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Sample records for basilar membrane oscillation

  1. Analysis of an impulse response measured at the basilar membrane of the chinchilla (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Hero P.; Bell, Andrew

    In a recent paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2224-2239 (2013)], Shera and Cooper report on the impulse response of the basilar membrane (BM) of a chinchilla, a waveform which shows repetitive bursts. They explain the bursts in terms of repeated coherent reflection at BM discontinuities and partial

  2. An articulated predictive model for fluid-free artificial basilar membrane as broadband frequency sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Riaz; Banerjee, Sourav

    2018-02-01

    In this article, an extremely versatile predictive model for a newly developed Basilar meta-Membrane (BM2) sensors is reported with variable engineering parameters that contribute to it's frequency selection capabilities. The predictive model reported herein is for advancement over existing method by incorporating versatile and nonhomogeneous (e.g. functionally graded) model parameters that could not only exploit the possibilities of creating complex combinations of broadband frequency sensors but also explain the unique unexplained physical phenomenon that prevails in BM2, e.g. tailgating waves. In recent years, few notable attempts were made to fabricate the artificial basilar membrane, mimicking the mechanics of the human cochlea within a very short range of frequencies. To explain the operation of these sensors a few models were proposed. But, we fundamentally argue the "fabrication to explanation" approach and proposed the model driven predictive design process for the design any (BM2) as broadband sensors. Inspired by the physics of basilar membrane, frequency domain predictive model is proposed where both the material and geometrical parameters can be arbitrarily varied. Broadband frequency is applicable in many fields of science, engineering and technology, such as, sensors for chemical, biological and acoustic applications. With the proposed model, which is three times faster than its FEM counterpart, it is possible to alter the attributes of the selected length of the designed sensor using complex combinations of model parameters, based on target frequency applications. Finally, the tailgating wave peaks in the artificial basilar membranes that prevails in the previously reported experimental studies are also explained using the proposed model.

  3. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Scala Tympani Morphology on Basilar Membrane Contact With a Straight Electrode Array: A Human Temporal Bone Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Juul; Risi, Frank; Campbell, Luke; Chambers, Scott; O'Leary, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of straight electrode arrays. Hearing preservation is the goal of cochlear implantation with current thin straight electrode arrays. These hug the lateral wall, facilitating full, atraumatic insertions. However, most studies still report some postoperative hearing loss. This study explores the influence of scala tympani morphology on array position relative to the basilar membrane and its possible contribution to postoperative hearing loss. Twenty-six fresh-frozen human temporal bones implanted with a straight electrode array were three-dimensionally reconstructed from micro-photographic histological sections. Insertion depth and the proximity between the array and basilar membrane were recorded. Lateral wall shape was quantified as a curvature ratio. Insertion depths ranged from 233 to 470 degrees. The mean first point of contact between the array and basilar membrane was 185 degrees; arrays tended to remain in contact with the membrane after first contacting it. Eighty-nine and 93% of arrays that reached the upper basal (>240-360 degrees) and second (>360-720 degrees) turns respectively contacted the basilar membrane in these regions. Scalar wall curvature ratio decreased significantly (the wall became steeper) from the basal to second turns. This shift correlated with a reduced distance between the array and basilar membrane. Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of a straight electrode array. In addition to gross trauma of cochlear structures, contact between the array and basilar membrane and how this impacts membrane function should be considered in hearing preservation cases.

  5. MEMS flexible artificial basilar membrane fabricated from piezoelectric aluminum nitride on an SU-8 substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Jang, Jeong Hun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible artificial basilar membrane (FABM) that mimics the passive mechanical frequency selectivity of the basilar membrane. The FABM is composed of a cantilever array made of piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) on an SU-8 substrate. We analyzed the orientations of the AlN crystals using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The AIN crystals are oriented in the c -axis (0 0 2) plane and effective piezoelectric coefficient was measured as 3.52 pm V −1 . To characterize the frequency selectivity of the FABM, mechanical displacements were measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. When electrical and acoustic stimuli were applied, the measured resonance frequencies were in the ranges of 663.0–2369 Hz and 659.4–2375 Hz, respectively. These results demonstrate that the mechanical frequency selectivity of this piezoelectric FABM is close to the human communication frequency range (300–3000 Hz), which is a vital feature of potential auditory prostheses. (paper)

  6. Development of a Multi-Channel Piezoelectric Acoustic Sensor Based on an Artificial Basilar Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdo Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we have developed a multi-channel piezoelectric acoustic sensor (McPAS that mimics the function of the natural basilar membrane capable of separating incoming acoustic signals mechanically by their frequency and generating corresponding electrical signals. The McPAS operates without an external energy source and signal processing unit with a vibrating piezoelectric thin film membrane. The shape of the vibrating membrane was chosen to be trapezoidal such that different locations of membrane have different local resonance frequencies. The length of the membrane is 28 mm and the width of the membrane varies from 1 mm to 8 mm. Multiphysics finite element analysis (FEA was carried out to predict and design the mechanical behaviors and piezoelectric response of the McPAS model. The designed McPAS was fabricated with a MEMS fabrication process based on the simulated results. The fabricated device was tested with a mouth simulator to measure its mechanical and piezoelectrical frequency response with a laser Doppler vibrometer and acoustic signal analyzer. The experimental results show that the as fabricated McPAS can successfully separate incoming acoustic signals within the 2.5 kHz–13.5 kHz range and the maximum electrical signal output upon acoustic signal input of 94 dBSPL was 6.33 mVpp. The performance of the fabricated McPAS coincided well with the designed parameters.

  7. Mechanical frequency selectivity of an artificial basilar membrane using a beam array with narrow supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sangwon; Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Song, Won Joon; Jang, Jeong Hun

    2013-01-01

    The study presented in this paper assessed the frequency selectivity of an artificial basilar membrane (ABM) constructed using a piezoelectric beam array with narrow supports. Three ABM samples were constructed. Each ABM contained 16 beams with various lengths in a one-dimensional array. To experimentally assess the frequency selectivity of the ABM, mechanical vibration induced either by an electrical or an acoustic stimulus was measured with a scanning laser-Doppler vibrometer. The electro-mechanical and acousto-mechanical transfer functions were defined for the same purpose. The tonotopy of each beam array was visualized by post-processing the experimental results. Finite element analyses were conducted to numerically compute the resonance frequencies, identify the associated vibrational modes, and evaluate the harmonic responses of the beams. The influence of the residual stresses existing in the beams was reflected in the geometric models by introducing three different levels of arc-shaped lateral deformations in the beams. The harmonic analyses revealed that each beam of the ABM samples presented independent band-pass characteristics. The experiments and simulations commonly showed a frequency selectivity of the fabricated ABMs in the range of 2–20 kHz. Therefore, the device is suitable for development of a totally implantable artificial cochlea, implementing a mechanical frequency analyzer. This work is part of research to develop a prototype of a totally implantable artificial cochlea. (paper)

  8. Near field fluid coupling between internal motion of the organ of Corti and the basilar membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-31

    The pressure distribution in each of the fluid chambers of the cochlea can be decomposed into a 1D, or plane wave, component and a near field component, which decays rapidly away from the excitation point. The transverse motion of the basilar membrane, BM, for example, generates both a 1D pressure field, which couples into the slow wave, and a local near field pressure, proportional to the BM acceleration, that generates an added mass on the BM due to the fluid motion. When the organ of Corti, OC, undergoes internal motion, due for example to outer hair cell activity, this motion will not itself generate any 1D pressure if the OC is incompressible and the BM is constrained not to move volumetrically, and so will not directly couple into the slow wave. This motion will, however, generate a near field pressure, proportional to the OC acceleration, which will act on the OC and thus increases its effective mass. The near field pressure due to this OC motion will also act on the BM, generating a force on the BM proportional to the acceleration of the OC, and thus create a “coupling mass” effect. By reciprocity, this coupling mass is the same as that acting on the OC due to the motion of the BM. This near field fluid coupling is initially observed in a finite element model of a slice of the cochlea. These simulations suggest a simple analytical formulation for the fluid coupling, using higher order beam modes across the width of the cochlear partition. It is well known that the added mass due to the near field pressure dominates the overall mass of the BM, and thus significantly affects the micromechanical dynamics. This work not only quantifies the added mass of the OC due its own motion in the fluid, and shows that this is important, but also demonstrates that the coupling mass effect between the BM and OC significantly affects the dynamics of simple micromechanical models.

  9. Basilar membrane and reticular lamina motion in a multi-scale finite element model of the mouse cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, Joris; Dirckx, Joris; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    A multi-scale finite element (FE) model of the mouse cochlea, based on its anatomy and material properties is presented. The important feature in the model is a lattice of 400 Y-shaped structures in the longitudinal direction, each formed by Deiters cells, phalangeal processes and outer hair cells (OHC). OHC somatic motility is modeled by an expansion force proportional to the shear on the stereocilia, which in turn is proportional to the pressure difference between the scala vestibule and scala tympani. Basilar membrane (BM) and reticular lamina (RL) velocity compare qualitatively very well with recent in vivo measurements in guinea pig [2]. Compared to the BM, the RL is shown to have higher amplification and a shift to higher frequencies. This comes naturally from the realistic Y-shaped cell organization without tectorial membrane tuning.

  10. Pressure-induced basilar membrane position shifts and the stimulus-evoked potentials in the low-frequency region of the guinea pig cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fridberger, A; vanMaarseveen, JTPW; Scarfone, E; Ulfendahl, M; Flock, B; Flock, A

    1997-01-01

    We have used the guinea pig isolated temporal bone preparation to investigate changes in the nonlinear properties of the tone-evoked cochlear potentials during reversible step displacements of the basilar membrane towards either the scala tympani or the scala vestibuli. The position shifts were

  11. Estimating the basilar-membrane input-output function in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    To partly characterize the function of cochlear processing in humans, the basilar membrane (BM) input-output function can be estimated. In recent studies, forward masking has been used to estimate BM compression. If an on-frequency masker is processed compressively, while an off-frequency masker...... is transformed more linearly, the ratio between the slopes of growth of masking (GOM) functions provides an estimate of BM compression at the signal frequency. In this study, this paradigm is extended to also estimate the knee-point of the I/O-function between linear rocessing at low levels and compressive...... processing at medium levels. If a signal can be masked by a low-level on-frequency masker such that signal and masker fall in the linear region of the I/O-function, then a steeper GOM function is expected. The knee-point can then be estimated in the input level region where the GOM changes significantly...

  12. The pectinate zone is stiff and the arcuate zone determines passive basilar membrane mechanics in the gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongyi; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2018-05-01

    The gerbil basilar membrane (BM) differs from other mammalian BMs in that the lower collagen-fiber layer of the pectinate zone (PZ) forms an arch, the upper fiber layer is flat, and ground substance separates the two layers. The role of this arch has been unknown, but can be elucidated by models. In the standard simple beam model (SBM), the upper and lower collagen-fiber layers of the BM are represented as a single layer in both the PZ and the arcuate zone (AZ). In our new arch-beam model (ABM), the upper fiber layer is flat, the lower layer forms an arch in the PZ, and the two layers combine to form the flat portion of the BM in the AZ. This design is incorporated into a 3D finite-element tapered-box model of the cochlea with viscous fluid. We find in the model that the PZ rotates as a rigid body, so its specific properties have little influence, while the AZ thickness and collagen volume fraction primarily determine passive BM mechanics.

  13. A microelectromechanical system artificial basilar membrane based on a piezoelectric cantilever array and its characterization using an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jongmoon; Lee, Jangwoo; Woo, Seongyong; Sly, David J.; Campbell, Luke J.; Cho, Jin-Ho; O'Leary, Stephen J.; Park, Min-Hyun; Han, Sungmin; Choi, Ji-Wong; Hun Jang, Jeong; Choi, Hongsoo

    2015-07-01

    We proposed a piezoelectric artificial basilar membrane (ABM) composed of a microelectromechanical system cantilever array. The ABM mimics the tonotopy of the cochlea: frequency selectivity and mechanoelectric transduction. The fabricated ABM exhibits a clear tonotopy in an audible frequency range (2.92-12.6 kHz). Also, an animal model was used to verify the characteristics of the ABM as a front end for potential cochlear implant applications. For this, a signal processor was used to convert the piezoelectric output from the ABM to an electrical stimulus for auditory neurons. The electrical stimulus for auditory neurons was delivered through an implanted intra-cochlear electrode array. The amplitude of the electrical stimulus was modulated in the range of 0.15 to 3.5 V with incoming sound pressure levels (SPL) of 70.1 to 94.8 dB SPL. The electrical stimulus was used to elicit an electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) from deafened guinea pigs. EABRs were successfully measured and their magnitude increased upon application of acoustic stimuli from 75 to 95 dB SPL. The frequency selectivity of the ABM was estimated by measuring the magnitude of EABRs while applying sound pressure at the resonance and off-resonance frequencies of the corresponding cantilever of the selected channel. In this study, we demonstrated a novel piezoelectric ABM and verified its characteristics by measuring EABRs.

  14. Basilar migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, W F; Kuhn, S C; Daylida, L

    1997-03-01

    Basilar migraine is a complicated headache which the International Headache Society describes as 'migraine with aura symptoms clearly originating from the brainstem or from both occipital lobes'. For years this headache was thought to originate from a transient disturbance in the vertebrobasilar circulation, but more recent studies suggest that a central neuronal disorder may be the source of migraine. Basilar migraines may have certain symptoms which are similar to other neurologic, vascular, psychiatric and metabolic diseases, yet there are specific criteria which can help differentiate it from other diagnoses. It is characterized by a throbbing occipital headache which may be preceded by an aura. The unusual symptoms of basilar migraine, which may precede and continue throughout the duration of the headache and even after it, include bilateral visual symptoms, altered mental status, vertigo, gait ataxia, bilateral paresthesia, bilateral paralysis and dysarthria. We describe a 29-year-old black female whose husband brought her to the emergency department complaining of confusion, headache, and left-sided weakness for 2 h prior to arrival.

  15. Combination tones along the basilar membrane in a 3D finite element model of the cochlea with acoustic boundary layer attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnke, Frank; Scheunemann, Christian; Semmelbauer, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    The propagation of traveling waves along the basilar membrane is studied in a 3D finite element model of the cochlea using single and two-tone stimulation. The advantage over former approaches is the consideration of viscous-thermal boundary layer damping which makes the usual but physically unjustified assumption of Rayleigh damping obsolete. The energy loss by viscous boundary layer damping is 70 dB lower than the actually assumed power generation by outer hair cells. The space-time course with two-tone stimulation shows the traveling waves and the periodicity of the beat frequency f2 - f1.

  16. Probing glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Allan K.; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    , while mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the fluorescent dye DiOC(2)(3). The results show that, as opposed to NADH and other intermediates in glycolysis, intracellular glucose is not oscillating. Furthermore, oscillations in NADH and membrane potential are inhibited by the ATP...

  17. Membrane oscillations in the channel of a stationary plasma motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugrova, A.I.; Lipatov, A.S.; Morozov, A.I.; Kharchevnikov, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Results of measuring the ion flux density in the channel of the stationary plasma drive are presented. Two plane easters move both along and transverse to the plasma flux. During the experiment, the strong low-frequency oscillations (∼ 35 kHz) are observed in the channel of the stationary plasma drive. It is found that membrane oscillations are accompanied by oscillations of the electron temperature. These membrane oscillations affect the divergence of the output plasma jet and the erosion of the output part of the channel of the stationary plasma drive [ru

  18. Simulation of mechano-electrical transduction in the cochlea considering basilar membrane vibration and the ionic current of the inner hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sinyoung; Koike, Takuji

    2018-05-01

    The inner hair cells (IHCs) in the cochlea transduce mechanical vibration of the basilar membrane (BM), caused by sound pressure, to electrical signals that are transported along the acoustic nerve to the brain. The mechanical vibration of the BM and the ionic behaviors of the IHCs have been investigated. However, consideration of the ionic behavior of the IHCs related to mechanical vibration is necessary to investigate the mechano-electrical transduction of the cochlea. In this study, a finite-element model of the BM, which takes into account the non-linear activities of the outer hair cells (OHCs), and an ionic current model of IHC were combined. The amplitudes and phases of the vibration at several points on the BM were obtained from the finite-element model by applying sound pressure. These values were fed into the ionic current model, and changes in membrane potential and calcium ion concentration of the IHCs were calculated. The membrane potential of the IHC at the maximum amplitude point (CF point) was higher than that at the non-CF points. The calcium ion concentration at the CF point was also higher than that at the non-CF points. These results suggest that the cochlea achieves its good frequency discrimination ability through mechano-electrical transduction.

  19. Membrane Lipid Oscillation: An Emerging System of Molecular Dynamics in the Plant Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki

    2018-03-01

    Biological rhythm represents a major biological process of living organisms. However, rhythmic oscillation of membrane lipid content is poorly described in plants. The development of lipidomic technology has led to the illustration of precise molecular profiles of membrane lipids under various growth conditions. Compared with conventional lipid signaling, which produces unpredictable lipid changes in response to ever-changing environmental conditions, lipid oscillation generates a fairly predictable lipid profile, adding a new layer of biological function to the membrane system and possible cross-talk with the other chronobiological processes. This mini review covers recent studies elucidating membrane lipid oscillation in plants.

  20. Clustering of Cochlear Oscillations in Frequency Plateaus as a Tool to Investigate SOAE Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Wit, Hero; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-01-01

    of coupled oscillators (OAM) [7] are also found in a transmission line model (TLM) which is able to generate realistic SOAEs [2] and if these frequency plateaus can be used to explain the formation of SOAEs. The simulations showed a clustering of oscillators along the simulated basilar membrane Both, the OAM...

  1. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane. (paper)

  2. A new approach to the spectral analysis of liquid membrane oscillators by Gábor transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Płocharska-Jankowska, E.; Szpakowska, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Liquid membrane oscillators very frequently have an irregular oscillatory behavior. Fourier transformation cannot be used for these nonstationary oscillations to establish their power spectra. This important point seems to be overlooked in the field of chemical oscillators. A new approach...... is presented here based on Gábor transformation allowing one to obtain power spectra of any kind of oscillations that can be met experimentally. The proposed Gábor analysis is applied to a liquid membrane oscillator containing a cationic surfactant. It was found that the power spectra are strongly influenced...

  3. A membrane model for cytosolic calcium oscillations. A study using Xenopus oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jafri, M S; Vajda, S; Pasik, P; Gillo, B

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium oscillations occur in a wide variety of cells and are involved in different cellular functions. We describe these calcium oscillations by a mathematical model based on the putative electrophysiological properties of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The salient features of our membrane model are calcium-dependent calcium channels and calcium pumps in the ER membrane, constant entry of calcium into the cytosol, calcium dependent removal from the cytosol, and buffering ...

  4. Regulation of glycolytic oscillations by mitochondrial and plasma membrane H+-ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Folke; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Lunding, Anita

    2009-01-01

    ,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide. The responses of glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations to a number of inhibitors of glycolysis, mitochondrial electron flow, and mitochondrial and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase were investigated. Furthermore, the glycolytic flux was determined as the rate of production of ethanol....../ATP antiporter and the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATPase. The results further suggest that ATP hydrolysis, through the action of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATPase and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, are important in regulating these oscillations. We conclude that it is glycolysis that drives the oscillations...

  5. Vertebral basilar artery dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Atlas, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients (ten male, one female; range, 2-56 years) presented with posterior circulation ischemic symptoms and were evaluated with computed tomography (CT) (eta=11), arteriography (eta=11), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (eta=6). Angiography showed dissection of a vertebral artery (eta=8), a basilar artery (eta=1), or a combination of both (eta=2). On CT and/or MR images, infarctions were demonstrated in ten of 11 cases. Most frequently involved were the thalmus (eta=7), cerebellum (eta=6), occipital lobes (eta=4), and pons (eta=3). The site of infarction did not correlate with the side or site of angiographic abnormality. In six cases evaluated by all modalities, MR imaging showed more extensive and widespread infarction than did CT and also showed whether or not the infarcts were hemorrhagic. MR imaging was able to demonstrate the presence of intramural dissecting hematoma prior to angiography and to indicate whether or not flow was reconstituted on follow-up examination

  6. Cell membrane as a possible site of Fröhlich's coherent oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinowska, K. J.; Lech, W.; Wittlin, A.

    1985-05-01

    The microwave absorption spectra of erythrocytes and their ghosts have a resonant structure and reveal a close resemblance, indicating that the cell membrane is the primary site of Fröhlich's coherent oscillations.

  7. On-line measurements of oscillating mitochondrial membrane potential in glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Poulsen, Allan K.; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    We employed the fluorescent cyanine dye DiOC(2)(3) to measure membrane potential in semi-anaerobic yeast cells under conditions where glycolysis was oscillating. Oscillations in glycolysis were studied by means of the naturally abundant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We found...... studies showed that glycolytic oscillations perturb the mitochondrial membrane potential and that the mitochondria do not have any controlling effect on the dynamics of glycolysis under these conditions. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by addition of FCCP quenched mitochondrial membrane...... potential oscillations and delocalized DiOC(2)(3), while glycolysis continued to oscillate unaffected....

  8. Low frequency acoustic properties of bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial with magnetic oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansha Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial was proposed to overcome the influence of the mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure that can effectively isolate low frequency noise. The finite element analysis (FEA results agree well with the experimental results. It is proved that the sound transmission losses (STLs of the proposed structures are higher than those of same surface density acoustic materials. The introduction of the magnetic mass block is different from the traditional design method, in which only a passive mass block is fixed on the membrane. The magnetic force will cause tension in the membrane, increase membrane prestress, and improve overall structural stiffness. The effects of the geometry size on the STLs are discussed in detail. The kind of method presented in this paper can provide a new means for engineering noise control. Keywords: Bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial, Low frequency sound insulation, Sound transmission loss, Magnet oscillator

  9. Imaging in acute basilar artery thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Falcone, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Naidich, T.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Bowen, B. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Quencer, R.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States))

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the imaging features in acute (< 24 h) basilar artery thrombosis. CT and MR studies in 11 patients with clinical diagnosis of acute basilar artery thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. MR angiography was obtained in 4 patients. Correlation with clinical symptoms was performed. Multiple cranial nerve palsies and hemiparesis were the most common clinical symptoms at presentation. CT revealed hyperdense basilar arteries (n = 7) and hypodensities in the posterior circulation territory (n = 8). In one instance, the infarction was hemorrhagic. MR imaging showed absence of flow void within the basilar in 6 patients and MRA (using both PC and TOF techniques) confirmed absence of blood flow in 4 basilar arteries. One week after presentation, 5 patients died. Autopsy was obtained in 1 case and confirmed the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis. Basilar artery thrombosis has fairly typical imaging features by both CT and MR. MRA may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Prompt recognition may lead to early thrombolytic treatment and may improve survival. (orig.)

