a change in the depositional pattern along the Levant margin and basin. A shift from carbonate dominated environments into clastic rich systems has been observed. Through this communication we explore the importance of multi-scale constraints (i.e.,seismic, well and field data) in the quantification of the subsidence history, sediment transport and deposition of a Middle-Upper Miocene "multi-source" to sink system along the northernLevant frontier region. We prove through a comprehensive forward stratigraphic modeling workflow that the contribution to the infill of the northern Levant Basin (offshore Lebanon) is split in between proximal and more distal clastic sources as well as in situ carbonate/hemipelagic deposition. In a wider perspective this work falls under the umbrella of multi-disciplinary source to sink studies that investigate the impact of geodynamic events on basin/margin architectural evolutions, consequent sedimentary infill and thus on petroleum systems assessment.

  14. Future hydrological regimes and glacier cover in the Everest region: The case study of the upper Dudh Koshi basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncini, Andrea; Bocchiola, Daniele; Confortola, Gabriele; Minora, Umberto; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Salerno, Franco; Viviano, Gaetano; Shrestha, Dibas; Senese, Antonella; Smiraglia, Claudio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina

    2016-09-15

    Assessment of future water resources under climate change is required in the Himalayas, where hydrological cycle is poorly studied and little understood. This study focuses on the upper Dudh Koshi river of Nepal (151km(2), 4200-8848ma.s.l.) at the toe of Mt. Everest, nesting the debris covered Khumbu, and Khangri Nup glaciers (62km(2)). New data gathered during three years of field campaigns (2012-2014) were used to set up a glacio-hydrological model describing stream flows, snow and ice melt, ice cover thickness and glaciers' flow dynamics. The model was validated, and used to assess changes of the hydrological cycle until 2100. Climate projections are used from three Global Climate Models used in the recent IPCC AR5 under RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Flow statistics are estimated for two reference decades 2045-2054, and 2090-2099, and compared against control run CR, 2012-2014. During CR we found a contribution of ice melt to stream flows of 55% yearly, with snow melt contributing for 19%. Future flows are predicted to increase in monsoon season, but to decrease yearly (-4% vs CR on average) at 2045-2054. At the end of century large reduction would occur in all seasons, i.e. -26% vs CR on average at 2090-2099. At half century yearly contribution of ice melt would be on average 45%, and snow melt 28%. At the end of century ice melt would be 31%, and snow contribution 39%. Glaciers in the area are projected to thin largely up to 6500ma.s.l. until 2100, reducing their volume by -50% or more, and their ice covered area by -30% or more. According to our results, in the future water resources in the upper Dudh Koshi would decrease, and depend largely upon snow melt and rainfall, so that adaptation measures to modified water availability will be required. PMID:27262982

  15. Observing high flow with the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle: the case study from upper Nysa Klodzka basin (SW Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Matylda; Spallek, Waldemar; Slopek, Jacek; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments of the HydroProg system (research project no. 2011/01/D/ST10/04171 of the National Science Centre of Poland), which aims to issue warnings against floods, are associated with predicting inundation, and hence there is a need for verifying the prognoses of overbank flow extent. The progress in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology causes that UAVs are now easily available and - provided formal flight requirements are fulfilled - can be used for observing numerous features of the natural environment. This intrinsically concerns hydrological applications in which dynamics is a key issue. Hence, in order to observe true extent of water during flood, UAV can be used on demand. However, unanswered is the problem of the minimum size, understood in terms of flooded area, of water increment which is detectable when inferred from the orthophoto image. The present study aims to address the above-mentioned problem by applying the small-sample statistical inference methods to a sample of nine study sites observed during five UAV observational campaigns in the vicinity of the gauge in Gorzuchow, situated along the Scinawka river (SW Poland). Since November 2012 we have carried our regular flights using the swinglet CAM fixed-wing UAV, and the areas adjacent to the gauge itself have been monitored in detail. We produced a series high-resolution orthotphoto images, corresponding to low-, normal- and high-flow situations. We sketched shapes of terrain covered by water on a basis of the detailed analysis of the ortophoto images, and the judgment was supported by our geomorphological knowledge about the channel characteristics. The resulting data were subsequently presented as percentages, and later a logarithm transformation was applied. The assumptions of Student's t-test were found to be fulfilled, and thus we used the t-test and its Bootstrap version to detect significant increments of water, inside or outside the channel. We explicitly identified the

  16. KE Basin water dispositioning engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This engineering study is a feasibility study of KE Basin water treatment to an acceptable level and dispositioning the treated water to Columbia River, ground through ETF or to air through evaporation

  17. Tectonic fabrics vs. mineralogical artifacts in AMS analysis: A case study of the Western Morocco extensional Triassic basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, B.; Casas, A. M.; Moussaid, B.; Villalaín, J. J.; El Ouardi, H.; Soto, R.; Torres-López, S.; Román-Berdiel, T.

    2016-03-01

    New magnetic fabric data from 48 sites in Upper Triassic red beds from the Argana, Asni and Tizi n'Tichka areas in the western High Atlas, in combination with rock magnetic analyses, SEM observations and qualitative chemical analyses, reveal that mineralization processes can affect the primary (extensional) or secondary (post-depositional) magnetic fabrics. Twenty out of the 48 analyzed sites show tectonic-related fabrics consistent with the rifting stage (primary). Their orientation suggests that the extensional Atlasic (for the Asni area) and Atlantic (for Argana area) distinct directions prevailing during Liassic times are already present in the Upper Triassic sediments. The other 28 sites show axes switching (including different possibilities, kmax-kmin or kint-kmin), indicating their secondary development related to mineralogical changes after deposition. However, orientation of magnetic susceptibility axes (without considering their relative value) is consistent with the main directions obtained for the rifting stage. This magnetic fabric study also suggests that (i) extension had a small transtensional component and (ii) there is a limited influence of compressional inversion tectonics.

  18. SNOW DEPTH ESTIMATION USING TIME SERIES PASSIVE MICROWAVE IMAGERY VIA GENETICALLY SUPPORT VECTOR REGRESSION (CASE STUDY URMIA LAKE BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zahir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lake Urmia is one of the most important ecosystems of the country which is on the verge of elimination. Many factors contribute to this crisis among them is the precipitation, paly important roll. Precipitation has many forms one of them is in the form of snow. The snow on Sahand Mountain is one of the main and important sources of the Lake Urmia’s water. Snow Depth (SD is vital parameters for estimating water balance for future year. In this regards, this study is focused on SD parameter using Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I instruments on board the Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F16. The usual statistical methods for retrieving SD include linear and non-linear ones. These methods used least square procedure to estimate SD model. Recently, kernel base methods widely used for modelling statistical problem. From these methods, the support vector regression (SVR is achieved the high performance for modelling the statistical problem. Examination of the obtained data shows the existence of outlier in them. For omitting these outliers, wavelet denoising method is applied. After the omission of the outliers it is needed to select the optimum bands and parameters for SVR. To overcome these issues, feature selection methods have shown a direct effect on improving the regression performance. We used genetic algorithm (GA for selecting suitable features of the SSMI bands in order to estimate SD model. The results for the training and testing data in Sahand mountain is [R²_TEST=0.9049 and RMSE= 6.9654] that show the high SVR performance.

  19. Snow Depth Estimation Using Time Series Passive Microwave Imagery via Genetically Support Vector Regression (case Study Urmia Lake Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, N.; Mahdi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Urmia is one of the most important ecosystems of the country which is on the verge of elimination. Many factors contribute to this crisis among them is the precipitation, paly important roll. Precipitation has many forms one of them is in the form of snow. The snow on Sahand Mountain is one of the main and important sources of the Lake Urmia's water. Snow Depth (SD) is vital parameters for estimating water balance for future year. In this regards, this study is focused on SD parameter using Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) instruments on board the Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16. The usual statistical methods for retrieving SD include linear and non-linear ones. These methods used least square procedure to estimate SD model. Recently, kernel base methods widely used for modelling statistical problem. From these methods, the support vector regression (SVR) is achieved the high performance for modelling the statistical problem. Examination of the obtained data shows the existence of outlier in them. For omitting these outliers, wavelet denoising method is applied. After the omission of the outliers it is needed to select the optimum bands and parameters for SVR. To overcome these issues, feature selection methods have shown a direct effect on improving the regression performance. We used genetic algorithm (GA) for selecting suitable features of the SSMI bands in order to estimate SD model. The results for the training and testing data in Sahand mountain is [R²_TEST=0.9049 and RMSE= 6.9654] that show the high SVR performance.

  20. Assessing the implications of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services: A case study in the Lake Tana basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dile, Yihun Taddele; Karlberg, Louise; Daggupati, Prasad; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Wiberg, David; Rockström, Johan

    2016-01-15

    Water harvesting systems have improved productivity in various regions in sub-Saharan Africa. Similarly, they can help retain water in landscapes, build resilience against droughts and dry spells, and thereby contribute to sustainable agricultural intensification. However, there is no strong empirical evidence that shows the effects of intensification of water harvesting on upstream-downstream social-ecological systems at a landscape scale. In this paper we develop a decision support system (DSS) for locating and sizing water harvesting ponds in a hydrological model, which enables assessments of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services in meso-scale watersheds. The DSS was used with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for a case-study area located in the Lake Tana basin, Ethiopia. We found that supplementary irrigation in combination with nutrient application increased simulated teff (Eragrostis tef, staple crop in Ethiopia) production up to three times, compared to the current practice. Moreover, after supplemental irrigation of teff, the excess water was used for dry season onion production of 7.66 t/ha (median). Water harvesting, therefore, can play an important role in increasing local- to regional-scale food security through increased and more stable food production and generation of extra income from the sale of cash crops. The annual total irrigation water consumption was ~4%-30% of the annual water yield from the entire watershed. In general, water harvesting resulted in a reduction in peak flows and an increase in low flows. Water harvesting substantially reduced sediment yield leaving the watershed. The beneficiaries of water harvesting ponds may benefit from increases in agricultural production. The downstream social-ecological systems may benefit from reduced food prices, reduced flooding damages, and reduced sediment influxes, as well as enhancements in low flows and water quality. The benefits of water

  1. Socio-hydrologic drivers of the Pendulum Swing between agriculture development and environmental health: a case study from Murrumbidgee River Basin, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kandasamy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study centered on the Murrumbidgee river basin in eastern Australia that illustrates the dynamics of the balance between water extraction and use for food production and efforts to mitigate and reverse consequent degradation of the riparian environment. In particular the paper traces the history of a pendulum swing between an exclusive focus on agricultural development and food production in the initial stages and its attendant socio-economic benefits, followed by the gradual realization of the adverse environmental impacts, efforts to mitigate these with the use of remedial measures, and ultimately concerted efforts and externally imposed solutions to restore environmental health and ecosystem services. The 100 yr history of development within Murrumbidgee is divided into four eras, each underpinned by the dominance of different norms/goals and turning points characterized by their changes. The various stages of development can be characterized by the dominance, in turn, of infrastructure systems, policy frameworks, economic instruments, and technological solutions. The paper argues that, to avoid these costly pendulum swings, management needs to be underpinned by long-term coupled socio-hydrologic system models that explicitly include the two-way coupling between human and hydrological systems, including evolution of human values/norms relating to water and the environment. Such coupled human-water system models can provide insights into dominant controls of the trajectory of their co-evolution in a given system, and can also be used to interpret patterns of co-evolution of such coupled systems in different places across gradients of climatic, socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions, and in this way to help develop generalizable understanding.

  2. Quantification of effects of climate variations and human activities on runoff by a monthly water balance model: A case study of the Chaobai River basin in northern China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, G; Xia, J.; J. Che

    2009-01-01

    The Chaobai River basin in northern China consists of two major tributaries, the Chao River and Bai River. Monthly observations of precipitation, streamfiow, and panevaporation data are available for 35 years (1961-1966 and 1973-2001). Using the annual time series of the observed streamfiow, one break point at 1979 is detected and is adopted to divide the data set into two study periods, the "before" and "after" periods marking the onset of significant anthropogenic alteration of the flow (re...

  3. Wetland planning in agricultural landscape using Geographical Information System : A case study of Lake Ringsjön basin in South Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Olszewska, Dorota Olga

    2005-01-01

    The problem of increasing eutrophication encouraged the Baltic States to implement new measures, which would help to decrease the nutrient load into the Baltic Sea. Constructed wetlands are considered as one of the possible solutions to the problem of nutrient leakage from agricultural areas in Sweden. The aim of this study was to identify the best wetland locations in the Lake Ringsjön basin (in southern Sweden, Scania) using Land Score System (LSS) based on Geographic Information System (GI...

  4. Integrated flood risk analysis during different SST conditions in a changing climate: A case study of the Korean Han River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Kim, J.; Moon, Y. I.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an integrated flood risk index (IFRI) was developed using information on hydrological, socio-economic, and ecological components to assess watershed-based flood hazards and vulnerability in the Korean Han River basin, which is a region where flood disasters frequently occur. In total, this study used 15 indicators to create an IFRI map for the region, and 5 categories of flood risk were distinguished: "very high," "high," "medium," "low," and "very low." The results, which were presented in ternary diagrams to illustrate the relative importance of the three different components, show that urban areas in the Korean Han River basin have experienced a decrease of 1.0% in terms of the hydrologic component. However, the socio-economic and ecological components have increased by 3.2% and 4.4%, respectively. In rural areas, an increase of 4.8% was found in the hydrologic component alongside decreases in the socio-economic (1.6%) and ecological (2.2%) factors. In addition, the IFRI map shows that 20.02% of the total area of the Han River Basin was classified as having "very high" or "high" flood risk; the size of this high-risk zone has increased significantly by since 1990. This study also evaluated flood risks according to the different phases of conditions, and the results from the analysis indicate that flood risks were worse during strong cold-tongue (CT) and warm-pool (WP) El Niño years. Further analyses of possible factors that affect the vulnerability and resilience of communities to flood hazards in the Han River basin should be conducted on the basis of this research. Accordingly, the results from this study may provide useful data for reducing flood risks in developing areas that are experiencing.

  5. Study of chemical composition of sludges and scales from the oil production activities and correlation with natural radioactivity - case study: Campos Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work intended to study general aspects related to natural radioactivity, focusing on its occurrence in the oil industry and on sludge and scales samples taken from the Oil E and P region from Campos's Basin. The physical and chemical analysis and the statistical treatment were carried out with the objective of determine the samples composition checking the differences between the sludges and the scales. Third six representative samples were obtained from the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute (IRD/CNEN), Brazil, taking into account factors such as activity concentration, physical and chemical aspects and origin. After the oil extraction, samples were classified by aspects as color and granulometry. Ali the studied samples were analyzed by X-rays diffraction being identified the presence of barite, calcite, quartz among others. The results supplied a base for the elaboration of a successive determination scheme which comprehended residual organic material, carbonate, sulfate, silica, chloride and metals as the alkaline, earthy alkaline, aluminum, etc. The sludges presented a highly variable chemical composition, being rich in silica and carbonates. The main components analysis showed a statistical valid relationship among the radium isotopes and the carbonates presence. On the other hand, the scales are made of barium and strontium sulfates (75%), presenting a minor variation on its chemical composition and in the existing radium content. Due to this low variability of the barium, sulfate and radium contents, it has not been possible to consider valid a relationship that could exist among them in the application of the main component analysis. (author)

  6. Carbonate Sequence Stratigraphy of a Back-Arc Basin: A Case Study of the Qom Formation in the Kashan Area, Central Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guoqiang; ZHANG Shaonan; LI Zhongdong; SONG Lailiang; LIU Huimin

    2007-01-01

    The Qom Formation comprises Oligo-Miocene deposits from a marine succession distributed in the Central Basin of Iran. It is composed of five members designated as A-F. Little previous work exists on the sequence stratigraphy. Based on an integrated study of sequence stratigraphy with outcrop data, wells and regional seismic profiles, the Qom Formation is interpreted as a carbonate succession deposited in a mid-Tertiary back-arc basin. There are two second-order sequences (designated as SS1 and SS2) and five third-order sequences (designated as S1-S5). Five distinct systems tracts including transgressive, highstand, forced regressive, slope margin and lowstand have been recognized. The relationship between the sequences and lithologic sub-units has been collated and defined (S1 to S5 individually corresponding to A-C1, C2-C4, D-E, the lower and upper portions of F); a relative sea level change curve and the sequence stratigraphic framework have been established and described in detail. The coincidence of relative sea level change between that of the determined back-arc basin and the world indicates that the sedimentary cycles of the Qom Formation are mainly controlled by eustatic cycles. The variable combination of the systems tracts and special tectonic-depositional setting causally underpin multiple sequence stratigraphic framework styles seen in the carbonates of the back-arc basin revealing: (1) a continental margin basin that developed some form of barrier, characterized by the development of multiple cycles of carbonate-evaporites; (2) a flat carbonate ramp, which occurred on the southern shelf formed by the lack of clastic supply from nearby magmatic islands plus mixed siliciclastics and carbonates that occurred on the northern shelf due to a sufficient clastics supply from the land; and (3) a forced regressive stratigraphic stacking pattern that occured on the southern shelf and in basin lows due to the uplifting of the southern shelf. Thick and widespread

  7. Distribution of halogenated species over the Los Angeles Basin measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase). A case study: HFC-152a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Nissenson, P.; Dabdub, D.; Vancuren, R. A.; Pederson, J. R.; Rowland, F. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) study. Four research flights sponsored by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) were carried out over Californa in June 2008. Among many other measurements, whole air samples were collected on board of the DC-8 aircraft and were analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which included several halogenated species. This study focuses on the characterization and distribution in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin of selected halocarbons including CFCs, CFC replacements (HCFCs and HFCs), halogenated solvents, and methyl halides. The levels of some of the halogenated species were found to be greatly enhanced over the LA basin. For instance, average mixing ratios of 95±77 pptv and 52±60 pptv were measured for HFC-134a and HFC-152a respectively, representing a 160% and ~800% enhancement. Using the ARCTAS-CARB data set, we estimate annual emissions of HFC-152a from the Los Angeles basin.

  8. Detection of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges: a case study from the central-southern Siena Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ivan; Arragoni, Simone; Aldinucci, Mauro; Foresi, Luca Maria; Bambini, Anna Maria; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The detection of detached nearshore wedges formed in response to relative sea-level drops is considered one of the hottest topics in sequence stratigraphic analysis due to their importance as reservoir analogues. In fact, they usually constitute sandy and porous bodies generally encased in impermeable clay, thus presenting a good potential as traps for fluids. This paper focuses on the sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pliocene deposits cropping out in the central-southern sector of the Siena Basin (Tuscany, Italy), a post-collisional basin of the Northern Apennines. The exposed sedimentary succession was investigated through a detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic approach, integrated by biostratigraphic analyses, aimed at a better characterization of the infilling history of this sector of the basin. Specifically, this study revealed the occurrence of repeated facies shifts that allowed the identification of two depositional sequences. In detail, a thick sand-rich body far from the basin margins, and previously considered as a turbiditic lobe, has been reinterpreted as formed in a nearshore setting during a fall in relative sea level. This body is totally encased in offshore clay, and due to the lack of physical connection with the related HST deposits, it has to be considered as a detached forced-regressive wedge. The present work led to the recognition of some sedimentological and stratigraphic features typical of falling stage systems tract deposits (e.g. presence of intrabasinal recycled materials, sedimentological evidence of a pre-existing fluvial network subsequently eroded) that can provide useful clues for the identification of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges in core studies and poorly exposed settings.

  9. Superficial and deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal succession: the case study of Maiolica Formation, Gargano Promontory, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonská, Danica; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational phenomena on the paleoslope of continental margins play a significant role both in redistribution of sediment and formation of new structural features within sedimentary basins worldwide. Mass-transport deposits (MTDs) represent important heterogeneities within the succession and occur on various scales (tens of centimetres to hundreds of metres). Small- to medium-scale MTDs (up to tens of meters) act as layers of different petrophysical properties, whereas large-scale MTDs (tens to hundreds of meters) form both stratigraphic and structural discontinuities (faults, thrusts, erosional surfaces, dykes or injections) within the succession. The Maiolica Formation, Early Cretaceous deep basinal succession cropping out in Gargano Promontory of Southeast Italy is represented by undisturbed intervals of flat-lying thin-bedded, cherty micritic limestone interstratified with intervals of lithologically similar, but structurally distorted beds. For this reason, the studied outcrops provide a good opportunity to characterize the geometry and the internal deformation of small- and medium-scale carbonate MTDs. At the outcrop scale, small- to medium-sized MTDs can be simply identified as sheets of deformed strata alternated with packages of undeformed beds. However, several observed features such as folded stylolites with radially oriented peaks within some of these deformed packages and the presence of large vertical clastic-dyke-like bodies in the succession suggest that some of these deformed packages represent deep-seated basal gliding horizons of large-scale MTDs. In this study, we present MTDs on two different scales that have a crucial influence on the evolution of slope to basinal successions. Moreover, we define the features that distinguish superficial MTDs from the deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal carbonates.

  10. Estimation of human-induced changes in terrestrial water storage through integration of GRACE satellite detection and hydrological modeling: A case study of the Yangtze River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Salama, Mhd. Suhyb; Krol, Maarten S.; Su, Zhongbo; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.; Zeng, Yijian; Zhou, Yunxuan

    2015-10-01

    Quantifying the human effects on water resources plays an important role in river basin management. In this study, we proposed a framework, which integrates the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite estimation with macroscale hydrological model simulation, for detection and attribution of spatial terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes. In particular, it provides valuable insights for regions where ground-based measurements are inaccessible. Moreover, this framework takes into account the feedback between land and atmosphere and innovatively put forward several suggestions (e.g., study period selection, hydrological model selection based on soil moisture-climate interactions) to minimize the uncertainties brought by the interaction of human water use with terrestrial water fluxes. We demonstrate the use of the proposed framework in the Yangtze River basin of China. Our results show that, during the period 2003-2010, the TWS was continually increasing in the middle and south eastern reaches of the basin, at a mean rate of about 3 cm yr-1. This increment in TWS was attributed to anthropogenic modification of the hydrological cycle, rather than natural climate variability. The dominant contributor to the TWS excess was found to be intensive surface water irrigation, which recharged the water table in the middle and south eastern parts of the basin. Water impoundment in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is found to account for nearly 20% of the human-induced TWS increment in the region where the TGR is located. The proposed framework gives water managers/researchers a useful tool to investigate the spatial human effects on TWS changes.

  11. GIS and remote sensing techniques for the assessment of land use changes impact on flood hydrology: the case study of Yialias Basin in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Alexakis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Flooding is one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, leading to economic losses and loss of human lives. This paper highlights the hydrological effects of multi-temporal land use changes in flood hazard within the Yialias catchment area, located in central Cyprus. Calibrated hydrological and hydraulic models were used to describe the hydrological processes and internal basin dynamics of the three major sub-basins, in order to study the diachronic effects of land use changes. For the implementation of the hydrological model, land use, soil and hydrometeorological data were incorporated. The climatic and stream flow data were derived from rain and flow gauge stations located in the wider area of the watershed basin. In addition, the land use and soil data were extracted after the application of object oriented nearest neighbor algorithms of ASTER satellite images. Subsequently, the CA-Markov chain analysis was implemented to predict the 2020 Land use/Land cover (LULC map and incorporate it to the hydrological impact assessment. The results denoted the increase of runoff in the catchment area due to the recorded extensive urban sprawl phenomenon of the last decade.

  12. Estimation of evapotranspiration in an arid region by remote sensing—A case study in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingmin; Lu, Ling; Yang, Wenfeng; Cheng, Guodong

    2012-07-01

    Estimating surface evapotranspiration is extremely important for the study of water resources in arid regions. Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (NOAA/AVHRR), meteorological observations and data obtained from the Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER) project in 2008 are applied to the evaporative fraction model to estimate evapotranspiration over the Heihe River Basin. The calculation method for the parameters used in the model and the evapotranspiration estimation results are analyzed and evaluated. The results observed within the oasis and the banks of the river suggest that more evapotranspiration occurs in the inland river basin in the arid region from May to September. Evapotranspiration values for the oasis, where the land surface types and vegetations are highly variable, are relatively small and heterogeneous. In the Gobi desert and other deserts with little vegetation, evapotranspiration remains at its lowest level during this period. These results reinforce the conclusion that rational utilization of water resources in the oasis is essential to manage the water resources in the inland river basin. In the remote sensing-based evapotranspiration model, the accuracy of the parameter estimate directly affects the accuracy of the evapotranspiration results; more accurate parameter values yield more precise values for evapotranspiration. However, when using the evaporative fraction to estimate regional evapotranspiration, better calculation results can be achieved only if evaporative fraction is constant in the daytime.

  13. Mid-level synoptic analysis of flood-generating systems in South-west of Iran (case study: Dalaki watershed river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sabziparvar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood is known as one of the most distractive natural disaster worldwide. Therefore, its prediction is of great importance from the socio-economical point of view. Despite the great improvement in computational techniques and numerical weather prediction approaches, so far, in Iran, an acceptable flood prediction method has not yet been introduced. The main aim of this study is to recognize and classify the patterns of synoptic systems leading to torrential rainfalls in a watershed basin located in south-west of Iran. In this research, 20 major floods characterized by high rainfall intensities and severe damage were selected. The pattern, extension, and the direction of movement of the selected synoptic maps from surface to 500 hPa pressure levels were identified. Furthermore, the position of cyclones, anti-cyclones and mid-level trough lines were carefully tracked and classified into different groups. The results show that the major severe floods occurring in Dalaki watershed river basin are mainly influenced by strengthening of the center of Sudan heat low (SHL and the coincidence moisture feeding by the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. It was found that simultaneous merging of the SHL system and Mediterranean frontal system would intensify the flood intensities over the basin. The mean positions of high pressures, low pressures, the Red Sea trough lines and 1015 hPa isobars of the major floods are also discussed.

  14. Assessment of erosion hazard with the USLE and GIS: A case study of the Upper Ewaso Ng'iro North basin of Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mati, Bancy M.; Morgan, Royston PC; Gichuki, Francis N.; Quinton, John N.; Brewer, Tim R.; Liniger, Hans P.

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was used to predict soil erosion hazard in the Upper Ewaso Ng'iro North basin of Kenya using data from erosion plots and reconnaissance surveys. The R-factor (rainfall erosivity) was determined by extrapolation from the rainfall amount-erosivity relationship, using data from autographic records. The K-factor (soil erodibility) was determined using data obtained by laboratory analysis of soil samples collected from 83 test sites in the basin. The LS-factors (slope length and steepness) were determined from a digital elevation model (DEM) of the basin, while the C-factor (crop and management) was determined from vegetation cover data, obtained from SPOT imagery and field surveys. The P-factor (conservation practice) was estimated from maps of soil conservation, obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture. A raster-based Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to interactively calculate soil loss and map erosion hazard. The results obtained were comparable to measured soil loss values from erosion plots. About 36 percent of the Upper Ewaso Ng'iro basin was predicted to have high risk of erosion, most of this land being in the overgrazed rangelands. Land use and management were the major factors associated with soil erosion, and — to a lesser extent — the topography. Due to the reconnaissance scale of this study there were limitations in determining reliable LS, C and P factors for the USLE. In addition, there is a need for research to determine appropriate P-factors for local soil conservation practices, such as trash lines, fanya-juu terraces and stone lines.

  15. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  16. ALLUVIUM RUNOFF STUDY IN GILORT HYDROGRAPHIC BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRIGORE CIOCĂZAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aims the characterization of the solid runoff in the Gilort hydrographic basin, analyzing the variations in time (for the period 1982-2007 and in space (for the three major relief units in the basin of this parameter. The data came from the three hydrometric stations where are performed the measurements for the alluvium runoff: Ciocadia, Târgu-Cărbuneşti (Gilort river and Turburea.

  17. Integrating Global Satellite-Derived Data Products as a Pre-Analysis for Hydrological Modelling Studies: A Case Study for the Red River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Gijs Simons; Wim Bastiaanssen; Le An Ngô; Christopher R. Hain; Martha Anderson; Gabriel Senay

    2016-01-01

    With changes in weather patterns and intensifying anthropogenic water use, there is an increasing need for spatio-temporal information on water fluxes and stocks in river basins. The assortment of satellite-derived open-access information sources on rainfall (P) and land use/land cover (LULC) is currently being expanded with the application of actual evapotranspiration (ETact) algorithms on the global scale. We demonstrate how global remotely sensed P and ETact datasets can be merged to exami...

  18. Transient dynamics study on casing deformation resulted from lost circulation in low-pressure formation in the Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of completion of an ultra-deep well newly drilled in the Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin, long-section and large-scale deformation occurred in the heavy casing section and nickel base alloy casing section of the sealing Triassic limestone interval, so a new hole had to be sidetracked, which impels us to rediscover the applicability of conventional drilling and completion technology in ultra-deep wells. In this paper, based on the borehole condition and field operation data of this well, the borehole pressure field variation initiated by lost circulation in the low-pressure formation was analyzed from the perspective of dynamics, then, the variation pattern of differential pressure inside and outside the well bore at different time intervals was depicted, and the primary cause of such complication was theoretically revealed, i.e., the pressure wave generated by instant lost circulation in low-pressure formation would result in redistribution of pressure inside the downhole confined space, and then the crush of casing in the vicinity of local low-pressure areas. Pertinent proposals for avoiding these kinds of engineering complexities were put forward: ① when downhole sealing casing operation is conducted in open hole completion, liner completion or perforated hole, the potential damage of lost circulation to casing should be considered; ② the downhole sealing point and sealing mode should be selected cautiously: the sealing point had better be selected in the section with good cementing quality or as close to the casing shoe as possible, and the sealing mode can be either cement plug or mechanical bridge plug. This paper finally points out that good cementing quality plays an important role in preventing this type of casing deformation.

  19. An integrated study of fluid–rock interaction in a CO2-based enhanced geothermal system: A case study of Songliao Basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We evaluated the interactions between rock, brine, and CO2 in CO2-EGS using laboratory experiments. • We examined changes of the dissolved ionic composition of the solution. • Minerals dissolve (feldspar and calcite) or precipitate (secondly carbonates). • We used numerical simulations to reproduce chemical processes of CO2-EGS. • Numerical simulations were generally consistent with experimental results. - Abstract: The reactive behavior of a mixture of supercritical CO2 and brine under physical–chemical conditions relevant to the CO2-based Enhanced Geothermal System (CO2-EGS) is largely unknown. Thus, laboratory experiments and numerical simulations were employed in this study to investigate the fluid–rock interaction occurring in the CO2-EGS. Rock samples and thermal–physical conditions specific to the Yingcheng Formation of Songliao Basin, China, an EGS research site, were used. Experiments were conducted by using of reactors at high temperature and pressure. Six batch reaction experiments injected with supercritical CO2 were designed at temperatures of 150–170 °C and a pressure of 35 MPa. Moreover, a separate experiment at the same experimental conditions without injection of CO2 was also conducted for comparison. Analyses of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the resulting solids were conducted to characterize changes in mineral phases. Numerical simulations were also performed under the same conditions as those used in the experiments. Significant mineral alterations were detected at the CO2-EGS reservoir, which may change the properties of fluid flow. The presence of supercritical CO2 led to an dissolution of primary minerals such as calcite and K-feldspar and precipitations of secondary carbonate such as calcite and ankerite. The numerical simulations were generally consistent with laboratory experiments, which provide a tool for scaling the time up for long period of reservoir simulations. The

  20. Basin-scale characterization of river hydromorphology by map derived information: A case study on the Red River (Sông Hông), Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R. J.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of river hydromorphological processes has been recognized in the last decades as a priority of modern catchment management, since fluvial geomorphic processes shape physical habitat, affect river infrastructures and influence freshwater ecological processes. Characterization of river hydromorphological features is commonly location specific and highly demanding in terms of field-works, resource and expertise required. Therefore, its routine application at regional or national scales, although an urgent need of catchment management, is infeasible at present. Recently available high-resolution data, such as DEM or LIDAR, opens up novel potential for basin-wide analysis of fluvial processes at limited effort and cost. Specifically, in this study we assess the feasibility of characterizing river hydromorphology from specific map derived geomorphic controls namely: channel gradient, bankfull flow, specific stream power, and degree of channel confinement. The river network, extracted from a digital elevation model and validated with available network shape-files and optical satellite imagery, available flow gauging stations and GIS processing allow producing continuous values of geomorphic drivers defined over given length segments at catchment or regional scales. This generic framework was applied to the Red River (Sông Hông) basin, the second largest basin (87,800 km2) in Vietnam. Besides its economic importance, the river since few years is experiencing severe river bed incisions due to the building of new dams in the upstream part of the catchment and sand mining in the surrounding of the capital city Hanoi. In this context, characterized by an high developing rate, current efforts to increase water productivity by infrastructure and management measures require a thorough understanding of fluvial system and, in particular, of the basin-wide river hydromorphology. The framework proposed has allowed producing high-dimensional samples of spatially

  1. The Roussillon Basin (S. France): A case-study to distinguish local and regional events between 6 and 3 Ma

    OpenAIRE

    Clauzon, Georges; Le Strat, Paul; Duvail, Cédric; Do Couto, Damien; Suc, Jean-Pierre; Molliex, Stéphane; Bache, François; Besson, David; Lindsay, Everett H.; Opdyke, Neil D.; Rubino, Jean-Loup; Popescu, Speranta-Maria; Haq, Bilal U.; Gorini, Christian

    2015-01-01

    International audience The Roussillon Basin is a non-silled Miocene sedimentary basin filling a late Oligocene–early Miocene graben. The basin was intensively impacted by the 2 Messinian fluvial erosion, as evidenced in exposed sections, in seismic profiles and in deep boreholes drilled for hydrocarbon exploration. As the basin was open to the Mediterranean Sea, the huge drop in sea level at the peak of the Messinian Salinity Crisis is clearly recorded, along with the subsequent sudden mar...