  10. A hybrid system of a membrane oscillator coupled to ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschulte, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    The control over micro- and nanomechanical oscillators has recently made impressive progress. First experiments demonstrated ground-state cooling and single-phonon control of high-frequency oscillators using cryogenic cooling and techniques of cavity optomechanics. Coupling engineered mechanical structures to microscopic quantum system with good coherence properties offers new possibilities for quantum control of mechanical vibrations, precision sensing and quantum-level signal transduction. Ultracold atoms are an attractive choice for such hybrid systems: Mechanical can either be coupled to the motional state of trapped atoms, which can routinely be ground-state cooled, or to the internal states, for which a toolbox of coherent manipulation and detection exists. Furthermore, atomic collective states with non-classical properties can be exploited to infer the mechanical motion with reduced quantum noise. Here we use trapped ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the fundamental vibrational mode of a Si3N4 membrane. The coupling of membrane and atomic motion is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and enhanced by an optical cavity around the membrane. The observed cooling of the membrane from room temperature to 650 +/- 230 mK shows that our hybrid mechanical-atomic system operates at a large cooperativity. Our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state. Furthermore, we will present a scheme where an optomechanical system is coupled to internal states of ultracold atoms. The mechanical motion is translated into a polarization rotation which drives Raman transitions between atomic ground states. Compared to the motional-state coupling, the new scheme enables to couple atoms to high-frequency structures such as optomechanical crystals.

  11. Management of basilar invagination: A historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhidha Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the terms basilar invagination and platybasia were used interchangeably. Basilar invagination has been defined as a prolapse of the vertebral column into the spinal cord. Platybasia is defined as an abnormal obtuse angle between the anterior skull base and the clivus. The authors review the existing literature and summarize the historical and modern perspectives in the management of basilar invagination. From radiological curiosities, the subject of basilar invagination is now viewed as eminently treatable. The more pronounced understanding of the subject has taken place in the last three decades when on the basis of understanding of the biomechanical subtleties the treatment paradigm has remarkably altered. From surgery that involved decompression of the region, stabilization and realignment now form the basis of treatment.

  12. Feedback Interactions of Polymerized Actin with the Cell Membrane: Waves, Pulses, and Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anders

    Polymerized filaments of the protein actin have crucial functions in cell migration, and in bending the cell membrane to drive endocytosis or the formation of protrusions. The nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments are controlled by upstream agents in the cell membrane, including nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) that activate the Arp2/3 complex to form new branches on pre-existing filaments. But polymerized actin (F-actin) also feeds back on the assembly of NPFs. We explore the effects of the resulting feedback loop of F-actin and NPFs on two phenomena: actin pulses that drive endocytosis in yeast, and actin waves traveling along the membrane of several cell types. In our model of endocytosis in yeast, the actin network is grown explicitly in three dimensions, exerts a negative feedback interaction on localized patch of NPFs in the membrane, and bends the membrane by exerting a distribution of forces. This model explains observed actin and NPF pulse dynamics, and the effects of several interventions including i) NPF mutations, ii) inhibition of actin polymerization, and iii) deletion of a protein that allows F-actin to bend the cell membrane. The model predicts that mutation of the active region of an NPF will enhance the accumulation of that NPF, and we confirm this prediction by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. For actin waves, we treat a similar model, with NPFs distributed over a larger region of the cell membrane. This model naturally generates actin waves, and predicts a transition from wave behavior to spatially localized oscillations when NPFs are confined to a small region. We also predict a transition from waves to static polarization as the negative-feedback coupling between F-actin and the NPFs is reduced. Supported by NIGMS Grant R01 GM107667.

  13. Sympathetic cooling of a membrane oscillator in a hybrid mechanical-atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöckel, Andreas; Faber, Aline; Kampschulte, Tobias; Korppi, Maria; Rakher, Matthew T.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms and atomic ions enables ultralow temperatures in systems where direct laser or evaporative cooling is not possible. It has so far been limited to the cooling of other microscopic particles, with masses up to 90 times larger than that of the coolant atom. Here, we use ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the vibrations of a Si3N4 nanomembrane, the mass of which exceeds that of the atomic ensemble by a factor of 1010. The coupling of atomic and membrane vibrations is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and is enhanced by placing the membrane in an optical cavity. We observe cooling of the membrane vibrations from room temperature to 650 ± 230 mK, exploiting the large atom-membrane cooperativity of our hybrid optomechanical system. With technical improvements, our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as nanomembranes or levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state.

  14. Delayed treatment of basilar thrombosis in a patient with a basilar aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhouri T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute occlusion of the basilar artery is a neurological emergency that has a high risk of severe disability and mortality. Delayed thrombolysis or endovascular therapy has been performed with some success in patients who present after 3 hours of symptom onset. Here we present the first case of delayed intra-arterial thrombolysis of a basilar artery thrombosis associated with a large saccular aneurysm. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian man with a history of smoking and alcohol abuse presented to the Emergency Department complaining of diplopia and mild slurred speech and who progressed over 12 hours to coma and quadriparesis. He was found to have a large basilar tip aneurysm putting him at high risk for hemorrhage with lytic treatment. Conclusion The treatment options for basilar thrombosis are discussed. Aggressive treatment options should be considered despite long durations of clinical symptoms in basilar thrombosis, even in extremely high risk patients.

  15. Mechanical thrombectomy in basilar artery thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fesl, Gunther; Holtmannspoetter, Markus; Patzig, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Multiple endovascular devices have been used for mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in basilar artery occlusion (BAO) for >10 years. Based on a single-center experience during the course of one decade, we present data on safety and efficacy of previous MT devices compared with modern stent...

  16. Anastomose carótido-basilar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Reixach-Granés

    1965-09-01

    Full Text Available O autor relata um caso de anastomose carótido-basilar por persistência da artéria trigeminal, demonstrado angiogràficamente. O paciente apresentou hemiplegia súbita e era portador de transtornos mentais de tipo deficitário. A pneumencefalografia evidenciou atrofia do parênquima cerebral do lado da anomalia.

  17. Visually Evoked 3-5 Hz Membrane Potential Oscillations Reduce the Responsiveness of Visual Cortex Neurons in Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Michael C; Polack, Pierre-Olivier; Tran, Duy T; Golshani, Peyman

    2017-05-17

    Low-frequency membrane potential ( V m ) oscillations were once thought to only occur in sleeping and anesthetized states. Recently, low-frequency V m oscillations have been described in inactive awake animals, but it is unclear whether they shape sensory processing in neurons and whether they occur during active awake behavioral states. To answer these questions, we performed two-photon guided whole-cell V m recordings from primary visual cortex layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in awake mice during passive visual stimulation and performance of visual and auditory discrimination tasks. We recorded stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations where the V m baseline hyperpolarized as the V m underwent high amplitude rhythmic fluctuations lasting 1-2 s in duration. When 3-5 Hz V m oscillations coincided with visual cues, excitatory neuron responses to preferred cues were significantly reduced. Despite this disruption to sensory processing, visual cues were critical for evoking 3-5 Hz V m oscillations when animals performed discrimination tasks and passively viewed drifting grating stimuli. Using pupillometry and animal locomotive speed as indicators of arousal, we found that 3-5 Hz oscillations were not restricted to unaroused states and that they occurred equally in aroused and unaroused states. Therefore, low-frequency V m oscillations play a role in shaping sensory processing in visual cortical neurons, even during active wakefulness and decision making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A neuron's membrane potential ( V m ) strongly shapes how information is processed in sensory cortices of awake animals. Yet, very little is known about how low-frequency V m oscillations influence sensory processing and whether they occur in aroused awake animals. By performing two-photon guided whole-cell recordings from layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the visual cortex of awake behaving animals, we found visually evoked stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations that disrupt

  18. The Basilar Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography Prognostic Score for Basilar Artery Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemseged, Fana; Shah, Darshan G; Diomedi, Marina; Sallustio, Fabrizio; Bivard, Andrew; Sharma, Gagan; Mitchell, Peter J; Dowling, Richard J; Bush, Steven; Yan, Bernard; Caltagirone, Carlo; Floris, Roberto; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R; Davis, Stephen M; Campbell, Bruce C V

    2017-03-01

    Basilar artery occlusion is associated with high risk of disability and mortality. This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of a new radiological score: the Basilar Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography (BATMAN) score. A retrospective analysis of consecutive stroke patients with basilar artery occlusion diagnosed on computed tomographic angiography was performed. BATMAN score is a 10-point computed tomographic angiography-based grading system which incorporates thrombus burden and the presence of collaterals. Reliability was assessed with intraclass coefficient correlation. Good outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale score of ≤3 at 3 months and successful reperfusion as thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b-3. BATMAN score was externally validated and compared with the Posterior Circulation Collateral score. The derivation cohort included 83 patients with 41 in the validation cohort. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, BATMAN score had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-0.9) in derivation cohort and an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.6-0.9) in validation cohort. In logistic regression adjusted for age and clinical severity, BATMAN score of BATMAN score of BATMAN score had greater accuracy compared with Posterior Circulation Collateral score ( P =0.04). The addition of collateral quality to clot burden in BATMAN score seems to improve prognostic accuracy in basilar artery occlusion patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Hipnoticos corticales y basilares y acciones anticonvulsivantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gutiérrez-Noriega

    1943-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudian las diferencias de los hipnóticos corticales y basilares desde el punto de vista de sus acciones anticonvulsivantes. Los resultados son los siguientes: 1. Los hipnóticos del grupo basilar (barbitúrico y uretano poseen un poder anticonvulsivante considerablemente mayor que los hipnóticos del grupo cortical (alcoholes, aldehidos, bromuros, éter, con excepción del sulfato de magnesia, clasificado en el grupo subcortical, que tiene muy poca acción anticonvulsivante. 2. Algunos hipnóticos del grupo cortical (cloralosa disminuyen notablemente a dosis narcótica el umbral para las convulsiones clónicas, producidas por el cardiazol, coramina y estricnina; pero aumentan el umbral para las convulsiones tónicas. Estos hipnóticos actúan paradójicamente, como anticonvulsivantes y como sinergistas de los convulsivantes. 3. El sinergismo de cardiazol y estricnina para producir convulsiones clónicas es mucho más notable durante la narcosis por cloralosa que en el animal no anestesiado. 4. Existen significativas diferencias cualitativas y cuantitativas entre las convulsiones del animal no anestesiado y las convulsiones del animal durante la narcosis por cloralosa. En este último caso no se produce la reacción tónica, las reacciones neurovegetativas son más débiles, pero la duración de las convulsiones clónicas es considerablemente mayer. 5. Las diferencias de actividad anticonvulsivante observadas entre los dos grupos de hipnóticos, no pueden ser tomadas como prueba de la clasificación topográfica (córtico-basilar. Al contrario, sugieren que algunos hipnóticos del grupo cortical deben su típica manera de actuar a una acción estimulante tanto sobre la corteza cerebral como sobre los centros subcorticales. Se discute la posibilidad de que el sistema internuncial sea el que principalmente se estimula. Así, mientras que en la narcosis de tipo barbitúrico disminuye la excitabilidad de todo el sistema nervioso de relaci

  20. successful occipitocervical fusion for basilar invagination in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His X-rays, CT scans and MRI revealed basilar invagination (8.5mm ... McRae. Opisthion. McGregor. Hard palate. Chamberlain. DISCUSSION. Although congenital, basilar invagination can remain asymptomatic and unrecognized until adulthood (1). ... the reducible type; this is similar to Goel et al's (3) patients, 82% of ...

  1. Arterial occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Qing Ke; Liu, Wei Dong; Liu, Peng; Li, Xue Yuan; Zhang, Lian Qun; Ma, Long Jia; Ren, Yun Fei; Wu, Ya Ping; Wang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Object: To explore the clinical feasibility of employing occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. Methods: One patient, male and 46 years old, suffered transient numbness and weakness on the right limbs. Cerebral angiography indicated basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. The patient

  2. Voltage Oscillations in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell with Pd-Pt/C and Pd/C Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Jéssica Alves; Varela, Hamilton

    2017-10-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) fed with H 2 contaminated with CO may exhibit oscillatory behavior when operated galvanostatically. The self-organization of the anodic overpotential is interesting because it can be accompanied by an increase in the average performance. Herein we report experimental studies of voltage oscillations that emerge in a PEMFC equipped with a Pd/C or PdPt/C anode and fed with H 2 contaminated with CO (100 ppm). We used on-line mass spectrometry to investigate how the mass fragments associated with CO 2 and CO ( m / z 44 and 28, respectively) varied with the voltage oscillations. Overall, we observed that oscillations in the anodic overpotential are in phase with that of the CO and CO 2 signals. This fact is consistent with an autonomous adsorption-oxidation cyclic process. For both anodes, it has been observed that, in general, an increase in current density implies an increase in oscillatory frequency. By using CO stripping, we also discuss how the onset of CO oxidation is related to the maximum overpotential reached during a cycle, whereas the minimum overpotential can be associated with the catalytic activity of the electrode for H 2 oxidation.

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurus Marques de Almeida Holanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  4. Electromechanical coupling in rat basilar artery in response to morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, A; Harder, D R

    1983-12-01

    Force development, intracellular membrane potential (Em), and voltage vs. current curves were measured in rat basilar artery to help elucidate the mechanism of action of morphine sulfate and a synthetic narcotic, meperidine hydrochloride, on this preparation. Morphine sulfate caused a dose-dependent contraction of these vessels, which was reversible with naloxone. Electrical studies show that morphine may act upon this vascular smooth muscle preparation by decreasing potassium conductance (gk). This hypothesis is supported by the findings that morphine sulfate depolarized these cells and increased the input resistance (rin) determined by the application of rectangular hyperpolarizing and depolarizing current pulses through the microelectrode during impalement and recording of the associated voltage changes (delta V). Meperidine hydrochloride had significantly less effect on this preparation than morphine sulfate. Further studies show that the vehicular medium used for the commercially available preparation of naloxone (viz. the methyl and propyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in a ratio of 9:1) is, in vitro, a vasodilator of cerebral vascular smooth muscle.

  5. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palková, Z.; Váchová, Libuše; Gášková, D.; Kučerová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2009), s. 228-235 ISSN 0968-7688 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/0294; GA ČR GA204/08/0718; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Grant - others:US(US) Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Award (#55005623) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast colony population * transmembrane potential oscillations * cell energetics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.777, year: 2009

  6. Basilar-membrane modularity and the growth of forward masking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plack, C.J.; Oxenham, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Forward masking growth functions were measured for pure-tone maskers and signals at 2 and 6 kHz as a function of the silent interval between the masker and signal. The inclusion of conditions involving short signals and short masker-signal intervals ensured that a wide range of signal thresholds

  7. Linking Cellular Mechanisms to Behavior: Entorhinal Persistent Spiking and Membrane Potential Oscillations May Underlie Path Integration, Grid Cell Firing, and Episodic Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Hasselmo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex plays an important role in spatial memory and episodic memory functions. These functions may result from cellular mechanisms for integration of the afferent input to entorhinal cortex. This article reviews physiological data on persistent spiking and membrane potential oscillations in entorhinal cortex then presents models showing how both these cellular mechanisms could contribute to properties observed during unit recording, including grid cell firing, and how they could underlie behavioural functions including path integration. The interaction of oscillations and persistent firing could contribute to encoding and retrieval of trajectories through space and time as a mechanism relevant to episodic memory.

  8. The Relationship between Respiration-Related Membrane Potential Slow Oscillations and Discharge Patterns in Mitral/Tufted Cells: What Are the Rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffaud, Virginie; Fourcaud-Trocmé, Nicolas; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Buonviso, Nathalie; Amat, Corine

    2012-01-01

    Background A slow respiration-related rhythm strongly shapes the activity of the olfactory bulb. This rhythm appears as a slow oscillation that is detectable in the membrane potential, the respiration-related spike discharge of the mitral/tufted cells and the bulbar local field potential. Here, we investigated the rules that govern the manifestation of membrane potential slow oscillations (MPSOs) and respiration-related discharge activities under various afferent input conditions and cellular excitability states. Methodology and Principal Findings We recorded the intracellular membrane potential signals in the mitral/tufted cells of freely breathing anesthetized rats. We first demonstrated the existence of multiple types of MPSOs, which were influenced by odor stimulation and discharge activity patterns. Complementary studies using changes in the intracellular excitability state and a computational model of the mitral cell demonstrated that slow oscillations in the mitral/tufted cell membrane potential were also modulated by the intracellular excitability state, whereas the respiration-related spike activity primarily reflected the afferent input. Based on our data regarding MPSOs and spike patterns, we found that cells exhibiting an unsynchronized discharge pattern never exhibited an MPSO. In contrast, cells with a respiration-synchronized discharge pattern always exhibited an MPSO. In addition, we demonstrated that the association between spike patterns and MPSO types appeared complex. Conclusion We propose that both the intracellular excitability state and input strength underlie specific MPSOs, which, in turn, constrain the types of spike patterns exhibited. PMID:22952828

  9. Basilar artery aneurysm case presented with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar Utku

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain related with disorders of the brain and neck vascular structures is not rare but importance was attached to a condition that is often overlooked. Tension as a sudden onset, radiating to the nape, the neck pain becomes unbearable and within seconds the raging 51-year-old female patient with aneurysm at the distal end of basilar artery was found. Case, the only sign of neck pain with unruptured basilar artery aneurysm is presented in terms of raising awareness on the subject.

  10. Primary stenting as emergency therapy in acute basilar artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreer, Joachim; Arnold, Sebastian; Klisch, Joachim; Schumacher, Martin; Els, Thomas; Hetzel, Andreas; Huppertz, Hans-Juergen; Oehm, Eckhardt

    2002-01-01

    In three patients with acute occlusion of the basilar artery intra-arterial fibrinolysis resulted in only partial recanalization and revealed severe stenosis as the underlying cause. Application of micro-stents without previous dilatation resulted in vessel re-opening. Two patients had an excellent clinical outcome. One patient died 10 days after the stroke due to brainstem infarction. Emergency primary stent application may improve the outcome in acute basilar artery occlusion, if intra-arterial thrombolysis fails to re-establish a sufficient flow. (orig.)

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: MR imaging of basilar impression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, G. J. M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Beek, E.; Gooskens, R. H. J. M.; Pruijs, J. E. H.

    2003-01-01

    To determine on radiographs the presence of Basilar Impression (BI) in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). To confirm this sign and altered geometrical relationships of the craniocervical junction in course of time with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In a cohort study of 130 patients with

  12. Delayed onset of fatal basilar thrombotic embolus after whiplash injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viktrup, L; Knudsen, G M; Hansen, S H

    1995-01-01

    in a collision. CASE DESCRIPTION: After whiplash trauma in a car accident, a 50-year-old taxi driver suffered from headache and episodic visual disturbances. Two months after the accident he suddenly lost consciousness and was admitted to the hospital. A CT scan performed at that time was indicative of basilar...

  13. Basilar artery thrombosis in the setting of antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Larry T.; Heithaus, R. Evans; Shamim, Sadat A.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss, and multiple additional clinical manifestations. We describe a man with severe atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis and superimposed in situ thrombus who was found to have antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:24982561

  14. Ocorrência familiar de impressão basilar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentaram os resultados clínicos e radiológicos de 9 membros de uma família, dos quais dois foram submetidos ao tratamento neurocirúrgico de impressão basilar e malformação de Arnold-Chiari.

  15. Stereotactic gamma irradiation of basilar artery in cat. Preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A; Wennerstrand, J; Leksell, D; Backlund, E O [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of the basilar artery of cats by stereotactic technique was performed with doses varying from 100 to 300 Gy in a gamma unit. Histologically, vascular lesions such as vacuolization, degeneration and desquamation of the endothelium and hyalinization and necrosis of the muscular coat predominated, whereas reparatory reactions were relatively sparse. Thrombosis was completely absent.

  16. Relaxation effect of abacavir on rat basilar arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wai Sum Li

    Full Text Available The use of abacavir has been linked with increased cardiovascular risk in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, the mechanism involved remains unclear. We hypothesize that abacavir may impair endothelial function. In addition, based on the structural similarity between abacavir and adenosine, we propose that abacavir may affect vascular contractility through endogenous adenosine release or adenosine receptors in blood vessels.The relaxation effect of abacavir on rat basilar arteries was studied using the myograph technique. Cyclic GMP and AMP levels were measured by immunoassay. The effects of abacavir on nucleoside transporters were studied using radiolabeled nucleoside uptake experiments. Ecto-5' nucleotidase activity was determined by measuring the generation of inorganic phosphate using adenosine monophosphate as the substrate.Abacavir induced the relaxation of rat basilar arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. This relaxation was abolished when endothelium was removed. In addition, the relaxation was diminished by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, and the protein kinase G inhibitor, KT5820. Abacavir also increased the cGMP level in rat basilar arteries. Abacavir-induced relaxation was also abolished by adenosine A2 receptor blockers. However, abacavir had no effect on ecto-5' nucleotidase and nucleoside transporters. Short-term and long-term treatment of abacavir did not affect acetylcholine-induced relaxation in rat basilar arteries.Abacavir induces acute endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat basilar arteries, probably through the activation of adenosine A2 receptors in endothelial cells, which subsequently leads to the release of nitric oxide, resulting in activation of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate/protein kinase G-dependent pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells. It is speculated that abacavir-induced cardiovascular risk may not be related to

  17. Dissecting and fusiform aneurysms of vertebro-basilar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwama, T.; Andoh, T.; Sakai, N.; Iwata, T.; Yamada, H.; Hirata, T.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) findings of three cases with vertebro-basilar dissecting aneurysms (DA) were compared with those of two cases with vertebro-basilar fusiform aneurysms (FA). No abnormal findings, excepting a dilatation of a signal-void area corresponding to the arterial blood flow, were shown on the MR images in the patients with a FA. In contrast to the FA cases, various abnormalities were detected by the MR studies in all three DA cases. An intimal flap and a double lumen were demonstrated in one case. An intra-mural hematoma was shown in one case. A hematoma neighboring the parent artery was demonstrated in two cases. MR imaging was thought to be useful for detecting intracranial vascular lesions, such as a DA, and for discriminating between a DA and a FA. (orig.)