  2. Rock physical properties of Mesozoic basins on the periphery of Songliao Basin-a case study of Tuquan basin and Wulangai basin%松辽盆地外围中生代盆地的岩石物性——以突泉盆地和乌兰盖盆地为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟清; 方慧; 李晓昌; 袁永真; 刘畅往; 高保屯; 卢景奇

    2013-01-01

    Through collecting specimens and testing the density,magnetic susceptibility,residual magnetism and resistivity of rocks,the authors found that,during the evaluation of hydrocarbon resources in the oil-gas bearing basin,the real rock physical properties of the exploration targets,especially the electrical parameters,can hardly be obtained by testing specimens conventionally,because the rocks contain too much mudstone and carbonaceous matters.A comparison of the near-well logging model with core and logging curve shows that the near-well sounding technology is an effective method for obtaining the real resistivity value.In combination with physical properties data available,the physical properties of strata and rocks in Wulangai basin and Tuquan basin were arranged statistically,and the histogram of the main strata and physical properties of the study area was established.In addition,the petrophysical characteristics of strata and rocks in the basins were analyzed.The results can provide the basic information for non-seismic geophysical measurements in this area.%系统采集突泉盆地、乌兰盖盆地的地层岩石物性标本,测试了密度、磁化率、剩磁及电阻率.研究发现,由于含油气盆地勘探目标层往往含泥质、炭质成分较多,采用常规的物性标本测试方法很难获得这类地层岩石真实的物性参数,特别是电性参数.通过井旁测井模型与岩心及测井曲线对比,证明井旁测深技术是一种获取地层电性参数的有效方法.结合前人物性研究资料与本次工作结果,系统地整理了突泉盆地、乌兰盖盆地地层岩石物性参数,建立了主要地层-物性柱,分析了盆地的地层岩石物性特征,为在该地区开展非震地球物理测量提供了基础性资料.

  3. Twenty-year advanced DInSAR analysis of severe land subsidence: The Alto Guadalentín Basin (Spain) case study

    OpenAIRE

    Bonì, Roberta; Herrera García, Gerardo; Meisina, Claudia; Notti, Davide; Béjar Pizarro, Marta; Zucca, Francesco; González, Pablo J.; Palano, Mimmo; Tomás Jover, Roberto; Fernández Torres, José; Fernández-Merodo, José Antonio; Mulas de la Peña, Joaquín; Aragón, Ramón; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Mora, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    A twenty-year period of severe land subsidence evolution in the Alto Guadalentín Basin (southeast Spain) is monitored using multi-sensor SAR images, processed by advanced differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) techniques. The SAR images used in this study consist of four datasets acquired by ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, ALOS and COSMO-SkyMed satellites between 1992 and 2012. The integration of ground surface displacement maps retrieved for different time periods allows us to quan...

  4. California Basin Studies (CaBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The California Continental Borderland's present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 106 years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 106 years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation

  5. Prediction of Ungauged River Basin for Hydro Power Potential and Flood Risk Mitigation; a Case Study at Gin River, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    The most of the primary civilizations of the world emerged in or near river valleys or floodplains. The river channels and floodplains are single hydrologic and geomorphic system. The failure to appreciate the integral connection between floodplains and channel underlies many socioeconomic and environmental problems in river management today. However it is a difficult task of collecting reliable field hydrological data. Under such situations either synthetic or statistically generated data were used for hydraulic engineering designing and flood modeling. The fundamentals of precipitation-runoff relationship through synthetic unit hydrograph for Gin River basin were prepared using the method of the Flood Studies Report of the National Environmental Research Council, United Kingdom (1975). The Triangular Irregular Network model was constructed using Geographic Information System (GIS) to determine hazard prone zones. The 1:10,000 and 1:50,000 topography maps and field excursions were also used for initial site selection of mini-hydro power units and determine flooding area. The turbines output power generations were calculated using the parameters of net head and efficiency of turbine. The peak discharge achieves within 4.74 hours from the onset of the rainstorm and 11.95 hours time takes to reach its normal discharge conditions of Gin River basin. Stream frequency of Gin River is 4.56 (Junctions/ km2) while the channel slope is 7.90 (m/km). The regional coefficient on the catchment is 0.00296. Higher stream frequency and gentle channel slope were recognized as the flood triggering factors of Gin River basin and other parameters such as basins catchment area, main stream length, standard average annual rainfall and soil do not show any significant variations with other catchments of Sri Lanka. The flood management process, including control of flood disaster, prepared for a flood, and minimize it impacts are complicated in human population encroached and modified

  6. Water Footprint Calculation on the Basis of Input–Output Analysis and a Biproportional Algorithm: A Case Study for the Yellow River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Yellow River basin, China, ecosystems suffer from the overexploitation and utilization of water resources, resulting in various environmental impacts. Consideration must be given to both human and ecosystem water requirements in water resources management. A water footprint (WF is a tool for estimating industrial, agricultural, commercial and household water requirements and for examining the impact of consumption on water resources. The study attempts to establish an approach to analyse the dynamic processes and driving forces that result in certain WFs. Using input–output tables for provinces and municipalities, we calculate water use coefficients, the total WF and the net external WF of consumption in China’s Yellow River Basin. A biproportional algorithm is employed to revise the input–output tables for analysing the temporal dynamics of the WF. The factor analysis and linear regression were used to analyse the main influencing factors of WF. Results indicate that the coefficient for water use by primary industries is highest and that coefficients for provincial water use differ significantly. Second, household consumption and residuals from capital accumulation constituted approximately half of the total WF of the Yellow River basin in 2002 and also differed significantly among provinces. Third, the ratio of the net external WF to the total WF increased, and the ratio of final consumption to the total WF declined during the period examined. Fourth, output by secondary industries correlated most strongly with the WF, followed by area under irrigation, per capita meat consumption, water consumption per 10,000-yuan increase in added value and population.

  7. Potential impacts of climate warming on runoff from snowmelt: a case study of two mountainous basins in the Upper Rio Grande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Steele, C. M.; Elias, E.; Mejia, J.; Fernald, A.

    2013-12-01

    We used historical climate, snow cover and streamflow data in the Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM) to drive simulations of runoff from two mountainous basins in the Upper Rio Grande. The basins selected for this study are El Rito and Santa Fe. With climate warming, both have been shown to be at risk of losing annual snowpack and the associated peak in the spring hydrograph caused by snowmelt. Historical flow simulations supplied model parameters specific to each basin (runoff coefficients, degree day factors, temperature lapse rates, critical temperature and recession coefficients). These parameters were then used in applying SRM under changed climate conditions (scenario A2, ECHAM-5 general circulation model, 2046-2100). Although there is some interannual variability, under the A2 scenario the SRM simulations imply (i) a profound loss of annual snowpack at all but the highest elevations; (ii) decline in springtime streamflow (fraction of flow occurring between April and July) and (iii) earlier occurrence of winter-spring center of volume (half total runoff volume for January 1 to May 31). Our results have profound implications for the rural acequia community in El Rito for whom the annual snowpack acts as a natural reservoir releasing water to the acequias (irrigation canals) concurrent with the beginning of the growing season. In El Rito, the only alternative to water from snowmelt runoff is groundwater, but this source of water will also be affected by the accumulation, quantity and duration of annual snowpack. With two reservoirs, the urban area of Santa Fe is less dependent on the timing of snowmelt than El Rito. Additionally, Santa Fe has access to alternate sources of surface water (e.g., from the San Juan-Chama Project). Nevertheless, climate-change induced scarcity of water throughout the region will also have important socio-economic and political impacts on the City of Santa Fe.

  8. Identifying potential areas for biofuel production and evaluating the environmental effects: a case study of the James River Basin in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shu-Guang; Li, Zhengpeng

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are now an important resource in the United States because of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Both increased corn growth for ethanol production and perennial dedicated energy crop growth for cellulosic feedstocks are potential sources to meet the rising demand for biofuels. However, these measures may cause adverse environmental consequences that are not yet fully understood. This study 1) evaluates the long-term impacts of increased frequency of corn in the crop rotation system on water quantity and quality as well as soil fertility in the James River Basin and 2) identifies potential grasslands for cultivating bioenergy crops (e.g. switchgrass), estimating the water quality impacts. We selected the soil and water assessment tool, a physically based multidisciplinary model, as the modeling approach to simulate a series of biofuel production scenarios involving crop rotation and land cover changes. The model simulations with different crop rotation scenarios indicate that decreases in water yield and soil nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) concentration along with an increase in NO3-N load to stream water could justify serious concerns regarding increased corn rotations in this basin. Simulations with land cover change scenarios helped us spatially classify the grasslands in terms of biomass productivity and nitrogen loads, and we further derived the relationship of biomass production targets and the resulting nitrogen loads against switchgrass planting acreages. The suggested economically efficient (planting acreage) and environmentally friendly (water quality) planting locations and acreages can be a valuable guide for cultivating switchgrass in this basin. This information, along with the projected environmental costs (i.e. reduced water yield and increased nitrogen load), can contribute to decision support tools for land managers to seek the sustainability of biofuel development in this region.

  9. Land-use effects on erosion, sediment yields, and reservoir sedimentation: a case study in the Lago Loiza Basin, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, A.C.; Webb, R.M.T.; McIntyre, S.C.; Wolfe, W.J.

    2006-01-01

     Lago Loíza impounded in 1953 to supply San Juan, Puerto Rico, with drinking water; by 1994, it had lost 47% of its capacity. To characterize sedimentation in Lago Loíza, a study combining land-use history, hillslope erosion rates, and subbasin sediment yields was conducted. Sedimentation rates during the early part of the reservoir’s operation (1953– 1963) were slightly higher than the rates during 1964–1990. In the early history of the reservoir, cropland comprised 48% of the basin and erosion rates were high. Following economic shifts during the 1960s, cropland was abandoned and replaced by forest, which increased from 7.6% in 1950 to 20.6% in 1987. These land-use changes follow a pattern similar to the northeastern United States. Population in the Lago Loíza Basin increased 77% from 1950 to 1990, and housing units increased 194%. Sheetwash erosion measured from 1991 to 1993 showed construction sites had the highest sediment concentration (61,400 ppm), followed by cropland (47,400 ppm), pasture (3510 ppm), and forest (2050 ppm). This study illustrates how a variety of tools and approaches can be used to understand the complex interaction between land use, upland erosion, fluvial sediment transport and storage, and reservoir sedimentation. 

  10. Influence of Hydrological Model Selection on Simulation of Moderate and Extreme Flow Events: A Case Study of the Blue Nile Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Onyutha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hydrological models were applied based on data from the Blue Nile Basin. Optimal parameters of each model were obtained by automatic calibration. Model performance was tested under both moderate and extreme flow conditions. Extreme events for the model performance evaluation were extracted based on seven criteria. Apart from graphical techniques, there were nine statistical “goodness-of-fit” metrics used to judge the model performance. It was found that whereas the influence of model selection may be minimal in the simulation of normal flow events, it can lead to large under- and/or overestimations of extreme events. Besides, the selection of the best model for extreme events may be influenced by the choice of the statistical “goodness-of-fit” measures as well as the criteria for extraction of high and low flows. It was noted that the use of overall water-balance-based objective function not only is suitable for moderate flow conditions but also influences the models to perform better for high flows than low flows. Thus, the choice of a particular model is recommended to be made on a case by case basis with respect to the objectives of the modeling as well as the results from evaluation of the intermodel differences.

  11. Modelling the flood-risk extent using LISFLOOD-FP in a complex watershed: case study of Mundeni Aru River Basin, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, G.; Umer, Y. M.; Alahacoon, N.; Inada, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Flood management is adopting a more risk-based approach, whereby flood risk is the product of the probability and consequences of flooding. Two-dimensional flood inundation modeling is a widely used tool to aid flood-risk management. The aim of this study is to develop a flood inundation model that uses historical flow data to produce flood-risk maps, which will help to identify flood protection measures in the rural areas of Sri Lanka. The LISFLOOD-FP model was developed at the basin scale using available historical data, and also through coupling with a hydrological modelling system, to map the inundation extent and depth. Results from the flood inundation model were evaluated using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images to assess product accuracy. The impacts of flooding on agriculture and livelihoods were analyzed to assess the flood risks. It was identified that most of the areas under paddy cultivation that were located near the middle and downstream part of the river basin are more susceptible to flood risks. This paper also proposes potential countermeasures for future natural disasters to prevent and mitigate possible damages.

  12. Integrating Spatial Land Use Analysis and Mathematical Material Flow Analysis for Nutrient Management: A Case Study of the Bang Pakong River Basin in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupkanchanakul, Wallapa; Kwonpongsagoon, Suphaphat; Bader, Hans-Peter; Scheidegger, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    Rivers in developing and emerging countries often lack good water quality. Tools to assess the water quality in rivers, including identification of possible sources of pollution, are therefore of increasing importance. The aim of this study is to apply mathematical material flow and spatial land use analyses to identify and geographically locate the main nitrogen and phosphorus sources and processes in Bang Pakong Basin (BPB). Potential measures to mitigate the nitrogen and phosphorus loads to the water system can then be efficiently evaluated. The combination of these two methods reveals the overall nutrient load as well as local "hot spots." This allows possible mitigation measures to be discussed with regard to their spatial location. This approach goes beyond previous work in which mathematical material flow analysis was shown to be a useful tool to investigate sources of nutrients regardless of their location. The results show that the main sources contributing nutrients to waterways are aquaculture, such as shrimp, tilapia, catfish, and sea bass farming, as well as rice paddies along the main river. Additional sources contributing nutrients to this basin are field crops, livestock, aquaculture, households, and industry. High levels of nutrient inflows come from feeds and fertilizers through aquaculture and rice cultivation. The excess nutrients run into the waterways by direct discharge from aquaculture and runoff processes from rice paddies. Scenario analysis shows that management practices for aquaculture, rice, pig, and poultry farming are key drivers for reducing nutrients in the BPB.

  13. Genesis Analysis of High-Gamma Ray Sandstone Reservoir and Its Log Evaluation Techniques: A Case Study from the Junggar Basin, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Junggar basin, northwest China, many high gamma-ray (GR sandstone reservoirs are found and routinely interpreted as mudstone non-reservoirs, with negative implications for the exploration and exploitation of oil and gas. Then, the high GR sandstone reservoirs’ recognition principles, genesis, and log evaluation techniques are systematically studied. Studies show that the sandstone reservoirs with apparent shale content greater than 50% and GR value higher than 110API can be regarded as high GR sandstone reservoir. The high GR sandstone reservoir is mainly and directly caused by abnormally high uranium enrichment, but not the tuff, feldspar or clay mineral. Affected by formation’s high water sensitivity and poor borehole quality, the conventional logs can not recognize reservoir and evaluate the physical property of reservoirs. Then, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR logs is proposed and proved to be useful in reservoir recognition and physical property evaluation.

  14. Applicability of Doppler weather radar based rainfall data for runoff estimation in Indian watersheds – A case study of Chennai basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Josephine; B V Mudgal; S B Thampi

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, India has been vulnerable to various hazards such as floods, droughts and cyclones. About 8% of the total Indian landmass is prone to cyclones. A number of Doppler weather radars are installed in India and their products are utilized for weather predictions and detection of cyclones approaching the Indian coast. Radar-based hydrological studies in various countries have proven that computation of runoff using radar rainfall data could outperform rain gauge network measurements. There are no reported studies on their utilization for hydrological modelling and/or flood-related studies in Indian river basins. A comparison study between Doppler weather radar (DWR) derived rainfall data and the conventional rain gauge data was carried out with hourly inputs at one of the watersheds of Chennai basin, Tamil Nadu, India using HEC-HMS model. The model calibration and validation were performed by comparing the simulated outflow with the observed daily outflow data. The calibrated model was used to predict runoff from two post-monsoon cyclonic storm events with hourly inputs. It was noticed that the discrepancy in the runoff volume was small, but the difference in the peak flow was substantial. Additionally, there was a variation at the time to peak flow using daily and hourly inputs. The results show that the use of radar data may be optional for runoff volume estimation for the watersheds with sufficient rain gauge density, but highly desirable for peak flow and time to peak estimation. Therefore, the DWR derived rainfall data is a promising input for runoff estimation, especially in urban flood modelling.

  15. Structural and morphological characterization of active intermontane basins: a case of the Gubbio captured basin (Umbria Pre-Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavitolo, Paolo; Menichetti, Marco; Nesci, Olivia; Savelli, Daniele; Troiani, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Intermontane basins characterize many orogenic chains, where they are originated either by crustal stretching or gravitational collapse of the axial zones of the chain. Extensional and/or transtensional mechanisms generate structures with geometries controlled by fault-bounded depressed areas, which in some cases are seismogenetic. The western sector of the Northern Apennines in Central Italy is characterized by several intermontane basins filled by continental Plio-Pleistocene sediments. At present, a few of these basins are depressed endorheic areas, whereas most of them have been captured by river upstream erosion. The morphotectonic characterization at both regional and local scale of these structures is crucial considering the associated geological hazards due to clustered seismicity and seismic-related slope-instability along the basin-margins. This work presents a multi-disciplinary approach based on new and existing data to define the structural geometries, landforms and processes related to the genesis and the morphoevolution of the intermountain valleys/captured-basins in Central Italy. Quantitative geomorphological analyses from Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) are compared with geological and structural data and with geophysical investigations of active and sismogenetic faults bordering the Gubbio valley in the Umbria Pre-Apennines in central Italy. This 4 km-wide valley extends for ca. 20 km in NW-SE direction and is bounded along the NE margin by a SW-dipping listric normal fault with an offset of 1500 m. The area locates along one of the main seismogenic portion of the Apennine chain and recorded historical (i.e., April 29, 1984: Ms 5.3) and many instrumental earthquakes. In this study, new data on the slope-instability along the basin-margins and the influence of active tectonics and gravitational phenomena on the streams incision and aggradation are also provided.

  16. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Carmona

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a 3-D generalization of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E, potential evapotranspiration (Ep and precipitation (P. For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E/P, Φ = Ep/P and Ω = E/Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep/P → 0 at E/Ep = 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = k Φe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93. This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space–time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by linking spatial patterns of the power

  17. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies a 3-D state space representation of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E ⁄ P, Φ = Ep ⁄ P and Ω = E ⁄ Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep ⁄ P = 0 when E ⁄ Ep → 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = kΦe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by linking spatial

  18. The challenges of catchment hydrological modelling in the Himalayan region: a case study from the Dudh Kosi River basin of Eastern Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Santosh; Bajracharya, Sagar R.; Shea, Joseph; Wahid, Shahriar M.; Shrestha, Arun B.; Flügel, Wolfgang-Albert

    2014-05-01

    Catchment-scale hydrological modelling in the Himalayan region suffers from multiple issues that affect our ability to represent the hydrological dynamics of a river system. Due to a lack of monitoring infrastructure, especially in the high-altitude areas, the spatial distribution of precipitation is essentially unknown. Therefore, the regionalization of precipitation in river basins is a challenging task that has implications in the modelling approach at different levels. This paper explores the uncertainty in modelled discharge using different precipitation input datasets in the glaciated catchment of the Dudh Kosi River basin in Eastern Nepal (3712 km2). The basin hosts some of the world's highest mountain peaks, including Mt Everest. Six precipitation stations, which cover mostly the lowland area of the basin, give a station density of one station per 618 km2. First, we examine precipitation dynamics in the study area based on the observed data. Second, the process-oriented distributed J2000 hydrological model is applied in the Dudh Kosi River basin. Third, the model is run with APHRODITE-(V1003R1), CPC-RFE-(2.0) and TRMM-(V7) precipitation products to compare observed and modelled discharge. Nearly 82% of the precipitation occurs during the monsoon season (June - September), and the limited station observations suggest that there is non-uniform distribution of precipitation in which the underlying topography has a great influence. The maximum precipitation occurred at the station which is located on the middle hills region, followed by the station located at the foothills of the Higher Himalaya. Compared to the observed precipitation, the TRMM product is found to be 7% less than the observed data, whereas the other two products were up to 35% less. The model was applied with the six stations data and the regionalization was carried out using Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method to simulate the hydrograph. The model was first applied between 1985-1997 in

  19. Use of the 137Cs technique in soil-erosion investigations: A case study in the Zitouna basin in the north of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesium-137 is a useful radionuclide for obtaining estimates of soil loss caused by erosion over a relatively long period of time (about 35 years). This artificial radionuclide was derived from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and was strongly adsorbed by fine soil particles. The measurement of the 137Cs inventory (in Bq·m-2) allows rates of soil erosion and deposition to be determined. The 137Cs technique has been successfully applied in a wide range of environments and locations, particularly in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. In this study, the technique was applied in Morocco to fields in the Zitouna basin located in the vicinity of El Hoceima. The results confirmed the potential for using the 137Cs technique in Morocco, but also identified some limitations and constraints due to local conditions. (author)

  20. Use of the 137 Cs technique in soil-erosion investigations: A case study in the Zitouna Basin in the north of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesium-137 is a useful radionuclide for obtaining estimates of soil loss caused by erosion over a relatively long period of time (about 35 years). This artificial radionuclide was derived from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and was strongly adsorbed by fine soil particles. The measurement of the 137Cs inventory (in B m-2) allows rates of soil erosion and deposition to be determined. The 137Cs technique has been successfully applied in a wide range of environments and locations, particularly in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. In this study, the technique was applied in Morocco to fields in the Zitouna basin located in the vicinity of El Hoceima. The results confirmed the potential for using the 137Cs technique in Morocco, but also identified some limitations and constraints due to local conditions. (author)

  1. A study of benefits compensation mechanism for agricultural water rights trading under the restriction of ecological reconstruction: case study of Shiyang River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural water allocation system based on priority rights has caused regional conJtiets and downstream ecological degradation.It is the urgent need to introduce the concept of the initial water rights and establish benefits compensation mechanism to resolve such problems.This paper takes the Shivang River basin as an example to calculate the opportunity cost of 0.97×108m3 of agricultural water encroached by the middle reach based on initial water right allocation system under which water is allocated in accordance with the ratio between agricultural population of two different regions concerning the downstream ecological reconstruction needs with Bio-economic model (BEM).The results suggest that the total economic loss of Minqin County for ecological econstruction amounts to 2.57×108 yuan,of which 1.68×108 yuan is ecological compensation,representing the economic loss Minqin suffered for ecological reconstruction which should burden beneficial groups of eeological reconstruction and 0.89×108 yuan is the economic loss Minqin suffered due to Liangzhou's encroachment behavior which should be compensated by Liangzhou.

  2. Sarmatian vertebrate marine fauna assemblage from Dacian Basin with Paratethyan affinities - a comparative case study between Buzau Land (Carpathian Foredeep) and South Dobrogea, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftode, Silvia Gabriela; Stoica, Marius

    2015-04-01

    At the Badenian/Sarmatian boundary (12.7 Ma), the Paratethys domain experienced a new moment in its evolution. Restricted connections between the Paratethys and the open seas (Mediterranean or/alternatively Indian Ocean) that occured at this boundary interval led to the decreasing of water salinity, strong faunal endemism and the onset of anoxic/disoxic conditions in the internal parts of Paratethyan Basins (like the actual Black Sea). The low oxigen bottom conditions in the Volhynian - Early Bessarabian favorised the preservation of fish and mammal marine fauna like Cetaceans, Pinnipeds and Sirenids. The purpose of this study is to compare both areas - Buzău Land and South Dobrogea, Romania taking into account the palaecological changes in the Eastern Paratethys Basin. This aspect can be very well noticed in the Carpathian Foredeep zone (Buzău - Rîmnicului - Milcov Valleys, Buzău Land) where fish and cetaceans (Cetotherium sp.) remains are frequent in thick sandstone and blackish shale deposits. Several terrestrial mammal remains were also found in Kherssonian (the late Sarmatian - senso lato) terrestrial deposits, related to a regressive moment. In South Dobrogea we have studied Lower Bessarabian deposits formed in shallow marginal facies, close to the shoreline or around small islands. The littoral sandy facies preserved a rich fossil assemblage composed of seal and marine birds remains. Vertebrate marine fauna dominated by pinnipeds - Phoca pontica, cetaceans - Delphinidae, Cetotheriidae, teleost fish and pelagic birds were also found near Credința and Ciobănița localities. Based on the fossil assemblage found so far in the Lower Bessarabian formations from Buzău Land and South Dobrogea, the environments were similar in both areas. Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from EEA Financial Mecanism 2009 - 2014 under the GeoSust project contract no 22 SEE/30.06.2014.

  3. Measurements and modelling of evapotransiration to assess agricultural water productivity in basins with changing land use patterns : a case study in the São Francisco River basin, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Teixeira, de, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Key words: Vineyards, mango, energy balance, evapotranspiration, water productivity, Bowen ratio, eddy correlation, water balance, natural vegetation, latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, biomass, water productivity, remote sensing, water management. . The São Francisco River basin in Brazil is marked by socio-eco¬nomic disparities and environmental vulnerabilities. Water managers in the semi-arid region of the basin are faced with several challenges, such as competition among different wate...

  4. The role of deuterium excess in determining the water salinisation mechanism: A case study of the arid Tarim River Basin, NW China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the water salinisation mechanism is the basis for regional salt management. Mineral dissolution, evaporation and transpiration are the main factors controlling natural water salinity in arid inland basins; however, the two are difficult to differentiate. Because deuterium excess decreases during evaporation and is unrelated to the isotopic composition of the initial water, it is a potential tool for determining the contribution of the evapoconcentration of a given water body using the relationship between deuterium excess and salinity rather than between δ18O (or δ2H) and salinity. In this paper, the relationship between the residual water fraction and deuterium excess was derived from the Rayleigh distillation equation. The contribution of evapoconcentration and mineral dissolution and/or transpiration for a given water body can be determined by comparing the residual water fraction and salinity between the initial water and the evapoconcentrated water. The extremely arid Tarim River Basin in NW China is taken as an example to demonstrate deuterium excess and salinity evolution from the source stream to river water, lake/reservoir water and groundwater. The results show that mineral dissolution contributes most of the salinity (67–77%) for Boston Lake and the Kongque and Tarim rivers relative to the source stream. Mineral dissolution and/or transpiration contribute greater salinity (73–99.6%) to the groundwater recharged by the river water in the middle and lower reaches of the Tarim River. The study provides a method for determining the salinisation mechanism and is important for salt movement and management.

  5. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  6. Identification of spatiotemporal patterns of biophysical droughts in semi-arid region - a case study of the Karkheh river basin in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, B.; Abbaspour, K. C.; Lehmann, A.; Wehrli, B.; Yang, H.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims at identifying historical patterns of meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural (inclusively biophysical) droughts in the Karkheh River Basin (KRB), one of the nine benchmark watersheds of the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food. Standardized precipitation index (SPI), standardized runoff index (SRI), and soil moisture deficit index (SMDI) were used to represent the above three types of droughts, respectively. The three drought indices were compared across temporal and spatial dimensions. Variables required for calculating the indices were obtained from the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) constructed for the region. The model was calibrated based on monthly runoff and yearly wheat yield using the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) algorithm. Five meteorological drought events were identified in the studied period (1980-2004), of which four corresponded with the hydrological droughts with 1-3 month lag. The meteorological droughts corresponded well with the agricultural droughts during dry months (May-August), while the latter lasted for a longer period of time. Analysis of drought patterns showed that southern parts of the catchment were more prone to agricultural drought, while less influenced by hydrological drought. Our analyses highlighted the necessity for monitoring all three aspects of drought for a more effective watershed management. The analysis on different types of droughts in this study provides a framework for assessing their possible impacts under future climate change in semi-arid areas.

  7. Integrated Groundwater Resources Management Using the DPSIR Approach in a GIS Environment Context: A Case Study from the Gallikos River Basin, North Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Christos Mattas; Konstantinos S. Voudouris; Andreas Panagopoulos

    2014-01-01

    The Gallikos River basin is located in the northern part of Greece, and the coastal section is part of a deltaic system. The basin has been influenced by anthropogenic activities during the last decades, leading to continuous water resource degradation. The holistic approach of the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR) framework was applied in order to investigate the main causes and origins of pressures and to optimize the measures for sustainable management of water resources. The ...

  8. What are the gendered implications of neoliberal land grabs? A case study of Rufiji River Basin in Rufiji district, coast region in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mbezi, Rose George

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explores the gendered implications of the neoliberal land grab in Rufiji River basin in Tanzania. I set out to deconstruct the taken for granted assumptions concerning the state/legal approaches in the implementation of the neoliberal land grab, especially as how the grabs relate to the Warufiji gendered land relations as well as the multiple meanings of land in the basin. In the thesis I argue that most of the taken for granted Tanzanian government oriented neoliberal...

  9. Optimization of Coalbed Methane Completion Strategies, Selection Criteria and Production Prediction: A Case Study in Chinaâ s Qinshui Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Keim, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Advanced three-dimensional reservoir modeling was used to determine the optimum strategy for coalbed methane production in Chinaâ s Qinshui Basin. Multiple completion strategies were analyzed for pre-mining methane drainage on the bases of economic, environmental, and mining-safety-based factors. Effective degasification in the Qinshui Basin is crucial to enhance the health and safety of the underground mining workforce and to decrease carbon dioxide equivalent greenhouse gas emissions. A...

  10. Combining semi-distributed process-based and data-driven models in flow simulation: a case study of the Meuse river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Corzo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges in river flow simulation modelling is increasing the accuracy of forecasts. This paper explores the complementary use of data-driven models, e.g. artificial neural networks (ANN to improve the flow simulation accuracy of a semi-distributed process based model. The IHMS-HBV model of the Meuse river basin is used in this research. Two schemes are tested. The first one explores the replacement of sub-basin models by data-driven models. The second scheme is based on the replacement of the Muskingum-Cunge routing model, which integrates the multiple sub-basin models, by an ANN. The results showed that: (1 after a step-wise spatial replacement of sub-basin conceptual models by ANNs it is possible to increase the accuracy of the overall basin model; (2 there are time periods when low and high flow conditions are better represented by ANNs; and (3 the improvement in terms of RMSE obtained by using of ANNs is greater than that when using sub-basin replacements. It can be concluded that the presented two schemes based on the analysis of seasonal and spatial weakness of the process based models can improve performance of the process based models in the context of operational flow forecasting.