  18. Cranial Paget's disease - clinical case of symptomatic secondary basilar impression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagov, E.; Gabrovsky, N.; Gabrovsky, S.

    2010-01-01

    A clinical case of 52 years old woman with history of periodic headaches for many years. The headache became more intensive and constant during the last 4-6 months. Instability by walking and stagger occurred as well as weakness in all 4 extremities, difficult swallowing and speech changes. Bulbar, quadripyramidal and archicerebellar symptoms were in hand. Pagets disease was ascertained engaging the skull with secondary basilar impression and compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem leading to the above described clinical signs. Decompressive median suboccipital craniectomy was performed with laminectomy of C1. Occipital squama was thickened and highly vascularized.. Secondary basilar impression could occur in cranial Pagets disease with clinical symptoms resulting from the compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem

  19. Histomorphometric study of basilar artery in normal and suicide persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Parmar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression in association with cerebro-vascular risk factors and white matter lesions is increasingly referred to as ‘vascular depression’. There are several brain areas known for playing a role in patho-physiology of depression which may lead to suicidal tendencies, are fed by basilar artery. Therefore, the arterial histoarchitecture was studied in the normal and suicide individuals to establish a relationship between the vascular structural changes and depression. Methods: 40 post-mortem samples (both sexes of basilar artery have been collected and were grouped into normal and suicide groups. Samples were measured for arterial, lumen diameter and the thickness of tunica intima, media and adventitia using H & E stained sections. While, Orcein stained sections were used to estimate the volume fraction of elastic fibres, and Van Gieson stained sections to estimate the volume fraction of collagen fibres. Results: The mean thickness of tunica media of basilar artery in suicide individuals (1.08 microns showed a statistically significant decrease when compared to normal person (1.33 microns. Further, volume fraction of collagen (0.06 mm3/mm3 and elastic fibres (0.06 mm3/mm3 in suicide persons showed a statistically significant decrease when compared to normal person (collagen fibres 0.08 mm3/mm3; elastic fibres 0.09 mm3/mm3. Conclusions: This study establishes a probable causative relationship between vascular structural abnormality and depression which may drive the individual to commit suicide. Keywords: Histomorphometry, Basilar artery, Suicide, Depression

  20. Computed tomography in basilar artery occlusion in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koreaki; Miwa, Soichi; Handa, Hajime

    1978-01-01

    A case of basilar artery occlusion in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Eighteen other cases of such occlusion in childhood in the relevant literature were analyzed, and then all nineteen cases were compared to adult cases. In comparison with adult cases, the following points were clear: (1) In children as well as in adults, basilar artery occlusion is more common in males. (2) As is well known, arteriosclerosis is the commonest cause in adults. In children, however, idiopathic and/or congenital occlusion are more common causes. (3) The main clinical manifestations in childhood as well as in maturity are consciousness disturbance, hemiplegia or quadriplegia, and pupillary abnormalities. (4) An occlusion of the proximal third of the basilar artery is common in adults, whereas an occlusion of the middle third is common in childhood. (5) Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, cerebral angiography, and computed tomography. (6) In contrast to the poor prognosis in adults, the prognosis is fairly in children. (author)

  1. Basilar Artery Thrombosis in a Child Treated With Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Jakob Fink; Sonnenborg, Laura; Larsen, Line Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Basilar artery occlusion in children is rare. It has a high mortality and morbidity if recanalization is not achieved before extensive brainstem infarction has occurred. An 11-year-old boy presented with a clinical and radiological "top-of-the-basilar" syndrome. Intravenous tissue plasminogen act...... thrombolysis (4.5 hours), the present case suggests that bridging therapy in pediatric basilar artery occlusion can be safe and effective....

  2. Reversed tonotopic map of the basilar papilla in Gekko gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, G A; Köppl, C; Sneary, M

    1999-05-01

    A published model of the frequency responses of different locations on the basilar papilla of the Tokay gecko Gekko gecko (Authier and Manley, 1995. Hear. Res. 82, 1-13) had implied that (a) unlike all other amniotes studied so far, the frequency map is reversed, with the low frequencies at the base and the high frequencies at the apex, and (b) the high-frequency area is split into two parallel-lying hair cell areas covering different frequency ranges. To test these hypotheses, the frequency representation along the basilar papilla of Gekko gecko was studied by recording from single auditory afferent nerve fibers and labelling them iontophoretically with horseradish peroxidase. Successfully labelled fibers covered a range of characteristic frequencies from 0.42 to 4.9 kHz, which extended from 78% to 9% of the total papillar length, as measured from the apex. The termination sites of labelled fibers within the basilar papilla correlated with their characteristic frequency, the lowest frequencies being represented basally, and the highest apically. This confirms the first prediction of the model. The map indicates, however, that one of the two high-frequency papillar regions (the postaxial segment) represents the full high-frequency range, from about 1 to 5 kHz. No functionally identified labelling was achieved in the preaxial segment. Thus the assumptions underlying the proposed model need revision. A good mathematical description of the frequency distribution was given by an exponential regression with a mapping constant in the living state of approximately 0.4 mm/octave.

  3. Histomorphometric study of basilar artery in normal and suicide persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Suresh Kumar; Prasad, V Satya

    2016-10-01

    Depression in association with cerebro-vascular risk factors and white matter lesions is increasingly referred to as 'vascular depression'. There are several brain areas known for playing a role in patho-physiology of depression which may lead to suicidal tendencies, are fed by basilar artery. Therefore, the arterial histoarchitecture was studied in the normal and suicide individuals to establish a relationship between the vascular structural changes and depression. 40 post-mortem samples (both sexes) of basilar artery have been collected and were grouped into normal and suicide groups. Samples were measured for arterial, lumen diameter and the thickness of tunica intima, media and adventitia using H & E stained sections. While, Orcein stained sections were used to estimate the volume fraction of elastic fibres, and Van Gieson stained sections to estimate the volume fraction of collagen fibres. The mean thickness of tunica media of basilar artery in suicide individuals (1.08 microns) showed a statistically significant decrease when compared to normal person (1.33 microns). Further, volume fraction of collagen (0.06 mm 3 /mm 3 ) and elastic fibres (0.06 mm 3 /mm 3 ) in suicide persons showed a statistically significant decrease when compared to normal person (collagen fibres 0.08 mm 3 /mm 3 ; elastic fibres 0.09 mm 3 /mm 3 ). This study establishes a probable causative relationship between vascular structural abnormality and depression which may drive the individual to commit suicide. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Basilar artery occlusion: Prognostic signs of severity on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: pierre-alexandre.poletti@hcuge.ch [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Pereira, Vitor Mendes [Service of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto (Canada); Lovblad, Karl-Olof [Service of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Canel, Lucie [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Sztajzel, Roman [Service of Neurology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Becker, Minerva [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Platon, Alexandra [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The main CT signs associated with basilar artery occlusion were analyzed. • CT sign of acute ischemic lesion is significantly associated with a bad outcome. • The site of the basilar artery occlusion is not associated to the patients’ outcome. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the computed tomography (CT) signs that are predictive of the clinical outcome of basilar artery occlusion (BAO). Materials and methods: The study population consisted in 37 patients (14 women, 23 men, mean age: 63 years), admitted with onset of neurological deficit, starting 1–72 h prior to admission, who were diagnosed with BAO on the basis of a CT examination with intravenous contrast agent. The following signs were collected on CT scans performed on admission: clot density on noncontrast images, clot length, and clot location, as well as the presence of acute ischemic lesions. The results were compared against the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of patients at 3 months, favorable clinical outcome being defined as a mRS score ≤3. Results: The clinical outcome was favorable in 13 (35%) of the 37 patients and unfavorable in 24 (65%). Signs of acute ischemia were visible in 13 of the 24 patients with unfavorable outcome but in none of the 13 patients with favorable outcome (p < 0.001). None of the other CT signs analyzed were significantly correlated with clinical prognosis. Conclusion: Of all the CT signs analyzed, only the presence of signs of acute ischemia on the admission CT of patients with BAO was associated with poor prognosis.

  5. Surgical treatment of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan MA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal fixation on Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression.Methods The clinical data of 16 cases(7 males and 9 females,aged 17 to 65 years,mean 36.4 of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.The diagnoses for all the patients were confirmed by radiology.Small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression was performed in all patients,cerebellar tonsils were resected,and then one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion using autogenous iliac bone and internal wiring fixation were performed.Neck support was used for 3 months after surgery.Results Symptoms were significantly improved in all cases after surgical operation.No patient died or infected.Cerebrospinal fluid leakage was found at draining site in one case.Transient pain of scapular and chest was found in one case and disappeared spontaneously.A 6-months follow-up showed that 6 patients were cured,9 improved and 1 unchanged according to Symon and Lavender standard.Postoperative MRI showed the reconstructed cisterna magna was clear in all patients,no cerebellar ptosis was found,and the occipital-cervical graft bone was fused.Conclusion In patients with Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression,small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal wiring fixation has a clear and definite effect,it can increase the volume of posterior fossa and alleviate the ventral brain stem compression simultaneously,and reconstruct the stability of cranio-cervical junction.

  6. WDR1 Presence in the Songbird Basilar Papilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Henry J.; Sanovich, Elena; Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F.; Yan, Kai; Dooling, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    WD40 repeat 1 protein (WDR1) was first reported in the acoustically injured chicken inner ear, and bioinformatics revealed that WDR1 has numerous WD40 repeats, important for protein-protein interactions. It has significant homology to actin interacting protein 1 (Aip1) in several lower species such as yeast, roundworm, fruitfly and frog. Several studies have shown that Aip1 binds cofilin/actin depolymerizing factor, and that these interactions are pivotal for actin disassembly via actin filament severing and actin monomer capping. However, the role of WDR1 in auditory function has yet to be determined. WDR1 is typically restricted to hair cells of the normal avian basilar papilla, but is redistributed towards supporting cells after acoustic overstimulation, suggesting that WDR1 may be involved in inner ear response to noise stress. One aim of the present study was to resolve the question as to whether stress factors, other than intense sound, could induce changes in WDR1 presence in the affected avian inner ear. Several techniques were used to assess WDR1 presence in the inner ears of songbird strains, including Belgian Waterslager (BW) canary, an avian strain with degenerative hearing loss thought to have a genetic basis. Reverse transcription, followed by polymerase chain reactions with WDR1-specific primers, confirmed WDR1 presence in the basilar papillae of adult BW, non-BW canaries, and zebra finches. Confocal microscopy examinations, following immunocytochemistry with anti-WDR1 antibody, localized WDR1 to the hair cell cytoplasm along the avian sensory epithelium. In addition, little, if any, staining by anti-WDR1 antibody was observed among supporting cells in the chicken or songbird ear. The present observations confirm and extend the early findings of WDR1 localization in hair cells, but not in supporting cells, in the normal avian basilar papilla. However, unlike supporting cells in the acoustically damaged chicken basilar papilla, the inner ear of the BW

  7. Hemifacial spasm in a patient with basilar artery dolichoectasia caused by uncontrolled hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon S. Crabtree

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of hemifacial spasm. Magnetic resonance imaging performed showed his tortuous basilar artery with nerve compression, and the patient was treated conservatively with botulinum toxin injections with complete resolution of symptoms. This rare disease was caused by his long history of hypertension, which led to his major basilar artery dolichoectasia.

  8. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome ''depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs

  9. Neurofibromatosis, stroke and basilar impression: case report Neurofibromatose, acidente vascular cerebral e impressão basilar: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELCIO JULIATO PIOVESAN

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 can virtually affect any organ, presenting most frequently with "cafe au lait" spots and neurofibromas. Vasculopathy is a known complication of NF1, but cerebrovascular disease is rare. We report the case of a 51-year-old man admitted to the hospital with a history of stroke four months before admission. On physical examination, he presented various "cafe au lait" spots and cutaneous neurofibromas. Neurologic examination demonstrated right-sided facial paralysis, right-sided hemiplegia, and aphasia. Computed tomography scan of head showed hypodense areas in the basal ganglia and centrum semiovale. Radiographs of cranium and cervical spine showed basilar impression. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of both vertebral and left internal carotid arteries, and partial stenosis of the right internal carotid artery. A large network of collateral vessels was present (moyamoya syndrome. It is an uncommon case of occlusive cerebrovascular disease associated with NF1, since most cases described in the literature are in young people, and tend to spare the posterior cerebral circulation. Basilar impression associated with this case may be considered a pure coincidence, but rare cases of basilar impression and NF1 have been described.A neurofibromatose tipo 1 (NF1 pode acometer qualquer órgão mas as apresentações mais frequente são manchas café com leite e neurofibromas. O envolvimento de vasos é complicação conhecida da NF1, mas a doença cerebrovascular é rara. Relatamos o caso de paciente do sexo masculino de 51 anos com história de acidente vascular cerebral há quatro meses da admissão. Ao exame físico apresentava várias manchas café com leite e neurofibromas cutâneos. O exame neurológico demonstrou acometimento facial direito, hemiplegia direita e afasia. Tomografia computadorizada de crânio mostrou áreas hipodensas nos gânglios basais e centros semi-ovais. Radiografias do crânio e coluna cervical

  10. Analysis of Surgical Freedom Variation Across the Basilar Artery Bifurcation: Towards a Deeper Insight Into Approach Selection for Basilar Apex Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Benet, Arnau; Rodriguez Rubio, Roberto; Yousef, Sonia; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-03-03

    The orbitozygomatic approach is generally advocated over the pterional approach for basilar apex aneurysms. However, the impact of the extensions of the pterional approach on the obtained maneuverability over multiple vascular targets (relevant to basilar apex surgery) has not been studied before. To analyze the patterns of surgical freedom change across the basilar bifurcation between the pterional, orbitopterional, and orbitozygomatic approaches. Surgical freedom was assessed for 3 vascular targets important in basilar apex aneurysm surgery (ipsilateral and contralateral P1-P2 junctions, and basilar apex), and compared between the pterional, orbitopterional, and orbitozygomatic approaches in 10 cadaveric specimens. Transitioning from the pterional to orbitopterional approach, the surgical freedom increased significantly at all 3 targets (P < .05). However, the gain in surgical freedom declined progressively from the most superficial target (60% for ipsilateral P1-P2 junction) to the deepest target (35% for contralateral P1-P2 junction). Conversely, transitioning from the orbitopterional to the orbitozygomatic approach, the gain in surgical freedom was minimal for the ipsilateral P1-P2 and basilar apex (<4%), but increased dramatically to 19% at the contralateral P1-P2 junction. The orbitopterional approach provides a remarkable increase in surgical maneuverability compared to the pterional approach for the basilar apex target and the relevant adjacent arterial targets. However, compared to the orbitopterional, the orbitozygomatic approach adds little maneuverability except for the deepest target (ie, contralateral P1-P2 junction). Therefore, the orbitozygomatic approach may be most efficacious with larger basilar apex aneurysms limiting the control over of the contralateral P1 PCA.

  11. Basilar artery angulation and vertigo due to the hemodynamic effect of dominant vertebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, Murat; Yaman, Mehmet; Eser, Olcay; Songur, Ahmet; Ozen, Oguz A

    2008-01-01

    Vertebral arteries form the basilar artery at the pontobulbar junction. The vertebral artery may have dominancy in one of them. The branches of basilar arteries supply blood for the vestibular nuclei and its connections. Vertigo is seen generally in the upper middle aged patients. Vertigo can be observed in dolichoectasia of basilar artery such as angulation and elongation, because of the diminished blood supply and changed hemodynamic factors of vestibular nuclei and its connections. We hypothesized that angulation or elongation of basilar artery can be estimated according to the unilateral vertebral artery dominant hypertensive patients. The basilar artery can angulate from the dominant side of vertebral artery to the recessive side. These angulation and elongation can effect the hemodynamic factors in absence of growing collateral arteries. So, the vertigo attacks may occur in these patients.

  12. Transcavernous Approach to the Basilar Apex: A Cadaveric Prosection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, Jonathan N; Navarro, Jovany C; Batjer, Hunt H; Van Loveren, Harry; Duckworth, Edward A

    2018-01-01

    The transcavernous approach to the basilar artery, as initially described by Dolenc, is one of the most common and elegant approaches to the region. It affords a generous working and viewing angle, but it can be technically challenging and requires attention to detail at each step. We investigate this approach in this report via a cadaveric prosection with a focus on the value of each of the component steps in improving surgical view and exposure. The transcavernous approach steps are divided into extradural stages: orbitozygomatic osteotomy (a modern adjunct to Dolenc’s original description), drilling of the lesser sphenoid wing, and anterior clinoidectomy; and intradural stages: wide splitting of the Sylvian fissure, unroofing of the oculomotor and trochlear nerves, and posterior clinoidectomy. The surgical windows afforded by each step in the approach are illustrated using microscopic images taken during the cadaveric prosection of a donor who happened to harbor a basilar apex aneurysm. An illustrative case and artist illustrations are used to emphasize the relative value of each step of the transcavernous exposure. PMID:29682431

  13. CNS fungal meningitis to the "Top of the basilar"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Logan CS; Kirschner RC; Simonds GR

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) infections are a rare complication of epidural steroid injections and without strong clinical suspicion, fungal organisms may be overlooked among the long differential of causes of meningitis.Rare sequela of fungal meningitis is the development of stroke.To our knowledge, we present the first case of post epidural steroid injection(ESI) fungal meningitis leading toa basilar artery stroke, otherwise known as“top of the basilar” syndrome.We present a49-year-old female with a history ofESIs who presented to the emergency department with headache, neck stiffness, and abdominal pain.She was discharged after her labs and symptoms were deemed inconsistent with meningitis.She was eventually admitted and twelve days after her originalED visit, she was diagnosed with meningitis and started on anti-fungal treatment.She was discharged88 days later but was readmitted due to left sided weakness and mental status changes.She quickly lost motor and bulbar functions.AnMRA showed diminished distal flow through the basilar artery, suggesting near complete occlusion.Although appropriate long term anti-fungal treatment was started, the patient still succumbed to a rare vascular event.Physicians who are treating patients forESI meningitis should be aware of the potential for vasculitic and encephalitic complications.

  14. Pharmacological and molecular comparison of K(ATP) channels in rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Edvinsson, Lars; Olesen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    , we studied the possible involvement of endothelial K(ATP) channels by pressurized arteriography after luminal administration of synthetic K(ATP) channel openers to rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries. Furthermore, we examined the mRNA and protein expression profile of K(ATP) channels to rat...... basilar and middle cerebral arteries using quantitative real-time PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Western blotting, respectively. In the perfusion system, we found no significant responses after luminal application of three K(ATP) channel openers to rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries...

  15. Endovascular treatment of basilar tip aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Ohba, S.; Shibukawa, M.; Kiura, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Uozumi, T.; Nakahara, T.

    2003-01-01

    We report the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of basilar tip aneurysms (BTA) in five patients with moyamoya disease. The patients underwent intra-aneurysmal embolisation with detachable platinum coils. Three BTA presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH); the other two were asymptomatic. In four cases, one embolisation procedure produced >95% angiographic obliteration of the aneurysm. In the other patient, 80-90% obliteration was achieved initially, but due to growth of the residual aneurysm, the procedure was repeated 7 months later. Two patients experienced transient oculomotor paresis as a procedure-related complication. Mean follow-up was 43.6±34.0 months (range 8-92 months). One patient died of putaminal haemorrhage unrelated to the aneurysm 15 months after embolisation. The other four had no subsequent SAH and survived without sequelae. Endovascular embolisation using detachable platinum coils proved to be a safe and efficient treatment modality for BTA associated with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  16. Imaging basilar skull fractures in the horse: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, O. III; Jorgensen, J.S.; Thrall, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Due to the complex nature of the anatomy of the equine head, superimposition of numerous structures, and poor soft tissue differentiation, radiography may be of limited value in the diagnosis of basilar skull fractures. However, in many horses radiographic changes such as soft tissue opacification of the guttural pouch region, irregular bone margination at the sphenooccipital line, attenuation of the nasopharynx, ventral displacement of the dorsal pharyngeal wall and the presence of irregularly shaped bone fragments in the region of the guttural pouches are suggestive of a fracture of the skull base. These findings in conjunction with physical examination findings and historical information may lead to a presumptive diagnosis of a fracture. When available and when the patient will accommodate the equipment, computed tomography may give a definitive diagnosis owing to its superior resolution and differentiation of soft tissue structures

  17. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  18. The Basilar Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography Score for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion Treated with Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haihua; Ma, Ning; Liu, Lian; Gao, Feng; Mo, Dapeng; Miao, Zhongrong

    2018-06-01

    Recently, the Basilar Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography (BATMAN) score predicts clinical outcome of acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO), yet there is no extensive external validation. The purpose of this study was to validate the prognostic value of BATMAN scoring system for the prediction of clinical outcome in patients with acute BAO treated with endovascular mechanical thrombectomy by using cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We analyzed the clinical and angiographic data of consecutive patients with acute BAO from March 2012 to November 2016. The BATMAN scoring system was used to assess the collateral status and thrombus burden. Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score 2b-3 was defined as successful recanalization. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the area under the curve (AUC) and the optimum cutoff value. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify the predictor of clinical outcome. This study included 63 patients with acute BAO who underwent mechanical thrombectomy. Of these patients, 90.5% (57/63) achieved successful recanalization (TICI, 2b-3) and 34.9% (22/63) had a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2). ROC analysis indicated that the AUC of the BATMAN score was .722 (95% confidence interval [CI], .594-.827), and the optimal cutoff value was 3 (sensitivity = 72.73, specificity = 63.41). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the BATMAN score higher than 3 was associated with favorable outcome (odds ratio, 5.214; 95% CI, 1.47-18.483; P = .011). The BATMAN score on DSA seems to predict the functional outcome in patients of acute BAO treated with mechanical thrombectomy. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes of basilar artery occlusion in patients aged 75 years or older in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Compter, Annette; Tanne, David; Engelter, Stefan T; Audebert, Heinrich; Thijs, Vincent; de Freitas, Gabriel; Algra, Ale; Jaap Kappelle, L; Schonewille, Wouter J

    2012-11-01

    Patients with an acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) have a high risk of long-lasting disability and death. Only limited data are available on functional outcome in elderly patients with BAO. Using data from the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study, we aimed to determine outcomes in patients ≥75 years. Primary outcome measure was poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale score 4-6). Secondary outcomes were death, insufficient vessel recanalization (defined as thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 0-1) and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Patients were divided into four age-groups, based on quartiles: 18-54, 55-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years. Outcomes were compared between patients ≥75 years and patients aged 18-54 years. Risk ratios with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and Poisson regression analyses were performed to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRR). We included 619 patients [18-54 years n = 153 (25 %), 55-64 years n = 133 (21 %), 65-74 years n = 171 (28 %), and ≥75 years n = 162 (26 %)]. Compared with patients aged 18-54 years, patients ≥75 years were at increased risk of poor functional outcome [aRR 1.33 (1.14-1.55)] and death [aRR 2.47 (1.75-3.51)]. Nevertheless, 35/162 (22 %, 95 % CI 15-28 %) of patients ≥75 years had good functional outcome. No significant differences between age groups were observed for recanalization rate and incidence of SICH. Although patients ≥75 years with BAO have an increased risk of poor outcome compared with younger patients, a substantial group of patients ≥75 years survives with a good functional outcome.

  20. Basilar impression in osteogenesis imperfecta: can it be treated with halo traction and posterior fusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noske, D. P.; van Royen, B. J.; Bron, J. L.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2006-01-01

    Basilar impression (BI) and hydrocephalus complicating osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually treated by anterior transoral decompression and posterior fixation. Nevertheless, it may be questioned if posterior fusion following axial halo traction is adequate in patients with symptomatic BI

  1. Basilar impression and osteogenesis imperfecta in a three-year-old girl: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, P.J.; Berbrayer, D.; Reilly, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl with osteogenesis imperfecta developed symptomatic basilar impression. Her neurological symptoms were treated by foramen magnum decompression and laminectomy. This is an unusually young patient to have this condition.

  2. Basilar impression and osteogenesis imperfecta in a three-year-old girl: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, P.J.; Berbrayer, D.; Reilly, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl with osteogenesis imperfecta developed symptomatic basilar impression. Her neurological symptoms were treated by foramen magnum decompression and laminectomy. This is an unusually young patient to have this condition. (orig.)

  3. Extreme fenestration of the basilar artery associated with cleft palate, nasopharyngeal mature teratoma, and hypophyseal duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Fujita, I. [Department of Pediatrics, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The authors present the case of a newborn girl with extreme fenestration of the basilar artery. This anomaly was found incidentally during MR imaging study for cleft palate and nasopharyngeal teratoma. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a totally duplicated basilar artery with connections at the proximal and distal ends of the artery, suggesting an extreme fenestration. Duplicated pituitary gland was also found on MR imaging. (orig.)

  4. Extreme fenestration of the basilar artery associated with cleft palate, nasopharyngeal mature teratoma, and hypophyseal duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S.; Fujita, I.

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the case of a newborn girl with extreme fenestration of the basilar artery. This anomaly was found incidentally during MR imaging study for cleft palate and nasopharyngeal teratoma. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a totally duplicated basilar artery with connections at the proximal and distal ends of the artery, suggesting an extreme fenestration. Duplicated pituitary gland was also found on MR imaging. (orig.)

  5. The M-current contributes to high threshold membrane potential oscillations in a cell type-specific way in the pedunculopontine nucleus of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla eBordas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pedunculopontine nucleus is known as a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system, participating in regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Besides cholinergic neurons, it consists of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons as well. According to classical and recent studies, more subgroups of neurons were defined. Groups based on the neurotransmitter released by a neuron are not homogenous, but can be further subdivided.The PPN neurons do not only provide cholinergic and non-cholinergic inputs to several subcortical brain areas but they are also targets of cholinergic and other different neuromodulatory actions. Although cholinergic neuromodulation has been already investigated in the nucleus, one of its characteristic targets, the M-type potassium current has not been described yet.Using slice electrophysiology, we provide evidence in the present work that cholinergic neurons possess M-current, whereas GABAergic neurons lack it. The M-current contributes to certain functional differences of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, as spike frequency adaptation, action potential firing frequency or the amplitude difference of medium afterhyperpolarizations. Furthermore, we showed that high threshold membrane potential oscillation with high power, around 20 Hz frequency is a functional property of almost all cholinergic cells, whereas GABAergic neurons have only low amplitude oscillations. Blockade of the M-current abolished the oscillatory activity at 20 Hz, and largely diminished it at other frequencies.Taken together, the M-current seems to be characteristic for PPN cholinergic neurons. It provides a possibility for modulating gamma band activity of these cells, thus contributing to neuromodulatory regulation of the reticular activating system.

  6. The tectopontine projection the the rat with comments on visual pathways to the basilar pons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burne, R.A.; Azizi, S.A.; Mihailoff, G.A.; Woodward, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The projection from the superior and inferior colliculi to the basilar pons in the rat was studied with the technique of orthograde transport of labeled amino acids and autoradiography. Injections restricted to the medial or lateral regions of the superior colliculus gave rise to grain labeling representing terminal fields over the ipsilateral peduncular, dorsolateral, and ventrolateral regions of the caudal basilar pons and over the dorsomedial area of the contralateral nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis (NRTP). The pontine projection from the superior colliculus to the lateral basilar pons is topographically organized; the medial superior colliculus projects primarily to the peduncular region, whereas the lateral superior colliculus terminates chiefly in ventrolateral pontine areas. A projection from the superior colliculus to the contralateral dorsomedial pontine and medial peduncular pontine regions, a previously undescribed finding, has also been shown. Descending fibers from the inferior colliculus do not appear to terminate extensively within the basilar pons but rather course adjacent to pontine cells of the dorsolateral region in the caudal pons. Pretectal nuclei project ipsilaterally to medial and lateral nuclei in the rostral and middle basilar pons, respectively. A rostrocaudal topography exists in the tectopontine projection; the pretectum projects to rostromiddle basilar pons, the superior colliculus to more caudal pontine regions, and the inferior colliculus (although sparsely) to further caudal areas. The pontine projection pattern from the colliculi and pretectum differs from the pontine afferents from the visual cortices

  7. Nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in intramural hematoma of the basilar artery - a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.; Nakov, V.; Hristov, H.

    2012-01-01

    Pretruncal (perimesencephalic) nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a benign variant of SAH. Although angiography fails to show a source of the hemorrhage, mild basilar artery narrowing may be observed. The cause of pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH has not been established. Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that the center of this type of SAH is not around the mesencephalon but is in the prepontine or interpeduncular cistern with the hemorrhage closely associated with the basilar artery. We review the possible sources of hemorrhage in these cisterns and hypothesize that pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH is caused by a primary intramural hematoma of the basilar artery. Such an intramural hematoma would explain bleeding under low pressure, the location of the hemorrhage anterior to the brainstem, and the typical findings of hemorrhage adjacent to the basilar artery lumen on magnetic resonance imaging and mild basilar artery narrowing on angiography. Hemorrhage in such location is easily found in native computed tomography (CT) images. Crescent, hyperdense thickening of the basilar artery wall is also observed. We have presented this unusual case to highlight the possible mechanism of hematoma formation and underline the importance of MDCT examination in the diagnosis confirmation and also excluding other potentially serious underlying condition that could also lead to non traumatic SAH. (authors)

  8. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J.M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.N.; Maitland, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present within the pre-treatment aneurysms. An estimation of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The Newtonian viscosity model and the porous media model capture similar qualitative trends, though both yield a smaller volume of thrombus within the SMP foam. PMID:23329002

  9. Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy in Basilar Artery Occlusion: Initial Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bum-Soo; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Choi, Seung-Won; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) for patients diagnosed with basilar artery (BA) occlusion. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical and imaging data of 16 patients diagnosed with BA occlusion who were treated with endovascular intervention from July 2012 to February 2013. Direct suction using the Penumbra system and thrombus retrieval by the Solitaire stent were the main endovascular techniques used to restore BA flow. The outcomes were evaluated based on rate of angiographic recanalization, rate of improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, rate of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge and after 3 months, and rate of cerebral hemorrhagic complications. Successful recanalization was defined as achieving Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction (TICI) of II or III. Results Sixteen patients received thrombectomy. The mean age was 67.8 ± 11 years and the mean NIHSS score was 12.3 ± 8.2. Eight patients treated within 6 hours of symptom onset were grouped as A and the other 8 patients treated beyond 6 hours (range, 6-120) were grouped as B. Successful recanalization was met in six patients (75%) for group A and 7 (87.5%) for group B. Favorable outcome occurred in 4 patients (50%) for group A and 5 (62.5%) for group B. Conclusion Our study supports the effectiveness and safety of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in treating BA occlusion even 6 hours after symptom onset. PMID:24167791

  10. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: MR imaging of basilar impression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janus, G.J.M.; Engelbert, R.H.H.; Beek, E.; Gooskens, R.H.J.M.; Pruijs, J.E.H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine on radiographs the presence of Basilar Impression (BI) in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). To confirm this sign and altered geometrical relationships of the craniocervical junction in course of time with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and patients: In a cohort study of 130 patients with OI (OI type I: 85; OI type III: 21; OI type IV: 24) lateral radiographs of the skull and cervical spine were made in a standardised way. MRI scans were performed when BI was suspected based upon protrusion of the odontoid above Chamberlain's line. Intracranial abnormalities as well as the basal angle were described. Neurological examination was performed in patients with conclusive BI at MRI-scan. Results and discussion: In eight patients BI could be confirmed by MRI-scan. None of the children had or developed in time neurological symptoms or signs. Follow up of BI by MRI scans was done in seven patients (mean: 5 years; range: 2-6 years). No alteration of intracranial findings were seen at subsequent investigation, although in one child Chamberlain's line increased from 8 (first MRI) to 15 mm (last MRI). BI can be diagnosed by radiographs but in the extreme osteoporotic bone and altered anatomy of the craniocervical junction of children with OI MRI is preferable. As intracranial pathology can be demonstrated by MRI, also a relation can be laid to possible neurological symptoms and signs at clinical examination. Conclusion: In our cohort study no alteration of the intracranial contents was seen at subsequent MRI scans. Although anatomic deformations exist in BI, no neurological symptoms or signs were present in our study and no operative reconstruction had to be performed. Periodical MRI-scan has not been of influence on the clinical decision making process. At the moment we perform a MRI-scan if BI is suspected at lateral skull radiographs. The MRI images serve as reference findings to anticipate on possible future symptoms and signs of

  11. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report. Introduction

  12. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report.

  13. Characterization of CGRP(1) receptors in the guinea pig basilar artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, I; Kaarill, L; Edvinsson, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterise receptors mediating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-induced relaxation of guinea pig basilar artery. This was done by investigating vasomotor responses in vitro and performing autoradiographic binding studies. We also intended to study...... the importance of an intact endothelium. Agonist studies showed that peptides of the CGRP family induced relaxation of the guinea pig basilar artery with the following order of potency: human beta-CGRP=human alpha-CGRP>adrenomedullin=[acetamidomethyl-Cys(2,7)]alpha-human CGRP ([Cys(ACM)(2,7)]CGRP...... in the absence of human CGRP-(8-37). The study shows the presence of a relaxant CGRP(1) receptor on the smooth muscle cells of guinea pig basilar artery. Various endothelial factors did not influence relaxant responses....

  14. Method for Dissecting the Auditory Epithelium (Basilar Papilla) in Developing Chick Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levic, Snezana; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2016-01-01

    Chickens are an invaluable model for exploring auditory physiology. Similar to humans, the chicken inner ear is morphologically and functionally close to maturity at the time of hatching. In contrast, chicks can regenerate hearing, an ability lost in all mammals, including humans. The extensive morphological, physiological, behavioral, and pharmacological data available, regarding normal development in the chicken auditory system, has driven the progress of the field. The basilar papilla is an attractive model system to study the developmental mechanisms of hearing. Here, we describe the dissection technique for isolating the basilar papilla in developing chick inner ear. We also provide detailed examples of physiological (patch clamping) experiments using this preparation.

  15. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: MR imaging of basilar impression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, G.J.M. E-mail: janus@knmg.nl; Engelbert, R.H.H.; Beek, E.; Gooskens, R.H.J.M.; Pruijs, J.E.H

    2003-07-01

    Objective: To determine on radiographs the presence of Basilar Impression (BI) in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). To confirm this sign and altered geometrical relationships of the craniocervical junction in course of time with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and patients: In a cohort study of 130 patients with OI (OI type I: 85; OI type III: 21; OI type IV: 24) lateral radiographs of the skull and cervical spine were made in a standardised way. MRI scans were performed when BI was suspected based upon protrusion of the odontoid above Chamberlain's line. Intracranial abnormalities as well as the basal angle were described. Neurological examination was performed in patients with conclusive BI at MRI-scan. Results and discussion: In eight patients BI could be confirmed by MRI-scan. None of the children had or developed in time neurological symptoms or signs. Follow up of BI by MRI scans was done in seven patients (mean: 5 years; range: 2-6 years). No alteration of intracranial findings were seen at subsequent investigation, although in one child Chamberlain's line increased from 8 (first MRI) to 15 mm (last MRI). BI can be diagnosed by radiographs but in the extreme osteoporotic bone and altered anatomy of the craniocervical junction of children with OI MRI is preferable. As intracranial pathology can be demonstrated by MRI, also a relation can be laid to possible neurological symptoms and signs at clinical examination. Conclusion: In our cohort study no alteration of the intracranial contents was seen at subsequent MRI scans. Although anatomic deformations exist in BI, no neurological symptoms or signs were present in our study and no operative reconstruction had to be performed. Periodical MRI-scan has not been of influence on the clinical decision making process. At the moment we perform a MRI-scan if BI is suspected at lateral skull radiographs. The MRI images serve as reference findings to anticipate on possible future symptoms and

  16. Complete Obliteration of a Basilar Artery Aneurysm after Insertion of a Self- Expandable Leo Stent into the Basilar Artery without Coil Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juszkat, Robert; Nowak, Stanis Aw; Wieloch, Micha; Zarzecka, Anna [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2008-08-15

    We report a case of a 45-year-old man who underwent endovascular treatment in the acute setting of a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a widenecked basilar trunk aneurysm. The patient was treated with stent implantation without coiling. A control angiographic scan obtained immediately after the procedure revealed significantly decreased intraaneurysmal flow. Follow-up angiography performed after one month demonstrated total aneurysm occlusion.

  17. Safety and Outcome of Intra-Arterial Treatment for Basilar Artery Occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houwelingen, Reinier C.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Mazuri, Aryan; Bokkers, Reinoud P. H.; Eshghi, Omid S.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE After the many positive results in thrombectomy trials in ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation, the question arises whether these positive results also apply to the patient with basilar artery occlusion (BAO). OBJECTIVE To report up-to-date outcome data of intra-arterial (IA)

  18. Merging flows in an arterial confluence : The vertebro-basilar junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, J; Krijger, JKB; Hillen, B; Hoogstraten, HW

    1995-01-01

    The basilar artery is one of the three vessels providing the blood supply to the human brain. It arises from the confluence of the two vertebral arteries. In fact, it is the only artery of this size in the human body arising from a confluence instead of a bifurcation. Earlier work, concerning flow

  19. Different Imaging Strategies in Patients with Possible Basilar Artery Occlusion: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Beyer (Sebastian E.); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam); F. Schöberl (Florian); L. von Baumgarten; S.E. Petersen (Steffen); C. Kubisch (Christian); H. Janssen (Hendrik); B. Ertl-Wagner (Birgit); M.F. Reiser (Maximilian F.); W.H. Sommer (Wieland H.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose-This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different noninvasive imaging strategies in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion. Methods-A Markov decision analytic model was used to evaluate long-term outcomes resulting from strategies using computed

  20. Dissecção da artéria basilar: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOGNOLA WALDIR ANTONIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de dissecção da artéria basilar, documentado com neuroimagem (tomografia computadorizada do crânio, ressonância magnética e angiografia digital com subtração de imagem.

  1. Collateral flow predicts outcome after basilar artery occlusion : The posterior circulation collateral score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; McVerry, Ferghal; Vos, Jan Albert; Algra, Ale; Puetz, Volker; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Schonewille, Wouter J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of a semiquantitative computed tomography angiography-based grading system, for the prediction of outcome in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion, based on the presence of potential collateral pathways on computed tomography

  2. Hemiplegia cruzada associada a impressão basilar, malformação de Arnold-Chiari e siringomielia: relato de caso Cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de hemiplegia cruzada associada a impressão basilar, malformação de Arnold-Chiari e siringomielia. Discutem as propostas anatômicas e a fiopatogenia desta síndrome de ocorrência bastante rara.The authors report a case of cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. The neuroanatomical controversy, the surgical treatment and the good outcome of the patient are discussed.

  3. Investigating time-efficiency of forward masking paradigms for estimating basilar membrane input-output characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    -output (I/O) function have been proposed. However, such measures are very time consuming. The present study investigated possible modifications of the temporal masking curve (TMC) paradigm to improve time and measurement efficiency. In experiment 1, estimates of knee point (KP) and compression ratio (CR......”, was tested. In contrast to the standard TMC paradigm, the maker level was kept fixed and the “gap threshold” was obtained, such that the masker just masks a low-level (12 dB sensation level) signal. It is argued that this modification allows for better control of the tested stimulus level range, which...

  4. Extent of hypoattenuation on CT angiography source images in basilar artery occlusion: prognostic value in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Volker; Khomenko, Andrei; Hill, Michael D; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Michel, Patrik; Weimar, Christian; Wijman, Christine A C; Mattle, Heinrich P; Engelter, Stefan T; Muir, Keith W; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Tanne, David; Szabo, Kristina; Kappelle, L Jaap; Algra, Ale; von Kummer, Ruediger; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter J

    2011-12-01

    The posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (pc-ASPECTS) quantifies the extent of early ischemic changes in the posterior circulation with a 10-point grading system. We hypothesized that pc-ASPECTS applied to CT angiography source images predicts functional outcome of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS). BASICS was a prospective, observational registry of consecutive patients with acute symptomatic basilar artery occlusion. Functional outcome was assessed at 1 month. We applied pc-ASPECTS to CT angiography source images of patients with CT angiography for confirmation of basilar artery occlusion. We calculated unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RRs) of pc-ASPECTS dichotomized at ≥8 versus <8. Primary outcome measure was favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale scores 0-3). Secondary outcome measures were mortality and functional independence (modified Rankin Scale scores 0-2). Of 158 patients included, 78 patients had a CT angiography source images pc-ASPECTS≥8. Patients with a pc-ASPECTS≥8 more often had a favorable outcome than patients with a pc-ASPECTS<8 (crude RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.98-3.0). After adjustment for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and thrombolysis, pc-ASPECTS≥8 was not related to favorable outcome (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.8-2.2), but it was related to reduced mortality (RR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-0.98) and functional independence (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.8). In post hoc analysis, pc-ASPECTS dichotomized at ≥6 versus <6 predicted a favorable outcome (adjusted RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.2-7.5). pc-ASPECTS on CT angiography source images independently predicted death and functional independence at 1 month in the CT angiography subgroup of patients in the BASICS registry.

  5. Ultrasound assisted arthroscopic approach for removal of basilar sesamoid fragments of the proximal sesamoid bones in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Elizabeth J; Rodgerson, Dwayne H

    2014-08-01

    To describe an ultrasound assisted arthroscopic approach for removal of non-articular basilar sesamoid fragments in Thoroughbred yearlings. Thoroughbred yearlings (n = 7). Basilar sesamoid fragments identified during pre-sale radiographic examination were removed using a palmar/plantar arthroscopic approach to the fetlock joint and ultrasonographic guidance. Complete fragment removal was confirmed by ultrasonography and radiography. Basilar sesamoid fracture fragments were localized and removed successfully using rongeurs and a radiofrequency probe for soft tissue dissection of the fragment. Complete fragment removal was confirmed by ultrasonography and radiography. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. At 6-8 months follow-up, no fragments or bony proliferation at the base of the sesamoid was observed. Ultrasonographic guidance can be used to facilitate localization, dissection, and confirmation of removal of basilar fragments of the proximal sesamoid bone. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Oscillator monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Present high-speed data acquisition systems in nuclear diagnostics use high-frequency oscillators to provide timing references for signals recorded on fast, traveling-wave oscilloscopes. An oscillator's sinusoidal wave shape is superimposed on the recorded signal with each cycle representing a fixed time increment. During data analysis the sinusoid is stripped from the signal, leaving a clean signal shape with known timing. Since all signal/time relationships are totally dependant upon working oscillators, these critical devices must have remote verification of proper operation. This manual presents the newly-developed oscillator monitor which will provide the required verification

  7. Endoscopic transnasal odontoidectomy to treat basilar invagination with congenital osseous malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To introduce the surgical techniques of image-guided endoscopic transnasal odontoidectomy to treat basilar invagination with congenital osseous malformations and describe several advantages compared to the traditional transoral procedure. Methods From September 2009 to February 2010, two cases with basilar invagination, of which the etiology was congenital osseous malformations, underwent endoscopic transnasal odontoidectomy. Case 2 also received occipitocervical fixation and bone fusion during the same surgical episode to ensure stability. The clinical symptoms of the two cases were evaluated by using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score for the evaluation of cervical myelopathy. Results Both patients were extubated after recovery from anesthesia and allowed oral food intake the next day. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea was found in the second case and cured by continuous lumber drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. No infection was noted. The average follow?up time was more than 24 months. Remarkable neurological recovery was observed at postoperation in both patients. The JOA scores elevated from preoperative 12 and 8 to postoperative 17 and 15. Conclusion The endoscopic transnasal odontoidectomy is a more minimally invasive approach for anterior decompression of cervicomedullary with basilar invagination. The advantages over the standard transoral odontoidectomy include visualization improvement, elimination of risk of tongue swelling and teeth damaging, alleviation of prolonged intubation, reduction of need for enteral tube feeding, and less risk of affecting phonation.