  11. Use of geochemical, isotopic, and age tracer data to develop models of groundwater flow: A case study of Gafsa mining basin-Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Younes; Ahmadi, Riadh; Demdoum, Abdeslam; Bouri, Salem; Gargouri, Imed; Ben Dhia, Hamed; Al-Gamal, Samir; Laouar, Rabah; Choura, Abedjabar

    2014-12-01

    Hydro-(major and trace elements: Cd, F and Sr), isotope (18O, 2H, 3H and 13C) geochemistry and radiogenic carbon (14C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were used to investigate the sources of groundwater contamination and the hydrodynamic functioning of the multilayer aquifer system in the mining Gafsa basin (Southwestern Tunisia). The groundwater of the study area is subject to intense exploitation to accommodate all the water demands of this arid area. The Gafsa basin contains a multi-layered aquifer with four principal levels: Upper Zebbag (Cenomanian-Turonian), Abiod (Campanien-Maastrichian), Beglia (Miocene) and Segui (Plio-Quaternary) Formations. The hydrogeology of this system is largely affected by tectonics (Gafsa-Tebessa, Sehib, Negrine-Tozeur, Tabeddit and Metlaoui faults…). The groundwater of these aquifers undergoes a significant decline in water level (≈0.5 m y-1), increasing salinity (TDS increase from 400 to 800-6000 mg l-1: generally, TDS increases from the mountainous regions towards the discharge area) due to a long time of aridity, irregular rainfall and overexploitation (irrigation and industrial activities). Groundwater pumped from the semi-confined Complex Terminal (C.T) aquifers (Cretaceous and Mio-Plio-Quaternary: MPQ) and from the confined Continental Intercalaire (C.I) aquifers is an important production factor in irrigated oases agriculture and phosphate washing in Southwestern Tunisia. A rise in the groundwater salinity has been observed as a consequence of increasing abstraction from the aquifer during the last few decades. The salinization phenomena in the region are complex. Several possible causes for salinization exist: (1) the upwelling of saline and "fossil" water from the underlying, confined "C.I" aquifer; (2) as well as the backflow of agricultural drainage water; (3) phosphate and domestic wastewater; (4) brine intrusion from the salt lake (Sebkha/Garaat); (5) evaporate meteoric water dams (El Khangua and El Oude

  12. Vertical distribution of agriculture crop residue burning aerosol observed by space-borne lidar CALIOP - A case study over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Shibata, T.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). It is also one of the main causes for dense atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) formation over South Asian region. Present study deals with spatial and vertical variability of aerosol optical and microphysical properties during the crop residue burning season (October and November) over the IGB. MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire location data and MODIS AOD data confirms the crop residue burning activities over irrigated cropland of the IGB during October and November, 2009. Large values (> 0.7) of MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) backscatter (>0.006 km-1 sr-1 below 1.0 km altitude) are suggesting enhanced atmospheric pollution associated with agriculture crop residue burning. The increase in tropospheric columnar NO2 and surface CO concentration during October and November also emphasized the significant contribution of crop residue burning activities in enhanced anthropogenic pollution over the IGB. Vertical distribution of backscatter coefficients showed trapping of biomass (crop residues) burning aerosol within boundary layer. Spatial variation of aerosol backscatter and AOD showed large value above north-west part of IGB, major area of crop residue burning activities. The results of this study will be very useful in quantification of optical properties of atmospheric brown clouds and its effect on climate.

  13. Land Capability Classification for Crop and Fruit Product Assessment Using GIS Technology. Case Study: The Niraj River Basin (Transylvania Depression, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Maria ROȘCA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficient capitalisation of agricultural land is dependent on determining the environmental suitability of the area and on identifying the most appropriate culture types for a particular terrain. Because of its complex landforms, the anthropic pressure and the irrational use of land on large surfaces, the Basin of Niraj River was the object of a reorganising process in the production activities, by emphasising the agricultural land use as a resource for sustainable development, which has been too long underexploited.  The technique of capability classification, in collaboration with the GIS techniques of spatial analysis, represents one of the most facile and concrete ways of identifying and creating an inventory of lands which fulfil the best conditions for the creation of orchards, through the use of specific indicators: climatic, morphometric, morphologic, pedologic. The present study created a new GIS model of spatial analysis, which could offer a new approach to the classical method of land capability classification. The identification of the areas which are suitable for fruit tree cultivation was based on this model by integrating the specific indicators into databases and GIS spatial analysis equations. The results of this study highlights the maps of the land favorability for apple trees, pear trees, plum trees, cherry trees, peach trees and apricot trees and a geodatabase materialization in the maps of quality classes for orchards.

  14. Determining the most suitable areas for artificial groundwater recharge via an integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in GIS environment (case study: Garabaygan Basin, Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hossein; Boloorani, Ali Darvishi; Sabokbar, Hassan Ali Faraji; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Hamzeh, Mohamad; Rafii, Yusef

    2013-01-01

    Flood spreading is a suitable strategy for controlling and benefiting from floods. Selecting suitable areas for flood spreading and directing the floodwater into permeable formations are amongst the most effective strategies in flood spreading projects. Having combined geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria decision analysis approaches, the present study sought to locate the most suitable areas for flood spreading operation in the Garabaygan Basin of Iran. To this end, the data layers relating to the eight effective factors were prepared in GIS environment. This stage was followed by elimination of the exclusionary areas for flood spreading while determining the potentially suitable ones. Having closely examined the potentially suitable areas using the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE) II and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods, the land suitability map for flood spreading was produced. The PROMETHEE II and AHP were used for ranking all the alternatives and weighting the criteria involved, respectively. The results of the study showed that most suitable areas for the artificial groundwater recharge are located in Quaternary Q(g) and Q(gsc) geologic units and in geomorphological units of pediment and Alluvial fans with slopes not exceeding 3%. Furthermore, significant correspondence between the produced map and the control areas, where the flood spreading projects were successfully performed, provided further evidence for the acceptable efficiency of the integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in locating suitable flood spreading areas. PMID:22402992

  15. A new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone: case study of middle Es3 member of Paleogene formation in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjie; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Biao; Sun, Xiaoming; Guo, Jigang

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and quantitatively defines the evolution process of porosity. This method is based on the principle that the present is the key to the past. We take the middle Es3 member in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, and Bohai Bay Basin as an example. The method used in this study considers the present porosity as a constraint condition, and the influences of both constructive diagenesis and destructive diagenesis to divide the porosity evolution process into two independent processes, namely porosity increase and porosity decrease. An evolution model of sandstone porosity can be established by combining both the pore increase and pore decrease effects. Our study reveals that the porosity decrease model is a continuous function of burial depth and burial time, whereas the porosity increase model mainly occurs in an acidified window for paleotemperature of 70°C to 90°C. The porosity evolution process can be divided into the following phases: normal compaction, acidification and pore increase, and post-acidification compaction. Thus, the porosity evolution model becomes a piecewise function of three subsections. Examples show that the method can be applied effectively in recovering the paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and simulating the porosity evolution process.

  16. Rock magnetic characteristics of faulted sediments with magnetic anomalies: A case study from the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V. J.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution airborne surveys in the Rio Grande rift have documented abundant short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies generated at faults within basin sediments. We present a rock magnetic study bearing on the source of a10-20-nT linear anomaly over the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in outcrop in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) values (SI vol) from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of Santa Fe Group and pre-rift sedimentary rocks juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault have lognormal distributions with well-defined means. These averages generally increase up section through eight map units: from 1.7E-4 to 2.2E-4 in the pre-rift Cretaceous and Eocene rocks, from 9.9E-4 to 1.2E-3 in three units of the Miocene Zia and Cerro Conejo Formations of the Santa Fe Group, and from 1.5E-3 to 3.5E-3 in three units of the Miocene-Pliocene Arroyo Ojito and Ceja Formations of the Santa Fe Group. Remanent magnetization is not important; Koenigsberger ratios are less than 0.3 for Santa Fe Group samples. Rock magnetic parameters (e.g., ARM/MS and S ratios) and petrography indicate that detrital magnetite content and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite are the predominant controls of magnetic property variations within the Santa Fe Group sediments. Magnetite is present in rounded detrital grains (including both homogeneous and subdivided types) and as fine inclusions in volcanic rock fragments. Santa Fe Group sediments with highest magnetic susceptibility have greatest magnetic-grain size as indicated by lowest ARM/MS ratios. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size to pebbly sand within the fluvial Arroyo Ojito Formation. In contrast, MS reaches highest values in fine to medium sands in eolian Zia Formation. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite and resultant lower MS is spatially associated with calcite cementation

  17. Regional vegetation dynamics and its response to climate change—a case study in the Tao River Basin in Northwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 30-year normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series from AVHRR/MODIS satellite sensors was used in this study to assess the regional vegetation dynamic changes in the Tao River Basin, which cuts across the Eastern Tibetan Plateau (ETP) and the Southwestern Loess Plateau (SLP). First, principal component and correlation analyses were carried out to determine the key climatic variables driving ecological change in the region. Then, regression models were tested to correlate NDVI with the selected climatic variables to determine their predictive power. Finally, Sen’s slope method was used to determine how terrestrial vegetation has responded to regional climate change in the region. The results indicated an average winter season NDVI value of 0.14 in the ETP but only 0.04 in the SLP. Primarily driven by increasing temperature, vegetation growth has generally been enhanced since 1981; spring NDVI increased by 0.03 every 10 years in the ETP and 0.02 in the SLP. Further, results from trend analyses suggest vegetation growth in the ETP shifted to earlier-start and earlier-end dates, however in the SLP, the growing season has been extended with an earlier-start and later-end date. The precipitation threshold for vegetation germination, measured by the cumulative spring rainfall, was found to be 44 mm for both the ETP and SLP. (paper)

  18. Fibrous gypsum veins as diffuse features and within fault zones: the case study of the Pisco Basin (Ica desert, southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    New knowledge on patterns of fibrous gypsum veins, their genetic mechanisms, deformation style and weathering are provided by a field- and laboratory-based study carried out on the Neogene to Quaternary Pisco Basin sedimentary strata (porous sandstones, siltstones and diatomites) exposed in the Ica desert, southern Peru. Gypsum veins vary considerably in dimensions, attitudes and timing and can develop in layered and moderately fractured rocks also in the absence of evaporitic layers. Veins occur both as diffuse features, confined to certain stratigraphic levels, and localised within fault zones. Arrays formed by layer-bounded, mutually orthogonal sets of steeply-dipping gypsum veins are reported for the first time. Vein length, height and spacing depend on the thickness of the bed packages in which they are confined. Within fault zones, veins are partly a product of faulting but also inherited layer-bounded features along which faults are superimposed. Due to the different petrophysical properties with respect to the parent rocks and their susceptibility to textural and mineralogical modifications, water dissolution and rupture, gypsum veins may have a significant role in geofluid management. Depending on their patterns and grade of physical and chemical alteration, veins may influence geofluid circulation and storage, acting as barriers to flow and possibly also as conduits.

  19. Large scale landslide susceptibility assessment using the statistical methods of logistic regression and BSA – study case: the sub-basin of the small Niraj (Transylvania Depression, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roşca

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a large number of GIS models for the identification of landslide occurrence probability makes difficult the selection of a specific one. The present study focuses on the application of two quantitative models: the logistic and the BSA models. The comparative analysis of the results aims at identifying the most suitable model. The territory corresponding to the Niraj Mic Basin (87 km2 is an area characterised by a wide variety of the landforms with their morphometric, morphographical and geological characteristics as well as by a high complexity of the land use types where active landslides exist. This is the reason why it represents the test area for applying the two models and for the comparison of the results. The large complexity of input variables is illustrated by 16 factors which were represented as 72 dummy variables, analysed on the basis of their importance within the model structures. The testing of the statistical significance corresponding to each variable reduced the number of dummy variables to 12 which were considered significant for the test area within the logistic model, whereas for the BSA model all the variables were employed. The predictability degree of the models was tested through the identification of the area under the ROC curve which indicated a good accuracy (AUROC = 0.86 for the testing area and predictability of the logistic model (AUROC = 0.63 for the validation area.

  20. Probabilistic Forecasting of Drought Events Using Markov Chain- and Bayesian Network-Based Models: A Case Study of an Andean Regulated River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avilés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The scarcity of water resources in mountain areas can distort normal water application patterns with among other effects, a negative impact on water supply and river ecosystems. Knowing the probability of droughts might help to optimize a priori the planning and management of the water resources in general and of the Andean watersheds in particular. This study compares Markov chain- (MC and Bayesian network- (BN based models in drought forecasting using a recently developed drought index with respect to their capability to characterize different drought severity states. The copula functions were used to solve the BNs and the ranked probability skill score (RPSS to evaluate the performance of the models. Monthly rainfall and streamflow data of the Chulco River basin, located in Southern Ecuador, were used to assess the performance of both approaches. Global evaluation results revealed that the MC-based models predict better wet and dry periods, and BN-based models generate slightly more accurately forecasts of the most severe droughts. However, evaluation of monthly results reveals that, for each month of the hydrological year, either the MC- or BN-based model provides better forecasts. The presented approach could be of assistance to water managers to ensure that timely decision-making on drought response is undertaken.

  1. Quantitative calculation of GOR of complex oil-gas-water systems with logging data: A case study of the Yingdong Oil/Gas Field in the Qaidam Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Liqiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Yingdong Oil/Gas Field of the Qaidam Basin, multiple suites of oil-gas-water systems overlie each other vertically, making it difficult to accurately identify oil layers from gas layers and calculate gas-oil ratio (GOR. Therefore, formation testing and production data, together with conventional logging, NMR and mud logging data were integrated to quantitatively calculate GOR. To tell oil layers from gas layers, conventional logging makes use of the excavation effect of compensated neutron log, NMR makes use of the different relaxation mechanisms of light oil and natural gas in large pores, while mud logging makes use of star chart of gas components established based on available charts and mathematical statistics. In terms of the quantitative calculation of GOR, the area ratio of the star chart of gas components was first used in GOR calculation. The study shows that: (1 conventional logging data has a modest performance in distinguishing oil layers from gas layers due to the impacts of formation pressure, hydrogen index (HI, shale content, borehole conditions and invasion of drilling mud; (2 NMR is quite effective in telling oil layers from gas layers, but cannot be widely used due to its high cost; (3 by contrast, the star chart of gas components is the most effective in differentiating oil layers from gas layers; and (4 the GOR calculated by using the area ratio of star chart has been verified by various data such as formation testing data, production data and liquid production profile.

  2. Permeability prediction in deep coal seam: a case study on the No. 3 coal seam of the Southern Qinshui Basin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pinkun; Cheng, Yuanping

    2013-01-01

    The coal permeability is an important parameter in mine methane control and coal bed methane (CBM) exploitation, which determines the practicability of methane extraction. Permeability prediction in deep coal seam plays a significant role in evaluating the practicability of CBM exploitation. The coal permeability depends on the coal fractures controlled by strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature which change with depth. The effect of the strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature on the coal (the coal matrix and fracture) under triaxial stress and strain conditions was studied. Then we got the change of coal porosity with strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature and established a coal permeability model under tri-axial stress and strain conditions. The permeability of the No. 3 coal seam of the Southern Qinshui Basin in China was predicted, which is consistent with that tested in the field. The effect of the sorption swelling on porosity (permeability) firstly increases rapidly and then slowly with the increase of depth. However, the effect of thermal expansion and effective stress compression on porosity (permeability) increases linearly with the increase of depth. The most effective way to improve the permeability in exploiting CBM or extracting methane is to reduce the effective stress. PMID:24396293

  3. Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

    2011-03-15

    The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

  4. Large scale landslide susceptibility assessment using the statistical methods of logistic regression and BSA - study case: the sub-basin of the small Niraj (Transylvania Depression, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşca, S.; Bilaşco, Ş.; Petrea, D.; Fodorean, I.; Vescan, I.; Filip, S.; Măguţ, F.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of a large number of GIS models for the identification of landslide occurrence probability makes difficult the selection of a specific one. The present study focuses on the application of two quantitative models: the logistic and the BSA models. The comparative analysis of the results aims at identifying the most suitable model. The territory corresponding to the Niraj Mic Basin (87 km2) is an area characterised by a wide variety of the landforms with their morphometric, morphographical and geological characteristics as well as by a high complexity of the land use types where active landslides exist. This is the reason why it represents the test area for applying the two models and for the comparison of the results. The large complexity of input variables is illustrated by 16 factors which were represented as 72 dummy variables, analysed on the basis of their importance within the model structures. The testing of the statistical significance corresponding to each variable reduced the number of dummy variables to 12 which were considered significant for the test area within the logistic model, whereas for the BSA model all the variables were employed. The predictability degree of the models was tested through the identification of the area under the ROC curve which indicated a good accuracy (AUROC = 0.86 for the testing area) and predictability of the logistic model (AUROC = 0.63 for the validation area).

  5. Mackenzie Basin impact study: Interim report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MIBS) is a six-year study undertaken to assess the potential impacts on the Mackenzie River Basin region and its inhabitants. The study framework, structure, organization, methods, and data are described. Highlights of work to date are reviewed. The MBIS employs scenarios of future warmer climates and changes in population and economic conditions. Research is coordinated by an interagency working committee and research activities cover 28 areas including permafrost, hydrology, sea ice, boreal ecosystems, freshwater fish, wildlife, forestry, agriculture, tourism, community studies, and defense. Six issues have been identified: interjurisdictional water management, sustainability of native lifestyles, economic development opportunities, infrastructure and buildings, and sustainability of ecosystems. An integrated assessment approach is used in the MBIS, combining scientific and indigenous traditional knowledge and attempting to include all interactions that occur between sectors. Two methods are being developed: socio-economic integration using a resource accounting framework, and an integrated land assessment framework. Four scenarios of warmer climates have been developed, all showing increased precipitation for the basin as a whole. Moderate growth in the resource sector is predicted. Preliminary results of some research are reported, including a lengthened open-water season in the Beaufort Sea accompanied by a greater extent of open water. 44 figs., 16 tabs

  6. Measurements and modelling of evapotransiration to assess agricultural water productivity in basins with changing land use patterns : a case study in the São Francisco River basin, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro Teixeira, de A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Key words: Vineyards, mango, energy balance, evapotranspiration, water productivity, Bowen ratio, eddy correlation, water balance, natural vegetation, latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, biomass, water productivity, remote sensing, water management. . The São Francisco River basin in Brazil is m

  7. Flood risk analysis and adaptive strategy in context of uncertainties: a case study of Nhieu Loc Thi Nghe Basin, Ho Chi Minh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Long-Phi; Chau, Nguyen-Xuan-Quang; Nguyen, Hong-Quan

    2013-04-01

    The Nhieu Loc - Thi Nghe basin is the most important administrative and business area of Ho Chi Minh City. Due to system complexity of the basin such as the increasing trend of rainfall intensity, (tidal) water level and land subsidence, the simulation of hydrological, hydraulic variables for flooding prediction seems rather not adequate in practical projects. The basin is still highly vulnerable despite of multi-million USD investment for urban drainage improvement projects since the last decade. In this paper, an integrated system analysis in both spatial and temporal aspects based on statistical, GIS and modelling approaches has been conducted in order to: (1) Analyse risks before and after projects, (2) Foresee water-related risk under uncertainties of unfavourable driving factors and (3) Develop a sustainable flood risk management strategy for the basin. The results show that given the framework of risk analysis and adaptive strategy, certain urban developing plans in the basin must be carefully revised and/or checked in order to reduce the highly unexpected loss in the future

  8. Representation of spatial and temporal variability in large-domain hydrological models: case study for a mesoscale pre-Alpine basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; Torfs, Paul; Zappa, Massimiliano; Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-06-01

    The transfer of parameter sets over different temporal and spatial resolutions is common practice in many large-domain hydrological modelling studies. The degree to which parameters are transferable across temporal and spatial resolutions is an indicator of how well spatial and temporal variability is represented in the models. A large degree of transferability may well indicate a poor representation of such variability in the employed models. To investigate parameter transferability over resolution in time and space we have set up a study in which the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model for the Thur basin in Switzerland was run with four different spatial resolutions (1 km × 1 km, 5 km × 5 km, 10 km × 10 km, lumped) and evaluated for three relevant temporal resolutions (hour, day, month), both applied with uniform and distributed forcing. The model was run 3150 times using the Hierarchical Latin Hypercube Sample and the best 1 % of the runs was selected as behavioural. The overlap in behavioural sets for different spatial and temporal resolutions was used as an indicator of parameter transferability. A key result from this study is that the overlap in parameter sets for different spatial resolutions was much larger than for different temporal resolutions, also when the forcing was applied in a distributed fashion. This result suggests that it is easier to transfer parameters across different spatial resolutions than across different temporal resolutions. However, the result also indicates a substantial underestimation in the spatial variability represented in the hydrological simulations, suggesting that the high spatial transferability may occur because the current generation of large-domain models has an inadequate representation of spatial variability and hydrologic connectivity. The results presented in this paper provide a strong motivation to further investigate and substantially improve the representation of spatial and temporal variability in

  9. Water accounting for conjunctive groundwater and surface water irrigation sources:A case study in the middle Heihe River Basin of arid northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueXiang Chang; Bing Liu; Hu Liu; ShouBo Li

    2015-01-01

    Oases in arid northwestern China play a significant role in the region's economic stability and development. Overex-ploitation of the region's water resources has led to serious environmental consequences. In oases, irrigated agriculture is the primary consumer of water, but water shortages resulting from dramatically growing human needs have become a bottleneck for regional sustainable development, making effective management of the limited available water critical. Effective strategies must be formulated to increase agricultural productivity while reducing its environmental impacts. To support the development of such strategies, water use patterns were analyzed during the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons, from May to early October, to identify opportunities for improving water management using the Mold-en-Sakthivadivel water-accounting method, which combines groundwater and surface water into a single domain and can provide a good estimate of the uses, depletion, and productivity of water in a water basin context. The study area lies in Linze County, Gansu Province, China. In the study area, the inflow water resources consist of irrigation, precipita-tion, and soil water, which accounted for 89.3%, 8.9%, and 1.8% of the total in 2007, and 89.3%, 4.8%, and 5.9% in 2008, respectively. The irrigation depends heavily on groundwater, which accounted for 82.1% and 83.6% of the total irrigation water in 2007 and 2008, respectively. In 2007 and 2008, deep percolation accounted for 50.1% and 47.9% of the water outflow, respectively, with corresponding depleted fractions of 0.51 and 0.55, respectively. For the irrigation district as a whole, the water productivity was only 1.37 CNY/m3. To significantly increase crop water productivity and prevent depletion of the region's groundwater aquifer, it will be necessary to reduce the amount of water used for ir-rigation. Several water-saving agricultural practices are discussed and recommended.

  10. Distribution of toxic elements and transfer from the environment to humans traced by using lead isotopes. A case of study in the Sarno River basin, south Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchella, Domenico; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Albanese, Stefano; Adamo, Paola; Lima, Annamaria; Taiani, Manuela V E; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-04-01

    The results of a large geochemical study on various environmental media (soil, stream sediment, groundwater, surface water, lettuce and human hair) of the Sarno River basin, which is one of the most polluted areas in Italy, are presented. Further, it aims to deepen our understanding of the distribution of Pb and its isotope composition for the differentiation between natural and anthropogenic metal sources. Our results show the environmental media to be significantly enriched in Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Zn, and to a lesser extent in Sb, Cd and Ni compared to the natural local background variation. The numerous industrial activities (mainly tanneries) have caused environmental pollution especially Cr and Hg in soils and sediment samples. Such contamination is also evident in lettuce and in the hair of the resident population, which shows particularly high values for both Cr and Hg. The unusually high As, Be and Sn concentrations arise mostly from natural sources due to the volcanic nature of the investigated area. Lead isotope measurements indicate a trend suggesting mixing between two end-members, one of clear natural origin (geogenic) and another related to human activities (anthropogenic). Lead isotope results demonstrate that Pb in hair of inhabitants is similar to those in the local topsoil and that gasoline is one of the main, but not the only source of metal pollution. The most important exposure risks within the study area are associated with toxic elements levels in topsoil and stream sediment, and the ingestion of locally grown lettuce. The high concentrations of these elements in hair are a further confirmation of this exposure pathway. PMID:26164469

  11. Nose Structure Delineation of Bouguer Anomaly as the Interpretation Basis of Probable Hydrocarbon Traps: A Case Study on the Mainland Area of Northwest Java Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamtono Kamtono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v7i3.144Two important aspects in the exploration of oil and gas are technology and exploration concepts, but the use of technology is not always suitable for areas with geological conditions covered by young volcanic sediments or limestone. The land of the Northwest Java Basin is mostly covered by young volcanic products, so exploration using seismic methods will produce less clear image resolution. To identify and interpret the subsurface structure and the possibility of hydrocarbon trap, gravity measurements have been carried out. Delineation of nose structures of a Bouguer anomaly map was used to interpret the probability of hydrocarbon traps. The result of the study shows that the gravity anomalies could be categorized into three groups : low anomaly (< 34 mgal, middle anomaly (34 - 50 mgal, and high anomaly (> 50 mgal. The analysis of Bouguer anomaly indicates that the low anomaly is concentrated in Cibarusa area as a southern part of Ciputat Subbasin, and in Cikampek area. The result of delineation of the Bouguer anomaly map shows the nose structures existing on Cibinong-Cileungsi and Pangkalan-Bekasi Highs, while delineation of residual anomaly map shows the nose structures occurs on Cilamaya-Karawang high. Locally, the gas fields of Jatirangon and Cicauh areas exist on the flank of the nose structure of Pangkalan-Bekasi High, while the oil/gas field of Northern Cilamaya is situated on the flank of the nose structure of Cilamaya-Karawang High. The concept of fluid/gas migration concentrated on nose structures which are delineated from gravity data can be applied in the studied area. This concept needs to be tested in other oil and gas field areas.

  12. The impacts of tracer selection and corrections for organic matter and particle size on the results of quantitative sediment fingerprinting. A case study from the Nene basin, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Simon; Ian, Foster; Paula, Antunes

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, sediment fingerprinting methodologies have gained widespread adoption when tracing sediment provenance in geomorphological research. A wide variety of tracers have been employed in the published literature, with corrections for particle size and organic matter applied when the researcher judged them necessary. This paper aims to explore the errors associated with tracer use by a comparison of fingerprinting results obtained using fallout and lithogenic radionuclides, geochemical, and mineral magnetic tracers in a range of environments located in the Nene basin, UK. Specifically, fingerprinting was undertaken on lake, reservoir and floodplain sediment cores, on actively transported suspended sediment and on overbank and channel bed sediment deposits. Tracer groups were investigated both alone and in combination to determine the differences between their sediment provenance predictions and potential causes of these differences. Additionally, simple organic and particle size corrections were applied to determine if they improve the agreement between the tracer group predictions. Key results showed that when fingerprinting contributions from channel banks to actively transported or recently deposited sediments the tracer group predictions varied by 24% on average. These differences could not be clearly attributed to changes in the sediment during erosion or transport. Instead, the most likely cause of differences was the pre-existing spatial variability in tracer concentrations within sediment sources, combined with highly localised erosion. This resulted in the collected sediment source samples not being representative of the actual sediment sources. Average differences in provenance predictions between the different tracer groups in lake, reservoir and floodplain sediment cores were lowest in the reservoir core at 19% and highest in some floodplain cores, with differences in predictions in excess of 50%. In these latter samples organic enrichment of

  13. Storage and origin of metals in active stream sediments from mountainous rivers: A case study in the River Douro basin (North Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examine the quality of oxic active fluvial sediments in mountainous rural catchments. • We found considerable contribution of metals from the different sources: geogenic, urban and agriculture. • The influence of the streamflow regime is significant: the sediments are constantly in transit. • There is a considerable contribution of metals into the mainstream of river Douro. • Quality of finer sediments influences the quality of the associated ecosystems. - Abstract: The study area is located in the transboundary River Douro basin (northern Portugal); it comprises the River Corgo fluvial network, which drains a meso-scale rural catchment with an area of 295 km2, underlain by crystalline rocks, in a temperate climate. The results reported in this study derive from a geochemical survey of active fluvial sediments, with the aim of characterising the spatial and temporal distribution of the contents of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a basin with mountainous features. To assess total contents of metals and their potential availability, as well as possible different origins of metals (natural vs. anthropogenic), a sequential chemical approach was used (modified BCR procedure). Multivariate data analysis (PCA) was used to assist the interpretation of datasets. The results show that, on the one hand, the metal contents distribute among all the geochemical phases studied. For the most relative labile fractions the reducible fraction is the most significant. The element-partitioning among geochemical phases indicates: (a) Co and Mn are transported in greater proportions in the most labile fraction, as exchangeable ions, as well as important proportions of Ni, Zn and Cu; (b) Cd and Pb associate preferentially with the hydroxides of Fe and Mn; (c) Cr and Cu are also transported by the organic phase; (d) the residual phase transport important proportions of Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Fe and Pb. The higher concentrations of Cu, Zn and, in particular

  14. Assessing the effects of land-use changes on landslide susceptibility: a case study in the upper Rivo basin (Molise, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Luca; Parise, Mario; Rosskopf, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are the results of the complex spatial-temporal interaction of various predisposing and triggering factors, among which land-use is one of the most important. Especially in the short term perspective, whilst geological and geomorphological factors change in relatively long periods, land-use can evolve in few decades, which explains why variations in the land use may determine significant changes in the landslide frequency and distribution, even in a short time span. In this study, have been analyzed land use changes occurred during the second part of the last century in order to get some hints about their likely influence on activity, dimensions and distribution of landslide-prone areas in small sized rural catchments. The selected study area is the upper sector of the Rivo basin, located in Molise region (Italy). The main goal of this study is to understand the effects of land use changes resulting from land management activities on landslide susceptibility. In the study area, major socio-economical transformations have been identified during the period 1954-2003, regarding both land management and land-use pattern. To this aim, multi-temporal land-use and landslide inventory maps have been compiled for the considered period, by means of air photo interpretation. Then, using the obtained data sets, different landslide susceptibility maps have been developed in order to quantify the changes in land use and evaluate their effects on landslide proneness. The analysis of the most recent aerial photos reveals a decrease in the landslides occurrence, but, at the same time, an increase in the landslide extinction rate. The preliminary results show that the increase in forested areas, due to the corresponding decrease in pasture and bushes, determines changes in the stability of the slopes, and the development of smaller-size areas with high susceptibility to landslides. These outcomes represent an important step towards the better understanding of the past

  15. Using stable isotopes in tracing contaminant sources in an industrial area: A case study on the hydrological basin of the Olt River, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracing pollution sources and transformation of nitrogen compounds in surface- and groundwater is an issue of great significance worldwide due to the increased human activity, translated in high demand of water resources and pollution. In this work, the hydrological basin of an important chemical industrial platform in Romania (Ramnicu Valcea industrial area) was characterized in terms of the physico-chemical and isotope composition of δ18O and δ2H in water samples and δ15N of the inorganic nitrogen species. Throughout a period of one year, water samples from the Olt River and its more important tributaries were collected monthly in the industrial area, when the seasonal and spatial isotope patterns of the surface waters and the main sources of pollution were determined. Higher inorganic nitrogen concentrations (up to 10.2 mg N L−1) were measured between November 2012 and April 2013, which were designated as anthropogenic additions using the mixing calculations. The main sources of pollution with inorganic nitrogen were agriculture and residential release. The inorganic nitrogen from the industrial waste water duct had a distinct δ15N fingerprint (mean of − 8.6‰). Also, one industrial release into the environment was identified for Olt River, at Ionesti site, in November 2012. The mean precipitation samples had the lowest inorganic nitrogen concentrations (less than 5.5 mg N L−1) with a distinct δ15N fingerprint compared to the surface and industrial waters. - Highlights: • The main source of nitrogen pollution was agriculture/residential. • Anthropogenic additions of nitrogen were identified in the colder months. • Industrial nitrogen source was differentiated from the agriculture/residential one. • One industrial nitrogen release in the Olt River was observed during the study

  16. Using stable isotopes in tracing contaminant sources in an industrial area: A case study on the hydrological basin of the Olt River, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Raluca [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, 4 Uzinei Str, RO-240050 Ramnicu-Valcea (Romania); Mimmo, Tanja [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, University Plaza no. 5, I-39100 Bolzano (Italy); Dinca, Oana Romina [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, 4 Uzinei Str, RO-240050 Ramnicu-Valcea (Romania); Capici, Calogero [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, University Plaza no. 5, I-39100 Bolzano (Italy); Costinel, Diana; Sandru, Claudia [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, 4 Uzinei Str, RO-240050 Ramnicu-Valcea (Romania); Ionete, Roxana Elena, E-mail: roxana.ionete@icsi.ro [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, 4 Uzinei Str, RO-240050 Ramnicu-Valcea (Romania); Stefanescu, Ioan [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, 4 Uzinei Str, RO-240050 Ramnicu-Valcea (Romania); Axente, Damian [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65–103 Donath Str., RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Tracing pollution sources and transformation of nitrogen compounds in surface- and groundwater is an issue of great significance worldwide due to the increased human activity, translated in high demand of water resources and pollution. In this work, the hydrological basin of an important chemical industrial platform in Romania (Ramnicu Valcea industrial area) was characterized in terms of the physico-chemical and isotope composition of δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H in water samples and δ{sup 15}N of the inorganic nitrogen species. Throughout a period of one year, water samples from the Olt River and its more important tributaries were collected monthly in the industrial area, when the seasonal and spatial isotope patterns of the surface waters and the main sources of pollution were determined. Higher inorganic nitrogen concentrations (up to 10.2 mg N L{sup −1}) were measured between November 2012 and April 2013, which were designated as anthropogenic additions using the mixing calculations. The main sources of pollution with inorganic nitrogen were agriculture and residential release. The inorganic nitrogen from the industrial waste water duct had a distinct δ{sup 15}N fingerprint (mean of − 8.6‰). Also, one industrial release into the environment was identified for Olt River, at Ionesti site, in November 2012. The mean precipitation samples had the lowest inorganic nitrogen concentrations (less than 5.5 mg N L{sup −1}) with a distinct δ{sup 15}N fingerprint compared to the surface and industrial waters. - Highlights: • The main source of nitrogen pollution was agriculture/residential. • Anthropogenic additions of nitrogen were identified in the colder months. • Industrial nitrogen source was differentiated from the agriculture/residential one. • One industrial nitrogen release in the Olt River was observed during the study.