  8. Avoiding pitfalls in diagnosing basilar artery occlusive disease: clinical and imaging clues - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bastos Conforto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The aim of this paper was to report on the characteristics that aid in establishing the diagnosis of basilar artery occlusive disease (BAOD among patients with hemiparesis and few or minor symptoms of vertebrobasilar disease. CASE REPORT: This report describes two cases in a public university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We present clinical and imaging findings from two patients with hemiparesis and severe BAOD, but without clinically relevant carotid artery disease (CAD. One patient presented transient ischemic attacks consisting of spells of right hemiparesis that became progressively more frequent, up to twice a week. The neurological examination revealed slight right hemiparesis and right homonymous hemianopsia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed pontine and occipital infarcts. Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed severe basilar artery stenosis. The other patient presented sudden left-side hemiparesis and hypoesthesia. One year earlier, she had reported sudden onset of vertigo that, at that time, was attributed to peripheral vestibulopathy and was not further investigated. MRI showed a right-side pontine infarct and an old infarct in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Basilar artery occlusion was diagnosed. Both patients presented their symptoms while receiving aspirin, and became asymptomatic after treatment with warfarin. CONCLUSIONS: Misdiagnosing asymptomatic CAD as the cause of symptoms in BAOD can have disastrous consequences, such as unnecessary carotid endarterectomy and exposure to this surgical risk while failing to offer the best available treatment for BAOD. Clinical and imaging features provided important clues for diagnosis in the cases presented.

  9. Posterior cerebral artery involvement in moyamoya disease: initial infarction and angle between PCA and basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Choi, Jung Won; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, In-One; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2013-12-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease, and progressive involvement of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has been reported. However, majority of MMD articles are presenting classic anterior circulation related issues. This study investigates the preoperative factors related to the long-term outcome of posterior circulation in MMD. Retrospective review of 88 MMD patients (166 PCAs in either hemisphere) without symptomatic disease involvement of PCA at initial diagnosis was done. Data at initial diagnosis regarding age, presence of infarction, status of the PCA, type of posterior communicating artery, and the angle between PCA and basilar artery were reviewed. Progressive stenosis of PCA was evaluated by symptom or radiological imaging during follow up. During an average follow up of 8.3 years, 29 out of 166 (18 %) evaluated PCAs showed progressive disease involvement. The average time of progression from the initial operation was 4.9 years, with the latest onset at 10.8 years. The patients who showed progressive stenosis of the PCA tended to be younger, present with infarction, have smaller angle between PCA and basilar artery, and have asymptomatic stenosis of the PCA at initial presentation. However, multivariate analysis confirmed only the presence of initial infarction and a smaller angle between PCA and basilar artery to be significantly associated with progressive stenosis of PCA. Involvement of PCA in MMD may occur in a delayed fashion, years after the completion of revascularization of anterior circulation. Persistent long-term follow-up regarding the posterior circulation is recommended.

  10. RESULTS OF THE USE OF PEEK CAGES IN THE TREATMENT OF BASILAR INVAGINATION BY GOEL TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Carelli Teixeira da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analysis of the use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages for atlantoaxial facet realignment and distraction for treatment of basilar invagination by Goel technique. Method: Retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of the neurological status, pain, presence of subsidence and bone fusion with the use of PEEK cages in 8 atlantoaxial joints of 4 patients with basilar invagination. All patients were treated with atlantoaxial facet distraction and realignment and subsequent arthrodesis C1-C2 by the technique of Goel modified by the use of PEEK cage. Results: All patients showed improvement in Nurick neurological assessment scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of pain. There were no cases of subsidence, migration, or damage to the vertebral artery during the insertion of the cage. All joints evolved with bone fusion, assessed by dynamic radiographs, and computed tomography. Two patients developed neuropathic pain in dermatome of C2 and one patient had unilateral vertebral artery injury during C2 instrumentation treated with insertion of pedicle screw to control the bleeding. Conclusion: The results of the treatment of basilar invagination by the Goel technique with the use of PEEK cages shown to be effective and safe although further studies are needed to confirm this use.

  11. Megadolicho basilar artery as a cause of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo, Antonio Antunes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At the differentiated diagnosis of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing losses, vascular disorders are present, one of which is megadolicho basilar artery. This disease is generally asymptomatic, and when symptoms are found, they can be caused by a compression or ischemia. Clinically, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, facial hypoesthesia, trigeminal neuralgia, vertigo, diplopia and facial palsy, among others, are likely to occur. The image examination of choice for its diagnosis is nuclear magnetic resonance. The megadolicho basilar artery therapy can be surgical or conservative, according to the associated findings. A multidisciplinary approach, including a neurologist, neurosurgeon and an otorhinolaryngologist is recommended for a proper administration of the case. Objective: Report the case of a patient with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, diagnosed of megadolicho basilar artery. Case report: JBS, 57-year-old white male with a history of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral whistle-like tinnitus for several years. The otorhinolaryngologic evaluation, including otoscopy, anterior rhinoscopy and oral pharynx, was normal. Final Comments: The treatment consisted in following up with the patient, controlling the tinnitus by drugs and using an individual sound amplification apparatus on the left ear.

  12. Subtemporal approach to basilar tip aneurysm with division of posterior communicating artery: Technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Kakino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Shunsuke Kakino, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Yoshitaka Kubo, Hideaki Nishimoto, Akira OgawaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Iwate, JapanAbstract: The subtemporal approach with division of the posterior communicating artery (PcomA is described for treating aneurysms of the basilar tip. When the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA interferes with visibility and manipulation around the aneurysm neck and the artery is tethered by the PcomA and not mobilized, the PcomA can be divided near the junction with the PCA. The procedure permits PCA mobilization and exposes the neck of the aneurysm. We applied this procedure to a patient with a ruptured aneurysm of the basilar tip. The postoperative course was uneventful except for transient left oculomotor nerve palsy. Postoperative cerebral angiography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the respective disappearance of the aneurysm and no new ischemic lesions. The subtemporal approach allows safer and easier division of the PcomA near the junction to the PCA compared with the pterional approach, and the present procedure is more suitable for the subtemporal approach.Keywords: basilar tip aneurysm, subtemporal approach, posterior communicating artery

  13. Chromospheric oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lites, B.W.; Rutten, R.J.; Thomas, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    We show results from SO/Sacramento Peak data to discuss three issues: (i)--the spatial occurrence of chromospheric 3--min oscillations; (ii)--the validity of Ca II H&K line-center Doppler Shift measurements; (iii)--the signi ?cance of oscillation power and phase at frequencies above 10 mHz.

  14. Inverted oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuce, C [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Kilic, A [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Coruh, A [Physics Department, Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    The inverted harmonic oscillator problem is investigated quantum mechanically. The exact wavefunction for the confined inverted oscillator is obtained and it is shown that the associated energy eigenvalues are discrete, and the energy is given as a linear function of the quantum number n.

  15. Neuronal oscillations enhance stimulus discrimination by ensuring action potential precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaefer, Andreas T; Angelo, Kamilla; Spors, Hartwig

    2006-01-01

    generated membrane potential oscillations dramatically improve action potential (AP) precision by removing the membrane potential variance associated with jitter-accumulating trains of APs. This increased AP precision occurred irrespective of cell type and--at oscillation frequencies ranging from 3 to 65 Hz......Although oscillations in membrane potential are a prominent feature of sensory, motor, and cognitive function, their precise role in signal processing remains elusive. Here we show, using a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and theoretical approaches, that both synaptically and intrinsically......, membrane potential oscillations dramatically enhance the discriminatory capabilities of individual neurons and networks of cells and provide one attractive explanation for their abundance in neurophysiological systems....

  16. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-08-15

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1-/- mice. In the CaV3.1-/- mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1-/- mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1-/- mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1-/- and CaV3.1-/- mice. These results suggest that both alpha1A P/Q- and alpha1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics.

  17. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  18. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the law of mass-action that every simple reaction approaches ... from thermodynamic equilibrium. Such oscillating systems cor- respond to thermodynamically open systems. .... experimentally observable, and the third is always unstable.

  19. Transient basilar artery occlusion monitored by transcranial color Doppler presenting with a spectacular shrinking deficit: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Sette Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe the case of a 79-year-old Caucasian Italian woman with a transient basilar occlusion monitored by transcranial Doppler, with subsequent recanalization and clinical shrinking deficit. This is the first case of transient basilar occlusive disease diagnosed and monitored by transcranial Doppler. This case is important and needs to be reported because transient basilar occlusion may be easily diagnosed if transcranial Doppler is performed. Case presentation A 79-year-old woman affected by chronic atrial fibrillation and not treated with oral anticoagulants, cardioverted to sinus rhythm during a gastric endoscopy. She then showed a sudden-onset loss of consciousness, horizontal and vertical gaze palsy, tetraparesis and bilateral miosis and coma. Two hours later, the symptoms resolved quickly, leaving no residual neurologic deficits. Transcranial Doppler examination showed a dampened flow in the basilar artery in the emergency examination and a restored flow when the symptoms resolved. Conclusion This is the first case of transient basilar occlusive disease diagnosed and monitored by transcranial Doppler. We believe that transcranial Doppler should be performed in all cases of unexplained acute loss of consciousness, in particular, if associated with signs of brainstem dysfunctions.

  20. CT scans of giant aneurysms in the vertebro-basilar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Toyofumi; Ohsugi, Tamotsu; Motozaki, Takahiko; Sakaki, Saburo; Matsuoka, Kenzo

    1980-01-01

    Clinical course and neurological and neuroradiological findings of giant aneurysms in the vertebro-basilar artery observed in two of our cases were discussed. The first case was a 66-year-old man. He complained of sensory disturbance over his left face and unstable gait for 2 years before admission. Neurological examinations on admission showed hypesthesia in the territory of the second branch of the left fifth cranial nerve, nystagmus, and a left cerebellar sign. No mental deterioration or pyramidal signs were noticed. Retrograde left brachial artery angiograms revealed a giant aneurysm with inferior pointing measuring 30 x 10 mm in diameter arising from the left superior cerebellar artery. Precontrast CT scans demonstrated a round, large, high-density area, cantaining a relatively low-density area within it, in the medioventral portion of the left cerebellum; a part of this high-density area was markedly enhanced in the postcontrast CT scan. No ventricular dilatations were noticed by CT scans. Direct surgery was abandoned due to the size and location of the aneurysm. No neurologically abnormal finding developed after discharge. The second case was a 61-year-old man. He complained of unstable gait for 2 years before admission. Neurological examinations on admission showed bilateral pyramidal sings (more pronounced on the left) and nystagmus. There were no cranial nerve palsy and no sensory disturbances. Precontrast CT scans showed a large, oval, high-density area in the medioventral portion of the right cerebellum, extending to the upper brainstem; a part of this high-density area was markedly enhanced in the postcontrast CT scans. Retrograde left brachial artery angiograms revealed that the fusiform aneurysm in the left vertebral, the basilar artery, and the dilated basilar artery ran 30 mm from the clivus, with a dorsal convex arch. (J.P.N.)

  1. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y.; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O 2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100 μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8 Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine > methamphetamine > hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic

  2. Clinical efficacy of intra-arterial thrombolsis for basilar artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Hua; Li Shenmao; Zhu Fengshui; Zhao Huipin; Xu Yanjie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and influence of intra-arterial thrombolysis for basilar artery occlusion. Methods: Thirty-three consecutive cases of basilar artery occlusion treated by intra-arterial thrombolysis were retrospectively reviewed. They were 25 males and 8 females aged from 28 to 71 years old (average: 56±11 years). The recovery was graded by Glasgow outcome scale, which 1 to 3 point is unfavorable and 4 to 5 is favorable. The short-term follow-up was performed referring to the medical record at the time of discharge and the long-term follow-up was performed by telephone. The differences between the favorable and unfavorable, including sex, age, time to thrombolysis, dizziness, nystagmus, coma, bilateral babinski syndrome, occlusive part, revascularization, angioplasty and its type, were compared by Fisher exact test where P<0.05 was significant. Results: The short-term follow-up was evaluated during the admission (2 to 63 days, 21±16 days). Eighteen eases were favorable and 15 cases were unfavorable and 3 cases died. Twenty one cases showed revascularization and 19 cases showed bilateral positive Babinski sign. The positive Babinski sign, revascularization and coma had significant difference between the favorable and unfavorable (P<0.05). The sex, age, time to thrombolysis between the favorable and unfavorable showed no statistical difference. The long-term follow-up were performed after 1 year and 9 cases missed. 15 of them were favorable and 6 were unfavorable (4 cases died). Conclusion: The intra-arterial thrombolysis could improved the prognosis of basilar artery occlusion. (authors)

  3. Sensitivity of Hyperdense Basilar Artery Sign on Non-Enhanced Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Ernst

    Full Text Available The hyperdense basilar artery sign (HBAS is an indicator of vessel occlusion on non contrast-enhanced computer tomography (NECT in acute stroke patients. Since basilar artery occlusion (BAO is associated with a high mortality and morbidity, its early detection is of great clinical value. We sought to analyze the influence of density measurement as well as a normalized ratio of Hounsfield unit/hematocrit (HU/Hct ratio on the detection of BAO on NECT in patients with suspected BAO.102 patients with clinically suspected BAO were examined with NECT followed immediately by Multidetector computed tomography Angiography. Two observers independently analyzed the images regarding the presence or absence of HBAS on NECT and performed HU measurements in the basilar artery. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal density threshold for BAO using attenuation measurements or HU/Hct ratio.Sensitivity of visual detection of the HBAS on NECT was relatively low 81% (95%-CI, 54-95% while specificity was high 91% (95%-CI, 82-96%. The highest sensitivity was achieved by the combination of visual assessment and additional quantitative attenuation measurements applying a cut-off value of 46.5 HU with 94% sensitivity and 81% specificity for BAO. A HU/Hct ratio >1.32 revealed sensitivity of 88% (95%-CI, 60-98% and specificity of 84% (95%-CI, 74-90%.In patients with clinically suspected acute BAO the combination of visual assessment and additional attenuation measurement with a cut-off value of 46.5 HU is a reliable approach with high sensitivity in the detection of BAO on NECT.

  4. Post traumatic vertebro basilar dissection: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Y.R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Posterior circulation territory stroke following mild head injury is a known entity although rarely seen. Numerous case reports appear in literature from time to time highlighting this complication. Blunt trauma to the head and neck possibly causes injury to the vertebrobasilar system in the form of angiorrhexis, subintimal, intramural and perivascular hemorrhage which causes secondary narrowing of the injured vessel. These processes can be complicated by progressive thrombosis & vascular occlusion. Here we are reporting a case of post traumatic vertebra-basilar dissection causing bilateral cerebellar and brainstem infarct.

  5. CT-angiography source images indicate less fatal outcome despite coma of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Lars P; Khomenko, Andrei; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Jessica; Barlinn, Kristian; Zerna, Charlotte; van der Hoeven, Erik Jrj; Algra, Ale; Kapelle, L Jaap; Michel, Patrik; Bodechtel, Ulf; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter; Puetz, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Background Coma is associated with poor outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Aims We sought to assess whether the posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and the Pons-Midbrain Index applied to CT angiography source images predict the outcome of comatose patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study. Methods Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study was a prospective, observational registry of patients with acute basilar artery occlusion with 48 recruiting centers worldwide. We applied posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and Pons-Midbrain Index to CT angiography source images of Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study patients who presented with coma. We calculated adjusted risk ratios to assess the association of dichotomized posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (≥8 vs. International Cooperation Study registry, CT angiography source images were available for review in 158 patients. Among these, 78 patients (49%) presented with coma. Compared to non-comatose patients, comatose patients were more likely to die (risk ratios 2.34; CI 95% 1.56-3.52) and less likely to have a favourable outcome (risk ratios 0.44; CI 95% 0.24-0.80). Among comatose patients, a Pons-Midbrain Index < 3 was related to reduced mortality (adjusted RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.46-0.96), but not to favourable outcome (adjusted RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.39-3.62). Posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score dichotomized at ≥ 8 vs. <8 was not significantly associated with death (adjusted RR 0.70; 95% CI 0.46-1.05). Conclusion In comatose patients with basilar artery occlusion, the extent of brainstem ischemia appears to be related to mortality but not to favourable outcome.

  6. Nonlinear oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, Ali Hasan

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Oscillations is a self-contained and thorough treatment of the vigorous research that has occurred in nonlinear mechanics since 1970. The book begins with fundamental concepts and techniques of analysis and progresses through recent developments and provides an overview that abstracts and introduces main nonlinear phenomena. It treats systems having a single degree of freedom, introducing basic concepts and analytical methods, and extends concepts and methods to systems having degrees of freedom. Most of this material cannot be found in any other text. Nonlinear Oscillations uses sim

  7. Drug-eluting stent implantation for the percutaneous treatment of vertebro-basilar arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Rujun; Liu Jianmin; Huang Haiqing; Hong Bo; Xu Yi; Zhao Wenyuan; Zhao Rui; Chen Jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early results and mid-term outcomes following angioplasty of vertebro-basilar arterial stenosis with drug-eluting stents. Methods: All of the patients presented with recurrent TIA or ceretral infarction with >50% stenoses in vertebro-basilar arteries, and having failure in maximal medical therapy. All of the lesions were treated with primary stenting under local or general anesthesia and followed by continual anticoagulant therapy of clopidogrel and aspirin together with clinical follow-up and vascular imagings. Results: Of 28 stenoses (27 patients), 27 lesions were successfully treated with implantation of 24 Cypher stents, 2 Taxus stents and one Firebird stent. The mean stenotic severity reduced from (74 ± 6.7)% to (8.7 ± 4.4)%. Two patients had inchemic events relating to penetration vascular obstruction. During 2-14 months follow-up, the patients were clinically asymptomatic with no recurrent TIA/stoke. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at a mean of 7.2 months. Proximal restenosis (<50%) occurred in one patient (3.3%), and corrected with restenting, while others were free of intra-stent restenoses. Conclusion: Using DES in cerebrovascular stenosis is safe and effective with lowing the risk of intra-stent restenosis in comparison with bare stent. Further study for long term efficiency is still in need. (authors)

  8. Specific entities affecting the craniocervical region: osteogenesis imperfecta and related osteochondrodysplasias: medical and surgical management of basilar impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Arnold H

    2008-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable disorder of bone development caused by defective collagen synthesis. The attendant basilar impression or secondary basilar invagination is uncommon but can be devastating. Fifty-two patients with osteochondrodysplasia (28 with OI, six with Hajdu-Cheney syndrome, six with Paget's disease, and 12 with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia) with basilar impression were evaluated between 1985 and 2005. The male/female ratio in this cohort was 1:1. The mean age at presentation was 12.2 years. Symptoms and signs included headache, lower cranial nerve dysfunction, dysphagia, respiratory embarrassment, weakness, and ataxia. In the earlier part of the series (1985-1995), all patients with hydrocephalus were shunted and a ventral transoral decompression made for ventral compression of the pontomedullary junction followed by a dorsal occipitocervical fusion. As a result of this evaluation, it was felt that most patients would benefit by early bracing after the hydrocephalus was shunted if it existed. However, 20% of patients still required an anterior ventral decompression and the occipitocervical fusion. The results showed that the fusions were stable but over a period of time, there was progressive forward bending with osteogenesis imperfecta as well as with the Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. All patients with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia had a good strong stable fusion which stood the test of time. In conclusion, we feel that early intervention with occipitocervical bracing can prevent the progressive march of significant basilar impression which leads to mortality.

  9. Quantative flow measurement of the vertebro-basilar circulation for positional vertigo by using 2D phase contrast technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Satoru; Seo, Toru; Ishikura, Reiichi; Nakao, Norio; Tabuchi, Yukiko.

    1996-01-01

    Quantative measurements of blood flow in the vertebral and basilar arteries were obtained by the 2D phase contrast (2D PC) technique. In phantom study, flow velocity measured with 2D PC correlated well with actual flow velocity. Sixty-six patients were neurologically normal and 20 had positional vertigo due to vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). Mean velocities (MV) were measured by using a transverse plane in the vertebral arteries at the level of C3 and in the basilar arteries at the level of the sella floor. Volume flow rates (VFR) were calculated as the product of MV and the area of the arteries whose diameters were measured on the basis of pixel counting in the histogram of the signal intensity profile. In the normal group, MV of the left vertebral artery and MV and VFR of the basilar artery showed significant declines as age progressed. In the vertigo group, MV and VFR of the basilar artery were significantly lower than in the normal group. It is concluded that 2D PC technique appears to be fast and easy to handle without cardiac gating to assess blood flow in vessels surrounded by bone tissues. (author)

  10. Quantative flow measurement of the vertebro-basilar circulation for positional vertigo by using 2D phase contrast technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, Satoru; Seo, Toru; Ishikura, Reiichi; Nakao, Norio [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Tabuchi, Yukiko

    1996-04-01

    Quantative measurements of blood flow in the vertebral and basilar arteries were obtained by the 2D phase contrast (2D PC) technique. In phantom study, flow velocity measured with 2D PC correlated well with actual flow velocity. Sixty-six patients were neurologically normal and 20 had positional vertigo due to vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). Mean velocities (MV) were measured by using a transverse plane in the vertebral arteries at the level of C3 and in the basilar arteries at the level of the sella floor. Volume flow rates (VFR) were calculated as the product of MV and the area of the arteries whose diameters were measured on the basis of pixel counting in the histogram of the signal intensity profile. In the normal group, MV of the left vertebral artery and MV and VFR of the basilar artery showed significant declines as age progressed. In the vertigo group, MV and VFR of the basilar artery were significantly lower than in the normal group. It is concluded that 2D PC technique appears to be fast and easy to handle without cardiac gating to assess blood flow in vessels surrounded by bone tissues. (author).

  11. Development of the micro-architecture and mineralization of the basilar part of the pig occipital bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, R.J.A.; Mulder, L.; Koolstra, J.H.; Eijden, van T.M.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the development of the architecture and the degree and distribution of mineralization in the basilar part of the pig occipital bone, one of the contact points between the spine and skull base, was investigated. Multiple regions of the basiocciput of pig specimens of different

  12. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mei-Fang [Department of Medical Research, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Tzu Chi Center for Vascular Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hui-I [Department of Medical Research, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yi [Department of Medical Research, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ingrid Y. [Department of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lua, Ahai Chang [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Biotechnology & Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tony Jer-Fu, E-mail: tlee@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Tzu Chi Center for Vascular Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Life Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O{sub 2} demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100 μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8 Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine > methamphetamine > hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic

  13. Utility of digital subtraction angiography-based collateral evaluation in medically treated acute symptomatic basilar artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W-J; Jung, K-H; Ryu, Y J; Kim, J-M; Lee, S-T; Chu, K; Kim, M; Lee, S K; Roh, J-K

    2017-09-01

    Although a stroke from atherosclerosis in the basilar artery (BA) often presents with mild initial stroke severity, it has heterogeneous clinical courses. We investigated the efficacy of digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-based collateral perfusion evaluation in association with long-term outcomes of medically treated symptomatic basilar artery stenosis. From a registry database of all consecutive patients with stroke, we included 98 medically treated patients (due to mild initial stroke severity) [National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores ≤ 4; symptomatic basilar artery stenosis, 70-99%] with available initial diagnostic DSA. Basilar collateral scoring was performed via the DSA, using a modified version of the American Society of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology/Society of Interventional Radiology grading system in both the superior cerebellar artery and anterior/posterior-inferior cerebellar artery territories (score 0-8). The outcomes were designated as the 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS90) score (poor, 3-6). Student's t-test, chi-square test and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with a poor outcome. The median initial NIHSS score was 2 [interquartile range (IQR), 0-3], median posterior circulation Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score was 8 (IQR, 7-10), median collateral score was 7 (IQR, 7-8) and 20 (20.4%) had poor mRS90 scores. In multivariate analysis, poorer collateral scores (P = 0.003), higher NIHSS scores (P = 0.005) and lower posterior circulation Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (P = 0.017) were independently associated with a poor mRS90 score. The DSA-based collateral scoring of the BA large branches might predict long-term outcome in medically treated symptomatic basilar artery stenosis with mild initial severity. Evaluation of BA collateral perfusion status might be useful to determine appropriate treatment strategies. © 2017 EAN.

  14. Single stage reduction and stabilization of basilar invagination after failed prior fusion surgery in children with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedequist, Daniel; Bekelis, Kimon; Emans, John; Proctor, Mark R

    2010-02-15

    We describe an innovative single-stage reduction and stabilization technique using modern cervical instrumentation. We hypothesis modern instrumentation has made more aggressive surgical corrections possible and has reduced the need for transoral resection of the odontoid and traction reduction in children with basilar invagination. Craniocervical junction abnormalities, including atlantoaxial instability and progressive basilar invagination, are relatively common phenomenon in Down's syndrome patients, and can lead to chronic progressive neurologic deficits, catastrophic injury, and death. This patient population also can be a difficult one in which to perform successful stabilization and fusion. We reviewed the records and films on 2 children with Down's syndrome and atlantoaxial instability who had undergone prior occipital-cervical fusion and then presented with symptomatic progressive basilar invagination due to atlantoaxial displacement. In both cases, the children had progressive symptoms of spinal cord and brain stem compression. Multiple approaches for surgical correction, including preoperative traction and transoral odontoid resection, were considered, but ultimately it was elected to perform a single stage posterior operation. In both patients, we performed fusion takedown, intraoperative realignment with reduction of the basilar invagination, and stabilization using modern occipito-cervical instrumentation. In both children, excellent cranio-cervical realignment was achieved; along with successful fusion and improvement in clinical symptoms. In this article we will discuss the clinical cases and review the background of craniocervical junction abnormalities in Down's syndrome patients. We hypothesis modern instrumentation has made more aggressive surgical corrections possible and has reduced the need for transoral resection of the odontoid and traction reduction in children with basilar invagination.

  15. Incidence of basilar invagination in patients with tonsillar herniation ? a case control craniometrical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F Joaquim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective case-control study based on craniometrical evaluation was performed to evaluate the incidence of basilar invagination (BI. Patients with symptomatic tonsillar herniation treated surgically had craniometrical parameters evaluated based on CT scan reconstructions before surgery. BI was diagnosed when the tip of the odontoid trespassed the Chamberlain’s line in three different thresholds found in the literature: 2, 5 or 6.6 mm. In the surgical group (SU, the mean distance of the tip of the odontoid process above the Chamberlain’s line was 12 mm versus 1.2 mm in the control (CO group (p<0.0001. The number of patients with BI according to the threshold used (2, 5 or 6.6 mm in the SU group was respectively 19 (95%, 16 (80% and 15 (75% and in the CO group it was 15 (37%, 4 (10% and 2 (5%.

  16. Unrecognized paraganglioma of the urinary bladder as a cause for basilar-type migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Heidegger, Isabel; Klinglmair, Gerald; Kroiss, Alexander; Uprimny, Christian; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Schäfer, Georg; Steiner, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Extra-adrenal paraganglioma with isolated localization in the urinary bladder is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Although the typical symptoms like headache, nausea, weight loss, flushing, heart palpitation or paroxysmal hypertension during micturition are well established, we present an unusual case of bladder paraganglioma, 'misdiagnosed' with basilar-type migraine due to headache for the past 8 years. As urologists linked the presence of a tumor (by CT) and symptoms connected with micturition, no cystoscopy and no transurethral resection of the bladder was performed prior to detailed diagnostic workup. After diagnosis of an extra-adrenal paraganglioma, the patient was scheduled for open partial cystectomy. In consideration of the fact that bladder paraganglioma is an infrequent genitourinary cancer, this case report clearly points out the importance of an exact anamnesis and clinical examination to minimize the probability of misdiagnosis with possible fatal consequences in any case with clinical suspicion of bladder paraganglioma. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Vertebral artery stenosis in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS): prevalence and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compter, Annette; van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; van der Worp, H Bart; Vos, Jan Albert; Weimar, Christian; Rueckert, Christina M; Kappelle, L Jaap; Algra, Ale; Schonewille, Wouter J

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the prevalence of vertebral artery (VA) stenosis or occlusion and its influence on outcome in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO). We studied 141 patients with acute BAO enrolled in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS) registry of whom baseline CT angiography (CTA) of the intracranial VAs was available. In 72 patients an additional CTA of the extracranial VAs was available. Adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) for death and poor outcome, defined as a modified Rankin Scale score ≥4, were calculated with Poisson regression in relation to VA occlusion, VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 %, and bilateral VA occlusion. Sixty-six of 141 (47 %) patients had uni- or bilateral intracranial VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 %. Of the 72 patients with intra- and extracranial CTA, 46 (64 %) had uni- or bilateral VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 % and 9 (12 %) had bilateral VA occlusion. Overall, VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 % was not associated with the risk of poor outcome. Patients with intra- and extracranial CTA and bilateral VA occlusion had a higher risk of poor outcome than patients without bilateral VA occlusion (aRR, 1.23; 95 % CI 1.02-1.50). The risk of death did not depend on the presence of unilateral or bilateral VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 %. In conclusion, in patients with acute BAO, unilateral VA occlusion or stenosis ≥50 % is frequent, but not associated with an increased risk of poor outcome or death. Patients with BAO and bilateral VA occlusion have a slightly increased risk of poor outcome.

  18. Different Imaging Strategies in Patients With Possible Basilar Artery Occlusion: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sebastian E; Hunink, Myriam G; Schöberl, Florian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Petersen, Steffen E; Dichgans, Martin; Janssen, Hendrik; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian F; Sommer, Wieland H

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different noninvasive imaging strategies in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion. A Markov decision analytic model was used to evaluate long-term outcomes resulting from strategies using computed tomographic angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance imaging, nonenhanced CT, or duplex ultrasound with intravenous (IV) thrombolysis being administered after positive findings. The analysis was performed from the societal perspective based on US recommendations. Input parameters were derived from the literature. Costs were obtained from United States costing sources and published literature. Outcomes were lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and net monetary benefits, with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80,000 per QALY. The strategy with the highest net monetary benefit was considered the most cost-effective. Extensive deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the effect of varying parameter values. In the reference case analysis, CTA dominated all other imaging strategies. CTA yielded 0.02 QALYs more than magnetic resonance imaging and 0.04 QALYs more than duplex ultrasound followed by CTA. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80,000 per QALY, CTA yielded the highest net monetary benefits. The probability that CTA is cost-effective was 96% at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80,000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed that duplex ultrasound was cost-effective only for a prior probability of ≤0.02 and that these results were only minimally influenced by duplex ultrasound sensitivity and specificity. Nonenhanced CT and magnetic resonance imaging never became the most cost-effective strategy. Our results suggest that CTA in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion is cost-effective. © 2015 The Authors.

  19. Prevalence of fenestrated basilar artery with magnetic resonance angiography: a transversal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, L A; Villar-Martin, A; Poyatos-Ruiperez, C; Rodriguez-Boto, G; Arrazola-Garcia, J

    2013-08-01

    Fenestration of the basilar artery (BA) is a rare anatomical variation in comparison to those of the other intracranial arteries constituting the cerebral arterial circle. The incidence is difficult to ascertain and data vary according to type of series and modalities of detection. Basilar artery fenestration (BAF) has been reported in association with arteriovenous malformations, vascular variants, other developmental anomalies and neurovascular conflicts as a consequence of relations between the arterial branches of the BA and the nerves and other structures in the posterior cranial fossa. However, the real clinical interest of BAF is due to the possible formation of an aneurysm at the junction of the fenestrated segment and less frequently to the thrombosis of the vessels. With the aim to establish the prevalence of BAF in our population, we made a transversal pilot study of the first 200 MR angiographies performed on patients attending for the first time to control their base pathology (vascular or not). We have described three patients with this condition (representing a prevalence of 1.5 % on MR angiography) to shed additional light on this anomaly, two cases located at 1/3 proximal end (type 1-BAF) and one case located at joint 1/3 medium-1/3 distal end, locating distal to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (type 4-BAF). In neither case was any other lesion found (i.e. aneurysm, infarctions, ischemia or thromboembolism). The pertinent clinical anatomy and embryological basis for this variation are reviewed, and the possible clinical implications and associated findings are discussed.

  20. Endovascular treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion: time to treatment is crucial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorňák, T.; Herzig, R.; Kuliha, M.; Havlíček, R.; Školoudík, D.; Šaňák, D.; Köcher, M.; Procházka, V.; Lacman, J.; Charvát, F.; Krajina, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of multimodal endovascular treatment (EVT) of acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO), including bridging therapy [intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with subsequent EVT], to compare particular EVT techniques and identify predictors of clinical outcome. Materials and methods: This retrospective, multi-centre study comprised 72 acute ischaemic stroke patients (51 males; mean age 59.1 ± 13.3 years) with radiologically confirmed BAO. The following data were collected: baseline characteristics, risk factors, pre-event antithrombotic treatment, neurological deficit at time of treatment, localization of occlusion, time to therapy, recanalization rate, post-treatment imaging findings. Thirty- and 90-day outcomes were evaluated using the modified Rankin scale with a good clinical outcome defined as 0–3 points. Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 94.4% patients. Stepwise binary logistic regression analysis identified the presence of arterial hypertension (OR = 0.073 and OR = 0.067, respectively), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at the time of treatment (OR = 0,829 and OR = 0.864, respectively), and time to treatment (OR = 0.556 and OR = 0.502, respectively) as significant independent predictors of 30- and 90-day clinical outcomes. Conclusion: Data from this multicentre study showed that multimodal EVT was an effective recanalization method in acute BAO. Bridging therapy shortens the time to treatment, which was identified as the only modifiable outcome predictor. - Highlights: • Various treatments are being used in recanalization of basilar artery occlusion. • Multimodal endovascular treatment is an effective recanalization method. • Time-to-treatment is the only modifiable outcome predictor. • Bridging therapy shortens time-to-treatment. • Arterial hypertension, neurologic deficit are associated with poor outcome

  1. Oscillator circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Rudolf F

    1996-01-01

    This series of circuits provides designers with a quick source for oscillator circuits. Why waste time paging through huge encyclopedias when you can choose the topic you need and select any of the specialized circuits sorted by application?This book in the series has 250-300 practical, ready-to-use circuit designs, with schematics and brief explanations of circuit operation. The original source for each circuit is listed in an appendix, making it easy to obtain additional information.Ready-to-use circuits.Grouped by application for easy look-up.Circuit source listing

  2. One dimension harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; Diu, Bernard; Laloe, Franck.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of harmonic oscillator in classical and quantum physics, eigenvalues and eigenstates of hamiltonian operator are discussed. In complement are presented: study of some physical examples of harmonic oscillators; study of stationnary states in the /x> representation; Hermite polynomials; resolution of eigenvalue equation of harmonic oscillator by polynomial method; isotope harmonic oscillator with three dimensions; charged harmonic oscillator in uniform electric field; quasi classical coherent states of harmonic oscillator; eigenmodes of vibration of two coupled harmonic oscillators; vibration modus of a continuous physical system (application to radiation: photons); vibration modus of indefinite linear chain of coupled harmonic oscillators (phonons); one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in thermodynamic equilibrium at temperature T [fr

  3. Power oscillation damping controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A power oscillation damping controller is provided for a power generation device such as a wind turbine device. The power oscillation damping controller receives an oscillation indicating signal indicative of a power oscillation in an electricity network and provides an oscillation damping control...

  4. Oscillations of void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.; Davydov, L.N.; Spol'nik, Z.A.

    1976-01-01

    Oscillations of a nonideal crystal are studied, in which macroscopic defects (pores) form a hyperlattice. It is shown that alongside with acoustic and optical phonons (relative to the hyperlattice), in such a crystal oscillations of the third type are possible which are a hydridization of sound oscillations of atoms and surface oscillations of a pore. Oscillation spectra of all three types were obtained

  5. Molecular investigations of BK(Ca) channels and the modulatory beta-subunits in porcine basilar and middle cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Helle Wulf; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Poulsen, Asser Nyander

    2009-01-01

    arteries using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Western blotting was used to detect immunoreactivity for the porcine BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit and beta-subunit proteins. The BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit RNA and protein distribution patterns were......Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels are fundamental in the regulation of cerebral vascular basal tone. We investigated the expression of the mRNA transcripts for the BK(Ca) channel and its modulatory beta-subunits (beta1-beta4) in porcine basilar and middle cerebral...... visualized using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence studies, respectively. The study verified that the BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit is located to smooth muscle cells of porcine basilar and middle cerebral arteries. The mRNA transcript for beta1-, beta2- and beta4-subunit were shown by RT...

  6. A case with basilar artery thrombosis resulted in Locked-in syndrome in spite of endovascular treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf İnanç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Locked-in Sendrome is a clinical picture consist of quadriplegia, lower cranial nerve paralysis, and mutism with preservation of only vertical gaze and upper eyelid movement. Consciousness remains intact and the patient is able to communicate intentionally using eye blinking. The most common cause underlying the locked-in syndrome is thrombosis of the basilar artery. In this study, we reported a 49-years-old male with past medical history for cerebrovascular disease presented with acute basilar artery thrombosis, manifesting as reduced level of consciousness, weakness in all extremity dominated on the right side, speech impairment, horizontal gaze disorder and for reaching us of the last munite of endovascular intervention threshold, so it can perform only mechanical and intra-arterial thrombosis treatment method as an endovascular treatment modalities of acute stroke.

  7. Oscillations in glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Antonina; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2012-01-01

    also decreases by stimulating the ATPase activity, e.g. by FCCP or Amphotericin B. Thus, ATPase activity strongly affects the glycolytic oscillations. We discuss these data in relation to a simple autocatalytic model of glycolysis which can reproduce the experimental data and explain the role...... of membrane-bound ATPases . In addition we also studied a recent detailed model of glycolysis and found that, although thismodel faithfully reproduces the oscillations of glycolytic intermediates observed experimentally, it is not able to explain the role of ATPase activity on the oscillations....

  8. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J?nio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain′s line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Me...

  9. Pontine infarction caused by medial branch injury of the basilar artery as a rare complication of cisternal drain placement

    OpenAIRE

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Kuroiwa, Masafumi; Rahmah, Nunung Nur; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare complication of cisternal drain placement during aneurysm surgery. A ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm was clipped through a right pterional approach. A cisternal drain was inserted from the retro-carotid to the prepontine cistern. Postoperatively, a left-sided paresis of the upper extremity had developed. A CT brain scan revealed that the drain was located between the pons and the basilar artery, resulting in a pontine infarction. Vascular neurosurgeons should...

  10. Oscillators - a simple introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Oscillators are kernel components of electrical and electronic circuits. Discussion of history, mechanisms and design based on Barkhausens observation. Discussion of a Wien Bridge oscillator based on the question: Why does this circuit oscillate ?......Oscillators are kernel components of electrical and electronic circuits. Discussion of history, mechanisms and design based on Barkhausens observation. Discussion of a Wien Bridge oscillator based on the question: Why does this circuit oscillate ?...

  11. Oscillators and Eigenvalues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    In order to obtain insight in the nature of nonlinear oscillators the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian of the differential equations describing the oscillator are found and displayed as functions of time. A number of oscillators are studied including Dewey's oscillator (piecewise linear wit...... with negative resistance), Kennedy's Colpitts-oscillator (with and without chaos) and a new 4'th order oscillator with hyper-chaos....

  12. Age-Specific and Sexual Variability of Morphological and Biomechanical Parameters of the Basilar Artery of Adult People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Nicolenko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of studying of morphological and biomechanical parameters of the basilar artery in an experiment on monoaxonic distension by tensile-testing machine Tira Test 28005 (Germany with a loading cell — 100 N we determined general solidity, breaking point, maximum and relative deformation of the artery. Preliminary under a microscope on cross-section cuts we measured the external diameter of the artery, its wall thickness and calculated the diameter of the lumen. In total, 114 basilar arteries (66 — from corpses of men, 48 — from corpses of women have been investigated. They were received not later than 16 hours after autopsy of adult people, whose cause of death has not been connected with a sharp vascular cerebral pathology. The statistically authentic prevalence of the size of wall thickness and general solidity of the men’s artery wall was revealed. In age aspect the external diameter, the lumen diameter and the wall thickness of the basilar artery increase. At the same time the solidity of the wall decreases and its ability to prolongation increases.

  13. Endovascular therapy for acute basilar artery occlusion: Comparison between patients with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotics stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gun Soo; Kim, Seul Kee; Baek, Byeong Hyeon; Lee, Youn Young; Yoon, Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To compare the characteristics and outcomes of multimodal endovascular therapy (EVT) in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). We retrospectively analyzed the data from 50 patients with acute BAO who were treated with EVT. The baseline characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without ICAS were compared. Patients with ICAS underwent intracranial angioplasty or stenting after mechanical thrombectomy. Thirty percent of the patients (15/50) had underlying ICAS at the occlusion site. On pretreatment diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), bilateral thalamic infarction was less frequently found in patients with ICAS (0% vs. 25.7%, p = 0.03). Occlusion in the proximal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients with ICAS (60% vs. 5.7%, p < 0.001), whereas occlusion in the distal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients without ICAS (26.7% vs. 91.4%, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the rates of successful revascularization, 3-month modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–2, symptomatic hemorrhage, and mortality between the two groups. ICAS was common in patients with acute stroke due to BAO. The occlusion site and the presence or absence of bilateral thalamic infarction on pretreatment DWI might help predict the underlying ICAS in patients with acute BAO.

  14. Endovascular therapy for acute basilar artery occlusion: Comparison between patients with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotics stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gun Soo; Kim, Seul Kee; Baek, Byeong Hyeon; Lee, Youn Young; Yoon, Woong

    2017-01-01

    To compare the characteristics and outcomes of multimodal endovascular therapy (EVT) in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). We retrospectively analyzed the data from 50 patients with acute BAO who were treated with EVT. The baseline characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without ICAS were compared. Patients with ICAS underwent intracranial angioplasty or stenting after mechanical thrombectomy. Thirty percent of the patients (15/50) had underlying ICAS at the occlusion site. On pretreatment diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), bilateral thalamic infarction was less frequently found in patients with ICAS (0% vs. 25.7%, p = 0.03). Occlusion in the proximal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients with ICAS (60% vs. 5.7%, p < 0.001), whereas occlusion in the distal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients without ICAS (26.7% vs. 91.4%, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the rates of successful revascularization, 3-month modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–2, symptomatic hemorrhage, and mortality between the two groups. ICAS was common in patients with acute stroke due to BAO. The occlusion site and the presence or absence of bilateral thalamic infarction on pretreatment DWI might help predict the underlying ICAS in patients with acute BAO

  15. [Exploratory study of 3D printing technique in the treatment of basilar invagination and atlantoaxial dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yiheng; Yu, Xinguang; Tong, Huaiyu; Xu, Tao; Wang, Peng; Qiao, Guangyu

    2015-10-06

    To investigate the clinical application value of the 3D printing technique in the treatment of basilar invagination and atlantoaxial dislocation. From January 2013 to September 2013, 10 patients with basilar invagination and atlantoaxial dislocation needing posterior fixation undertook 3D printing modes at the Department of Neurosurgery in PLA General Hospital. The 1:1 size models were established from skull base to C4 level with different colors between bone structures and vertebral arteries. The simulation of screw insertion was made to investigate the fixation plan and ideal entry point to avoid vertebral artery injury. After obtaining the individual screw insertion data in 3D printing modes, the according surgical operations were performed. The actual clinical results and virtual screw data in 3D printing mode were compared with each other. The 3D printing modes revealed that all the 10 patients had the dysplasia or occipitalized C1 posterior arch indicating C1 posterior arch screw implantation was not suitable. C1 lateral masses were chosen as the screws entry points. C2 screws were designed individually based on the 3D printing modes as follows: 3 patients with aberrant vertebral artery or narrow C2 pedicle less than 3.5 mm were not suitable for pedicle screw implantation. Among the 3 patients, 1 was fixed with C2 laminar screw, and 1 with C2-3 transarticular screw and 1 with C3 pedicle screw (also combined with congenital C2-3 vertebral fusion). Two patients with narrow C2 pedicle between 3.5 and 4mm were designed to choose pedicle screw fixation after 3D printing mode evaluation. One patient with C1 lateral mass vertically dislocated axis was planned with C1-2 transarticular screw fixation. All the other patients were planned with C2 pedicle screws. All the 10 patients had operation designed as the 3D printing modes schemes. The follow-up ranged from 12 to 18 months and all the patients recovered from the clinical symptoms and the bony fusion attained to

  16. Basilar artery occlusive disease in stroke survivors in a multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciríaco, Jovana Gobbi Marchesi; Leite, Claudia da Costa; dMartin, Maria a Graça Morais; Barros, Cristiano Venturim; Puglia, Paulo; Caldas, José Guilherme Pereira; Scaff, Milberto; Conforto, Adriana Bastos

    2010-04-01

    To describe clinical, radiological findings, and outcome in a multiethnic population of stroke survivors with basilar artery occlusive disease (BAOC). Forty patients with infarcts in the basilar artery (BA) territory, alive 30 days after the ictus, participated in the study. BA stenosis (>50%) or occlusion was shown by magnetic resonance or digital subtraction angiography in all patients. Demographical, clinical and radiological characteristics were described. Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) scores at 30 days and 6 months after the ischemic event were evaluated. Association between demographical, clinical, radiological features and outcome were analyzed with Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. MRS scores at 30 days and 6 months were compared with the Wilcoxon test. Sixty percent of the patients were men, and 33% were Afro-Brazilian. Mean age was 55.8+/-12.9 years. Most (90%) had multiple vascular risk factors. Stroke was preceded by TIA in 48% of the patients, and 80% had a history of arterial hypertension. The most common neurological symptom was vertigo/dizziness (60%) and the sign, hemiparesis (60%). Most of the infarcts were located in the pons (85%) and the BA middle third was the most frequently affected segment (33%). BA occlusion occurred in 58% of the patients. More severe vascular occlusive lesions were present in Whites (p=0.002) and in patients with involvement of the middle third of the BA (p=0.021). Large-artery atherosclerosis was the most common stroke etiology (88%) and was more frequent in older patients (p<0.001). Most patients were treated with anticoagulation. MRS scores improved significantly at 6 months (p<0.001); at this time, 78% of the patients had MRS scores between 0 and 2. We observed different results compared with other series: greater proportion of Afro-descendents, higher frequency of atherosclerosis and BA occlusion. Rates of preceding TIAs and good outcome at 6 months were similar to previously published data. These results represent

  17. Management of acute basilar artery occlusion: should any treatment strategy prevail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornak, Tomas; Herzig, Roman; Sanak, Daniel; Skoloudik, David

    2014-12-01

    Acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) is relatively infrequent form of acute ischemic stroke associated with severe and persisting neurological deficit and high mortality rate (to 86%). Early recanalization is essential for good clinical outcome but the most effective treatment approach remains unestablished. Several treatment strategies are currently available but their safety and efficacy have only been tested in retrospective/prospective case series. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are lacking. We searched the PubMed database for assessments of recanalization rate and clinical outcome in BAO patients treated with various treatment methods. The results show that antithrombotics are least effective while specific reperfusion therapies including intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and various types of intra-arterial therapy (IAT) are more so. Less than half of BAO patients reach independent outcome following IVT with a recanalization rate 52-78%. Even though IAT recanalizes BAO more frequently (in up to 100%), the higher recanalization rate is not necessarily associated with better outcome. Good clinical outcome is strongly dependent on recanalization time. Thus, the concept of bridging therapy, combining widely available IVT with IAT, was introduced and is usually considered a rescue strategy in non-responders to IV alteplase. A trend to better outcome in patients treated with bridging therapy in some studies, has to be confirmed by large RCTs.