  17. Crop yield risk analysis and mitigation of smallholder farmers at quaternary catchment level: Case study of B72A in Olifants river basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magombeyi, Manuel S.; Taigbenu, Akpofure E.

    Currently, Sub-Sahara is experiencing increased frequency of disasters either as floods or droughts which depletes the scarce resources available to sustain increasing populations. Success in preventing food shortages in the African continent can only be achieved by understanding the vulnerability and risk of the majority of smallholder farmers under rainfed and supplementary irrigation coupled with appropriate interventions. Increased frequency of floods, droughts and dry spells pose an increasing threat to the smallholder farmers’ food security and water resources availability in B72A quaternary catchment of the Olifants river basin in South Africa. This paper links maize crop yield risk and smallholder farmer vulnerability arising from droughts by applying a set of interdisciplinary indicators (physical and socio-economic) encompassing gender and institutional vulnerabilities. For the study area, the return period of droughts and dry spells was 2 years. The growing season for maize crop was 121 days on average. Soil water deficit during critical growth stages may reduce potential yields by up to 62%, depending on the length and severity of the moisture deficit. To minimize grain yield loss and avoid total crop failures from intra-seasonal dry spells, farmers applied supplementary irrigation either from river water or rainwater harvested into small reservoirs. Institutional vulnerability was evidenced by disjointed water management institutions with lack of comprehension of roles of higher level institutions by lower level ones. Women are most hit by droughts as they derived more than 90% of their family income from agriculture activities. An enhanced understanding of the vulnerability and risk exposure will assist in developing technologies and policies that conform to the current livelihood strategies of smallholder, resource-constrained farmers. Development of such knowledge base for a catchment opens avenues for computational modeling of the impacts of

  18. The paleoclimatic records and the relevance with the formation of hydrocarbon source rocks:A case study of Huanghekou depression,Bohaiwan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanhong LIU; Sitian LI; Renchen XIN; Changgui XU; Jianchun CHENG

    2008-01-01

    Bohaiwan basin,covering an area of 200 000 km2,is one of the most important oil-bearing basins in Eastern China.Rifting processes formed the basin,and two evolution phases can be recognized.The rifting phase developed in Paleogene,and post-rifting phase occurred in Neogene.More than 200 oil fields have been found in the onshore and offshore area in Bohaiwan basin in recent years.The distribution of the oil fields is closely related to the rich hydrocarbon depressions,and the Huanghekou depression is one of these rich hydrocarbon depressions.A number of large and medium-sized oil and gas fields have been found in this area,such as BZ25-1,BZ34 etc.,and the hydrocarbon was mainly from the Huanghekou depression.The formation of rich hydrocarbon source rocks depended on the tectonic setting of rapid subsidence,favorable paleoclimatic conditions and paleolimnology environments.The effects of paleoclimatic condition on hydrocarbon source rocks are the focus of this paper.

  19. Assessment of dam impacts on river flow regimes and water quality: a case study of the Huai River Basin in P. R. China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jun; ZHANG Yong-yong; WANG Gang-sheng

    2008-01-01

    The Huai River Basin is a unique area in P.R.China with the highest densities of population and water projects. It is also subject to the most serious water pollution. We proposed a distributional SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model coupled with a water quality-quantity balance model to evaluate dam impacts on river flow regimes and water quality in the middle and upper reaches of the Huai River Basin. We calibrated and validated the SWAT model with data from 29 selected cross-sections in four typical years (1971, 1981, 1991 and 1999) and used scenario analysis to compensate for the unavailability of historical data regarding uninterrupted river flows before dam and floodgate construction, a problem of prediction for ungauged basins. The results indicate that dam and floodgate operations tended to reduce runoff, decrease peak value and shift peaking time.The contribution of water projects to river water quality deterioration in the concerned river system was between 0 to 40%, while pollutant discharge contributed to 60% to 100% of the water pollution. Pollution control should therefore be the key to the water quality rehabilitation in the Huai River Basin.

  20. Underground water and pollution vulnerability assessment of lower Imo sedimentary basin of South-eastern Nigeria: A case study of Nwangele Local Government Area of Imo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onunkwo – A, A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water exploitation and population explosion are two major problems facing Nwangele Local Government. This study was therefore predicated on these problems to assess the underground water and pollution vulnerability of the study area. The method of study involves literature survey of previous work done in Imo River sedimentary basin and other works considered necessary for the study. A total of ten (10 vertical electricity soundings (VES was conducted for data generation using terrameter 300 SAS employing Schlumberger configuration. Aquifer (sands from boreholes within three (3 communities and ten (10 water samples were collected and used for statistical and geochemical analysis. The result shows that the lithology is made of sand, silt sand, clay and shale. Three (3 aquifer systems exits in the area confined, semi confined and unconfined aquifers, these occur as upper (33.5m, middle (82m and lower (102 to 115m aquifers. The lithology comprises 4 to 6 layers with water bearing bed occurring at the fifth layer. Average aquifer thickness measured 38 metres. Multiaquifer system exists in some localities. Hydraulic conductivity values range from 25.6m/day to 28.9m/day, transmissivity ranges from 450.842/day to 111.7m2/day while the storativity values ranges from 0.468 x 10-5 to 1.13 x 10-5, all indicate aquifer of good yield. Aquifer thickness ranges from 12.5 to 45m. The water chemistry is neutral, mildly acidic to mildly alkaline. The underground water is of calcium by carbonate type (CaHCO3 fresh and ideal for consumption, irrigation and laundry industry. None of the constituents fell short of WHO (1984 standard . Environmental pollution is only confined to upper aquifer. It is recommended that the three aquifer horizons can be tapped at the depth range of 18 to 102 metres. Multiple screen should be employed where there are more than one aquifer horizon. It is advisable that down the hole electric logging be conducted prior to the installation of

  1. Recent developments in study of the typical superimposed basins and petroleum accumulation in China: Exemplified by the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Zhijun; WANG; Qingchen

    2004-01-01

    Most of petroliferous sedimentary basins in China have experienced multiple phases of tectonic evolution and deposition, and are characterized by tectonic and depositional superimposition. The term "superimposed basin" is suggested to describe those basins which consist of two or more simple prototype basins superimposing vertically and/or coalescing laterally. The characteristics of petroliferous superimposed basins are "multiple stages of basin forming and reworking, multiple layers of source rocks, multiple periods of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, multiple periods of petroleum migration-accumulation-escape". Therefore,applying the wave process analysis method to studying the process of basin formation, hydrocarbon generation, and reservoir formation, and then establishing theory of "petroleum accumulation system" is helpful to enhancing petroleum exploration efficiency in superimposed basins.This paper will, based on case study in the Tarim basin, report the major developments in studying basin formation, hydrocarbon generation and petroleum accumulation. In study of basin formation, (1) geophysical comprehensive profiles reveal that the Tarim plate has been subducted beneath the Tianshan orogenic belt with an interfinger structure and that the deep structure in the eastern section of the Tianshan orogenic belt is different from that in the western section. (2) The vertical variation in debris and geochemical composition reveals the nature and Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution history of the Kuqa Depression. (3) Field investigation and paleostress reconstruction show that the Kuqa Depression has undergone gravity-driven extension in sedimentary cover when the Tianshan uplifted vertically. In hydrocarbon generation study, new developments include (1) setting environmental index to judge high grade source rocks in marine carbonates, and (2) establishing the lower limit of the organic carbon content for effective carbonate source rocks. In petroleum accumulation

  2. Recent developments in study of the typical superimposed basins and petroleum accumulation in China:Exemplified by the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Zhijun; WANG Qingchen

    2004-01-01

    Most of petroliferous sedimentary basins in China have experienced multiple phases of tectonic evolution and deposition, and are characterized by tectonic and depositional superimposition. The term "superimposed basin" is suggested to describe those basins which consist of two or more simple prototype basins superimposing vertically and/or coalescing laterally. The characteristics of petroliferous superimposed basins are "multiple stages of basin forming and reworking, multiple layers of source rocks, multiple periods of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, multiple periods of petroleum migration-accumulation-escape". Therefore,applying the wave process analysis method to studying the process of basin formation, hydrocarbon generation, and reservoir formation, and then establishing theory of "petroleum accumulation system" is helpful to enhancing petroleum exploration efficiency in superimposed basins.This paper will, based on case study in the Tarim basin, report the major developments in studying basin formation, hydrocarbon generation and petroleum accumulation. In study of basin formation, (1) geophysical comprehensive profiles reveal that the Tarim plate has been subducted beneath the Tianshan orogenic belt with an interfinger structure and that the deep structure in the eastern section of the Tianshan orogenic belt is different from that in the western section. (2) The vertical variation in debris and geochemical composition reveals the nature and Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution history of the Kuqa Depression. (3) Field investigation and paleostress reconstruction show that the Kuqa Depression has undergone gravity-driven extension in sedimentary cover when the Tianshan uplifted vertically. In hydrocarbon generation study, new developments include (1) setting environmental index to judge high grade source rocks in marine carbonates, and (2) establishing the lower limit of the organic carbon content for effective carbonate source rocks. In petroleum accumulation

  3. Bioconversion of Coal: Hydrologic indicators of the extent of coal biodegradation under different redox conditions and coal maturity, Velenje Basin case study, Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Tjaša; Grassa, Fausto; Lazar, Jerneja; Jamnikar, Sergej; Zavšek, Simon; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Underground mining of coal and coal combustion for energy has significant environmental impacts. In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, other lower -carbon energy sources must be utilized. Coalbed methane (CBM) is an important source of relatively low-carbon energy. Approximately 20% of world's coalbed methane is microbial in origin (Bates et al., 2011). Interest in microbial CBM has increased recently due to the possibility of stimulating methanogenesis. Despite increasing interest, the hydrogeochemical conditions and mechanisms for biodegradation of coal and microbial methane production are poorly understood. This project aims to examine geochemical characteristics of coalbed groundwater and coalbed gases in order to constrain biogeochemical processes to better understand the entire process of coal biodegradation of coal to coalbed gases. A better understanding of geochemical processes in CBM areas may potentially lead to sustainable stimulation of microbial methanogenesis at economical rates. Natural analogue studies of carbon dioxide occurring in the subsurface have the potential to yield insights into mechanisms of carbon dioxide storage over geological time scales (Li et al., 2013). In order to explore redox processes related to methanogenesis and determine ideal conditions under which microbial degradation of coal is likely to occur, this study utilizes groundwater and coalbed gas samples from Velenje Basin. Determination of the concentrations of methane, carbondioxide, nitrogen, oxygen, argon was performed with homemade NIER mass spectrometer. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide, isotopic composition of methane, isotopic composition of deuterium in methane was determined with Europa-Scientific IRMS with an ANCA-TG preparation module and Thermo Delta XP GC-TC/CF-IRMS coupled to a TRACE GC analyzer. Total alkalinity of groundwater was measured by Gran titration. Major cations were analyzed by ICP-OES and anions by IC method. Isotopic composition of

  4. A conceptual socio-hydrological model of the co-evolution of humans and water: case study of the Tarim River basin, western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Tian, F.; Lin, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2015-02-01

    The complex interactions and feedbacks between humans and water are critically important issues but remain poorly understood in the newly proposed discipline of socio-hydrology (Sivapalan et al., 2012). An exploratory model with the appropriate level of simplification can be valuable for improving our understanding of the co-evolution and self-organization of socio-hydrological systems driven by interactions and feedbacks operating at different scales. In this study, a simplified conceptual socio-hydrological model based on logistic growth curves is developed for the Tarim River basin in western China and is used to illustrate the explanatory power of such a co-evolutionary model. The study area is the main stream of the Tarim River, which is divided into two modeling units. The socio-hydrological system is composed of four sub-systems, i.e., the hydrological, ecological, economic, and social sub-systems. In each modeling unit, the hydrological equation focusing on water balance is coupled to the other three evolutionary equations to represent the dynamics of the social sub-system (denoted by population), the economic sub-system (denoted by irrigated crop area ratio), and the ecological sub-system (denoted by natural vegetation cover), each of which is expressed in terms of a logistic growth curve. Four feedback loops are identified to represent the complex interactions among different sub-systems and different spatial units, of which two are inner loops occurring within each separate unit and the other two are outer loops linking the two modeling units. The feedback mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive relations for model parameters, i.e., the colonization and mortality rates in the logistic growth curves that are jointly determined by the state variables of all sub-systems. The co-evolution of the Tarim socio-hydrological system is then analyzed with this conceptual model to gain insights into the overall system dynamics and its sensitivity to the

  5. The role of anthropogenic water reservoirs within the landscapes of mining areas – a case study from the western part of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruchiewicz Ewelina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A few thousand anthropogenic water reservoirs can be found in the area of the Upper Silesian Coal Basis (USCB located in southern Poland. In this paper the role of such anthropogenic lakes in the landscape of the western part of the USCB was presented and illustrated with the example of Knurów, a mining city, and its immediate surrounding area. The study of landscape changes in this area was carried out on the basis of archival and contemporary cartographic materials, historical sources, and interviews with inhabitants and direct field observations. It was found that the origin of the majority of the water reservoirs is related to hard coal, clay and sand mining. They were created primarily as a result of filling subsidence basins and post-mining excavations with water, as well as being the result of the construction of various hydro-technical facilities (settling ponds, fire protection water reservoirs, etc. In the study area the anthropogenic water reservoirs are of different sizes, shapes and durability and play different roles in the environment. Between 1884 and 2001 their number increased 25-fold, while at the same time their total surface area increased more than 8-fold. The role of the newly created water reservoirs in the landscape primarily involves the transformation of the existing terrestrial ecosystems into wetland ecosystems. The agro-forestry landscape of the late 19th century was transformed into a typically anthropogenic landscape with a dominant share of water reservoirs, settlement ponds and mining waste heaps. The most common species of plants around the water reservoirs are Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea canadensis, Potamogeton natans, Lemna sp., Acorus calamus, Myriophyllum verticillatum, Sagittaria sagittifolia, Alisma plantago-aquatica and Glyceria aquatica. The most valuable elements of the flora include Trapa natans and Ruppia maritima, species recognized in Poland as threatened

  6. Effects of Land Use Change on Eco-environment in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin--A Case Study of Yanting County, Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Huai-liang; Zhu Bo; Chen Guo-jie; Gao Mei-rong

    2003-01-01

    With the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest being planted, there has been a marked land use change since 1970s' in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China. Data from meteorological observations or posts operated over long time, measurement and calculation of NPP (net primary production) and biomass of biological community, and analysis of soil organic matter content show that the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest has outstanding eco-environmental effect: adjusting local climate, raising soil fertility, alleviating menace of drought, and raising NPP and biomass of biological community. It is very beneficial for improving ecological environment to afforest artificial alder and cypress mixed forest in populous Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China.

  7. Constrained basin stability for studying transient phenomena in dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kan, Adrian; Jegminat, Jannes; Donges, Jonathan F.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transient dynamics are of large interest in many areas of science. Here, a generalization of basin stability (BS) is presented: constrained basin stability (CBS) that is sensitive to various different types of transients arising from finite size perturbations. CBS is applied to the paradigmatic Lorenz system for uncovering nonlinear precursory phenomena of a boundary crisis bifurcation. Further, CBS is used in a model of the Earth's carbon cycle as a return time-dependent stability measure of the system's global attractor. Both case studies illustrate how CBS's sensitivity to transients complements BS in its function as an early warning signal and as a stability measure. CBS is broadly applicable in systems where transients matter, from physics and engineering to sustainability science. Thus CBS complements stability analysis with BS as well as classical linear stability analysis and will be a useful tool for many applications.

  8. Land Capability Classification for Crop and Fruit Product Assessment Using GIS Technology. Case Study: The Niraj River Basin (Transylvania Depression, Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda Maria ROȘCA; Stefan BILAŞCO; Ioan PĂCURAR; Marcel ONCU; Cornel NEGRUŞIER; Dănuț PETREA

    2015-01-01

    The efficient capitalisation of agricultural land is dependent on determining the environmental suitability of the area and on identifying the most appropriate culture types for a particular terrain. Because of its complex landforms, the anthropic pressure and the irrational use of land on large surfaces, the Basin of Niraj River was the object of a reorganising process in the production activities, by emphasising the agricultural land use as a resource for sustainable development, which has ...

  9. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

    2008-06-10

    The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

  10. Application of GIS based on evidence weighting method to the evaluation of uranium metallogenic target areas: a case study of Bayingebi Basin in inner mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Former data and information in geology, geophysics, geochemistry and remote sensing of Bayingebi Basin are processed and analyzed. Fifteen information layers such as uranium of geochemical survey, uranium of airborne radioactive survey and hydroxy anomaly of remote sensing are selected to assess and evaluate the uranium mineralization potential by the method of evidence weighting based on GIS. The potential areas are classified and 11 prospecting targets are delineated. (authors)

  11. Advanced interpretation of land subsidence by validating multi-interferometric SAR data: the case study of the Anthemountas basin (Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Raspini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential of repeat-pass space borne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry has been exploited to investigate spatial patterns of land subsidence in the Anthemountas basin, in the northern part of Greece. The PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach, based on the processing of long series of SAR acquisitions, has been applied to forty-two images acquired in 1995–2001 by ERS1/2 satellites. Interferometric results have been analysed at a basin scale as support for land motion mapping and at a local scale for the characterisation of ground motion events affecting the village of Perea in the Thermaikos municipality and the "Macedonia" international airport. PSI results revealed a moderate subsidence phenomenon along the wider coastal zone of Anthemountas basin corresponding to intense groundwater extraction. Highest values, exceeding −20 mm yr−1, were measured in the airport area where the thickest sequence of compressible Quaternary sediments occurs. Intense subsidence has been detected also in the Perea village (maximum deformation of −10 to −15 mm yr−1, where a series of fractures, causing damages to both buildings and infrastructure, occurred in 2005–2006.

  12. Environmental Conditions in a Carpathian Deep Sea Basin During the Period Preceding Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 - A Case Study from the Skole Nappe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąk Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemipelagic green clayey shales and thin muddy turbidites accumulated in a deep sea environment below the CCD in the Skole Basin, a part of the Outer Carpathian realm, during the Middle Cenomanian. The hemipelagites contain numerous radiolarians, associated with deep-water agglutinated foraminifera. These sediments accumulated under mesotrophic conditions with limited oxygen concentration. Short-term periodic anoxia also occurred during that time. Muddy turbidity currents caused deposition of siliciclastic and biogenic material, including calcareous foramini-fers and numerous sponge spicules. The preservation and diversity of the spicules suggests that they originate from disarticulation of moderately diversified sponge assemblages, which lived predominantly in the neritic-bathyal zone. Analyses of radiolarian ecological groups and pellets reflect the water column properties during the sedimentation of green shales. At that time, surface and also intermediate waters were oxygenated enough and sufficiently rich in nutri-ents to enable plankton production. Numerous, uncompacted pellets with nearly pristine radiolarian skeletons inside show that pelletization was the main factor of radiolarian flux into the deep basin floor. Partly dissolved skeletons indicate that waters in the Skole Basin were undersaturated in relation to silica content. Oxygen content might have been depleted in the deeper part of the water column causing periodic anoxic conditions which prevent rapid bacterial degra-dation of the pellets during their fall to the sea floor.

  13. Types, Evolution and Pool-Controlling Significance of Pool Fluid Sources in Superimposed Basins: A Case Study from Paleozoic and Mesozoic in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Sihuang; Mei Lianfu; Yuan Caiping; Ma Yongsheng; Guo Tonglou

    2007-01-01

    Having multiple tectonic evolution stages, South China belongs to a superimposed basin in nature. Most marine gas pools became secondary pools. The pool fluid sources serve as the principal pool-controlling factors. On the basis of eight typical petroleum pools, the type, evolution in time-space,and the controlling of petroleum distribution of pool fluid sources are comprehensively analyzed. The main types of pool fluid sources include hydrocarbon, generated primarily and secondly from source rocks, gas cracked from crude oil, gas dissolved in water, inorganic gas, and mixed gases. In terms of evolution, the primary hydrocarbon was predominant prior to Indosinian; during Indosinian to Yenshanian the secondary gas includes gas cracked from crude oil, gas generated secondarily, gas dissolved in water, and inorganic gas dominated; during Yenshanian to Himalayan the most fluid sources were mixed gases. Controlled by pool fluid sources, the pools with mixed gas sources distributed mainly in Upper Yangtze block, especially Sichuan (四川) basin; the pools with primary hydrocarbon sources distributed in paleo-uplifts such as Jiangnan (江南), but most of these pools became fossil pools; the pools with secondary hydrocarbon source distributed in the areas covered by Cretaceous and Eogene in Middle-Lower Yangtze blocks, and Chuxiong (楚雄), Shiwandashan (十万大山), and Nanpanjiang (南盘江) basins; the pools with inorganic gas source mainly formed and distributed in tensional structure areas.

  14. Integrated Groundwater Resources Management Using the DPSIR Approach in a GIS Environment Context: A Case Study from the Gallikos River Basin, North Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Mattas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Gallikos River basin is located in the northern part of Greece, and the coastal section is part of a deltaic system. The basin has been influenced by anthropogenic activities during the last decades, leading to continuous water resource degradation. The holistic approach of the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR framework was applied in order to investigate the main causes and origins of pressures and to optimize the measures for sustainable management of water resources. The major driving forces that affect the Gallikos River basin are urbanization, intensive agriculture, industry and the regional development strategy. The main pressures on water resources are the overexploitation of aquifers, water quality degradation, and decrease of river discharge. Recommended responses were based on the Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC, and sum up to rationalization of water resources, land use management and appropriate utilization of waste, especially so effluent. The application of the DPSIR analysis in this paper links the socioeconomic drivers to the water resource pressures, the responses based on the WFD and the national legislation and is as a useful tool for land-use planning and decision making in the area of water protection.

  15. Basin characterisation by means of joint inversion of electromagnetic geophysical data: A case study from the Loop Head Peninsula, western Ireland, and the implications for onshore carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; McConnell, Brian; Haughton, Peter D. W.; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The Science Foundation Ireland funded IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) aims to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic geophysical data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goal of this investigation is to characterise the subsurface beneath the Loop Head Peninsula (part of the Clare Basin, Co. Clare, Ireland) and in particular to identify the main geoelectrical structures that can guide an interpretation of the carbon sequestration potential of this area. During the summer of 2014, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out on the Loop Head Peninsula. Data from a total of 140 sites were acquired, including audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. The dataset was used to generate four shallow three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity models to constrain the subsurface to depths of up to 3 km, and an additional deep study to constrain the electrical resistivity values to depths of up to 30 km. Three-dimensional (3-D) joint inversion process was performed using three different types of electromagnetic data to improve the resolution of the electrical resistivity models: MT impedance tensor (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (T) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (H). The interpretations of the resulting models were based on the geoelectrical results and compared with independent geological and geophysical data for a high-quality interpretation (i.e., deep borehole data from the peninsula, 2-D seismic reflection profiles, gravity data and geological structural information). Second-derivative models of the resulting MT models were used to define the main interfaces between the geoelectrical structures, facilitating superior comparison with geological and seismic results, and also reducing the influence of the colour scale on the interpretation of the results. Specific analysis was

  16. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  17. Effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes: a case study in Heihe River Basin, north-west of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Yu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As an important component of hydrologic cycle, groundwater is affected by topography, vegetation, climate condition, and anthropogenic activity. Groundwater horizontal convergence and divergence and vertical interaction with soil water result in variations of soil moisture, water and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere, which ultimately influences climate. In this work, a two-dimensional groundwater lateral flow scheme based on groundwater mass equation, is developed and incorporated into the land surface model CLM4.5 to investigate effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes in a river basin. A 30-year simulation with groundwater lateral flow and a control run without the horizontal movement are conducted over Heihe River Basin, north-west China, from 1979 to 2012 using the developed model. Results show that with groundwater lateral flow, equilibrium distribution of groundwater table shows more spatial variability following topography rather than the water balance between local precipitation and evapotranspiration, and are much closer to well observations especially over middle reaches area. Along with shallower groundwater table over piedmont areas in the middle reaches, increased soil moisture is shown which alleviates the underestimation of CLM4.5 at here. Changes in evapotranspiration are occurred and it is mainly controlled by the variation of local surface soil moisture, since water is the major limitation factor of evapotranspiration over this arid area. Besides, groundwater lateral flow can change the distribution of surface runoff by changing the saturated area fraction of each model grid cell. Energy cycle also responds to the changes of hydrological cycle which redistributes the sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the entire basin.

  18. Participatory modelling to support decision making in water management under uncertainty: Two comparative case studies in the Guadiana river basin, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona, Gema; Varela-Ortega, Consuelo; Bromley, John

    2013-01-01

    A participatory modelling process has been conducted in two areas of the Guadiana river (the upper and the middle sub-basins), in Spain, with the aim of providing support for decision making in the water management field. The area has a semi-arid climate where irrigated agriculture plays a key role in the economic development of the region and accounts for around 90% of water use. Following the guidelines of the European Water Framework Directive, we promote stakeholder involvement in water m...