  18. Persistent Neutrophilic Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Patient after Basilar Skull Fracture: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uslan Daniel Z

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent neutrophilic meningitis is an unusual form of chronic meningitis that is defined as clinical meningitis with a neutrophilic pleocytosis that persists for greater than 7 days despite empiric antimicrobial therapy. Although numerous disease processes can cause this syndrome, the majority of cases are due to opportunistic pathogens infecting immunocompromised hosts. Case Presentation A 47 year-old female presented after basilar skull fracture with persistent neutrophilic meningitis unresponsive to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. After more than weeks of intensive therapy, 4 hospitalizations and 3 relapses, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica was identified from cerebral spinal fluid. Induction therapy was begun with Ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX for 6 weeks followed by therapy with TMP-SMX and doxycycline for one year. The patient made a complete recovery without sequelae. Conclusions Due to the difficulty in obtaining a microbiologic diagnosis, appropriate treatment in cases of persistent neutrophilic meningitis is often delayed leading to morbidity, This case highlights a number of the unique features of Nocardia meningitis and the importance of considering Nocardia infection as a cause of persistent neutrophilic meningitis even in immunocompetent patients.

  19. Basilar expansion of the human sphenoidal sinus: an integrated anatomical and computerized tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haetinger, Rainer G.; Navarro, Joao A.C.; Liberti, Edson A.

    2006-01-01

    Basilar expansion of the sphenoidal sinus (BESS) was studied in order to demonstrate its critical relevance in endoscopic or microscopic endonasal surgical interventions, including access to the sphenoidal sinus itself or in transsphenoidal pituitary approaches. Direct evaluation of anatomical specimens (25 dry skulls and 25 formalin-fixed hemi heads) and the use of computerized tomography (CT) (50 dry skulls and 750 patients) showed a high BESS frequency (69%). The authors considered BESS to be critical when the posterior wall of the clivus was 2-mm thick and found a high incidence of this important anatomical variation (44%). This study also evaluated the relationship between the sinonasal septa, the clivus, and the internal carotid arteries, and a considerable regularity in the location of these structures was seen. The septa were anatomically related to the internal carotid arteries in 55% and to the clivus in 33% of the cases. In conclusion, the high frequency of critical BESS here described is relevant to endoscopic or microscopic endonasal surgical interventions, including access to the sphenoidal sinus itself or in transsphenoidal pituitary approaches. (orig.)

  20. Collateral flow after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.S.; Wiznitzer, M.; Haacke, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    MR angiography was used to evaluate collateral flow after extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in patients with permanent ligation of the right common carotid artery (RCCA). One year after ECMO, MR angiography of the cerebral circulation was performed in 11 survivors and MR angiography of the neck in seven. The diameters of the left common carotid (LCCA) and vertebral (Vert) arteries in the neck and of the basilar (Bas) and internal carotid arteries in the head were measured. Ratios of the artery diameters were compared with those of seven children (aged 6 months - 17 years) who had normal MR angiographic and brain MR imaging studies. Compared with carotid artery diameter, the ECMO population had proportionately larger vertebral (RVert/LCCA, -0.82 ± 0.12 vs 0.56 ± 0.20 [<.02], LVert/LCCA, -0.86 ± 0.15 vs 0.67 ± 0.05 [P < .02] and basilar artery diameters (LICA/Bas, -0.91 ± 0.15 vs 1.49 ± 0.48 [p < .003]) than did control subjects. Ratios in five children with enlarged RPComA after ECMO were not significantly different from those in controls. The RICA was present and smaller than the LICA in the ECMO population, but not in control subjects (RICA/LICA, -0.75 ± 0.06 vs 0.91 ± 0.23 [p < .05]). Increased vertebral and basilar artery flow is a response to RCCA ligation in the neonate and is independent of RPComA collateral flow. This suggests the presence of more extensive parenchymal collaterals from posterior cerebral arteries, from the vertebrobasilar circulation to the external carotid artery or other collaterals. Consequently, later abnormalities of vertebrobasilar flow might adversely affect right hemispheric function in this children

  1. A new procedure for automatic fitting of the basilar-membrane input-output function to individual behavioral data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; Fereczkowski, Michal; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    system and, potentially, for clinical diagnostics. Computational algorithms are available that mimic the functioning of the nonlinear cochlear processing. One such algorithm is the dual resonance non-linear (DRNL) filterbank [6]. Its parameters can be modified to account for individual hearing loss, e.......g., based on behavioral, temporal masking curves (TMC) data. This approach was used within the framework of the computational auditory signal-processing and perception (CASP) model to account for various aspects of SNHL [4]. However, due to the computational complexity, on-line fitting of the DRNL...

  2. Impact of posterior communicating artery on basilar artery steno-occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J M; Choi, J Y; Lee, J H; Yong, S W; Bang, O Y; Joo, I S; Huh, K

    2009-12-01

    Acute brainstem infarction with basilar artery (BA) occlusive disease is the most fatal type of all ischaemic strokes. This report investigates the prognostic impact of the posterior communicating artery (PcoA) and whether its anatomy is a safeguard or not. Consecutive patients who had acute brainstem infarction with at least 50% stenosis of BA upon CT angiography (CTA) were studied. The configuration of PcoA was divided into two groups upon CTA: "textbook" group (invisible PcoA with good P1 and P2 segment) and "fetal-variant of PcoA" group (only visible PcoA with absent P1 segment). Baseline demographics, radiological findings and stroke mechanisms were analysed. A multiple regression analysis was performed to predict clinical outcome at 30 days (modified Rankin disability Scale (mRSPcoA (26 bilateral, 18 unilateral). By multiple logistic regression analysis, the atherosclerotic mechanism (OR 18.0; 95% CI 3.0 to 107.0) and presence of fetal-variant PcoA (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.4 to 18.8) were independent predictors for good prognosis and initial NIH stroke scale score (OR 1.24 per one-point increase; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.4) for poor prognosis. Fetal-variant PcoA appears to act as a safeguard against ischaemic insult in acute stroke victims involving the brainstem with BA occlusive disease. This result can be explained by the fact that patients with fetal-variant PcoA have a smaller area of posterior circulation and a possibility of retrograde filling into the upper brainstem through the fetal-variant PcoA.

  3. Hyperdense basilar artery sign diagnoses acute posterior circulation stroke and predicts short-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoping [Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University at Shenyang, Department of Neurology, Shengjing Hospital, Shenyang (China); Guo, Yang [Shengjing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Shenyang (China)

    2010-12-15

    It is well established that the hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign is a specific marker for early ischemia in anterior circulation. However, little is known about the hyperdense basilar artery sign (HDBA) in posterior circulation. Our aim was to determine whether the HDBA sign has utility in early diagnosis of acute posterior circulation stroke and prediction of short-term outcome. Three-blinded readers examined unenhanced computed tomography scans for the HDBA sign, and materials were classified into two groups according to this sign. Vascular risk factors, admission and discharge National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, short-term outcome, and radiological findings between the two groups were compared. One hundred and twenty-six cases of acute posterior circulation stroke (PCS) were included in the study. No statistically significant differences were found in risk factors of ischemic stroke, except atrial fibrillation (P = 0.025). Admission and discharge NIHSS scores for the positive HDBA group were significantly higher than scores for the negative HDBA group (P = 0.001, 0.002, respectively). The infarction territory for the positive HDBA group was mainly multi-region in nature (51.6%, P < 0.001), while the negative HDBA group showed mainly middle territory infarction. Significant independent predictors of short-term outcome included the HDBA sign (P < 0.001) and admission NIHSS scores (P < 0.001). Approximately half of the HDBA patients showed multi-region infarction and a serious neurological symptom. Based on our results, this sign might not only be helpful in early diagnosis of acute PCS but also be able to correlate with a poor short-term outcome. (orig.)

  4. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jânio A; Botelho, Ricardo V

    2015-01-01

    Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle).

  5. Achados cirúrgicos em 260 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available A impressão basilar é malformação frequentemente observada no Nordeste do Brasil. No período de 1971 a 1992 foram operados, em nosso Serviço, 260 pacientes com malformações occipitocervicais, sendo 29 (11,1% casos de impressão basilar pura, 18 (6,9% com malformação de Arnold-Chiari e 213 (81,9% com impressão basilar associada à malformação de Arnold-Chiari. São relatados os achados cirúrgicos do plano ósseo, da dura-máter, do tecido nervoso e dos vasos da fossa posterior.

  6. Persistência da anastomose carótido-basilar: a propósito de um caso revelado pela angiografia cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Zaclis

    1955-12-01

    Full Text Available Publicando êste caso, o autor eleva para 23 o total dos casos registrados de persistência da anastomose carótido-basilar. Trata-se de caso cujo paciente foi submetido a estudo angiográfico injetando o contraste sucessivamente em ambas as artérias carótidas e no sistema vértebro-basilar. Êste é o sétimo caso com demonstração angiográfica da persistência da comunicação entre a carótida e a basilar. A presença desta anomalia condiciona modificações na hemodinâmica intracraniana demonstradas neste caso.

  7. Interaction of Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in Metabolic Oscillations of Pancreatic Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Richard; Satin, Leslie S.; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic ß-cells is oscillatory, with a typical period of 2–7 min, reflecting oscillations in membrane potential and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Our central hypothesis is that the slow 2–7 min oscillations are due to glycolytic oscillations, whereas faster oscillati...

  8. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  9. Espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de arnold-chiari relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma paciente com espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Com a descompressão cirúrgica da fossa posterior, empregada no tratamento da impressão basilar, houve melhora do quadro clínico e o espasmo hemifacial se reduziu quanto à frequência, duração e intensidade. É enfatizada a necessidade do tratamento etiológico do espasmo hemifacial, antes de se recorrer à toxina botulínica.

  10. Automatic Oscillating Turret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Final Report: February 1978 ZAUTOMATIC OSCILLATING TURRET SYSTEM September 1980 * 6. PERFORMING 01G. REPORT NUMBER .J7. AUTHOR(S) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT...o....e.... *24 APPENDIX P-4 OSCILLATING BUMPER TURRET ...................... 25 A. DESCRIPTION 1. Turret Controls ...Other criteria requirements were: 1. Turret controls inside cab. 2. Automatic oscillation with fixed elevation to range from 20* below the horizontal to

  11. Neutrino oscillations in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheyev, S.P.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we describe united formalism of ν-oscillations for different regimes, which is immediate generalization of vacuum oscillations theory. Adequate graphical representation of this formalism is given. We summarize main properties of ν-oscillations for different density distributions. (orig./BBOE)

  12. The colpitts oscillator family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.

    A tutorial study of the Colpitts oscillator family defined as all oscillators based on a nonlinear amplifier and a three- terminal linear resonance circuit with one coil and two capacitors. The original patents are investigated. The eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian for oscillators based...

  13. Posterior communicating and vertebral artery configuration and outcome in endovascular treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussen, Diogo C; Dharmadhikari, Sushrut S; Snelling, Brian; Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Thomas, Ajith; Peterson, Eric C; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate if vertebrobasilar anatomic variations impact reperfusion and outcome in intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for basilar artery occlusion (BAO). Consecutive BAO patients with symptom onset PCoA) diameters were measured (CT angiography or MR angiography). The presence of PCoA atresia, VA hypoplasia, VAs that end in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), and extracranial VA occlusion was recorded. 38 BAO patients were included. Mean age was 63±15 years; 52% were men. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 21±9, and mean/median time from symptom onset to IAT were 10/7 h. First generation thrombectomy devices were mostly used. Overall Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia 2b-3 reperfusion was 68.4%. Good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2) was observed in 17.8% and mortality in 64.3% of cases at 90 days. 55% of patients had an atretic PCoA while 47% had a hypoplastic VA. The mean sum of the bilateral PCoA and VA diameters were 2.3±1.2 and 5.2±5.2 mm, respectively. VAs that end in the PICA was noted in 23% of patients, and extracranial VA occlusion in 42%. BAO was proximal/mid/distal in 36%/29%/34%. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated hypertensive disease (β=2.97; 95% CI 1.15 to 4.79; p<0.01) and reperfusion rate (β=-0.40; 95% CI -0.74 to -0.70; p=0.02) independently associated with outcome. Multivariate analysis for predictors of reperfusion failed to identify other associations. A trend for better reperfusion with stent retrievers was noted (β=1.82; 95% CI -0.24 to 3.88; p=0.08). Reperfusion emerged as a predictor of good outcome in patients that underwent IAT for BAO. Angioarchitectural variations of the posterior circulation were not found to impact reperfusion or clinical outcome. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  15. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  16. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-10-06

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  17. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  18. Punica granatum L. Juice Attenuates Experimental Cerebral Vasospasm in the Rabbit Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model: A Basilar Artery Morphometric Study and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Demirci, Adnan; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Bayram, Pinar; Dilli, Alper; Gokce, Emre Cemal; Yaman, Onur; Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Alagoz, Fatih; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2017-03-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice on the rabbit basilar artery in an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. Methods  Eighteen adult male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: a control group ( n  = 6), SAH group ( n  = 6), and SAH + treatment group ( n  = 6). Basilar artery diameter was measured with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in all groups at the beginning of the study. Experimental SAH was created by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna. In the treatment group, the subjects were administered a daily dose of 30 ml/kg pomegranate juice via gastric gavage for 4 days after the SAH. The SAH group and SAH + treatment group underwent cerebral MRA after 72 hours. After a neurologic score assessment, all the animals were killed. The wall thickness and lumen area of the basilar artery were measured histometrically in all groups, and the apoptotic cell percentage in the artery was identified. The mean diameter of the basilar artery during MRA was measured. Results  Pomegranate improved neurologic functions compared with the SAH group ( p   0.05). The apoptotic cell rate in the SAH + treatment group was significantly lower than in the SAH group ( p   0.05). Discussion  Pomegranate was shown to have a vasospasm- attenuating effect on the basilar artery in the rabbit SAH model for the first time in our study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Revascularization Techniques for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion : Technical Considerations and Outcome in the Setting of Severe Posterior Circulation Steno-Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Eberhard; Bohner, Georg; Zweynert, Sarah; Maus, Volker; Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Liebig, Thomas; Kabbasch, Christoph

    2018-04-12

    To describe the clinical and radiological characteristics, frequency, technical aspects and outcome of endovascular treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion (ABO) in the setting of vertebrobasilar steno-occlusive disease. Retrospective analysis of databases of two universitary stroke centers including all consecutive patients from January 2013 until May 2017 undergoing thrombectomy for a) acute stroke due to basilar artery occlusion and either significant basilar artery stenosis or vertebral artery stenosis/occlusion as well as b) presumed embolic basilar artery occlusions. Demographics, stroke characteristics, time metrics, recanalization results and outcome were recorded. Interventional strategies were evaluated concerning the thrombectomy technique, additional angioplasty, type of approach with respect to lesion pattern (ipsilateral to steno-occlusive VA lesion: dirty road or contralateral: clean road) and sequence of actions. Out of 157 patients treated for ABO 38 (24.2%) had associated significant vertebrobasilar steno-occlusive lesions. An underlying significant basilar artery stenosis was present in 23.7% and additionally significant steno-occlusive vertebral lesions were present in 81.5%. Thrombectomy was performed with primary aspiration in 15.8% and with stent-retrievers in 84.2%. Successful revascularization (TICI 2b-3) was achieved in 86.8%. In 52.6% additional stent angioplasty was performed, in 7.9% balloon angioplasty only. The clean road approach was used in 22.5% of cases, the dirty road in 77.4%. Final modified Rankin scale (mRS) was 0-2 in 6 patients (15.8%) and 3-5 in 32 (84.2%). The in-hospital mortality was 36.8%. There were no statistically significant differences in outcome compared to presumed cases of embolisms. Endovascular treatment of ABO with underlying significant vertebrobasilar steno-occlusive lesions is effective and reasonably safe. Specific procedural strategies apply depending on individual patient pathology and anatomy

  20. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  1. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A.E.; Fontenla, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized. 7 refs

  2. Pontine infarction induced by injury of the perforating branch of the basilar artery after blunt head impact: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Iwamoto, Shin-ichiro; Nishi, Kouichirou

    2008-08-01

    A 77-year-old male pedestrian was hit by a car. On admission, he had disturbance of consciousness and left hemiplegia. Computed tomography (CT) indicated only left frontal subcutaneous hematoma and minor hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, suggesting axonal injury. CT on hospital day 2 revealed a low density area in the right paramedian pons, but CT angiography showed no dissection or occlusion of the vertebrobasilar artery. The diagnosis was pontine infarction resulting from shearing force injury to the paramedian branch of the basilar artery. He was transferred to another hospital for rehabilitation without improvement of symptoms on hospital day 51. Paramedian pontine infarction tends to occur in patients with risk factors for arteriosclerosis, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or smoking. The present elderly patient had hypertension and hyperlipidemia, so arteriosclerosis in the paramedian branch may have contributed to his susceptibility to such injury.

  3. Characterization of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction and acetylcholine-induced relaxation in isolated chicken basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, F; Watanabe, Y; Obi, T; Islam, M Z; Yamazaki-Himeno, E; Shiraishi, M; Miyamoto, A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the responsiveness of the chicken basilar artery to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and acetylcholine (ACh) and to characterize the related receptor subtypes in vitro. Basilar arteries were obtained from freshly slaughtered broiler chickens. The 5-HT induced concentration-dependent contraction of the arteries. The concentration-response curves for 5-HT were shifted 30-fold to the right by methiothepin (a 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) and 3-fold to the right by ketanserin (a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist). In the presence of ketanserin, the concentration-response curve for 5-HT was shifted 10-fold to the right by methiothepin. The pA(2) value for methiothepin was 8.26. The ACh induced concentration-dependent relaxation under conditions of precontraction by 5-HT. The concentration-response curve for ACh was shifted to the right by atropine [a nonselective muscarinic (M) receptor antagonist] and hexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride, a p-fluoroanalog (pFHHSiD, an M(3) receptor antagonist), but not by pirenzepine (an M(1) receptor antagonist) or methoctramine (an M(2) receptor antagonist). The pA(2) value for pFHHSiD was 7.55. Nω-Nitro-l-arginine (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) inhibited ACh-induced relaxation by approximately 50%. These results suggest that 5-HT induces contraction via activation of 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptors and that ACh induces relaxation via activation of the M(3) receptor. The 5-HT(1) receptor might play a dominant role in 5-HT-induced contraction. One of the factors involved in ACh-induced relaxation is probably nitric oxide released from endothelial cells.

  4. Fatal Mycotic Aneurysm of the Basilar Artery Caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a Patient with Pituitary Adenoma and Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Winterholler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS frequently occur in immunosuppressed patients. Here, we describe the case of an immunocompetent 64-year-old man who presented with diplopia, right-sided hemiparesis, and a mild headache after cleaning and replacing nesting boxes of wild birds during the preceding months. Lumbar puncture revealed pleocytosis, elevated protein, and lactate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Initial imaging showed ischemia in the left thalamus and an enlargement of the sellar region. Antibiotic treatment and corticosteroids led to an initial improvement but was followed by rapid deterioration. Antibiotic treatment was modified and antifungal therapy was added. Eighteen days after admission, the patient died from a subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from the rupture of a fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery. Microbiological culture of CSF was negative, but a positive galactomannan assay suggested fungal infection which was corroborated by detection of Aspergillus fumigatus DNA in pan-fungal PCR and sequencing. The presence of septated hyphae in the wall of the basilar artery confirmed the diagnosis of a mycotic aneurysm caused by hyphomycetal infection. In addition, brain autopsy revealed the presence of an invasive adrenocorticotrophic hormone-producing pituitary adenoma with arrosion of the sellar bone. This process and its invasiveness likely facilitated the spread of the fungal pathogen from the sphenoid sinus to the dura mater and finally led to cerebral angioinvasion. Our case demonstrates the challenge to timely diagnose and effectively treat aspergillosis as a cause of CNS infection also in apparently immunocompetent patients. The potential of assays detecting fungal antigens and of PCR to facilitate a timely diagnosis is discussed.