  19. Advanced interpretation of ground motion using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique: the Alto Guadalentín Basin (Spain) case of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonì, Roberta; Herrera, Gerardo; Meisina, Claudia; Notti, Davide; Zucca, Francesco; Bejar, Marta; González, Pablo; Palano, Mimmo; Tomás, Roberto; Fernandez, José; Fernández-Merodo, José; Mulas, Joaquín; Aragón, Ramón; Mora, Oscar

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence related to fluid withdrawal has occurred in numerous regions of the world. The phenomena is an important hazard closely related to the development of urban areas. The analysis of the deformations requires an extensive and continuous spatial and temporal monitoring to prevent the negative effects of such risks on structures and infrastructures. Deformation measurements are fundamental in order to identify the affected area extension, to evaluate the temporal evolution of deformation velocities and to identify the main control mechanisms. Differential SAR interferometry represents an advanced remote sensing tool, which can map displacements at very high spatial resolution. The Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) technique is a class of SAR interferometry that uses point-wise radar targets (PS) on the ground whose phase is not interested by temporal and geometrical decorrelation. This technique generates starting from a set of images two main products: the displacement rate along line of sight (LOS) of single PS; and the LOS displacement time series of individual PS. In this work SAR data with different spatio-temporal resolution were used to study the displacements that occur from 1992 to 2012 in the Alto Guadalentin Basin (southern Spain), where is located the city of Lorca The area is affected by the highest rate of subsidence measured in Europe (>10 cm/yr-1) related to long-term exploitation of the aquifer (González et al. 2011). The objectives of the work were 1) to analyse land subsidence evolution over a 20-year period with PSI technique; 2) to compare the spatial and temporal resolution of SAR data acquired by different sensors, 3) to investigate the causes that could explain this land motion. The SAR data have been obtained with ERS-1/2 & ENVISAT (1992-2007), ALOS PALSAR (2007-2010) and COSMO-SkyMed (2011-2012) images, processed with the Stable Point Network (SPN) technique. The PSI data obtained from different satellite from 1992 to 2012

  20. The use of environmental isotopic (C, Sr, S) and hydrochemical tracers to characterize anthropogenic effects on karst groundwater quality: A case study of the Shuicheng Basin, SW China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Groundwater is mostly Ca-HCO3 type in the Shuicheng Basin, Southwest China. → Groundwater quality was seriously affected by anthropogenic activities. → Cl- and Na+ were derived mostly from domestic sewage containing table salt. → High NO3- concentrations could be a result of domestic sewage and nitrogen fertilizers. → SO42- ion was derived mostly from domestic wastewater, rainwater, and sulfide oxidation. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing populations, and associated intensification of agriculture, urbanization and industrialization, place increased demands on water resources and increased likelihood of pollution in many areas of the world. The Shuicheng Basin, southwestern China, is one such area and in order to understand water-rock interactions (carbonate dissolution) and anthropogenic impacts on groundwater quality in this karstic landform-dominated area, chemical as well as C, Sr and S isotopic compositions of groundwater (spring and well) and surface water (river) were measured during and following rainy seasons. The concentrations of various ions in groundwater were characterized by the dominant cations (Ca2+, Mg2+) and anions (HCO3-, SO42-), which account for more than 80% of the total ion concentration. Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr, 0.70760-0.70918, mean 0.70831) and δ13CDIC (-14.2 per mille to -8.4 per mille, mean -10.7 per mille) indicate that the weathering dissolution of limestone controls Ca2+ and HCO3-. The decrease in δ13CDIC values with increasing concentrations of anthropogenic species (Cl-, NO3- and Na+) shows that the C isotopic composition of DIC can be a useful tracer of contaminants. Chemical compositions, hydrogeological conditions and δ34S analyses showed increasing SO42- concentration, resulting from domestic wastewater, fertilizer applications, atmospheric inputs through coal combustion, and oxidation of sulfide minerals, which typically are abundant in coal formations in the basin. Groundwater from

  1. Interpretation of aero-magnetic data and satellite imagery to delineate structure - a case study for uranium exploration from Gwalior Basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paleo-Meso Proterozoic Gwalior basin (E-W), lying to NW fringe of Bundelkhand massif is represented by litho-package of lower arenaceous Par Formation and upper chemogenic Morar Formation. It is bounded by Indo-Gangetic alluvium in north and east, Kaimur sediments in west and Bundelkhand granitoids in south. Gwalior Basin has been the exploration target for uranium mineralization right from early 60's. Surface radioactivity anomalies due to uranium has been reported in both Par and Morar Formations of Gwalior Group and Vindhyan sediments. Besides presence of syngenetic uranium in the system, presence of post-depositional faults and fractures are the favorable factors. Aeromagnetic survey was carried out by AMD in 2002 with N-S lines of 500 m interval covering 9406 line km. The data with sampling interval of 0.1 sec was corrected for spikes, diurnal variation, IGRF, heading and lag. Final processed images are prepared after suitable leveling and gridding. First vertical derivative of TMI-RTP and tilt-angle derivative images are used to map the litho-contacts, lineaments and structural features. Numerous NE-SW trending low amplitude and NW-SE trending high amplitude magnetic linears corroborate with quartz reefs and basic dykes respectively. Besides, E-W to WNW-ESE and ENE-WSW trending fractures are also evident from the processed image maps. Further, the Euler's depth solution of gridded aeromagnetic data calculated for structural indices of 0 and 1 are very consistent in locating the position of the causative sources. Based on the amplitude and textural character of processed aeromagnetic data, alteration zone is delineated well within the Morar Formation. Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) image with 30 m resolution was merged with IRS PAN 1D (5.8 m resolution) for better spatial/radiometric resolution to extract litho-contacts and lineament patterns. Merged PAN band-4 after linear contrast and edge enhancement techniques deciphered detailed lineament pattern

  2. Changes in microbial food web structure in response to changed environmental trophic status: a case study of the Vranjic Basin (Adriatic Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solić, M; Krstulović, N; Kuspilić, G; Nincević Gladan, Z; Bojanić, N; Sestanović, S; Santić, D; Ordulj, M

    2010-08-01

    Vranjic Basin, in the eastern part of KastelaBay (middle Adriatic Sea), received municipal wastewater until offshore submarine outfalls were finished in November 2004. To identify the responses of the microbial community to changes in the trophic status of the marine environment, two 4-year periods were compared: a eutrophic period (2001-2004) when the sewage waters entered the Basin and an oligotrophic period (2005-2008) after the outfalls were completed. The switch from eutrophic to oligotrophic conditions was accompanied by decreases in bacterial abundance, bacterial production and chlorophyll a, and increase in heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) abundance and bacterial specific growth rate. Qualitative changes in the phytoplankton community manifested through dramatically decreased abundance of the diatom species Skeletonema costatum and Euglenophyta Eutreptiella spp. during the oligotrophic period. Furthermore, the percent contribution of pico-nano phytoplankton chlorophyll to total chlorophyll increased from less than 40% during the eutrophic period to more than 60% during the oligotrophic period. Changes in seasonal patterns of phytoplankton, bacteria and HNF abundance were also observed, with summer maxima during the eutrophic period and spring and autumn maxima during the oligotrophic period. Significant changes in the microbial food web were also identified. During eutrophic conditions, bacteria were dominantly under the phytoplankton-mediated bottom-up control whereas HNF were dominantly controlled by ciliate grazing (top-down control). In contrast, during the oligotrophic period, predominantly top-down control of bacteria by strong HNF grazing was observed. At the same time, HNF were spared from strong ciliate predation pressure because the ciliates apparently switched their dominant prey from HNF to the pico-nano phytoplankton fraction during that period. PMID:20570345

  3. A retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrologic event: a case study of Hurricane Irene and on the Hudson River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Ramaswamy, Venkatsundar; Georgas, Nickitas; Blumberg, Alan F.; Pullen, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the uncertainties in hourly streamflow ensemble forecasts for an extreme hydrological event using a hydrological model forced with short-range ensemble weather prediction models. A state-of-the art, automated, short-term hydrologic prediction framework was implemented using GIS and a regional scale hydrological model (HEC-HMS). The hydrologic framework was applied to the Hudson River basin ( ˜ 36 000 km2) in the United States using gridded precipitation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and was validated against streamflow observations from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). Finally, 21 precipitation ensemble members of the latest Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS/R) were forced into HEC-HMS to generate a retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrological event, Hurricane Irene. The work shows that ensemble stream discharge forecasts provide improved predictions and useful information about associated uncertainties, thus improving the assessment of risks when compared with deterministic forecasts. The uncertainties in weather inputs may result in false warnings and missed river flooding events, reducing the potential to effectively mitigate flood damage. The findings demonstrate how errors in the ensemble median streamflow forecast and time of peak, as well as the ensemble spread (uncertainty) are reduced 48 h pre-event by utilizing the ensemble framework. The methodology and implications of this work benefit efforts of short-term streamflow forecasts at regional scales, notably regarding the peak timing of an extreme hydrologic event when combined with a flood threshold exceedance diagram. Although the modeling framework was implemented on the Hudson River basin, it is flexible and applicable in other parts of the world where atmospheric reanalysis products and streamflow data are available.

  4. Exploitation Contradictions Concerning Multi-Energy Resources among Coal, Gas, Oil, and Uranium: A Case Study in the Ordos Basin (Western North China Craton and Southern Side of Yinshan Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Feng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The particular “rich coal, meager oil, and deficient gas” energy structure of China determines its high degree of dependence on coal resources. After over 100 years of high-intensity mining activities in Northeast China, East Region, and the Southern Region, coal mining in these areas is facing a series of serious problems, which force China’s energy exploitation map to be rewritten. New energy bases will move to the western and northern regions in the next few years. However, overlapping phenomena of multiple resources are frequently encountered. Previous exploitation mainly focused on coal mining, which destroys many mutualistic and accompanying resources, such as uranium, gas, and oil. Aiming at solving this unscientific development mode, this research presents a case study in the Ordos Basin, where uranium, coal, and gas/oil show a three-dimensional overlapping phenomenon along the vertical downward direction. The upper uranium and lower coal situation in this basin is remarkable; specifically, coal mining disturbs the overlaying aquifer, thus requiring the uranium to be leached first. The technical approach must be sufficiently reliable to avoid the leakage of radioactive elements in subsequent coal mining procedures. Hence, the unbalanced injection and extraction of uranium mining is used to completely eradicate the discharged emissions to the environment. The gas and oil are typically not extracted because of their deep occurrence strata and their overlapping phenomenon with coal seams. Use of the integrated coal and gas production method is recommended, and relevant fracturing methods to increase the gas migrating degree in the strata are also introduced. The results and recommendations in this study are applicable in some other areas with similarities.

  5. ON EVOLUTION OF MAN-LAND SYSTEM IN OASIS-Taking Minqin Basin as a Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Human beings have had a tremendous impact on natural ecosystems and are now the principal power tochange the biosphere. It is logical that we should pay close attention to the interaction between human systems and environ-mental systems. Taking Minqin basin, Gansu Province, as a case, this paper focuses on the evolution of regional physi-cal environments and the cultural systems by which people maintain their relationships with those environments. This paper presents the conceptual framework for the man-land system. Expecting to accelerate the regional sustainable develop-ment, it also analyses the evolutionary mechanism of regional man-land system. On the basis of reviewing and analyzingthe evolution of man-land system in Minqin basin, the paper also brings forward an adjusting mode for the studied area,which consists of three aspects: to build up a concept that economic growth must harmonize with environmental quality'sand land productivity's improvement; to make a whole planning and management in the drainage area; and to push forward the technique of water-saving irrigation and establish water-saving agricultural system. It's meaningful for resourceexploitation and sustainable development of Chinese northwestern arid area, which is represented by Minqin basin, by under-standing what great changes the basin has experienced and is experiencing at the global background, and studying its timeorder and territorial structure, the system's character and law of evolution, trend and the regulating ways to improveman-land relationship.

  6. Case Study Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. Isotopic and geochemical evolution of ground and river waters in a karst dominated geological setting: A case study from Lijiang basin, South-Asia monsoon region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The river and ground water were of Ca2+–Mg2+–HCO3- type with similar ion compositions. ► Limestone and dolomite were the main end-members to water geochemistry. ► The δ18O similarity of surface and ground water suggested their common source. ► Melt water and precipitation were the main recharge of river and ground water. ► Frequent transformation of surface and ground water occurred in the karst region. - Abstract: Analysis of O isotopes and major ions in river and spring waters in Lijiang basin–Yulong Mountain region, SW China was carried out to identify the geochemical evolution affecting water quality and recharge sources of ground water. Both the river and ground water in the area were of the Ca2+–Mg2+–HCO3- type with similar ion compositions and showed small seasonal variations, normally high in the dry season and low in the wet season. From the upper basin downward there was a general increasing trend for the total ion concentrations in the river and ground water. Water–Rock interaction is the significant contributor to water geochemistry while there is little anthropogenic influence as a whole in the region. The co-relationship of Mg2+/Ca2+ versus Na+/Ca2+ indicated that limestone and dolomite were the main end-members controlling the variations in chemical composition of river and spring waters. The groundwater showed relatively depleted stable isotopic composition compared to modern rainfall, meltwater and river water. The similarity of δ18O for both surface and groundwater samples was due to their frequent transformation in karst regions and suggested rapid recharge of the groundwater aquifers by surface water coming from precipitation and ice–snow melt water from Yulong Mountain. The predominant recharge area of the Lijiang water resource is located at the high elevation with groundwater discharge southwards to the lowlands of the basin, providing water for Lijiang city

  8. CFD simulation on the generation of turbidites in deepwater areas:a case study of turbidity current processes in Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tao; ZHANG Yingzhao; TANG Sulin; ZHANG Daojun; ZUO Qianmei; LIN Weiren; WANG Yahui; SUN Hui; WANG Bo

    2014-01-01

    Turbidity currents represent a major agent for sediment transport in lakes, seas and oceans. In particu-lar, they formulate the most significant clastic accumulations in the deep sea, which become many of the world’s most important hydrocarbon reservoirs. Several boreholes in the Qiongdongnan Basin, the north-western South China Sea, have recently revealed turbidity current deposits as significant hydrocarbon res-ervoirs. However, there are some arguments for the potential provenances. To solve this problem, it is es-sential to delineate their sedimentary processes as well as to evaluate their qualities as reservoir. Numerical simulations have been developed rapidly over the last several years, offering insights into turbidity current behaviors, as geologically significant turbidity currents are difficult to directly investigate due to their large scale and often destructive nature. Combined with the interpretation of the turbidity system based on high-resolution 3D seismic data, the paleotophography is acquired via a back-stripping seismic profile integrated with a borehole, i.e., Well A, in the western Qiongdongnan Basin; then a numerical model is built on the basis of this back-stripped profile. After defining the various turbidity current initial boundary conditions, includ-ing grain size, velocity and sediment concentration, the structures and behaviors of turbidity currents are investigated via numerical simulation software ANSYS FLUENT. Finally, the simulated turbidity deposits are compared with the interpreted sedimentary bodies based on 3D seismic data and the potential provenances of the revealed turbidites by Well A are discussed in details. The simulation results indicate that a sedimen-tary body develops far away from its source with an average grain size of 0.1 mm, i.e., sand-size sediment. Taking into account the location and orientation of the simulated seismic line, the consistence between normal forward simulation results and the revealed cores

  9. Assessment of Karst Spring Features in a typical Mediterranean fluvial landscape with an Interdisciplinary Investigation nased on Radon-222 as an Environmental Indicator. The case study of the Bussento River basin (Campania region, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, A.; Guadagnuolo, D.; Guida, D.; Guida, M.; Knoeller, K.; Schubert, M.; Siervo, V.

    2012-04-01

    Karst aquifers provide 25% of the overall drinking water resources to the world's population and sustain aquatic life in most fluvial systems, providing several ecological services to human beings, although, because of their complex links between surface and groundwater, turn out to be very vulnerable to contamination and pollution. Hydrological assessment of karst systems reveals to be extremely complex and difficult and requires a stepwise multi-tracers approach. This work describes some of the most relevant findings obtained from the implementation of an interdisciplinary approach based on the use of Environmental Tracers, consisting of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides like Radon-222 (referred to as Radon), for the investigation of Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes in fluvial water bodies. In particular, Radon activity concentration measurement data having been collected from streamflow and instream springs during monthly field campaigns performed in a typical Mediterranean karst river basin: the Bussento river system (Campania region, Southern Italy). The general task has been to investigate the complex interactions and exchanges between streamflow and groundwater in a fluvial water body, at scales that are imperceptible to standard hydrological and hydraulic analyses. The Bussento River basin has been chosen as a study case for the following features of extreme relevance: Its location inside the Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park, its inclusion of a WWF Nature Reserve, it represents a remarkable Drinking Water resource for the territory and last but not least its system includes Submarine Groundwater Discharges (SGD) to the Policastro Gulf. All these issues causes, therefore, that the management of its relevant water resources requires not only groundwater protection for domestic drinking use, but also riverine wildlife preservation and coastal water quality maintenance. As a support for hydro-geomorphological and hydrological

  10. CORAL ASSEMBLAGES AND BIOCONSTRUCTIONS ADAPTED TO THE DEPOSITIONAL DYNAMICS OF A MIXED CARBONATE-SILICICLASTIC SETTING: THE CASE STUDY OF THE BURDIGALIAN BONIFACIO BASIN (SOUTH CORSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCO BRANDANO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coral bioconstructions associated with mixed carbonate-siliciclastic settings are known to be strongly controlled by coastal morphology and paleotopography. A striking example is represented by the different types of coral bioconstructions and coral-rich deposits of the Cala di Labra Formation deposited in the coastal environment of the Bonifacio Basin (Corsica, France during the Early Miocene. Detailed mapping on photomosaics allowed accurate documentation of the internal organization of coral deposits as well as lateral and vertical facies relationships. Four types of coral bioconstructions (CB  and one reworked coral deposits (RCD have been recognized. The CB are represented by sigmoidal cluster reefs, coral carpets and skeletal conglomerates rich in corals. The RCD occurs in lens-shaped bodies intercalated within clinoforms composed of bioclastic floatstones and coarse packstones. The investigated bioconstructions can be contextualised in a coastal environment. In the upper shoreface corals developed in association with the oyster Hyotissa, above bioclastic conglomerates sourced by ephemeral streams and erosion of the granitic coastline. In the lower shoreface corals formed sigmoidal bioconstructions interpreted as cluster reefs, whereas  coral carpets developed during a relative sea-level rise related to the middle Burdigalian transgressive phase. The reworked coral deposits can be interpreted as lobe-shaped deposits of coarse-grained bioclastic submarine fans formed at the base of the depositional slope of an infralittoral prograding wedge system.

  11. A SIMULTANEOUS APPROACH TO WATER—RESOURCE PROTECTION AND ECONOMIC STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT —A Case Study of Guanzhong Region in the Huanghe River Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXi-qin; LIUChang-ming; 等

    2002-01-01

    A regional multiple-objective water-resource and economic optimization model was developed using a quantitative method of systematic analysis.Input to the model includes indexes of economic structure and development,water-resource utilization,wastewater and pollutant discharge,and investment in wastewater treatment.The model,which consists of producton-structure and industrial-structure optimization modules,was applied to the Guanzhong region in the middle reaches of the Huanghe(Yellow) River basin in China.By evaluating several alternative production and industrialization schemes,the modal indicate that water pollution will get worsen though wastewater treatment improves if the economy continues to develop at the planned speed without structural adjustment.However,the results also show that not only economic goals but also water-resource protection and pollution-control targets can be achieved under an alternative,recommended production and industrial structure.This example illustrates that economic development and environmental protection can be improved coordinately by the regional multiple-objective water-resource and economic optimization model.It provides an operable approach to the simultaneous sustained development of water resources and economic growth.

  12. A SIMULTANEOUS APPROACH TO WATER-RESOURCE PROTECTION AND ECONOMIC STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT-A Case Study of Guanzhong Region in the Huanghe River Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A regional multiple-objectiv e water-resource and economic optimization model wasdevelopednsingaqnantita-five method of systematic analysis. Input to the model includes indexes of economic structure and development, wa-ter-resource utilization, wastewater and pollutant discharge, and investment in wastewater treatment. The model, whichconsists of production-structure and industrial-structure optimization modules, was applied to the Guanzhong region in themiddle reaches of the Huanghe (Yellow) River basin in China. By evaluating several alternative production and industrializa-tion schemes, the modal indicate that water pollution will get worsen though wastewater treatment improves if the economycontinues to develop at the planned speed without structural adjustment. However, the results also show that not only econom-ic goals but also water-resource protection and pollution-control targets can be achieved under an alternative, recommend-ed production and industrial structure. This example illustrates that economic development and environmental protectioncan be improved coordinately by the regional multiple-objective water-resource and economic optimization model. It pro-vides an operable approach to the simultaneous sustained development of water resources and economic growth.

  13. Selection of logging-based TOC calculation methods for shale reservoirs: A case study of the Jiaoshiba shale gas field in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renchun Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various methods are available for calculating the TOC of shale reservoirs with logging data, and each method has its unique applicability and accuracy. So it is especially important to establish a regional experimental calculation model based on a thorough analysis of their applicability. With the Upper Ordovician Wufeng Fm-Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm shale reservoirs as an example, TOC calculation models were built by use of the improved ΔlgR, bulk density, natural gamma spectroscopy, multi-fitting and volume model methods respectively, considering the previous research results and the geologic features of the area. These models were compared based on the core data. Finally, the bulk density method was selected as the regional experimental calculation model. Field practices demonstrated that the improved ΔlgR and natural gamma spectroscopy methods are poor in accuracy; although the multi-fitting method and bulk density method have relatively high accuracy, the bulk density method is simpler and wider in application. For further verifying its applicability, the bulk density method was applied to calculate the TOC of shale reservoirs in several key wells in the Jiaoshiba shale gas field, Sichuan Basin, and the calculation accuracy was clarified with the measured data of core samples, showing that the coincidence rate of logging-based TOC calculation is up to 90.5%–91.0%.

  14. Influence of Land Use/Cover Change on Storm Runoff——A Case Study of Xitiaoxi River Basin in Upstream of Taihu Lake Watershed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Land use/cover change (LUCC) is one of the main boundary conditions which influence many hydrologic processes. In view of the importance of Taihu Lake Watershed in China and the urgency of discovering the impacts of LUCC on storm runoff, two flood events under five land cover scenarios in the Xitiaoxi River Basin of the upstream of Taihu Lake watershed were simulated by distributed hydrologic modeling system HEC-HMS. The influences of each land cover on storm runoffwere discussed. It was concluded that under the same rainstorm the ascending order of runoff coefficient and peak flow produced by the 5 different land covers were woodland, shrub, grassland, arable land,and built-up land; the descending order of swelling time were woodland, shrub, grassland, arable land, and built-up land. Scenario of built-up land was the first to reach peak flow, then arable land, grassland, shrub, and woodland.There were close relationships between the runoff coefficients produced by the 5 different land covers. The degrees of impacts on runoff coefficient of land cover change modes were sorted by descending: woodland to built-up land, shrub to built-up land, grassland to built-up land, arable land to built-up land, woodland to arable land, shrub to arable land,arable land to grassland, shrub to grassland, grassland to arable land, and woodland to shrub. Urbanization will contribute to flood disaster, while forestation will mitigate flood disaster.

  15. Assessment of temporal and spatial variations in surface water quality using multivariate statistical techniques:A case study of Nenjiang River basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑力燕; 于宏兵; 王启山

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of temporal and spatial variations in surface water quality is important to evaluate the health of a watershed and make necessary management decisions to control current and future pollution of receiving water bodies. In this work, surface water quality data for 12 physical and chemical parameters collected from 10 sampling sites in the Nenjiang River basin during the years (2012−2013) were analyzed. The results show that river water quality has significant temporal and spatial variations. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) grouped 12 months into three periods (LF, MF and HF) and classified 10 monitoring sites into three regions (LP, MP and HP) based on the similarity of water quality characteristics. The principle component analysis (PCA)/factor analysis (FA) was used to recognize the factors or origins responsible for temporal and spatial water quality variations. Temporal and spatial PCA/FA revealed that the Nenjiang River water chemistry was strongly affected by rock/water interaction, hydrologic processes and anthropogenic activities. This work demonstrates that the application of HCA and PCA/FA has achieved meaningful classification based on temporal and spatial criteria.

  16. Documenting human transformation and establishing the reference condition of large river systems using Corona images: a case study from the Ganga River basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajiv; Pipil, Shobhit; Carbonneau, Patrice; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    The Ganga basin in northern India is one of the most populous river basin in the world with nearly half a billion inhabitants. In the post-independence era, population expansion and human interventions have left the ecosystem of the Ganga in a severely damaged state with dwindling water levels, pollution due to human activity and natural sediment transport severely perturbed by dams and barrages. Fortunately, there is a growing recognition by the policy managers in India that the restoration of the Ganga to a healthier status, closer to its original unperturbed state, would set a strong foundation to future, greener, economic growth in Northern India. However, given the past six decades of fast development, efforts to restore the Ganga to its original condition are faced with a fundamental question: What was the original state of the Ganga? Answering this question will require some knowledge of the former course of the Ganga and of the farming and urban density of the surrounding plains before the impacts of human disturbance could be felt. We have made use of the Corona spy satellite program that collected a large number of earth observation photos in the 1960s. These photos, now declassified, offer us a unique view of the Ganga at the very early stages of intense development and thus before the worst ecological damages occurred. However, actual usage of these images poses significant technical challenges. In the design of the Corona cameras, very high resolution comes at the cost of complex distortions. Furthermore, we have no information on the exact position and orientation of the satellite at the time of image acquisition so an accurate reprojection of the image into conventional map coordinates is not straightforward. We have developed a georectification process based on polynomial transformation to achieve a positional accuracy of ±20m for the area of our interest. Further, We have developed an object-based classification method that uses both texture and

  17. Agricultural runoff pollution control by a grassed swales coupled with wetland detention ponds system: a case study in Taihu Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinhui; Zhao, Yaqian; Zhao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The performance of a field grassed swales (GSs) coupled with wetland detention ponds (WDPs) system was monitored under four typical rainfall events to assess its effectiveness on agricultural runoff pollution control in Taihu Basin, China. The results indicated that suspended solids (SS) derived from the flush process has significant influence on pollution loads in agricultural runoff. Determination of first flush effect (FFE) indicated that total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus (TP) exhibited moderate FFE, while chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) showed weak FFE. Average removal efficiencies of 83.5 ± 4.5, 65.3 ± 6.8, 91.6 ± 3.8, and 81.3 ± 5.8 % for TSS, COD, TN, and TP were achieved, respectively. The GSs played an important role in removing TSS and TP and acted as a pre-treatment process to prevent clogging of the subsequent WDPs. Particle size distributions (PSDs) analysis indicated that coarse particles larger than 75 μm accounted for 80 % by weight of the total particles in the runoff. GSs can effectively reduce coarse particles (≥75 μm) in runoff, while its removal efficiency for fine particles (particles smaller than 25 μm. The length of GSs is a key factor in its performance. The WDPs can remove particles of all sizes by sedimentation. In addition, WDPs can improve water quality due to their buffering and dilution capacity during rainfall as well as their water purification ability during dry periods. Overall, the ecological system of GSs coupled with WDPs is an effective system for agricultural runoff pollution control. PMID:26832867

  18. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of individual alkanes as a new approach to petroleum correlation: case studies from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maowen Li; Obermajer, M.; Chunqing Jiang; Snowdon, L.R.; Fowler, M.G. [Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary (Canada); Yongsong Huang [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States). Department of Geological Science

    2001-07-01

    Isotopic compositions of carbon-bound hydrogen in individual n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoid alkanes, from a number of crude oil samples, were measured using gas chromatography-thermal conversion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The precision of this technique is better than 3 per cent for most alkanes, compared to the large range of {delta}D variation among the samples (up to 160 per cent). The oils were selected from major genetic oil families in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, with source rocks ranging in age from Ordovician (and possibly Cambrian) to Cretaceous. The hydrogen isotopic composition of alkanes in crude oils is controlled by three factors: isotopic compositions of biosynthetic precursors, source water {delta}D values, and postdepositional processes. The inherited difference in the lipid's biosynthetic origins and/or pathways is reflected by a small hydrogen isotopic variability within n-alkanes, but much larger differences in the {delta}D values between n-alkanes and pristane/phytane. The shift toward lighter hydrogen isotopic compositions from Paleozoic to Upper Cretaceous oils in the WCSB reflects a special depositional setting and/or a minor contribution of terrestrial organic matter. The strong influence of source water {delta}D values is demonstrated by the distinctively lower {delta}D values of lacustrine oils than marine oils, and also by the high values for oils with source rocks deposited in evaporative environments. Thermal maturation may alter the {delta}D values of the alkanes in the oil to some extent, but secondary oil migration does not appear to have had any significant impact. The fact that oils derived from source rocks that could be of Cambrian age still retain a strong signature of the hydrogen isotopic compositions of source organic matter, and source water, indicates that {delta}D values are very useful for oil-source correlation and for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. (author)

  19. Optimization of a development well pattern based on production performance: A case study of the strongly heterogeneous Sulige tight sandstone gas field, Ordos Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuegang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a typical tight sandstone gas field with strong heterogeneity, the Sulige Gas Field in the Ordos Basin faces major challenges in its development because the reservoirs in the gas field are small in effective sand scale, rapid in lithologic change, strong in plane heterogeneity, and poor in connectivity. How to scientifically deploy development wells to improve the recovery is the most important issue for the successful development of this kind of gas fields. Therefore, a well inference analysis was conducted to figure out the impact of well pattern density on the recovery based on the research of many years in gas field development methods and the summary of practical effect. In this paper, we put forward for the first time the concept of inter-well interference probability, and present the relationship between the probability of inter-well interference and well pattern density of the Sulige Gas Field. Then we established a mathematical model for the optimization of development well pattern by combining fine sand anatomy, reservoir engineering, numerical simulation and economic evaluation, and obtained a quantitative relationship between recovery and well pattern density. Furthermore, on the basis of comprehensive analysis, a reasonable development well pattern was designed for the Sulige Gas Field: this well pattern is parallelogram in shape, with a density of 3.1 wells/km2, well spacing of 500 m, and row spacing of 650 m. Development practices have confirmed that this scheme is capable of achieving better economic benefits, producing geological reserves as far as possible and improving the ultimate recovery of such gas fields.

  20. Design philosophy and practice of asymmetrical 3D fracturing and random fracturing: A case study of tight sand gas reservoirs in western Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchun Guo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At present two technical models are commonly taken in tight gas reservoir stimulation: conventional massive fracturing and SRV fracturing, but how to select a suitable fracturing model suitable for reservoir characteristics is still a question waiting to be answered. In this paper, based on the analysis of geological characteristics and seepage mechanism of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs, the differences between stimulation philosophy of tight gas reservoirs and shale reservoirs are elucidated, and the concept that a suitable stimulation model should be selected based on reservoir geological characteristics and seepage mechanism aiming at maximally improving the seepage capability of a reservoir. Based on this concept, two fracturing design methods were proposed for two tight gas reservoirs in western Sichuan Basin: asymmetrical 3D fracturing design (A3DF for the middle-shallow Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm stacked reservoirs in which the hydraulic fractures can well match the sand spatial distribution and seepage capability of the reservoirs; SRV fracturing design which can increase fracture randomness in the sandstone and shale laminated reservoirs for the 5th Member of middle-deep Upper Triassic Xujiahe Fm. Compared with that by conventional fracturing, the average production of horizontal wells fractured by A3DF increased by 41%, indicating that A3DF is appropriate for gas reservoir development in the Penglaizhen Fm; meanwhile, the average production per well of the 5th Member of the Xujiahe Fm was 2.25 × 104 m3/d after SRV fracturing, showing that the SRV fracturing is a robust technical means for the development of this reservoir.

  1. Comparison of monthly rainfall generated from dynamical and statistical downscaling methods: a case study of the Heihe River Basin in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haifeng; Xiong, Zhe; Yan, Xiaodong; Dai, Xingang; Wei, Wenguang

    2016-04-01

    Monthly rainfall in the Heihe River Basin (HRB) was simulated by the dynamical downscaling model (DDM) and statistical downscaling model (SDM). The rainy-season rainfall in the HRB obtained by SDM and DDM was compared with the observed datasets (OBS) over the period of 2003-2012. The results showed the following: (1) Both methods reasonably reproduced the spatial pattern of rainy-season rainfall in the HRB with a high-level skill. Rainfall simulated by DDM was better than that by SDM in the upstream, with biases of -12.09 and -13.59 %, respectively; rainfall simulated by SDM was better than that by DDM in the midstream, with biases of 3.91 and -23.22 %, respectively; there was little difference between the rainfall simulated by SDM and DDM in the downstream, with biases of -10.89 and -9.50 %, respectively. (2) Both methods reasonably reproduced monthly rainfall in rainy season in different subregions. Rainfall simulated by DDM was better than that by SDM in May and July in the upstream, whereas rainfall simulated by SDM was closer to OBS except August in the midstream and except August and September in the downstream. (3) For multi-year mean rainy-season rainfall in different stations, there was a little difference between the rainfall simulated by DDM and SDM in Tuole station in the upstream, with biases of -13.16 and -12.40 %, respectively; rainfall in Zhangye station simulated by SDM was overestimated with bias of 14.02 %, and rainfall simulated by DDM was underestimated with bias of -14.60 %; rainfall in Dingxin station simulated by DDM was reproduced better than that by SDM, with biases of -19.34 and -32.75 %, respectively.

  2. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  3. Analysing the meandering rivers responses to the slope-changes, depending on their bankfull discharge - Case study in the Pannonian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovszki, Judit; Timár, Gábor; Molnár, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    , so the sinuosity is a useable parameter to detect the changing slope. The research is made in the frame of project OTKA-NK83400 (SourceSink Hungary). The European Union and the European Social Fund also have provided financial support to the project under the grant agreement no. TÁMOP 4.2.1./B-09/1/KMR-2010-0003. References: Ackers, P., Charlton, F. G. (1971): The slope and resistance of small meandering channels. Inst. Civil Engineers Proc. Supp. XV, Paper 73625. Leopold, L. B., Wolman, M. G. (1957): River chanel patterns; braided, meandering and straight. USGS Prof. Paper 282B: 1-73. Schumm, S. A., Khan, H. R. (1972): Experimental study of channel patterns. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 83:1755-1770. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 2199-2207. Viczián E. (1905): Magyarország vízierői. Pallas, Budapest, 349 o.

  4. Organochlorine pesticides in fish, water and sediments in the middle Volta Basin: a case study of Kpando Torkor lake, Volta Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels of contamination with selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water, sediment, and two commonly harvested fish species namely Tilapia zilli and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus from Kpando Torkor Lake were determined. This was to give the general picture of the extent of contamination of these matrices with OCPs and also assess the suitability of the water and fish catch for human consumption. Organochlorine pesticides residues in water samples were extracted using liquid-liquid extraction whilst Soxhlet was used in the case of fish and sediment samples. All extracts were cleaned-up using packed columns and then analyzed using Gas chromatography equipped with 63Ni electron-capture detector (ECD). Fifteen organochlorine pesticide residues namely β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, Heptachlor, Aldrin, Dieldrin, Endrin, γ-Chlordane, α-Endosulfan, β-Endosulfan, Endosulfan sulphate and Methoxychlor were investigated in this study. Thirteen of them excluding γ-HCH and Endrin were detected in sediment and fish samples at concentrations ranging from below the level of quantification (LOQ) to 37.75ng/g wet weight, and occurrence frequencies ranging from 14 to 100%. Twelve of them excluding p,p'-DDT, -HCH and Endrin were however, measured in water samples with concentrations ranging from below LOQ to 0.669μg/L and occurrence frequencies ranging from 14 to 29%. γ-HCH and p,p'-DDD were the most frequently detected residues in all samples analyzed with an average percentage frequency of 85.8, followed by Endosulfan sulphate (83.0%) and β-HCH (80.0%) among others. In consonance with their properties, organochlorine pesticide residues measured in fish samples were higher than those of sediment samples. Even though, the fat content of catfish muscle (10.24%) was higher than tilapia muscle (2.80%), the levels of organochlorine pesticide residues in tilapia tissues were however, higher than that of catfish. For instance, the levels of β-HCH in

  5. Research on thermal evolution and hydrocarbon expulsion history of source rocks in low-exploration basins:a case study on Jiaojiang Sag, East China Sea Basin%低勘探程度盆地烃源岩热演化及排烃史研究——以东海椒江凹陷为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝志刚; 赵志刚; 杨树春; 席小应; 郝建荣; 喻英梅

    2012-01-01

    低勘探程度盆地,特别是在海域,钻井稀少且一般位于构造高部位,而盆地中心烃源岩埋藏深,又无钻井揭示,如何评价盆地中心烃源岩的演化程度和排烃历史是盆地或凹陷评价的关键问题.该文以东海椒江凹陷为例,从凹陷边缘或构造高部位具备实测温度和镜质体反射率(R.)资料的钻井出发,利用正演模拟方法,恢复椒江凹陷岩石圈结构及其演化史,进而模拟整个凹陷古新统烃源岩的热演化史.研究表明,椒江凹陷古新统烃源岩现今最大R.达到2.8%,为过成熟状态.凹陷总排油量略多于排气量,总排烃量为33×108m3油当量,主要的排烃期在中新世之前.下一步勘探应在凹陷中部凸起带选择圈闭条件好、且形成于中新世之前的目标进行钻探.%In low-exploration basins, especially offshore ones, wells are rare and usually locate in the higher positions. The source rocks in basin centers are buried deeply and are not drilled. Therefore, it is the key for basin/ sag evaluation to study the thermal evolution and hydrocarbon expulsion history of source rocks in basin centers. Case studies have been carried out in the Jiaojiang Sag of the East China Sea Basin. Based on the measured temperature and Ro data collected from wells locating in the sag edge or the higher positions, by means of forward modeling method, the lithosphere structure and thermal history of the Jiaojiang Sag have been recovered, and the thermal history of Paleocene source rocks in the whole sag have been modeled. The results show that the maximum Ro of Paleocene source rocks in the sag is 2.8% , indicating over-mature state. The total amount of oil expulsion is a little bit more than that of gas expulsion, and the amount of hydrocarbon expulsion is 33×l08 m3 oil equivalent. Hydrocarbon expulsion mainly took place before Miocene. In the future exploration, the prospects with good traps and were formed before Miocene in the central uplifts

  6. An integrated Dissolved Organic Carbon Dynamics Model (DOCDM 1.0): model development and a case study in the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, X.; Zhuang, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative understanding of the variation in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to studying the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. This study presents a process-based, dissolved organic carbon dynamics model (DOCDM 1.0) that couples the soil heat conduction, water flow, DOC production, mineralization and transport in both surface and subsurface of soil profile to quantify DOC dynamics in boreal terrestrial ecosystems. The model...

  7. Investigation of the geothermal state of sedimentary basins using oil industry thermal data: case study from Northern Alberta exhibiting the need to systematically remove biased data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface temperature data from industrial sources may contain significant biases that greatly reduce their overall quality. However, if these biases can be identified and removed, the data can provide a good preliminary source of information for further studies. In this paper, industrial thermal data from three sources: bottom hole temperatures, annual pool pressure tests and drill stem tests are evaluated to provide an updated view of the subsurface temperatures below the oil sand regions of Northern Alberta. The study highlights some of the potentially large systematic biases inherent in industrial temperature data which affect estimates of geothermal gradient and regional mapping of the geothermal field. (paper)

  8. Geochemical Variations in Hydrocarbon Components Distribution in a Prograding Deltaic Sequence: A Case Study of the Baram Delta, Offshore Sarawak Basin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ben-Awuah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hydrocarbon distribution have evolved from basic reservoir characterization to complex studies today involving the interactions between oil components and clay minerals and sequential extraction studies on hydrocarbon extracts in reservoir rocks. Findings from such studies include the discovery of variations in oil fractions in reservoirs such as adsorbed oil and free oil. The theory that first oil charge preferentially interacts with clay minerals occurring in pores and as coatings in reservoirs was also proposed by some researchers. Despite, all these studies some aspects of variations in the composition of hydrocarbons in reservoir rocks still need to be investigated further. This study has been carried out particularly because the qualitative and quantitative composition of aromatic and aliphatic components of hydrocarbons in terms of the presence and quantities of hydrocarbon functional groups and how they relate to hydrocarbon migration have not been exhaustively discussed. This study uses Ultra-Violet visible light (UV-vis and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR to characterize variations in hydrocarbon distribution in reservoir quality sandstones from three fields namely BD01, BD02 and BD03 in the Baram Delta, offshore Sarawak and to deduce how these variations relate to differential migration patterns in hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon extraction was done in the ultra vilolet visible (UV-vis experiment using 0.1M sodium pyrophosphate as solvent whereas in the Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, the experiment was done on very fine powdered samples of the sandstones. Results from both the UV-vis and FTIR experiments indicate a dominance of aromatic functional groups in the samples. Most of the samples have E4/E6 ratio of more than 1 which indicates a high degree of aromacity. The BD01 field sandstones with a maximum porosity of 32% has the highest average E4/E6 ratio of 1.21, followed by the BD02 field sandstones with a maximum

  9. Modern fluvial sediment provenance and pollutant tracing: a case study from the Dřevnice River Basin (eastern Moravia, Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehyba, Slavomír; Adamová, Marie; Faimon, Jiří; Kuchovský, Tomáš; Holoubek, Ivan; Zeman, Josef

    2010-04-01

    Modern fluvial deposits of a small fluvial system were studied in the area of eastern Moravia (Czech Republic) with the aim of determining the provenance of the deposits and weathering processes. Identification of the source rocks and their alongstream variations were used for the evaluation of the natural or anthropogenic source of the heavy metals. Paleogene flysch sandstones, flysch mudstones and Quaternary loesses represent source rocks and reflect both the role of recycling and local sources. Provenance from sandstones dominate upstream whereas mudstones represent dominant source rock in the downstream part of the fluvial system. The contents of Pb and Zn are highly enhanced when compared with the natural background in the entire study area. Their anthropogenic source is connected with the rubber/shoe manufacturing industry and traffic. The contents of Cr, Co, Cu, Ni and V are usually lower in modern deposits than in the identified source rocks.

  10. Identifying Watershed Regions Sensitive to Soil Erosion and Contributing to Lake Eutrophication—A Case Study in the Taihu Lake Basin (China)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Lin; Ronghua Ma; Bin He

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China is suffering from severe eutrophication partly due to non-point pollution from the watershed. There is an increasing need to identify the regions within the watershed that most contribute to lake water degradation. The selection of appropriate temporal scales and lake indicators is important to identify sensitive watershed regions. This study selected three eutrophic lake areas, including Meiliang Bay (ML), Zhushan Bay (ZS), and the Western Coastal region (WC), as well as ...

  11. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    OpenAIRE

    A. M. Carmona; G. Poveda; M. Sivapalan; S. M. Vallejo-Bernal; E. Bustamante

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies a 3-D generalization of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E/P, Φ = Ep/P and Ω = E/Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that...

  12. Monthly soil erosion monitoring based on remotely sensed biophysical parameters: a case study in Strymonas river basin towards a functional pan-European service

    OpenAIRE

    PANAGOS Panagiotis; Christos G. Karydas; Ioannis Z. Gitas; Montanarella, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Currently, many soil erosion studies at local, regional, national or continental scale use models based on the USLE-family approaches. Applications of these models pay little attention to seasonal changes, despite evidence in the literature which suggests that erosion risk may change rapidly according to intra-annual rainfall figures and vegetation phenology. This paper emphasises the aspect of seasonality in soil erosion mapping by using month-step rainfall erosivity data and biophysical tim...

  13. An integrated Dissolved Organic Carbon Dynamics Model (DOCDM 1.0): model development and a case study in the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Zhuang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of the variation in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to studying the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. This study presents a process-based, dissolved organic carbon dynamics model (DOCDM 1.0) that couples the soil heat conduction, water flow, DOC production, mineralization and transport in both surface and subsurface of soil profile to quantify DOC dynamics in boreal terrestrial ecosystems. The model is first evaluated and then applied for a watershed in Alaska to investigate its DOC production and transport. We find that 42 and 27 % of precipitation infiltrates to soils in 2004, a warmer year, and in 1976, a colder year, respectively. Under warming conditions, DOC transported via overland flow does not show the expected decrease trend while the overland DOC yield shows a 4 % increase. The horizontal subsurface flow only accounts for 1-2 % of total water flux, but transports 30-50 % of DOC into rivers. Water flush due to water infiltration controls DOC transport. Snowmelt plays a noticeable role in DOC flush-out and DOC transport significantly depends on flowpaths in the study region. High soil temperature stimulates DOC production. The overland DOC export does not necessarily follow the DOC downward trend in surface water transport. Overall, this study shows that DOC export behavior is complex under changing temperature and hydrological conditions in cold-region watersheds. To adequately quantify DOC dynamics in northern high latitudes, more DOC and hydrological data are needed to better parameterize and test the developed model before extrapolating it to the region.

  14. An integrated Dissolved Organic Carbon Dynamics Model (DOCDM 1.0: model development and a case study in the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative understanding of the variation in dissolved organic carbon (DOC is important to studying the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. This study presents a process-based, dissolved organic carbon dynamics model (DOCDM 1.0 that couples the soil heat conduction, water flow, DOC production, mineralization and transport in both surface and subsurface of soil profile to quantify DOC dynamics in boreal terrestrial ecosystems. The model is first evaluated and then applied for a watershed in Alaska to investigate its DOC production and transport. We find that 42 and 27 % of precipitation infiltrates to soils in 2004, a warmer year, and in 1976, a colder year, respectively. Under warming conditions, DOC transported via overland flow does not show the expected decrease trend while the overland DOC yield shows a 4 % increase. The horizontal subsurface flow only accounts for 1–2 % of total water flux, but transports 30–50 % of DOC into rivers. Water flush due to water infiltration controls DOC transport. Snowmelt plays a noticeable role in DOC flush-out and DOC transport significantly depends on flowpaths in the study region. High soil temperature stimulates DOC production. The overland DOC export does not necessarily follow the DOC downward trend in surface water transport. Overall, this study shows that DOC export behavior is complex under changing temperature and hydrological conditions in cold-region watersheds. To adequately quantify DOC dynamics in northern high latitudes, more DOC and hydrological data are needed to better parameterize and test the developed model before extrapolating it to the region.

  15. Application of GIS and remote sensing for water resource management in Arid area – Wadi Dahab Basin – South Eastern Sinai-Egypt (Case-study)

    OpenAIRE

    Omran, Adel Fouad Abdou

    2013-01-01

    The present work is conducted to estimate the flood risks areas in W. Dahab and to design a suitable management system to control its huge runoff quantities. Hydrogeological and -chemical investigations are necessary in order to define the water pollution and manage the available water resources in the study area. Moreover, Maps indicating the natural water resources should be drawn to show the future review of these resources and setting of the suggested tools to manage water resources in th...

  16. ON EVOLUTION OF MAN—LAND SYSTEM IN OASIS—Taking Minqin Basin as a Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAOLei-lei; CAIWei-bin; 等

    2002-01-01

    Human beings have had a tremendous impact on natural ecosystems and are now the principal power to change the biosphere.It is logical that we should pay close attention to the interaction between human systems and environ-mental systems.Taking Minqin bsin ,Gansu Province,as a case,this paper focuses on the evolution of regional physic-cal environments and the cultural systems by which people maintain their relationships with those environments.This pa-per presents the conceptural framework for the man-land system.Expecting to accelerate the regional sustainable develop-ment,it also analyses the evolutionary mechanism of regional man-land system.On the basis of reviewing and analyzing the evolution of man-land system in Minqin basin,the paper also brings forward an adujusting mode for the studied area, which consists of three aspects:to build up a concept that economic growth must harmonize with environmental qualityˊs and land productivityˊs improvement;to make a whole planning and management in the drainage area;and to push for-ward the technique of water-saving irrigation and establish water-saving agricultural system. Itˊs meaningful for resource exploitation and sustainable development of Chinese northwestern arid area,which is represented by Minqin basin,by under-standing what great changes the basin has experienced is experiencing at the global background,and studying its time standing what great changes the basin has experienced and is experiencing at the global background,and studying its time order and territorial structure ,the systemˊs character and law of evolution,trend and the regulating ways to improve man-land relationship.

  17. Constraints in using Cerium-animaly of bulk sediments as an indicator of paleo bottom water redox environment: A case study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Pearce, N.J.G.; Mislankar, P.G.

    /shale ratio very close to 1 normally indi- cates a dominant terrigenous source (Piper, 1974a; Thomson et al., 1984). The REE concentration how- ever gradually increases below 1 m in the core sug- studied for clay mineralogy on a Phillips X-ray dif- fractometer....63% to 0.78%), Ti (0.34% to 0.42%) and smectite between 4 and 5 m in the core could be responsible for the elevated REE because they contain high REE abundance (Piper, 1974a; Courtois and Jaffrezic-Renault, 1977; Desprairies and Courtois, 1980). The shale...

  18. Remote sensing data applied to the evaluation of soil erosion caused by land-use. Ribeirao Anhumas Basin Area: A case study. [Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Dosanjosferreirapinto, S.; Kux, H. J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Formerly covered by a tropical forest, the study area was deforested in the early 40's for coffee plantation and cattle raising, which caused intense gully erosion problems. To develop a method to analyze the relationship between land use and soil erosion, visual interpretations of aerial photographs (scale 1:25.000), MSS-LANDSAT imagery (scale 1:250,000), as well as automatic interpretation of computer compatible tapes by IMAGE-100 system were carried out. From visual interpretation the following data were obtained: land use and cover tapes, slope classes, ravine frequency, and a texture sketch map. During field work, soil samples were collected for texture and X-ray analysis. The texture sketch map indicate that the areas with higher slope angles have a higher susceptibilty to the development of gullies. Also, the over carriage of pastureland, together with very friable lithologies (mainly sandstone) occuring in that area, seem to be the main factors influencing the catastrophic extension of ravines in the study site.

  19. Landslide susceptibility-certainty mapping by a multi-method approach: A case study in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay (Massif central, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiraud, Alexandre

    2014-07-01

    The present study discusses the use of integrated variables along with a combination of multi-method forecasts for landslide susceptibility mapping. The study area is located in the south-eastern French Massif central, a volcanic region containing Tertiary sedimentary materials that are prone to landslides. The flowage-type landslides within the study area are very slow-moving phenomena which affect the infrastructures and human settlements. The modelling process is based on a training set of landslides (70% of total landslides) and a set of controlling factor (slope, lithology, surficial formation, the topographic wetness index, the topographic position index, distance to thalweg, and aspect). We create a composite variable (or integrated variable), corresponding to the union of geology and surficial formation, in order to avoid the conditional dependence between these two variables and to build a geotechnical variable. We use five classical modelling methods (index, weight-of-evidence, logistic regression, decision tree, and unique condition unit) with the same training set but with different architectures of input data made up of controlling factors. All the models are tested with a validation group (30% of total landslides), using the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUC) to quantify their predictive performance. We finally select a single “best” model for each method. However, these five models are all equivalent in quality, despite their differences in detail, so no single model stands out against another. Finally, we combine the five models into a unique susceptibility map with a calculation of median susceptibility class. The final AUC value of this combined map is better than that for a single model (except for Unique Condition Unit), and we can evaluate the certainty of the susceptibility class pixel by pixel. In agreement with the sparse literature on this topic, we conclude that i) integrated variables increase the performance

  20. How to update design floods after the construction of small reservoirs and check dams: A case study from the Daqinghe river basin, China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianzhu Li; Huafeng Sun; Ping Feng

    2016-06-01

    Several small reservoirs and a large number of check dams had been constructed in theWangkuai reservoirwatershed after 1970s, and flood time series lacked stationarity, which affected the original design floodhydrographs for the Wangkuai reservoir. Since the location, storage capacity and drainage area of thelarge number of check dams were unknown, we present a method to estimate their total storage capacities(TSC) and total drainage areas (TDA) by using the recorded rainstorm and flood data. On the basisof TSC and TDA, the flood events which occurred in an undisturbed period were reconstructed undercurrent conditions to obtain a stationary flood series. A frequency analysis was subsequently performedto assess the design flood peak and volume for both small and medium design floods with a 10–200year return period. For large and catastrophic floods, it was assumed that the upstream check dams andsmall reservoirs would be destroyed, and water stored in these hydraulic structures were re-routed to theWangkuai reservoir by unit hydrograph. The modified flood peak and volume decreased for floods witha 10–200 year return period when compared to the current design flood. But for large design floods witha return period exceeding 500 years, peak discharge increased. This study provides a new method fordesign flood calculation or modification of the original design flood in watersheds with a large numberof check dams.

  1. How to update design floods after the construction of small reservoirs and check dams: A case study from the Daqinghe river basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhu; Sun, Huafeng; Feng, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Several small reservoirs and a large number of check dams had been constructed in the Wangkuai reservoir watershed after 1970s, and flood time series lacked stationarity, which affected the original design flood hydrographs for the Wangkuai reservoir. Since the location, storage capacity and drainage area of the large number of check dams were unknown, we present a method to estimate their total storage capacities (TSC) and total drainage areas (TDA) by using the recorded rainstorm and flood data. On the basis of TSC and TDA, the flood events which occurred in an undisturbed period were reconstructed under current conditions to obtain a stationary flood series. A frequency analysis was subsequently performed to assess the design flood peak and volume for both small and medium design floods with a 10-200 year return period. For large and catastrophic floods, it was assumed that the upstream check dams and small reservoirs would be destroyed, and water stored in these hydraulic structures were re-routed to the Wangkuai reservoir by unit hydrograph. The modified flood peak and volume decreased for floods with a 10-200 year return period when compared to the current design flood. But for large design floods with a return period exceeding 500 years, peak discharge increased. This study provides a new method for design flood calculation or modification of the original design flood in watersheds with a large number of check dams.

  2. Numerical modeling and environmental isotope methods in integrated mine-water management: a case study from the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Haile; Tessema, Abera; Abiye, Tamiru; Demlie, Molla; Lin, Haili

    2015-05-01

    Improved groundwater flow conceptualization was achieved using environmental stable isotope (ESI) and hydrochemical information to complete a numerical groundwater flow model with reasonable certainty. The study aimed to assess the source of excess water at a pumping shaft located near the town of Stilfontein, North West Province, South Africa. The results indicate that the water intercepted at Margaret Shaft comes largely from seepage of a nearby mine tailings dam (Dam 5) and from the upper dolomite aquifer. If pumping at the shaft continues at the current rate and Dam 5 is decommissioned, neighbouring shallow farm boreholes would dry up within approximately 10 years. Stable isotope data of shaft water indicate that up to 50 % of the pumped water from Margaret Shaft is recirculated, mainly from Dam 5. The results are supplemented by tritium data, demonstrating that recent recharge is taking place through open fractures as well as man-made underground workings, whereas hydrochemical data of fissure water samples from roughly 950 m below ground level exhibit mine-water signatures. Pumping at the shaft, which captures shallow groundwater as well as seepage from surface dams, is a highly recommended option for preventing flooding of downstream mines. The results of this research highlight the importance of additional methods (ESI and hydrochemical analyses) to improve flow conceptualization and numerical modelling.

  3. How to update design floods after the construction of small reservoirs and check dams: A case study from the Daqinghe river basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhu; Sun, Huafeng; Feng, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Several small reservoirs and a large number of check dams had been constructed in the Wangkuai reservoir watershed after 1970s, and flood time series lacked stationarity, which affected the original design flood hydrographs for the Wangkuai reservoir. Since the location, storage capacity and drainage area of the large number of check dams were unknown, we present a method to estimate their total storage capacities (TSC) and total drainage areas (TDA) by using the recorded rainstorm and flood data. On the basis of TSC and TDA, the flood events which occurred in an undisturbed period were reconstructed under current conditions to obtain a stationary flood series. A frequency analysis was subsequently performed to assess the design flood peak and volume for both small and medium design floods with a 10-200 year return period. For large and catastrophic floods, it was assumed that the upstream check dams and small reservoirs would be destroyed, and water stored in these hydraulic structures were re-routed to the Wangkuai reservoir by unit hydrograph. The modified flood peak and volume decreased for floods with a 10-200 year return period when compared to the current design flood. But for large design floods with a return period exceeding 500 years, peak discharge increased. This study provides a new method for design flood calculation or modification of the original design flood in watersheds with a large number of check dams.

  4. Avaliação e identificação de parâmetros importantes para a qualidade de corpos d'água no semiárido baiano. Estudo de caso: bacia hidrográfica do rio Salitre Evaluation and identification of significant quality parameters for the bodies of water in bahia's semi-arid region. Case study: salitre river hydrographic basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Nobre de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this work was identifying superficial water quality parameters, significant to semi-arid hydrographic basins, minimizing costs of water monitoring. The Salitre river basin, an important sub-basin of the São Francisco river, was used as a case study. STD, Cl-, DO, BOD, pH, NO3-, PO4(3-, Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb were considered the most significant parameters, with concentration levels found in some stretches of the basin not compliant with the current legislation. Some of the Salitre river basin sediments may represent a risk to the quality of the water body in relation to levels of nickel and zinc.

  5. Hydrological studies in experimental and representative basins in Pernambuco State, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Montenegro, S.M.G.L.; da Silva, B. B.; A. C. D. Antonino; J. R. S. Lima; E.S. Souza; de Oliveira, L. M. M.; de Moura, A. E. S. S.; Souza, R. M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrological studies in experimental and representative basins are of fundamental importance for water resources management. This paper presents some activities of hydrological research in experimental and representative basins of the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. The study areas are located at Tapacurá and Mundaú representative basins and at the Gameleira experimental basin, and in experimental plots in Pajeú basin. In the Tapacurá basin, three studies were performed: (1) different monthly co...

  6. Hydrogeological and geochemical studies in the Perch Lake basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Perch Lake basin is a small drainage system along the Ottawa River about 200 km west of Ottawa on the Canadian Shield. Since 1975, groups of scientists from several Canadian universities and government departments have been studying the hydrological, geological and geochemical properties of the basin. The object of these studies is to develop and test simulation models used to describe the time-dependent mass flow rates of water and dissolved and suspended substances through the basin. To review progress, a symposium/workshop was held at Chalk Rier in 1978 April. This report contains 24 extended summaries of the material presented verbally at the workshop. Subject matters include atmospheric sources and sinks, mass flows through the surface and subsurface regimes in the drainage basins and interactions occurring in the lake. (author)

  7. Basin-wide water accounting using remote sensing data: the case of transboundary Indus Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, P.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Molden, D.; Cheema, M. J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The paper describes the application of a new Water Accounting Plus (WA+) framework to produce spatial information on water flows, sinks, uses, storages and assets, in the Indus Basin, South Asia. It demonstrates how satellite-derived estimates of land use, land cover, rainfall, evaporation (E), transpiration (T), interception (I) and biomass production can be used in the context of WA+. The results for one selected year showed that total annual water depletion in the basin (502 km3) plus outflows (21 km3) exceeded total precipitation (482 km3). The deficit in supply was augmented through abstractions beyond actual capacity, mainly from groundwater storage (30 km3). The "landscape ET" (depletion directly from rainfall) was 344 km3 (69% of total consumption). "Blue water" depletion ("utilized flow") was 158 km3 (31%). Agriculture was the biggest water consumer and accounted for 59% of the total depletion (297 km3), of which 85% (254 km3) was through irrigated agriculture and the remaining 15% (44 km3) through rainfed systems. While the estimated basin irrigation efficiency was 0.84, due to excessive evaporative losses in agricultural areas, half of all water consumption in the basin was non-beneficial. Average rainfed crop yields were 0.9 t ha-1 and 7.8 t ha-1 for two irrigated crop growing seasons combined. Water productivity was low due to a lack of proper agronomical practices and poor farm water management. The paper concludes that the opportunity for a food-secured and sustainable future for the Indus Basin lies in focusing on reducing soil evaporation. Results of future scenario analyses suggest that by implementing techniques to convert soil evaporation to crop transpiration will not only increase production but can also result in significant water savings that would ease the pressure on the fast declining storage.

  8. Study on economic moderate criteria of floodwater utilization: A case study of Hai River basin%洪水资源利用经济适度性研究—以海河流域为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠静; 马真臻; 廖四辉; 朱金峰; 尚文绣

    2013-01-01

    Economic moderate criteria of floodwater utilization is a criteria of economic rationality under the presupposition that the ecological moderate criteria is satisfied. In this study, an approach to the economic moderate criteria of floodwater is proposed, and it was applied to the Hai River basin by using an ecological water operation model developed by the authors. According to analysis of the statistics and simulation results of investments and water supply benefits of the large reservoirs, the marginal benefit of their floodwater utilization by implementing engineering measures in the regions of water resources already exploited to a great extent, becomes increasingly lower recent years owing to the constraints related to ecological water demands. Thus, non-engineering measures should be considered for floodwater utilization to alleviate basin-scale water crisis. This could be achieved through various strategies of enhancing water resources management, improving water use efficiency, and saving water resources.%洪水资源利用经济适度性是在满足生态适度性要求的前提下的经济合理性.利用构建的流域生态用水调度模型,提出了进行洪水资源利用经济适度性分析的方法,并在海河流域进行应用.对大型水库投资与供水效益的统计与模拟分析结果表明,受生态环境需水的约束,在水资源开发利用程度较高的流域通过工程措施来实现洪水资源利用边际效益越来越小.建议优先采用非工程措施来进行洪水资源利用,通过加强水资源管理、提高水资源利用效率和节约用水,缓解流域水资源危机.

  9. Basin-wide water accounting using remote sensing data: the case of transboundary Indus Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the application of a new Water Accounting Plus (WA+ framework to produce spatial information on water flows, sinks, uses, storages and assets, in the Indus Basin, South Asia. It demonstrates how satellite-derived estimates of land use, land cover, rainfall, evaporation (E, transpiration (T, interception (I and biomass production can be used in the context of WA+. The results for one selected year showed that total annual water depletion in the basin (502 km3 plus outflows (21 km3 exceeded total precipitation (482 km3. The deficit in supply was augmented through abstractions beyond actual capacity, mainly from groundwater storage (30 km3. The "landscape ET" (depletion directly from rainfall was 344 km3 (69% of total consumption. "Blue water" depletion ("utilized flow" was 158 km3 (31%. Agriculture was the biggest water consumer and accounted for 59% of the total depletion (297 km3, of which 85% (254 km3 was through irrigated agriculture and the remaining 15% (44 km3 through rainfed systems. While the estimated basin irrigation efficiency was 0.84, due to excessive evaporative losses in agricultural areas, half of all water consumption in the basin was non-beneficial. Average rainfed crop yields were 0.9 t ha−1 and 7.8 t ha−1 for two irrigated crop growing seasons combined. Water productivity was low due to a lack of proper agronomical practices and poor farm water management. The paper concludes that the opportunity for a food-secured and sustainable future for the Indus Basin lies in focusing on reducing soil evaporation. Results of future scenario analyses suggest that by implementing techniques to convert soil evaporation to crop transpiration will not only increase production but can also result in significant water savings that would ease the pressure on the fast

  10. K-Basin gel formation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key part of the proposed waste treatment for K Basin sludge is the elimination of reactive uranium metal by dissolution in nitric acid (Fkirnent, 1998). It has been found (Delegard, 1998a) that upon nitric acid dissolution of the sludge, a gel sometimes forms. Gels are known to sometimes impair solid/liquid separation and/or material transfer. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine the cause(s) of the gel formation and to determine operating parameters for the sludge dissolution that avoid formation of gel. This work and related work were planned in (Fkunent, 1998), (Jewett, 1998) and (Beck, 1998a). This report describes the results of the tests in (Beck, 1998a) with non-radioactive surrogates

  11. Geohydrologic study of the West Lake Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gephart, R.E.; Eddy, P.A.; Arnett, R.C.; Robinson, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to (1) collect and interpret geochemical data on the surface, unconfined, and confined waters of the West Lake Basin, and (2) evaluate the potential for radiochemical contamination of the uppermost confined aquifers. The report assesses the suitability of Gable Mountain Pond for receiving waste water from 200 East Area operations and applies a predictive digital computer model to assess the impacts to the groundwater regime of maintaining, increasing, or decreasing water discharge into Gable Mountain Pond. East of the 200 East Area lies a natural depression which has been dammed and used as a liquid waste disposal site (B Pond). B Pond waste waters directly recharge the underlying unconfined aquifer. This report will examine the suitability of using B Pond for receiving additional waste waters which would otherwise be discharged to Gable Mountain Pond. A predictive digital computer model will be used for assessments involving various discharges into B Pond.

  12. Validation of the MODIS Land Surface Temperature Products --A Case Study of the Heihe River Basin%MODIS地表温度产品的验证研究——以黑河流域为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于文凭; 马明国

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the key factors that result in the estimation errors of the MODIS land surfacetemperature products. Then the principle methods of validating the MODIS LST was discussed and com- pared. Normally there are bigger uncertainties of MODIS LST products in the semi-arid and arid regions. As a case study, the Heihe river basin was selected to estimate the accuracy of MODIS LST products in Chinese arid and semi-arid regions. The two kinds of ground-measured observation data were obtained from the automatic meteorological stations. Infrared Radiation Thermometer data and longwave radiation data. The comparisons were performed for the validation based on these two types of observation data over three typical land cover types. The result demonstrates that.it is more reasonable to use long-term nighttime surface longwave radiation data to validate the MODIS LST products. The validation results indicate that mean absolute error is less than 2.2℃in the selected stations.%分析了影响MODIS地表温度产品精度的主要因素,并对这些因素综合作用下的MODIS地表温度产品的精度验证方法进行了回顾和比较。针对MODIS地表温度产品在干旱半干旱地区误差偏大的状况,以黑河流域为例,对MODIS地表温度产品进行了验证。用于验证的地面观测数据包括自动气象站红外辐射温度计数据和长波辐射数据。这里结合具体的地表情况比较了两种验证方法的优劣,结果表明:使用长时间的夜间长波辐射数据验证MODIS地表温度产品更合理;黑河流域的MODIS地表温度产品的平均绝对偏差小于2.2℃。

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. Neotectonic Studies of the Lake Ohrid Basin (FYROM/Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadine, H.; Liermann, A.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Reicherter, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Lake Ohrid Basin located on 693 m a.s.l. at the south-western border of Macedonia (FYROM) with Albania is a suitable location for neotectonic studies. The lake is set in an extensional basin-and-range-like situation, which is influenced by the roll-back and detachment of the subducted slab of the Northern Hellenic Trench. The seismicity record of the area lists frequent shallow earthquakes with magnitudes of up to 6.6, which classifies the region as one of the highest risk areas for Macedonia and Albania. A multidisciplinary approach was chosen to reveal the stress history of the region. Tectonic morphology, paleostress analysis, remote sensing and geophysical investigations have been taken out to trace the landscape evolution. Furthermore, apatite fission-track (A-FT) analysis and t-T-path modelling was performed to constrain the thermal history and the exhumation rates. The deformation history of the basin can be divided in three major phases. This idea is also supported by paleostress data collected around the lake: 1. NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene with compression, thrusting and uplift; 2. Uplift and diminishing compression in Late Miocene causing strike-slip and normal faulting; 3. Vertical uplift and E-W extension from Pliocene to present associated with local subsidence and (half-) graben formation. The initiation of the Ohrid Basin can be dated to Late Miocene to Pliocene. The morphology of the basin itself shows features, which characterize the area as an active seismogenic landscape. The elongated NS-trending basin is limited by the steep flanks of Galicica and Mokra Mountains to the E and W, which are tectonically controlled by normal faulting. This is expressed in linear step-like fault scarps on land with heights between 2 and 35 m. The faults have lengths between 10 and 20 km and consist of several segments. Post-glacial bedrock fault scarps at Lake Ohrid are long-lived expressions of repeated surface faulting in tectonically

  15. Morphotectonic study of the Brahmaputra basin using geoinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath Sarma, Jogendra; Acharjee, Shukla; murgante, Beniamino

    2013-04-01

    The Brahmaputra River basin occupies an area of 580,000 km2 lying in Tibet (China), Bhutan, India and Bangladesh. It is bounded on the north by the Nyen-Chen-Tanghla mountains, on the east by the Salween River basin and Patkari range of hills, on the south by Nepal Himalayas and the Naga Hills and on the west by the Ganga sub-basin. Brahmaputra river originates at an elevation of about 5150 m in south-west Tibet and flows for about 2900 km through Tibet (China), India and Bangladesh to join the Ganga.. The Brahmaputra River basin is investigated to examine the influence of active structures by applying an integrated study on geomorphology, morphotectonics, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) using topographic map, satellite data, SRTM, and seismic data. The indices for morphotectonic analysis, viz. basin elongation ratio (Re) indicated tectonically active, transverse topographic symmetry (T = 0.018-0.664) indicated asymmetric nature, asymmetric factor (AF=33) suggested tilt, valley floor width to valley height ratio (Vf = 0.0013-2.945) indicated active incision and mountain-front sinuosity (Smf = 1.11-1.68) values indicated active tectonics in the area. A great or major earthquake in the modern times, in this region may create havoc with huge loss of life and property due to high population density and rapidly developing infrastructure. Keywords: .Morphotectonic, Brahmaputra river, earthquake

  16. Sprague River geomorphology studies, Klamath Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, P. F.; O'Connor, J. E.; Lind, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Sprague River drains 4050 square kilometers with a mean annual discharge of 16.3 m3/s before emptying into the Williamson River and then upper Klamath Lake in southcentral Oregon. The alternating wide alluvial segments and narrow canyon reaches of this 135-km-long westward flowing river provide for a variety of valued ecologic conditions and human uses along the river corridor, notably fisheries (including two endangered species of suckers, and formerly salmon), timber harvest, agriculture, and livestock grazing. The complex history of land ownership and landuse, water control and diversion structures, and fishery alterations, provides several targets for attributing historic changes to channel and floodplain conditions. Recently, evolving societal values (as well as much outside money) are inspiring efforts by many entities to 'restore' the Sprague River watershed. In cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Klamath Tribes, and many local landowners, we are launching an analysis of Sprague River channel and floodplain processes. The overall objective is to guide restoration activities by providing sound understanding of local geomorphic processes and conditions. To do this we are identifying key floodplain and channel processes, and investigating how they have been affected by historic floodplain activites and changes to the watershed. This is being accomplished by analysis of historic aerial photographs and maps, stratigraphic analysis of floodplain soils and geologic units, mapping of riparian vegetation conditions and changes, and quantitative analysis of high resolution LiDAR topography acquired for the entire river course in December 2004. Preliminary results indicate (1) much of the coarser (and more erodible) floodplain soils are largely composed of pumice deposited in the basin by the 7700 year BP eruption of Mount Mazama; and (2) the LiDAR digital elevation models provide a ready means of subdividing the river into segments with

  17. Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, J. R.; Jerla, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado River Basin Water Supply & Demand Study (Study), part of the Basin Study Program under the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program, is being conducted by the Bureau of Reclamation and agencies representing the seven Colorado River Basin States. The purpose of the Study is to assess future water supply and demand imbalances in the Colorado River Basin over the next 50 years and develop and evaluate options and strategies to resolve those imbalances. The Study is being conducted over the period from January 2010 to September 2012 and contains four major phases: Water Supply Assessment, Water Demand Assessment, System Reliability Analysis, and Development and Evaluation of Opportunities for balancing supply and demand. To address the considerable amount of uncertainty in projecting the future state of the Colorado River system, the Study has adopted a scenario planning approach that has resulted in four water supply scenarios and up to six water demand scenarios. The water supply scenarios consider hydrologic futures derived from the observed historical and paleo-reconstructed records as well as downscaled global climate model (GCM) projections. The water demand scenarios contain differing projections of parameters such as population growth, water use efficiency, irrigated acreage, and water use for energy that result in varying projections of future demand. Demand for outdoor municipal uses as well as agricultural uses were adjusted based on changing rates of evapotranspiration derived from downscaled GCM projections. Water supply and demand scenarios are combined through Reclamation's long-term planning model to project the effects of future supply and demand imbalances on Colorado River Basin resources. These projections lend to an assessment of the effectiveness of a broad range of options and strategies to address future imbalances.

  18. Objectivist case study research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Fachner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In order to comprehend the impact of music therapy or music therapy processes, a researcher might look for an approach where the topic under investigation can be understood within a broader context. This calls for a rich inclusion of data and consequently a limited number of participants and may be...... achieved through the use of objectivist case study research. The strength of the case study design is that it allows for uncovering or suggesting causal relationships in real-life settings through an intensive and rich collection of data. According to Hilliard (1993), the opposite applies for extensive...... designs, in which a small amount of data is gathered on a large number of subjects. With the richness of data, the intensive design is ―the primary pragmatic reason for engaging in single-case or small N research‖ (p. 374) and for working from an idiographic rather than a nomothetic perspective....

  19. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  20. Nesidioblastosis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, A L

    1997-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among neonates. Transient in nature, it usually resolves with an increase in glucose intake. However, as clinicians, we must recognize that prolonged hypoglycemia may be caused by increased insulin production. Nesidioblastosis is one cause of persistent hyperinsulinism of the newborn. This case study reviews fetal physiology, neonatal presentation, and treatment. PMID:9325879

  1. : Case studies: France

    OpenAIRE

    Bonerandi, Emmanuelle; Santamaria, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Case studies on territorial governance : urban region of Lyon (France) and the "Pays" policy (France) in the framework of the ESPON 2.3.2 project Études de cas sur la gouvernance territoriale : région urbaine de Lyon et politique des pays

  2. Comparison of Factorial Kriging Analysis Method and Upward Continuation Filter to Recognize Subsurface Structures – A Case Study: Gravity Data from a Hydrocarbon Field in the Southeast Sedimentary Basins of the East Vietnam Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To interpret geophysical anomaly maps, it is necessary to filter out regional and sometimes noise components. Each measured value in a gravity survey consists of different components. Upward continuation (UC is one of the most widely used filters. The shortcoming of this filter is not to consider the spatial structure of the data, and also the fact that the trial and error approach and expert’s judgment are needed to adjust it. This study aims to compare the factorial kriging analysis (FKA and UC filters for separation of local and regional anomalies in the gravity data of a hydrocarbon field in the southeast sedimentary basins of the East Vietnam Sea. As shown in this paper, FKA method permits to filter out all of the identified structures, while the UC filter does not possess this capability. Therefore, beside general and classic filtering methods, the FKA method can be used as a strong method in filtering spatial structures and anomaly component.

  3. Comparison of Factorial Kriging Analysis Method and Upward Continuation Filter to Recognize Subsurface Structures - A Case Study: Gravity Data from a Hydrocarbon Field in the Southeast Sedimentary Basins of the East Vietnam Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Mohammad-Reza; Koneshloo, Mohammad; Kamakar Rouhani, Abolghasem; Aghajani, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    To interpret geophysical anomaly maps, it is necessary to filter out regional and sometimes noise components. Each measured value in a gravity survey consists of different components. Upward continuation (UC) is one of the most widely used filters. The shortcoming of this filter is not to consider the spatial structure of the data, and also the fact that the trial and error approach and expert's judgment are needed to adjust it. This study aims to compare the factorial kriging analysis (FKA) and UC filters for separation of local and regional anomalies in the gravity data of a hydrocarbon field in the southeast sedimentary basins of the East Vietnam Sea. As shown in this paper, FKA method permits to filter out all of the identified structures, while the UC filter does not possess this capability. Therefore, beside general and classic filtering methods, the FKA method can be used as a strong method in filtering spatial structures and anomaly component.

  4. Transboundary Water Resources Allocation Under Various Parametric Conditions: The Case Of The Euphrates & Tigris River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Kucukmehmetoglu, Mehmet; Geymen, Abdurrahman

    2012-01-01

    The literature on transboundary water resources allocation modeling is still short in encompassing and analyzing complex geographic multiparty nature of basins. This study elaborates Inter Temporal Euphrates and Tigris River Basin Model (ITETRBM)*, which is a linear programming based transboundary water resources allocation model maximizing net economic benefit from allocation of scarce water resources to energy generation, urban, and agricultural uses. The elaborations can be categorized in ...

  5. Rotordynamic Stability Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury Pranabesh

    2004-01-01

    In this article case studies are presented involving rotordynamic instability of modern high-speed turbomachinery relating the field data to analytical methods. The studies include oil seal related field problems, instability caused by aerodynamic cross-coupling in high-pressure, high-speed compressors, and hydrodynamic bearing instability resulting in subsynchronous vibration of a high-speed turbocharger. It has been shown that the analytical tools not only help in problem diagnostics, bu...

  6. Prague Case Study Report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostelecký, Tomáš; Patočková, Věra; Illner, Michal; Vobecká, Jana; Čermák, Daniel

    Aarau: Centre for Democracy Studies Aarau (ZDA), 2014 - (Widmer, C.; Kübler, D.), s. 131-177 ISBN 978-3-9524228-2-3 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700280802 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : urban neighbourhods * regeneration * Prague Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences http://www.zdaarau.ch/dokumente/en/ZDA_Working-Papers/No3_RUN_case-studies_2014.pdf

  7. MIDAS case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusger, E.C.; Farber, M.A.; Sharpe Hayes, M.M.

    1989-07-01

    This series of three case studies illustrates the validity and usefulness of MIDAS, a microcomputer-based tool for integrated resource planning under uncertainty. The first, at Union Electric, serves to test and validate the model and to illustrate its use for demand/supply option evaluation. Focusing on nuclear plant life extension, the Virginia Power case demonstrates the model's extensive detail, particularly in the production cost and financial areas, as well as its flexibility in addressing approximately 70 uncertainty scenarios. Puget Sound Power Light, the third case, used MIDAS for the preparation of its integrated resource plan. A 108-endpoint decision tree illustrates the full power of the decision analysis capability.

  8. Hydrological study of La Paz river basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to determine the hydrological parameters for the La Paz river, by using tracer techniques and also the determination of the water quality parameters for the study of the behavior along the stream. This study intends the prediction and control of the water contamination by using mathematical modelling

  9. HYDROGEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SANDIKLI BASIN (AFYONKARAHISAR)-PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    Seyman Aksever, Arş. Gör. Fatma; Davraz, Doç.Dr.Ayşen; Karagüzel, Prof.Dr.Remzi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aims of this research are to determine hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical investigations of Sandıklı (Afyonkarahisar) basin and to plan of optimum groundwater management of the basin. The Sandıklı basin is situated in the west of the Aegean region and discharge to the Büyük Menderes Basin. The research area is occurred from Sandıklı Kuruçay basin and Küçük Sincanlı basin. It has 1556 km2 recharge area. The basin has a semi-closed basin property due to discharge to Kestel Ri...

  10. The Elbe case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krysanova, V.; Hesse, C.; Martínková, M.; Košková, Romana; Blažková, Š.

    1. London : Earthscan, 2010 - (Mysiak, J.; Henrikson, H.; Sullivan, C.; Bromley, J.; Pahl-Wostl, C.), s. 89-101 ISBN 978-1-84407-792-2 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 511179 - NEWATER Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : adaptive water management * Elbe river basin * stakeholder interaction Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  11. Corporate Governance. Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    This paper pretends to do a theoretical approach of Corporate Governance, having as support some case studies about companies like Coca-Cola, Nokia, Microsoft, and Amazon.com. The methodology adopted for this work is based in information from these companies available in their websites and annual reports. I concluded that both companies show the corporate governance components according to their core business and their environmental business.

  12. Case study - Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the lecture Case Study - Czechoslovakia with the sub-title 'Unified System of Personnel Preparation for Nuclear Programme in Czechoslovakia' the actual status and the current experience of NPP personnel training and preparation in Czechoslovakia are introduced. The above mentioned training system is presented and demonstrated by the story of a proxy person who is going to become shift engineer in a nuclear power plant in Czechoslovakia. (orig./HP)

  13. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  14. Dynamics of soils degradation, study on Indian ocean basins

    OpenAIRE

    Payet, Évelyne

    2015-01-01

    Since the 20th centuries, the Southwest of Indian Ocean is particularly affected by anthropogenic degradations. This study aims to analyze degradations on drainage basin scale, which allows a suitable monitoring of critical areas, in the southwest of Indian Ocean. It focus on the assessment of land degradation and its causes, land cover change and erosion.The main difficulty stands in the implementation of reproducible methods and proceeds for developed and developing countries. In light of t...

  15. Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility

  16. Spatial heterogeneity study of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Zhong, Bo; Guo, Liyu; Zhao, Xiangwei

    2014-11-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of the animal-landscape system has three major components: heterogeneity of resource distributions in the physical environment, heterogeneity of plant tissue chemistry, heterogeneity of movement modes by the animal. Furthermore, all three different types of heterogeneity interact each other and can either reinforce or offset one another, thereby affecting system stability and dynamics. In previous studies, the study areas are investigated by field sampling, which costs a large amount of manpower. In addition, uncertain in sampling affects the quality of field data, which leads to unsatisfactory results during the entire study. In this study, remote sensing data is used to guide the sampling for research on heterogeneity of vegetation coverage to avoid errors caused by randomness of field sampling. Semi-variance and fractal dimension analysis are used to analyze the spatial heterogeneity of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin. The spherical model with nugget is used to fit the semivariogram of vegetation coverage. Based on the experiment above, it is found, (1)there is a strong correlation between vegetation coverage and distance of vegetation populations within the range of 0~28051.3188m at Heihe River Basin, but the correlation loses suddenly when the distance greater than 28051.3188m. (2)The degree of spatial heterogeneity of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin is medium. (3)Spatial distribution variability of vegetation occurs mainly on small scales. (4)The degree of spatial autocorrelation is 72.29% between 25% and 75%, which means that spatial correlation of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin is medium high.

  17. Isotope study of the Oruro-Caracollo basin (Bolivia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope study was carried out on the Oruro-Caracollo fluvio-lacustrine basin on the Bolivian altiplano (mean altitude 3700 m a.s.l.) 250 km south of La Paz near the town of Oruro and its famous tin, silver and antimony mines. On interpretation, the distributions of natural isotopes (18O, 2H, 3H and 14C) revealed the presence of three different water types: (1) water from the surface aquifer through the alluvial cones at the foot of the Cordillera Oriental to the east; (2) thermal waters on the edges of the sedimentary basin which have little effect on the aquifers studied; (3) and deep circulation water through the Tertiary volcanic basement rock (San Jose mines). It was demonstrated that flooding on the Oruro plateau plays no part in recharge and is totally lost to evaporation. On the basis of 14C activity, a general direction of flow from northeast to southeast was deduced, with an estimated rate of flow of 1 m/a. The isotope data suggest that there is a hydrological division in the basement of the basin between the Kala Kaja and Challapampita well fields; it is also suggested that there is a line or fault running northeast to southeast in Kala Kaja along which water of deep origin rises. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  18. NOx trade. Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the questions with respect to the trade of nitrogen oxides that businesses in the Netherlands have to deal with are dealt with: should a business buy or sell rights for NOx emission; which measures must be taken to reduce NOx emission; how much must be invested; and how to deal with uncertainties with regard to prices. Simulations were carried out with the MOSES model to find the answers to those questions. Results of some case studies are presented, focusing on the chemical sector in the Netherlands. Finally, the financial (dis)advantages of NOx trade and the related uncertainties for a single enterprise are discussed

  19. Vertebral Angiosarcoma. Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Bone angiosarcomas, especially vertebral angiosarcomas, are very rare. There are no studies based on large clinical samples in the literature, and only a few single case reports can be found. The symptoms of the disease are not specific. It is usually detected incidentally or at a late stage when pathological vertebral fractures or neurological complications occur. Diagnostic imaging and history help to recognize the tumour behind the symptoms, but do not allow accurate clinical diagnosis. The basis for a diagnosis is the histopathological examination supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays. The case of a 26-year-old woman with an angiosarcoma involving the eighth thoracic vertebra we report reflects diagnostic problems adversely affecting the efficacy and accuracy of treatment offered to patients. The patient underwent three surgeries of the spine, including two biopsies. A needle biopsy did not provide sufficient information for the diagnosis. An open excisional biopsy, which at the same time temporarily reduced neurological deficits in the patient, was the only chance to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The third surgery was posterior decompression of the spinal cord due to the rapidly escalating paraparesis. It was not until 8 weeks later that the final diagnosis was established. At that time, the patient could not be qualified for any supplementary treatment. The patient died in hospital 6 months after the onset of disease. PMID:26468177

  20. Incorporation of Complex Hydrological and Socio-economic Factors for Non-point Source Pollution Control: A Case Study at the Yincungang Canal, the Lake Tai Basin of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Luo, X.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-04-01

    It is increasingly realized that non-point pollution sources contribute significantly to water environment deterioration in China. Compared to developed countries, non-point source pollution in China has the unique characteristics of strong intensity and composition complexity due to its special socioeconomic conditions. First, more than 50% of its 1.3 billion people are rural. Sewage from the majority of the rural households is discharged either without or only with minimal treatment. The large amount of erratic rural sewage discharge is a significant source of water pollution. Second, China is plagued with serious agricultural pollution due to widespread improper application of fertilizers and pesticides. Finally, there lack sufficient disposal and recycling of rural wastes such as livestock manure and crop straws. Pollutant loads from various sources have far exceeded environmental assimilation capacity in many parts of China. The Lake Tai basin is one typical example. Lake Tai is the third largest freshwater lake in China. The basin is located in the highly developed and densely populated Yangtze River Delta. While accounting for 0.4% of its land area and 2.9% of its population, the Lake Tai basin generates more than 14% of China's Gross Domestic Production (GDP), and the basin's GDP per capita is 3.5 times as much as the state average. Lake Tai is vital to the basin's socio-economic development, providing multiple services including water supply for municipal, industrial, and agricultural needs, navigation, flood control, fishery, and tourism. Unfortunately, accompanied with the fast economic development is serious water environment deterioration in the Lake Tai basin. The lake is becoming increasingly eutrophied and has frequently suffered from cyanobacterial blooms in recent decades. Chinese government has made tremendous investment in order to mitigate water pollution conditions in the basin. Nevertheless, the trend of deteriorating water quality has yet to

  1. Using isotope, hydrochemical methods and energy-balance modelling to estimate contribution of different components to flow forming process in a high-altitude catchment (Dzhancuat river basin case study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rets, Ekaterina; Loshakova, Nadezhda; Chizhova, Julia; Kireeva, Maria; Frolova, Natalia; Tokarev, Igor; Budantseva, Nadine; Vasilchuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    A multicomponent structure of sources of river runoff formation is characteristic of high-altitude territories: ice and firn melting; seasonal snow melting on glacier covered and non-glacier area of a watershed; liquid precipitation; underground waters. In addition, each of these components can run off the watershed surface in different ways. Use of isotopic, hydrochemical methods and energy balance modelling provides possibility to estimate contribution of different components to river runoff that is an essential to understand the mechanism of flow formation in mountainious areas. A study was carried out for Dzhancuat river basin that was chosen as representative for North Caucasus in course of the International Hydrological Decade. Complex glaciological, hydrological and meteorological observation have been carried in the basin since 1965. In years 2013-2015 the program also included daily collecting of water samples on natural stable isotopes on the Dzhancuat river gauging station, and sampling water nourishment sources (ice, snow, firn, liquid precipitation) within the study area. More then 800 water samples were collected. Application of an energy balance model of snow and ice melt with distributed parameters provided an opportunity to identify Dzhancuat river runoff respond to glaciers melt regime and seasonal redistribution of melt water. The diurnal amplitude of oscillation of the Dzhakuat river runoff in the days without precipitation is formed by melting at almost snow-free areas of the Dzhancuat glacier tongues. Snowmelt water from the non-glacierized part contributes to the formation of the next day runoff. A wave of snow and firn melt in upper zones of glacier flattens considerably during filtration through snow and run-off over the surface and in the body of the glacier. This determines a general significant inertia of the Dzhacuat river runoff. Some part of melt water is stored into natural regulating reservoirs of the watershed that supply the

  2. Pedo-sedimentary record of human-environment interaction in ditches and waterlogged depressions on tableland (roman and early medieval period) : micromorphological cases studies from Marne-la-Vallée area (Paris Basin, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammas, C.; Blanchard, J.; Broutin, P.; Berga, A.

    2012-04-01

    On lœss derived soils located on the Stampien plateau from the Paris Basin (France), archaeological anthroposols and ancient cultivated soils are only preserved in very few places. Recent archaeological excavations showed the presence of a pattern of roman ditches and waterlogged depressions (« mares ») under the actual cultivated horizon (Ap). This presence strongly suggests extensive past agricultural practices and water management. An original system of ditches was found Near Marne-la-Vallée (France). It is composed of two parts, one being large ditches characterized by flat bottom and sometimes water layered deposits, called « fossés collecteurs » by the archaeologists, and the orher being smaller ditches with colluvial deposits. Our objectives was to use archaeological and micromorphological studies in order to study i) the agricultural function of these ditches and depressions, ii) their evolution with time. Observations conducted on the infilling of a « fossé collecteur » at Bussy-Saint-Georges suggest that it was not part of a drainage system, but that it was a linear water controlled system, with a ramp in one part, and a basin or a tank in another, and that it was used for others anthropic activities. In the same area, a large waterlogged depression was studied, and micromorphological analysis helped to elucidate its pedo-sedimentary formation processes. At the bottom, massive silty clayey matrix retained water. Thin layers composed of silt and clay (indicating low energy flows and decantation), sometimes impregnated and hardened by iron, alternated with silty deposit (indicating higher ernergy water layered deposits). The thin, non porous and iron impregnated crusts helped to raise the depression level, as well as, most likely the water table during roman period, maintaining waterlogging conditions. At the beginning of the early medival period, a slightly peaty event was discriminated. Higher in the profile, in more redoxic conditions

  3. Alluvial basin statistics of the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — SWPA_alvbsn is a vector dataset of alluvial-fill basin statistics for the Southwest United States. Statistics for each basin include physical details such as area,...

  4. Electric property evidences of carbonification of organic matters in marine shales and its geologic significance: A case study of the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi shale in the southern Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuman Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for some reliable evidences that can verify the carbonification of organic matters in marine shales is a major scientific issue in selecting shale gas fairways in old strata. To this end, based on core, logging and testing data, the electric property of two organic-rich shale layers in the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm. and the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm. in the southern Sichuan Basin was compared to examine the carbonification signs of organic matters in the Qiongzhusi shale and its influence on gas occurrence in the shales. The following conclusions were reached: (1 the electric property experiment shows that the Qiongzhusi shale in the study area has had carbonification of organic matters. The low resistivity of dry samples from this highly mature organic-rich shale and ultra-low resistivity on downhole logs can be used to directly judge the degree of organic matter carbonification and the quality of source rocks; (2 in the Changning area, the Qiongzhusi shale shows low resistivity of dry samples and low to ultra-low resistivity on logs, indicating that organic matters are seriously carbonized, while in the Weiyuan area, the Qiongzhusi shale shows a basically normal resistivity on log curves, indicating its degree of graphitization between the Longmaxi Fm. and Qiongzhusi Fm. in the Changning area; (3 shale with medium-to-high resistivity is remarkably better than that with ultra-low resistivity in terms of gas generation potential, matrix porosity and gas adsorption capacity; (4 industrial gas flow has been tested in the organic shales with medium-to-high resistivity in the Jianwei–Weiyuan–Tongnan area in the north, where the Qiongzhusi shale is a favorable shale gas exploration target.

  5. New aerogeophysical study of the Eurasia Basin and Lomonosov Ridge: Implications for basin development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brozena, J.M.; Childers, V.A.; Lawver, L.A.;

    2003-01-01

    In 1998 and 1999, new aerogeophysical surveys of the Arctic Ocean's Eurasia Basin produced the first collocated gravity and magnetic measurements over the western half of the basin. These data increase the density and extend the coverage of the U.S. Navy acromagnetic data from the 1970s. The new...... Norwegian-Greenland Sea. With the opening of the Labrador Sea, Greenland began similar to200 km of northward movement relative to North America and eventually collided with Svalbard, Ellesmere Island, and the nascent Eurasia ocean basin. Both gravity and magnetic data sets reconstructed to times prior to...

  6. Restructuring of Turkey's electricity market and the share of hydropower energy: The case of the Eastern Black Sea Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the historical development of Turkey's electricity power sector, the efforts for introducing competition in the power industry in Turkey, and the concerns regarding restructuring in Turkey. The contribution of the hydropower energy potential in Turkey to the reconstruction of the electricity structure in Turkey is also investigated. Then, among the 25 hydrological basins in Turkey, the Eastern Black Sea Basin located in the northeast of Turkey, which has great advantages from the view point of small hydropower potential or hydropower potential without storage, is chosen as the case study to carry out some investigations concerning its potential and to analyze the contribution of the private sector (the corporate body) in regard to the development of hydro potential in this basin within the scope of the 4628 Electricity Market Law. With this law, concerning the restructuring of the electricity market, private sector investments in this segment have increased. In total, 1524 hydroelectric power projects with 22 360 MW installed capacity has been implemented until January 22nd, 2009 and this figure is continuously rising. (author)

  7. FLORISTIC STUDY IN THE LOWER PAPAGAYO RIVER BASIN, GUERRERO, MEXICO

    OpenAIRE

    Blanca Estela Carreto-Pérez; Ángel Almazán-Juárez; Pablo Sierra-Morales; R. Carlos Almazán-Núñez

    2015-01-01

    We present the floristic composition of the Papagayo river basin, Guerrero, México.Field work was carried out from June 2011 to June 2012. We identified a total of 204 species of vascular plants, including 73 families and 163 genus. Families Fabaceae,Poaceae, Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae and Rubiaceae represented 41% of all species and 38% of the genus in the study area. The herbaceous plant life form was the best represented with 81 species (40%). Were determined 10 vegetation types, of which t...

  8. Goiania incident case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  9. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  10. FMCT verification: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: How to manage the trade-off between the need for transparency and the concern about the disclosure of sensitive information would be a key issue during the negotiations of FMCT verification provision. This paper will explore the general concerns on FMCT verification; and demonstrate what verification measures might be applied to those reprocessing and enrichment plants. A primary goal of an FMCT will be to have the five declared nuclear weapon states and the three that operate unsafeguarded nuclear facilities become parties. One focus in negotiating the FMCT will be verification. Appropriate verification measures should be applied in each case. Most importantly, FMCT verification would focus, in the first instance, on these states' fissile material production facilities. After the FMCT enters into force, all these facilities should be declared. Some would continue operating to produce civil nuclear power or to produce fissile material for non- explosive military uses. The verification measures necessary for these operating facilities would be essentially IAEA safeguards, as currently being applied to non-nuclear weapon states under the NPT. However, some production facilities would be declared and shut down. Thus, one important task of the FMCT verifications will be to confirm the status of these closed facilities. As case studies, this paper will focus on the verification of those shutdown facilities. The FMCT verification system for former military facilities would have to differ in some ways from traditional IAEA safeguards. For example, there could be concerns about the potential loss of sensitive information at these facilities or at collocated facilities. Eventually, some safeguards measures such as environmental sampling might be seen as too intrusive. Thus, effective but less intrusive verification measures may be needed. Some sensitive nuclear facilities would be subject for the first time to international inspections, which could raise concerns

  11. Termination: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  12. Electric property evidences of carbonification of organic matters in marine shales and its geologic significance: A case study of the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi shale in the southern Sichuan Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Yuman Wang; Dazhong Dong; Xiangzhi Cheng; Jinliang Huang; Shufang Wang; Shiqian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Searching for some reliable evidences that can verify the carbonification of organic matters in marine shales is a major scientific issue in selecting shale gas fairways in old strata. To this end, based on core, logging and testing data, the electric property of two organic-rich shale layers in the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm. and the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm. in the southern Sichuan Basin was compared to examine the carbonification signs of organic matters in the Qiongzhusi shale and its...

  13. Combined application of numerical simulation models and fission tracks analysis in order to determine the history of temperature, subsidence and lifting of sedimentary basins. A case study from the Ruhr Coal basin inWest Germany; Die kombinierte Anwendung numerischer Simulationsmodelle und Spaltspurenuntersuchungen zur Entschluesselung der Temperatur-, Subsidenz- und Hebungsgeschichte von Sedimentbecken - Ein Fallbeispiel aus dem Ruhrkohlenbecken Westdeutschlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karg, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdoel und organische Geochemie; Littke, R. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Bueker, C. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Geologie

    1998-12-31

    The Ruhr Coal basin is one of the globally best known sedimentary basins. According to classical, established the Ruhr Basin is a typical foreland molasse basins. The thermal history (heating and cooling) and the structural and sedimentary development since the formation of the basin, i.e. subsidence and lifting and erosion are of the first importance for the potential formation of hydrocarbons. In order to quantify these processes, two-dimensional numerical simulation models (based on geological and seismological sections) of the Ruhr basin were developed from which one could conclude the heat flow at the time of maximum basin depth after variscis orogenesis, maximum temperatures of individual strata sections and thickness of eroded strata. The PetroMod program package of the company IES/Juelich was used for these analyses. Finite-element-grids enable mathematican mapping and reconstruction of complex geological structures and processes. The models on temperature history are calibrated by comparing measured and calculated carbonification (vitrinite reflection) data. (orig./MSK). [Deutsch] Das Ruhrkohlenbecken stellt weltweit eines der am besten erforschten Sedimentbecken dar. Nach klassischen und etablierten Beckenmodellen kann das Ruhrbecken als typisches Vorlandmolassebecken angesehen werden. Besonders relevant fuer die potentielle Bildung von Kohlenwasserstoffen sind in erster Linie die thermische Geschichte (Aufheizung und Abkuehlung) sowie die strukturelle und sedimentaere Entwicklung seit der Beckenbildung, sprich Versenkungs-, Hebungs- und Erosionsprozesse. Um solche Prozesse zu quantifizieren, wurden im Ruhrbecken zweidimensionale (d.h. auf der Grundlage von geologischen und seismischen Sektionen) numerische Simulationsmodelle entwickelt, die Aufschluss ueber Waermefluesse zur Zeit der maximalen Beckeneintiefung im Anschluss an die variszische Orogenese, erreichte Maximaltemperaturen einzelner Schichtglieder sowie die Maechtigkeit erodierter Schichten im

  14. hydrological study of the basin of Tunja using isotopics technical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the carried out study, it is analyzed the generalities in the first place on the city of Tunja, keeping in mind the aspects of Topography, Climate Population and the projection of this last one until the year 2020, and of equal it forms the demand of drinkable water for these same projections. Then it is the Superficial Hydrology of the area in study, keeping in mind the physiographic parameters of the basin, behavior pluviometrical graphic, flows and evapotranspiration, towards them to calculate this way the infiltration and power to end up determining the hydraulic balance of the area. In the concerning to Geology, this it was carried out on the base of the rising of stratigraphic columns made in having traveled by different roads and roads bordering to the study area; based on this columns it was carried out a geologic map with all the characteristics of the formations in the area

  15. Knowledge Organization of Integrated Water Resources Management: A Case of Chi River Basin, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Nattapong Kaewboonma; Kulthida Tuamsuk; Wanida Kanarkard

    2013-01-01

    This study is a part of the research project on the Development of an Ontology-Based Semantic Search for Integrated Water Resources Management of the Chi River Basin (CRB), Thailand. The study aimed at developing the knowledge domain of water resources management for CRB. The research methods included document analysis and qualitative research by adopting Liou (1990)’s knowledge acquisition approach. Fifteen experts including ten experts in the areas of environmental engineerin...

  16. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  17. Water-Energy-Food Nexus in a Transboundary River Basin: The Case of Tonle Sap Lake, Mekong River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Keskinen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The water-energy-food nexus is promoted as a new approach for research and policy-making. But what does the nexus mean in practice and what kinds of benefits does it bring? In this article we share our experiences with using a nexus approach in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake area. We conclude that water, energy and food security are very closely linked, both in the Tonle Sap and in the transboundary Mekong River Basin generally. The current drive for large-scale hydropower threatens water and food security at both local and national scales. Hence, the nexus provides a relevant starting point for promoting sustainable development in the Mekong. We also identify and discuss two parallel dimensions for the nexus, with one focusing on research and analysis and the other on integrated planning and cross-sectoral collaboration. In our study, the nexus approach was particularly useful in facilitating collaboration and stakeholder engagement. This was because the nexus approach clearly defines the main themes included in the process, and at the same time widens the discussion from mere water resource management into the broader aspects of water, energy and food security.

  18. Propuesta metodológica para el análisis morfo-sedimentológico en cuencas altamente urbanizadas: Caso de estudio quebrada Doña María (Colombia A methodological proposal to morph-sedimentologic analysis at urban basins: Case study: Doña Maria's basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Esteban González

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una propuesta metodológica para hacer el análisis de morfología fluvial y transporte de sedimentos para cuencas altamente intervenidas por la acción humana. En dicha metodología se proponen diferentes actividades las cuales permitirán hacer un análisis detallado de la morfología fluvial y los sedimentos en una cuenca. Entre las etapas que se proponen para implementar esta metodología se tienen: análisis en planta de la cuenca, análisis de los perfiles altimétricos de las principales corrientes, levantamiento de información en campo (aforos líquidos, sólidos y observaciones generales de la morfología de la cuenca y estimación de la carga y capacidad de carga de sedimentos en la quebrada principal. Una aplicación a la cuenca de la quebrada Doña María (en el Área Metropolitana del Valle de Aburrá, Colombia es presentada.This paper shows a methodological proposal to carry out river morphology analysis and sediment transport for urban basins highly intervened by human actions. In this methodology, different activities that will allow doing a detailed analysis for the river morphology and sediment transport in the basin are proposed. Among the steps proposed to implement this methodology, there are: analysis in plant of little basin, altitude profiles analysis of the main sub-basins, field measures (measures of liquid and solid discharge and general observations of the basin morphology, and estimations of sediments load and bed load capacity in the stream. An application to basin of Doña María is showed.

  19. Engineering study: 105KE to 105KW Basin fuel and sludge transfer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last five years, there have been three periods at the 105KE fuel storage basin (KE Basin) where the reported drawdown test rates were in excess of 25 gph. Drawdown rates in excess of this amount have been used during past operations as the primary indicators of leaks in the basin. The latest leak occurred in March, 1993. The reported water loss from the KE Basin was estimated at 25 gph. This engineering study was performed to identify and recommend the most feasible and practical method of transferring canisters of irradiated fuel and basin sludge from the KE Basin to the 105KW fuel storage basin (KW Basin). Six alternatives were identified during the performance of this study as possible methods for transferring the fuel and sludge from the KE Basin to the KW Basin. These methods were then assessed with regard to operations, safety, radiation exposure, packaging, environmental concerns, waste management, cost, and schedule; and the most feasible and practical methods of transfer were identified. The methods examined in detail in this study were based on shipment without cooling water except where noted: Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system and water cooling; Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system (without water cooling); Transfer by truck using the K Area fuel transfer cask (K Area cask); Transfer by truck using a DOE shipping cask; Transfer by truck using a commercial shipping cask; and Transfer by truck using a new fuel shipping cask

  20. Wekiva Basin onsite sewage treatment and disposal system study

    OpenAIRE

    Booher, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Existing onsite systems and aquifer vulnerability in the Wekiva Basin. Recommendations from the Bureau of Onsite Sewage Programs, Division of Environmental Health, Florida Department of Health. (11 slides)

  1. Intercultural Communicative Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冬梅

    2009-01-01

    The essay is mainly about the author's comprehension of cultural differences and intercultural communication after reading the book Communication Between Cultures.In addition,the author also analyses three cases with the theories and approaches mentioned in Communication Between Cultures.

  2. Prescriptions for adaptive comanagement: the case of flood management in the German Rhine basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Becker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrally administered bureaucracies are ill suited to managing the environmental resources of complex social-ecological systems. Therefore management approaches are required that can better deal with its complexity and uncertainty, which are further exacerbated by developments such as climate change. Adaptive comanagement (ACM has emerged as a relatively novel governance approach and potential solution to the challenges arising. Adaptive comanagement hinges on certain institutional prescriptions intended to enhance the adaptability of management by improving the comprehension of and response to the complex context and surprises of social-ecological systems. The ACM literature describes that for enhanced adaptability, institutional arrangements should be polycentric, aligned with the scale of ecosystems (the bioregional approach, feature open and participatory governance, and involve much experimentation. The case of flood management in the German part of the Rhine basin is used to provide an assessment of these ideas. We analyze whether and to what degree the prescriptions have been implemented and whether or not certain fundamental changes seen in German flood management can be traced back to the application of the prescriptions. Our study demonstrates a transition from the traditional engineering and "flood control" approach to a more holistic management concept based on a risk perspective. In this process, the four ACM prescriptions have made an important contribution in preparing or facilitating policy changes. The findings suggest that the application of the prescriptions requires the right supporting context before they can be applied to the fullest extent possible, such as a high problem pressure, new discourses, or leading actors. A major constraint arises in the misalignment of political power and of the different interests of the actors, which contribute to reactive management and inadequate interplay. To address this, we recommend

  3. Thermo-hydrodynamical modelling of a flooded deep mine reservoir - Case of the Lorraine Coal Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2006, cessation of dewatering in Lorraine Coal Basin (France) led to the flooding of abandoned mines, resulting in a new hydrodynamic balance in the area. Recent researches concerning geothermal exploitation of flooded reservoirs raised new questions, which we propose to answer. Our work aimed to understand the thermos-hydrodynamic behaviour of mine water in a flooding or flooded system. Firstly, we synthesized the geographical, geological and hydrogeological contexts of the Lorraine Coal Basin, and we chose a specific area for our studies. Secondly, temperature and electric conductivity log profiles were measured in old pits of the Lorraine Coal Basin, giving a better understanding of the water behaviour at a deep mine shaft scale. We were able to build a thermos-hydrodynamic model and simulate water behaviour at this scale. Flow regime stability is also studied. Thirdly, a hydrodynamic spatialized meshed model was realized to study the hydrodynamic behaviour of a mine reservoir as a whole. Observed water-table rise was correctly reproduced: moreover, the model can be used in a predictive way after the flooding. Several tools were tested, improved or developed to ease the study of flooded reservoirs, as three-dimensional up-scaling of hydraulic conductivities and a coupled spatialized meshed model with a pipe network. (author)

  4. Interdisciplinary cooperation and studies in geoscience in the Carpathian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel MINDRESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An interdisciplinary approach to geoscience is particularly important in this vast research field, as the more innovative studies are increasingly crossing discipline boundaries and thus benefitting from multiple research methods and viewpoints. Grasping this concept has led us to encourage interdisciplinary cooperation by supporting and promoting the creation of “meeting places” able to provide a framework for researchers and scholars involved in geoscience research to find common grounds for discussion and collaboration. Most recently, this was achieved by organizing the 1st Workshop on “Interdisciplinarity in Geosciences in the Carpathian Basin” (IGCB held in the Department of Geography at the University of Suceava (Romania, between the 18th and 22nd October 2012. This event brought together both an international group of scientists and local researchers which created opportunities for collaboration in research topics such as geography, environment, geology and botany, biology and ecology in the Carpathian Basin.

  5. Assessing Vulnerability under Uncertainty in the Colorado River Basin: The Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerla, C.; Adams, P.; Butler, A.; Nowak, K.; Prairie, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Spanning parts of the seven states, of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming, the Colorado River is one of the most critical sources of water in the western United States. Colorado River allocations exceed the long-term supply and since the 1950s, there have been a number of years when the annual water use in the Colorado River Basin exceeded the yield. The Basin is entering its second decade of drought conditions which brings challenges that will only be compounded if projections of climate change are realized. It was against this backdrop that the Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study was conducted. The Study's objectives are to define current and future imbalances in the Basin over the next 50 years and to develop and analyze adaptation and mitigation strategies to resolve those imbalances. Long-term planning in the Basin involves the integration of uncertainty with respect to a changing climate and other uncertainties such as future demand and how policies may be modified to adapt to changing reliability. The Study adopted a scenario planning approach to address this uncertainty in which thousands of scenarios were developed to encompass a wide range of plausible future water supply and demand conditions. Using Reclamation's long-term planning model, the Colorado River Simulation System, the reliability of the system to meet Basin resource needs under these future conditions was projected both with and without additional future adaptation strategies in place. System reliability metrics were developed in order to define system vulnerabilities, the conditions that lead to those vulnerabilities, and sign posts to indicate if the system is approaching a vulnerable state. Options and strategies that reduce these vulnerabilities and improve system reliability were explored through the development of portfolios. Four portfolios, each with different management strategies, were analyzed to assess their effectiveness at

  6. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  7. Customs Modernization Initiatives : Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    De Wulf, Luc; José B. Sokol

    2004-01-01

    This volume presents case studies of customs modernization initiatives in eight developing countries: Bolivia, Ghana, Morocco, Mozambique, Peru, the Philippines, Turkey, and Uganda. The purpose of these case studies was to obtain a firsthand view of how these countries undertook customs reforms and to assess their success. The overall lessons learned from these studies are presented in cha...

  8. Theory Testing Using Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke; Dissing Sørensen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The appropriateness of case studies as a tool for theory testing is still a controversial issue, and discussions about the weaknesses of such research designs have previously taken precedence over those about its strengths. The purpose of the paper is to examine and revive the approach of theory...... testing using case studies, including the associated research goal, analysis, and generalisability. We argue that research designs for theory testing using case studies differ from theorybuilding case study research designs because different research projects serve different purposes and follow different...

  9. Integrated geophysical studies of the Fort Worth Basin (Texas), Harney Basin (Oregon), and Snake River Plain (Idaho)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, Murari

    Geophysical methods such as seismic, gravity, magnetics, electric, and electromagnetics are capable of identifying subsurface features but each has a different spatial resolution. Although, each of these methods are stand-alone tools and have produced wonderful and reliable results for decades to solve geological problems, integrating geophysical results from these different methods with geological and geospatial data, adds an extra dimension towards solving geological problems. Integration techniques also involve comparing and contrasting the structural and tectonic evolution of geological features from different tectonic and geographic provinces. I employed 3D and 2D seismic data, passive seismic data, and gravity and magnetic data in three studies and integrated these results with geological, and geospatial data. Seismic processing, and interpretation, as well as filtering techniques applied to the potential filed data produced many insightful results. Integrated forward models played an important role in the interpretation process. The three chapters in this dissertation are stand-alone separate scientific papers. Each of these chapters used integrated geophysical methods to identify the subsurface features and tectonic evolution of the study areas. The study areas lie in the southeast Fort Worth Basin, Texas, Harney Basin, Oregon, and Snake River Plain, Idaho. The Fort Worth Basin is one of the most fully developed shale gas fields in North America. With the shallow Barnett Shale play in place, the Precambrian basement remains largely unknown in many places with limited published work on the basement structures underlying the Lower Paleozoic strata. In this research, I show how the basement structures relate to overlying Paleozoic reservoirs in the Barnett Shale and Ellenburger Group. I used high quality, wide-azimuth, 3D seismic data near the southeast fringe of the Fort Worth Basin. The seismic results were integrated with gravity, magnetic, well log, and

  10. Peak temperature in intracratonic basins constrained by magnetic studies:Example of the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uz, E.; Ferre, E. C.; Rimmer, S.; Morse, D. G.; Crockett, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Deciphering the thermal evolution of a package of sedimentary rocks through time constitutes an essential element in exploration for oil and gas. Classic geothermometers based on illite crystallinity, vitrinite reflectance, the Rock-Eval method or conodont coloration index are limited to rocks containing sufficient amounts of one of the index materials. Magnetic approaches to geothermometry have intrinsic advantages due to the quasi-ubiquitous presence of magnetically remanent grains in sedimentary environments. Previous attempts to correlate burial temperature with magnetic properties focused on the low-field bulk magnetic susceptibility Km (Hrouda et al., 2003) or on the low-temperature magnetic parameter PM in pyrrhotite-magnetite assemblages (MagEval method of Aubourg and Pozzi, 2010). We simultaneously investigate the variation of an array of magnetic parameters with temperature. These parameters include low-field magnetic susceptibility, saturation isothermal magnetic remanence, saturation magnetization, coercitive force and coercivity of magnetic remanence. Tracking multiple magnetic parameters offers the advantage of being sensitive not only to heating-induced mineralogical changes but also to heating-induced magnetic domain changes. This multi-parameter method also has the benefit of being applicable to a broad range of sedimentary lithologies. To demonstrate the principles of this method we begin examining intracontinental basins because they are broadly undeformed and their thermal histories remain, in general, relatively simple. Igneous intrusions and basinal hydrothermal fluids may, however, complicate matters. The Illinois Basin, an oil- and gas-producing basin, provides an accessible test area for the geothermometric tests. The Mount Simon Sandstone constitutes the first lithological unit investigated because it sits at the deepest level in the basin and is therefore likely to have recorded the highest burial temperatures. The proposed method

  11. Seismic refraction studies in the San Juan Basin, Northwest New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D.H.; Jaksha, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is studying some of the features of the earth's crust in the San Juan Basin region, northwest New Mexico. As a part of this study seismic refraction-reflection measurements were made in and around the basin using explosions and earthquakes as energy sources. Record sections and traveltime tables were derived from the measurements.

  12. Theory testing using case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing Sørensen, Pernille; Løkke Nielsen, Ann-Kristina

    Case studies may have different research goals. One such goal is the testing of small-scale and middle-range theories. Theory testing refers to the critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the 'why' and 'how' of a specified phenomenon in a particular setting. In this paper, we focus on...... the strengths of theory-testing case studies. We specify research paths associated with theory testing in case studies and present a coherent argument for the logic of theoretical development and refinement using case studies. We emphasize different uses of rival explanations and their implications...... for research design. Finally, we discuss the epistemological logic, i.e., the value to larger research programmes, of such studies and, following Lakatos, conclude that the value of theory-testing case studies lies beyond naïve falsification and in their contribution to developing research programmes...

  13. Ecological water demand: the case of the slope systems in the East Liaohe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANDenghua; HEYan; DENGWei; HOUYoushun

    2003-01-01

    The ecological water demand (EWD) is the least water amount required to maintain the structure and the function of the special eco-system and the temporal scale of a study on the EWD must be a season's time. Based on GIS and RS with the source information of hydrological data of 46 hydrological gauges covering 52 years and the digital images of Landsat TM in 1986, 1996 and 2000, the landscape patterns, precipitation and runoff in the East Liaohe River Basin were analyzed. With the result of the above analysis, the spatial and temporal changes of the ecological water demand in the slope systems (EWDSS) of the East Liaohe River Basin (ELRB) were derived. Landscapes in the ELRB are dispersed and strongly disturbed by human actions. The hydrological regime in ELRB has distinct spatial variations. The average annual EWDSS in the ELRB is 504.72 mm (324.08-618.89 mm), and the average EWDSS in the growth season (from May to September) is 88.29% of the year's total EWDSS .The ultimate guaranteeing ratio of the EWDSS in ELRB is 90%. The scarce EWDSS area in the whole year and in the growth season are 60.47% and 74.01% of the entire basin respectively. The trend of scarce EWDSS area is most serious according to the quantity and area of scarce EWDSS regions.

  14. Case Studies on Sustainable Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Sam CM

    2005-01-01

    This web site is developed with the aim to promote sustainable design and planning of buildings. A knowledge base of case studies and resources has been established to illustrate the sustainable design strategies and features in realistic building projects all over the world. The database of case studies can be searched by project names, locations, design strategies and design features.

  15. Three Community College Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  16. The Big Read: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  17. Integrated regional assessment of global climatic change. Lessons from the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the potential role integrated regional assessments of global climatic change scenarios could play in building better links between science and related policy concerns. The concept is illustrated through description of an ongoing case study from Canada-the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS). As part of the Government of Canada's Green Plan, the Global Warming Science Program includes a study of regional impacts of global warming scenarios in the Mackenzie Basin, located in northwestern Canada. The MBIS is a six-year program focussing on potential climate-induced changes in the land and water resource base, and the implications of four scenarios of global climatic change on land use and economic policies in this region. These policy issues include interjurisdictional water management, sustainability of native lifestyles, economic development opportunities (agriculture, forestry, tourism, etc.), sustainability of ecosystems and infrastructure maintenance. MBIS is due to be completed in 1997. MBIS represents an attempt to address regional impacts by incorporating a 'family of integrators' into the study framework, and by directly involving stakeholders in planning and research activities. The experience in organizing and carrying out this project may provide some lessons for others interested in organizing regional or country studies

  18. Integrated regional assessment of global climatic change: lessons from the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stewart J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper outlines the potential role integrated regional assessments of global climatic change scenarios could play in building better links between science and related policy concerns. The concept is illustrated through description of an ongoing case study from Canada—the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS). As part of the Government of Canada's Green Plan, the Global Warming Science Program includes a study of regional impacts of global warming scenarios in the Mackenzie Basin, located in northwestern Canada. The MBIS is a six-year program focussing on potential climate-induced changes in the land and water resource base, and the implications of four scenarios of global climatic change on land use and economic policies in this region. These policy issues include interjurisdictional water management, sustainability of native lifestyles, economic development opportunities (agriculture, forestry, tourism, etc.), sustainability of ecosystems and infrastructure maintenance. MBIS is due to be completed in 1997. MBIS represents an attempt to address regional impacts by incorporating a "family of integrators" into the study framework, and by directly involving stakeholders in planning and research activities. The experience in organizing and carrying out this project may provide some lessons for others interested in organizing regional or country studies.

  19. Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

  20. Experimental and numerical study on the design of a deposition basin outlet structure at a mountain debris cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gems

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mountain debris cones in the Alpine region often provide space for dense population and cultivation. Hence, a great number of buildings are exposed to torrential hazards. In order to protect the settlement areas against flooding and overbank sedimentation, torrent defence structures are implemented directly at the debris cones. In many cases, these protection measures include a deposition basin at the head of the debris cone and/or a confined channel that passes or tracks through the settlement. The work presented within this paper deals with the effect of specific outlet structure layouts, situated at the lower end of a selected deposition basin, on bed-load transport processes and flood protection. A case study analysis was accomplished comprising of a 3-D-numerical model (FLOW-3D and a physical scale model test (1:30. The subject of investigation was the deposition basin of the Larsennbach torrent in the Austrian Northern Limestone Alps. The basin is situated on a large debris cone and opens out into a paved channel. Since the basin is undersized and the accumulation of sediment in the outlet section reduces the available cross section during floods, adjoining settlements are considerably endangered of lateral overtopping of both clear water and sediment. Aiming for an upgrade in flood protection, certain layouts for a "closing-off structure" at the outlet were tested within this project. For the most efficient design layout, its effect on flood protection, a continuous bed-load output from the basin and the best possible use of the retention volume are pointed out. The simple design of the structure and the key aspects, that have to be taken into consideration for implementation, are highlighted.

  1. Kickstarter - A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Willumsen, Ea Christina; Byg-Fabritius, Edith Ursula Tvede

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an investigation of the online crowdfunding platform Kickstarter, and discusses what makes a Kickstarter campaign successful. Two previous Kickstarter campaigns have been debated in focus groups interviews, as the basis of the study is a reception analysis of two focus group interviews. Ee apply theories from Schrøder (2000) and Batey (2008) to our analysis to study how the campaigns appeal to their backers. By drawing on ideas from Rogers (2003) and Pine & Gilmore (1998), we fu...

  2. An ecological economics framework for assessing environmental flows: the case of inter-basin water transfers in Lesotho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matete, Mampiti; Hassan, Rashid

    2005-07-01

    This paper used the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) that transfers water from the Orange River Basin in Lesotho to the Vaal River Basin in South Africa as a case study to show how environmental sustainability aspects can be integrated into economic development planning. Using the Ecological Social Accounting Matrix (ESAM) for Lesotho that integrates ecological implications of the LHWP with economic benefits of the project, the paper analysed the impact of lost ecological services downstream the LHWP dams in Lesotho on the well-being of households directly affected by the project (riparians) and the general economy of the country. The results revealed that despite significant economic benefits, the project has unintended impacts on ecological resources and services with resultant deleterious well-being implications for riparians. The results from the ESAM analysis indicated that not only the income of riparians is likely to suffer, but also that of other households and social groups, as well as the general economy of Lesotho. While results of the ESAM analysis did not indicate large income impacts on the economy at large, they were significant for riparians. The importance of integrating ecological consequences into impact assessment of IBWT before such transfers can be implemented to ensure sustainable development and considering economy-wide impacts associated with IBWT was proven necessary for a holistic impact assessment of IBWT.

  3. Case study - Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antecedents and experience of nuclear activities in Argentina; the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). First development and research activities. Research reactors and radioisotopes plants. Health physics and safety regulations. - Feasibility studies for the first nuclear power plant. Awarding the first plant CNA I (Atucha I). Relevant data related to the different project stages. Plant performance. - Feasibility study for the second nuclear power plant. Awarding the second plant CNE (Central Nuclear Embalse). Relevant data related to established targets. Differences compared with the first station targets. Local participation. Plant performance. (orig./GL)

  4. Multispectral Study of the Schrödinger Impact Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, B.; Osinski, G.; Antonenko, I.; Stooke, P. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Schrödinger impact basin is located on the lunar far side near the south pole (76oS, 134oE) and is one of only two young multiring impact basins on the lunar surface [1]. With a diameter size of 312 km and basin floor 2-3 km deep, Schrödinger is the least modified impact basin of its size. A peak ring structure 150 km in diameter lies on the basin floor, formed by uplift of pre-Schrödinger crustal materials. Ejecta material, smooth in texture, covers the basin walls and extends out onto the surrounding surface up to 100 km in all directions. The first geological map published of Schrödinger was generated using preliminary Clementine data [1]. The map described the geology and geomorphology within the inner basin with smooth and rough plains of shocked material occupying most of the basin floor. The rough plains are identified by presence of hummocks, swales, and low knobs. Smooth plains have no discernable features identifiable. Ghost craters are found along both smooth and rough patches. A volcanic vent in the inner eastern corner of Schrödinger is interpreted as a source for pyroclastic eruptions within the area. Located along the volcanic vent is a north-east trending graben. There are thin patches of impact melt sheets along the basin walls and peak ring. A lobate ridge located near the centre of the inner basin is interpreted as having formed by buckling of the melt sheet. A more recent geologic map using high resolution Clementine UVVIS data and topography data is in agreement with the proposed geology within the Schrödinger basin [2]. Contacts between various units are better outlined in the recent map. Using spectra derived from high resolution Clementine UVVIS images and Lunar Prospector data we determine the composition of impact melt, impact ejecta, and the extent of proposed cryptomare deposits [3]. We also use Fe, Th, and Ti abundance in determining the composition of these units. Our goal is to determine the abundance and distribution of

  5. Clinical aspects of envenomation caused by Tityus obscurus (Gervais, 1843) in two distinct regions of Pará state, Brazilian Amazon basin: a prospective case series

    OpenAIRE

    Pardal, Pedro PO; Ishikawa, Edna AY; Vieira, José LF; Coelho, Johne S; Dórea, Regina CC; Abati, Paulo AM; Quiroga, Mariana MM; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Scorpion envenomations are a major public health problem in Brazil, whose most dangerous cases are attributable to the genus Tityus. This study was designed to compare the clinical and demographic features of envenomations by Tityus obscurus in two areas of the state of Pará located in the Amazon basin. Were compared demographic findings, local and systemic signs and symptoms of human envenomations caused by T. obscurus that occurred in western and eastern areas of the state. Resul...

  6. Constrained basin stability for studying transient phenomena in dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    van Kan, Adrian; Jegminat, Jannes; Donges, Jonathan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Transient dynamics are of large interest in many areas of science. Here, a generalization of basin stability (BS) is presented: constrained basin stability (CBS) that is sensitive to various different types of transients arising from finite size perturbations. CBS is applied to the paradigmatic Lorenz system for uncovering nonlinear precursory phenomena of a boundary crisis bifurcation. Further, CBS is used in a model of the Earth's carbon cycle as a return time-dependent stability measure of...

  7. 105KE and 105KW Basins fuel and sludge consolidation study, summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a summary report that examines and evaluates the feasibility of consolidating irradiated fuel and sludge currently in KE Basin with that in the KW Basin. This study was conducted in support of TPA Milestone (target date) M-34-00-T03. The report summarizes three supporting engineering studies involving: (1) spent fuel consolidation into the single basin, (2) transport of the encapsulated fuel between KE and KW Basins, and (3) dispositioning contaminated water remaining in KE Basin. From the three reports, and preferred storage method, transfer method and water disposition method were defined. These consolidation methods were then evaluated against the no action alternative of continued storage using both KE and KW Basins. The report concluded that the fuel and sludge currently stored in KE Basin not be consolidated in the KW Basin, primarily due to increased cost and radiation exposure required to consolidate the fuel and sludge. Consolidation is more attractive for storage periods beyond the year 2002, which is the study period of the report

  8. Underground flux studies in waste basin of CIPC using natural and artificial tracers (volume I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents studies to be done in wastes basin of CIPC in order to verify the contamination possibility of Rio das Antas basin, by infiltration in subsoil, of liquid wastes proceeding from mineral and industrial complex of Pocos de Caldas to be done up to February/82. (author)

  9. Geostatistical case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this volume of contributed chapters is to present a series of applications of geostatistics. These range from a careful variographic analysis on uranium data, through detailed studies on geologically complex deposits, right up to the latest nonlinear methods applied to deposits with highly skewed data contributions. Applications of new techniques such as the external drift method for combining well data with seismic information have also been included. The volume emphasizes geostatistics in practice. Notation has been kept to a minimum and mathematical details have been relegated to annexes

  10. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  11. The Baltic Basin Case Study—towards a sustainable Baltic Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bengt-Owe; Stålvant, Carl-Einar

    2001-12-01

    Four watersheds, each characterized by a major resource use were selected for the study: The Vistula River in Poland—agriculture; the Dalälven River in Sweden—forestry; the Archipelago Sea in Sweden, Finland, Estonia—tourism; and the Lake Peipsi in Estonia/Russia—fisheries/agriculture. The main objective was to examine the reactions of particular ecosystems within the Baltic Sea drainage area, and to assess sustainability conditions on the regional level. The degree of sustainability and impact on the Baltic Sea were investigated through workshops and seminars in the areas. Overviews of environmental and socio-economic conditions were succinctly summarized in commissioned papers. Interventions by and discussions with scholars, sector experts, administrators and stakeholders of the various sites laid the foundation for conceptualizing the interaction of natural and human forces for each case. The project was able to draw quite a number of conclusions, summarized as the following lessons learnt. In the Vistula Region, nutrient emissions have levelled off but shortage of freshwater is critical. Forestry in the Dalälven watershed is largely environmental-friendly, except for fragmentation of the landscape and its negative impact on biodiversity. In the Archipelago area a former low-energy community has been replaced by a leisure time society. Different types of tourism is developing, but despite this variety, an improved integration of ecological properties with socio-economic patterns is required in order to build a sustainable, living Archipelago. The lake Peipsi basin and the surrounding area suffer both from problems of resource management and economic backwardness. Parts of the local economy has lost access to the one time large Soviet market, although the Estonian side has apparently benefited from present economic growth. To cope with the division of the lake, a regime for trans-national management is unfolding. It is based on both informal and, to an

  12. Glof Study in Tawang River Basin, Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R.; Padhee, S. K.; Dutta, S.

    2014-11-01

    Glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) is one of the major unexpected hazards in the high mountain regions susceptible to climate change. The Tawang river basin in Arunachal Pradesh is an unexplored region in the Eastern Himalayas, which is impending to produce several upcoming hydro-electric projects (HEP). The main source of the river system is the snow melt in the Eastern Himalayas, which is composed of several lakes located at the snout of the glacier dammed by the lateral or end moraine. These lakes might prove as potential threat to the future scenario as they have a tendency to produce flash flood with large quantity of sediment load during outbursts. This study provides a methodology to detect the potential lakes as a danger to the HEP sites in the basin, followed by quantification of volume of discharge from the potential lake and prediction of hydrograph at the lake site. The remote location of present lakes induced the use of remote sensing data, which was fulfilled by Landsat-8 satellite imagery with least cloud coverage. Suitable reflectance bands on the basis of spectral responses were used to produce informational layers (NDWI, Potential snow cover map, supervised classification map) in GIS environment for discriminating different land features. The product obtained from vector overlay operation of these layers; representing possible water area, was further utilized in combination with Google earth to identify the lakes within the watershed. Finally those identified lakes were detected as potentially dangerous lakes based on the criteria of elevation, area, proximity from streamline, slope and volume of water held. HEC-RAS simulation model was used with cross sections from Google Earth and field survey as input to simulate dam break like situation; hydrodynamic channel routing of the outburst hydrograph along river reach was carried out to get the GLOF hydrograph at the project sites. It was concluded from the results that, the assessed GLOF would be a

  13. Hydrological studies in experimental and representative basins in Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, S. M. G. L.; da Silva, B. B.; Antonino, A. C. D.; Lima, J. R. S.; de Souza, E. S.; de Oliveira, L. M. M.; de Moura, A. E. S. S.; Souza, R. M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrological studies in experimental and representative basins are of fundamental importance for water resources management. This paper presents some activities of hydrological research in experimental and representative basins of the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. The study areas are located at Tapacurá and Mundaú representative basins and at the Gameleira experimental basin, and in experimental plots in Pajeú basin. In the Tapacurá basin, three studies were performed: (1) different monthly coefficients "k" of the Thornthwaite method were tested to calculate the effective temperature and, consequently, the reference evapotranspiration, giving rise to the method identified as Modified Thornthwaite; (2) the spatial variability of the retention curve and hydraulic conductivity parameters were analysed using the Beerkan method; (3) changes in vegetation cover were evaluated through the NDVI and NDWI indexes using TM-Landsat 5 images. In the Mundaú representative basin, the performance of different evapotranspiration methods was evaluated and compared to the FAO standard method, Penman-Monteith. In the Pajeú basin, the experimental plot is covered by pasture and sensors were installed to monitor the following variables: rainfall, air temperature, the energy balance components (net radiation, latent and sensible heat, and soil heat flux), wind velocity and CO2 flux into atmosphere, soil moisture and runoff.

  14. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  15. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  16. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  19. The Eastern Lau Basin Integrated Studies Site (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, D.

    2003-12-01

    A new venue for Ridge 2000 (R2K) Integrated Studies, the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) adds the element of a spreading center in a back-arc basin to the R2K program. The ELSC, located in the western Pacific near Tonga, is a 390 km-long first-order ridge segment that displays a broad range of effects of the back-arc environment. At its southern end it is only 40 km from the Tonga arc volcanic front and is propagating southward into a back-arc rift. At its northern end it is 100 km from the volcanic front and terminates at a large, non-transform offset. The ELSC displays substantial and systematic changes in multiple parameters: spreading rate, magma source and lava chemistry, axial depth and morphology, melt lens characteristics, and crustal thickness and structure. A main focus of the work at the ELSC is to determine how changes in these forcing functions affect key parameters such as magma source composition, crustal structure, and characteristics of hydrothermal venting such as temperature, chemistry, and faunal composition and abundance. Prior reconnaissance investigation shows that these hydrothermal field characteristics also vary within the southernmost segments, and show distinct differences compared with well-studied mid-ocean ridge sites. Four R2K cruises are planned for the ELSC in 2004. The first cruise (PI: Martinez) will investigate interrelationships among crustal structure, volcanism, and hydrothermal activity using deep tow, CTD's, and Tow-Yo. A second cruise (PI: Langmuir) will focus on petrological and water column properties using dredging, CTD's and ABE. The next cruise (PI: Tivey) will provide an initial characterization of vent fields, fluid chemistry, mineralogy, and biodiversity using Jason II and net tows, and a final cruise (PI: Childress) will investigate community ecology using Jason II. An additional study (PI: Thurnherr) will deploy autonomous floats to investigate hydrothermal plume circulation and dispersal .