  5. Randomized comparison of intra-arterial and intravenous thrombolysis in a canine model of acute basilar artery thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.I.; Yahia, A.M.; Boulos, A.S.; Hanel, R.A.; Suri, M.F.K.; Hopkins, L.N.; Alberico, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the rates of recanalization cerebral infarct and hemorrhage between intra-arterial (IA) reteplase and intravenous (IV) alteplase thrombolysis in a canine model of basilar artery thrombosis. Thrombosis was induced by injecting a clot in the basilar artery of 13 anesthetized dogs via superselective catheterization. The animals were randomized in a blinded fashion, 2 h after clot injection and verification of arterial occlusion, to receive IV alteplase 0.9 mg/kg over 60 min and IA placebo, or IA reteplase 0.09 units/kg over 20 min, equivalent to one-half the alteplase dose, and IV placebo. Recanalization was studied for 6 h after treatment with serial angiography; the images were later graded in a blinded fashion. Blinded interpretation of postmortem MRI was performed to assess the presence of brain infarcts and/or hemorrhage. At 3 h after initiation of treatment, partial or complete recanalization was observed in one of six dogs in the IV alteplase group and in five of seven in the IA reteplase group (P = 0.08). At 6 h, no significant difference in partial or complete recanalization was observed between the groups (two of six vs. five of seven; P = 0.20). Postmortem MRI revealed infarcts in four of six animals treated with IV alteplase and three of seven treated with IA reteplase (P = 0.4). Intracerebral hemorrhage was more common in the IV alteplase group (four of six vs. none of seven; P = 0.02). This study thus suggests that IA thrombolysis affords a recanalization rate similar to that of IV thrombolysis, but with a lower rate of intracerebral hemorrhage. (orig.)

  6. The Oscillator Principle of Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Oscillators are found on all levels in Nature. The general oscillator concept is defined and investigated. Oscillators may synchronize into fractal patterns. Apparently oscillators are the basic principle in Nature. The concepts of zero and infinite are discussed. Electronic manmade oscillators...

  7. On the Dirac oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we obtain a new representation for the Dirac oscillator based on the Clifford algebra C 7. The symmetry breaking and the energy eigenvalues for our model of the Dirac oscillator are studied in the non-relativistic limit. (author)

  8. A Conspiracy of Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss nonlinear mechanical systems containing several oscillators whose frequecies are all much higher than frequencies associated with the remaining degrees of freedom. In this situation a near constant of the motion, an adiabatic invariant, exists which is the sum of all the oscillator...... actions. The phenomenon is illustrated, and calculations of the small change of the adiabatic invariant is outlined....

  9. Synchronization of hyperchaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Cenys, A.; Mykolaitis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic oscillators is believed to have promising applications in secure communications. Hyperchaotic systems with multiple positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs) have an advantage over common chaotic systems with only one positive LE. Three different types of hyperchaotic electronic...... oscillators are investigated demonstrating synchronization by means of only one properly selected variable....

  10. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  11. Observation of Quasichanneling Oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wistisen, T. N.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Uggerhoj, University I.; Wienands, University; Markiewicz, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report on the first experimental observations of quasichanneling oscillations, recently seen in simulations and described theoretically. Although above-barrier particles penetrating a single crystal are generally seen as behaving almost as in an amorphous substance, distinct oscillation peaks nevertheless appear for particles in that category. The quasichanneling oscillations were observed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory by aiming 20.35 GeV positrons and electrons at a thin silicon crystal bent to a radius of R = 0.15 m, exploiting the quasimosaic effect. For electrons, two relatively faint quasichanneling peaks were observed, while for positrons, seven quasichanneling peaks were clearly identified.

  12. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say bar ν μ ) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say bar ν e ). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with bar ν μ oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations

  13. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, Boris

    2014-01-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures

  14. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Boris [Fermilab (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures.

  15. Oscillator, neutron modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaisse, R.; Leguen, R.; Ombredane, D.

    1960-01-01

    The authors present a mechanical device and an electronic control circuit which have been designed to sinusoidally modulate the reactivity of the Proserpine atomic pile. The mechanical device comprises an oscillator and a mechanism assembly. The oscillator is made of cadmium blades which generate the reactivity oscillation. The mechanism assembly comprises a pulse generator for cycle splitting, a gearbox and an engine. The electronic device comprises or performs pulse detection, an on-off device, cycle pulse shaping, phase separation, a dephasing amplifier, electronic switches, counting scales, and control devices. All these elements are briefly presented

  16. Enhancing hippocampal blood flow after cerebral ischemia and vasodilating basilar arteries: in vivo and in vitro neuroprotective effect of antihypertensive DDPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-(2,6-Dimethylphenoxy-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylethylamino-propane hydrochloride (DDPH is a novel antihypertensive agent based on structural characteristics of mexiletine and verapamine. We investigated the effect of DDPH on vasodilatation and neuroprotection in a rat model of cerebral ischemia in vivo, and a rabbit model of isolated basilar arteries in vitro. Our results show that DDPH (10 mg/kg significantly increased hippocampal blood flow in vivo in cerebral ischemic rats, and exerted dose-dependent relaxation of isolated basilar arteries contracted by histamine or KCl in the in vitro rabbit model. DDPH (3 × 10 -5 M also inhibited histamine-stimulated extracellular calcium influx and intracellular calcium release. Our findings suggest that DDPH has a vasodilative effect both in vivo and in vitro, which mediates a neuroprotective effect on ischemic nerve tissue.

  17. Functional ET(A)-ET(B) Receptor Cross-talk in Basilar Artery In Situ From ET(B) Receptor Deficient Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, SeongHun; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The role of endothelin (ET)(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in limiting the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction is revealed by the partial or complete dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition on functional removal of the ET(B) receptor. Although functional removal of the ET(B) receptor is generally accomplished with ET(B) receptor antagonist, a novel approach using rats containing a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the ET(B) receptor [rescued "spotting lethal" (sl) rats; ET(B)(sl/sl)] demonstrated increased ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in vena cava. We investigated whether this deletion mutation was also sufficient to remove the ET(B) receptor dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in the basilar artery. Consistent with previous reports, ET-1 plasma levels were elevated in ET(B)(sl/sl) as compared with ET(B)(+/+) rats. ET(B) receptor antagonist failed to relax the ET-1 constricted basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. Relaxation to combined ET(A) and ET(B) receptor antagonist was greater than relaxation to ET(A) receptor antagonist in the basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and, unexpectedly, ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. These findings confirm the presence of ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in the basilar artery. We speculate that mutant ET(B) receptor expression produced by alternative splicing may be sufficient to allow cross-talk.

  18. OSCILLATING FILAMENTS. I. OSCILLATION AND GEOMETRICAL FRAGMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas, E-mail: gritschm@usm.uni-muenchen.de [University Observatory Munich, LMU Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany)

    2017-01-10

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  19. Again on neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenky, S.M.; Pontecorvo, B.

    1976-01-01

    The general case is treated of a weak interaction theory in which a term violating lepton charges is present. In such a scheme the particles with definite masses are Majorana neutrinos (2N if in the weak interaction participate N four-component neutrinos). Neutrino oscillations are discussed and it is shown that the minimum average intensity at the earth of solar neutrinos is 1/2N of the intensity expected when oscillations are absent

  20. Density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Bratianu, C.

    1979-01-01

    Boiling flow in a steam generator, a water-cooled reactor, and other multiphase processes can be subject to instabilities. It appears that the most predominant instabilities are the so-called density-wave oscillations. They can cause difficulties for three main reasons; they may induce burnout; they may cause mechanical vibrations of components; and they create system control problems. A comprehensive review is presented of experimental and theoretical studies concerning density-wave oscillations. (author)

  1. Oscillators and operational amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A generalized approach to the design of oscillators using operational amplifiers as active elements is presented. A piecewise-linear model of the amplifier is used so that it make sense to investigate the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the differential equations. The characteristic equation of the general circuit is derived. The dynamic nonlinear transfer characteristic of the amplifier is investigated. Examples of negative resistance oscillators are discussed.

  2. Chaotic solar oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacher, S; Perdang, J [Institut d' Astrophysique, B-4200 Cointe-Ougree (Belgium)

    1981-09-01

    A numerical experiment on Hamiltonian oscillations demonstrates the existence of chaotic motions which satisfy the property of phase coherence. It is observed that the low-frequency end of the power spectrum of such motions is remarkably similar in structure to the low-frequency SCLERA spectra. Since the smallness of the observed solar amplitudes is not a sufficient mathematical ground for inefficiency of non-linear effects the possibility of chaos among solar oscillations cannot be discarded a priori.

  3. Case for neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramond, P.

    1982-01-01

    The building of a machine capable of producing an intense, well-calibrated beam of muon neutrinos is regarded by particle physicists with keen interest because of its ability of studying neutrino oscillations. The possibility of neutrino oscillations has long been recognized, but it was not made necessary on theoretical or experimental grounds; one knew that oscillations could be avoided if neutrinos were massless, and this was easily done by the conservation of lepton number. The idea of grand unification has led physicists to question the existence (at higher energies) of global conservation laws. The prime examples are baryon-number conservation, which prevents proton decay, and lepton-number conservation, which keeps neutrinos massless, and therefore free of oscillations. The detection of proton decay and neutrino oscillations would therefore be an indirect indication of the idea of Grand Unification, and therefore of paramount importance. Neutrino oscillations occur when neutrinos acquire mass in such a way that the neutrino mass eigenstates do not match the (neutrino) eigenstates produced by the weak interactions. We shall study the ways in which neutrinos can get mass, first at the level of the standard SU 2 x U 1 model, then at the level of its Grand Unification Generalizations

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Sildenafil Citrate (Viagra) on Vertebral Artery Blood Flow in Patients with Vertebro-Basilar Insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Berilgen, Sait; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Ogur, Erkin; Tekatas, Aslan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the vertebral artery blood flow of patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency (VBI) using color duplex sonography (CDS). The study included 21 patients with VBI (aged 31-76; mean 61.0 ± 10.5 yrs). We administered a 50 mg oral dose of sildenafil citrate to all patients. Next, we measured the peak systolic velocity (Vmax), end diastolic velocity (Vmin), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), diameter, area, and flow volume (FV) of vertebral arteries using CDS before the administration of sildenafil citrate; 45 minutes after, and 75 minutes after administration. Statistical testing was performed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The statistical test used to determine the outcome of the analysis was the repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Compared to the baseline values, the vertebral artery diameter, area, and FV increased significantly following the administration of sildenafil citrate. The diameter, area and FV increased from 3.39 mm at 45 minutes to 3.64 mm at 75 minutes, 9.43 cm 2 to 10.80 cm 2 at 45 minutes and 10.81 cm 2 at 75 minutes, as well as from 0.07 L/min at baseline to 0.09 L/min at 45 minutes and unchanged at 75 minutes, respectively. Sildenafil citrate elicited a significant effect on vertebral artery diameter, area and FVs

  5. Evaluation of the effects of sildenafil citrate (viagra) on vertebral artery blood flow in patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Berilgen, Sait; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Tekatas, Aslan; Ogur, Erkin

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the vertebral artery blood flow of patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency (VBI) using color duplex sonography (CDS). The study included 21 patients with VBI (aged 31-76; mean 61.0 +/- 10.5 yrs). We administered a 50 mg oral dose of sildenafil citrate to all patients. Next, we measured the peak systolic velocity (Vmax), end diastolic velocity (Vmin), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), diameter, area, and flow volume (FV) of vertebral arteries using CDS before the administration of sildenafil citrate; 45 minutes after, and 75 minutes after administration. Statistical testing was performed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The statistical test used to determine the outcome of the analysis was the repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Compared to the baseline values, the vertebral artery diameter, area, and FV increased significantly following the administration of sildenafil citrate. The diameter, area and FV increased from 3.39 mm at 45 minutes to 3.64 mm at 75 minutes, 9.43 cm(2) to 10.80 cm(2) at 45 minutes and 10.81 cm(2) at 75 minutes, as well as from 0.07 L/min at baseline to 0.09 L/min at 45 minutes and unchanged at 75 minutes, respectively. Sildenafil citrate elicited a significant effect on vertebral artery diameter, area and FVs.

  6. Evaluation of the Effects of Sildenafil Citrate (Viagra) on Vertebral Artery Blood Flow in Patients with Vertebro-Basilar Insufficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Berilgen, Sait; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Ogur, Erkin [Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig(Turkmenistan); Tekatas, Aslan [Elazig Government Hospital, Elazig (Turkmenistan)

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the effects of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the vertebral artery blood flow of patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency (VBI) using color duplex sonography (CDS). The study included 21 patients with VBI (aged 31-76; mean 61.0 +- 10.5 yrs). We administered a 50 mg oral dose of sildenafil citrate to all patients. Next, we measured the peak systolic velocity (Vmax), end diastolic velocity (Vmin), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), diameter, area, and flow volume (FV) of vertebral arteries using CDS before the administration of sildenafil citrate; 45 minutes after, and 75 minutes after administration. Statistical testing was performed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The statistical test used to determine the outcome of the analysis was the repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Compared to the baseline values, the vertebral artery diameter, area, and FV increased significantly following the administration of sildenafil citrate. The diameter, area and FV increased from 3.39 mm at 45 minutes to 3.64 mm at 75 minutes, 9.43 cm{sup 2} to 10.80 cm{sup 2} at 45 minutes and 10.81 cm{sup 2} at 75 minutes, as well as from 0.07 L/min at baseline to 0.09 L/min at 45 minutes and unchanged at 75 minutes, respectively. Sildenafil citrate elicited a significant effect on vertebral artery diameter, area and FVs

  7. Diagnostic and Prognostic Impact of pc-ASPECTS Applied to Perfusion CT in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Gerber, Johannes; Dzialowski, Imanuel; van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; Michel, Patrik; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Ozdoba, Christoph; Kappelle, L Jaap; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Khomenko, Andrei; Algra, Ale; Hill, Michael D; von Kummer, Ruediger; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter J; Puetz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (pc-APECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) predicts the functional outcome of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS). We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic impact of pc-ASPECTS applied to perfusion CT (CTP) in the BASICS registry population. We applied pc-ASPECTS to CTA-SI and cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) parameter maps of BASICS patients with CTA and CTP studies performed. Hypoattenuation on CTA-SI, relative reduction in CBV or CBF, or relative increase in MTT were rated as abnormal. CTA and CTP were available in 27/592 BASICS patients (4.6%). The proportion of patients with any perfusion abnormality was highest for MTT (93%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76%-99%), compared with 78% (58%-91%) for CTA-SI and CBF, and 46% (27%-67%) for CBV (P < .001). All 3 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 compared to 6/23 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS ≥ 8 had died at 1 month (RR 3.8; 95% CI, 1.9-7.6). CTP was performed in a minority of the BASICS registry population. Perfusion disturbances in the posterior circulation were most pronounced on MTT parameter maps. CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 may indicate patients with high case fatality. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  8. Do muons oscillate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.; Morozov, A.Yu.; Okun, L.B.; Schepkin, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    We develop a theory of the EPR-like effects due to neutrino oscillations in the π→μν decays. Its experimental implications are space-time correlations of the neutrino and muon when they are both detected, while the pion decay point is not fixed. However, the more radical possibility of μ-oscillations in experiments where only muons are detected (as suggested in hep-ph/9509261), is ruled out. We start by discussing decays of monochromatic pions, and point out a few ''paradoxes''. Then we consider pion wave packets, solve the ''paradoxes'', and show that the formulas for μν correlations can be transformed into the usual expressions, describing neutrino oscillations, as soon as the pion decay point is fixed. (orig.)

  9. Oscillations in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-01-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l → 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II l+1 from II l and II l-1 to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n c , while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  10. Oscillations in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-07-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l (>{sub )} 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II{sub l+1} from II{sub l} and II{sub l-1} to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n{sub c}, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  11. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  12. Oscillating Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we use the theory of summability of divergent series, presented earlier in Chap. 4, to derive the analogs of the Euler-Maclaurin summation formula for oscillating sums. These formulas will, in turn, be used to perform many remarkable deeds with ease. For instance, they can be used to derive analytic expressions for summable divergent series, obtain asymptotic expressions of oscillating series, and even accelerate the convergence of series by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, we will prove the notable fact that, as far as the foundational rules of summability calculus are concerned, summable divergent series behave exactly as if they were convergent.

  13. Brownian parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Christine; Jung, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the stochastic dynamics of dissipative, white-noise-driven Floquet oscillators, characterized by a time-periodic stiffness. Thus far, little attention has been paid to these exactly solvable nonstationary systems, although they carry a rich potential for several experimental applications. Here, we calculate and discuss the mean values and variances, as well as the correlation functions and the Floquet spectrum. As one main result, we find for certain parameter values that the fluctuations of the position coordinate are suppressed as compared to the equilibrium value of a harmonic oscillator (parametric squeezing).

  14. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  15. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  16. Oscillating Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we use the theory of summability of divergent series, presented earlier in Chap. 4, to derive the analogs of the Euler-Maclaurin summation formula for oscillating sums. These formulas will, in turn, be used to perform many remarkable deeds with ease. For instance, they can be used to derive analytic expressions for summable divergent series, obtain asymptotic expressions of oscillating series, and even accelerate the convergence of series by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, we will prove the notable fact that, as far as the foundational rules of summability calculus are concerned, summable divergent series behave exactly as if they were convergent.

  17. Oscillators from nonlinear realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N.; Krivonos, S.

    2018-02-01

    We construct the systems of the harmonic and Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillators, which are invariant with respect to arbitrary noncompact Lie algebras. The equations of motion of these systems can be obtained with the help of the formalism of nonlinear realizations. We prove that it is always possible to choose time and the fields within this formalism in such a way that the equations of motion become linear and, therefore, reduce to ones of ordinary harmonic and Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillators. The first-order actions, that produce these equations, can also be provided. As particular examples of this construction, we discuss the so(2, 3) and G 2(2) algebras.

  18. Biological oscillations: Fluorescence monitoring by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-01

    Fluctuations play a vital role in biological systems. Single molecule spectroscopy has recently revealed many new kinds of fluctuations in biological molecules. In this account, we focus on structural fluctuations of an antigen-antibody complex, conformational dynamics of a DNA quadruplex, effects of taxol on dynamics of microtubules, intermittent red-ox oscillations at different organelles in a live cell (mitochondria, lipid droplets, endoplasmic reticulum and cell membrane) and stochastic resonance in gene silencing. We show that there are major differences in these dynamics between a cancer cell and the corresponding non-cancer cell.

  19. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  20. Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-27

    PNNL developed a new tool for oscillation analysis and baselining. This tool has been developed under a new DOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) Project (GM0072 - “Suite of open-source applications and models for advanced synchrophasor analysis”) and it is based on the open platform for PMU analysis. The Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool (OBAT) performs the oscillation analysis and identifies modes of oscillations (frequency, damping, energy, and shape). The tool also does oscillation event baselining (fining correlation between oscillations characteristics and system operating conditions).

  1. From excitability to oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A. Y.; Jacobsen, J. C. B.

    2013-01-01

    One consequence of cell-to-cell communication is the appearance of synchronized behavior, where many cells cooperate to generate new dynamical patterns. We present a simple functional model of vasomotion based on the concept of a two-mode oscillator with dual interactions: via relatively slow dif...

  2. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments (ν μ →ν e and ν μ →ν τ ) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs

  3. A simple violin oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  4. Nonlinearity in oscillating bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Gazzola

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We first recall several historical oscillating bridges that, in some cases, led to collapses. Some of them are quite recent and show that, nowadays, oscillations in suspension bridges are not yet well understood. Next, we survey some attempts to model bridges with differential equations. Although these equations arise from quite different scientific communities, they display some common features. One of them, which we believe to be incorrect, is the acceptance of the linear Hooke law in elasticity. This law should be used only in presence of small deviations from equilibrium, a situation which does not occur in widely oscillating bridges. Then we discuss a couple of recent models whose solutions exhibit self-excited oscillations, the phenomenon visible in real bridges. This suggests a different point of view in modeling equations and gives a strong hint how to modify the existing models in order to obtain a reliable theory. The purpose of this paper is precisely to highlight the necessity of revisiting the classical models, to introduce reliable models, and to indicate the steps we believe necessary to reach this target.

  5. Integrated optoelectronic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Hao, Tengfei; Li, Wei; Domenech, David; Baños, Rocio; Muñoz, Pascual; Zhu, Ninghua; Capmany, José; Li, Ming

    2018-04-30

    With the rapid development of the modern communication systems, radar and wireless services, microwave signal with high-frequency, high-spectral-purity and frequency tunability as well as microwave generator with light weight, compact size, power-efficient and low cost are increasingly demanded. Integrated microwave photonics (IMWP) is regarded as a prospective way to meet these demands by hybridizing the microwave circuits and the photonics circuits on chip. In this article, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an integrated optoelectronic oscillator (IOEO). All of the devices needed in the optoelectronic oscillation loop circuit are monolithically integrated on chip within size of 5×6cm 2 . By tuning the injection current to 44 mA, the output frequency of the proposed IOEO is located at 7.30 GHz with phase noise value of -91 dBc/Hz@1MHz. When the injection current is increased to 65 mA, the output frequency can be changed to 8.87 GHz with phase noise value of -92 dBc/Hz@1MHz. Both of the oscillation frequency can be slightly tuned within 20 MHz around the center oscillation frequency by tuning the injection current. The method about improving the performance of IOEO is carefully discussed at the end of in this article.

  6. The variational spiked oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C.; Ullah, N.

    1992-08-01

    A variational analysis of the spiked harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian -d 2 / d x 2 + x 2 + δ/ x 5/2 , δ > 0, is reported in this work. A trial function satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions is suggested. The results are excellent for a large range of values of the coupling parameter. (author)

  7. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments ({nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  8. A case of basilar artery aneurysm rupture from 1836: lessons in clinical observation and the natural history of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Andreas K; Horiguchi, Takashi; Goodrich, James T; Kawase, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    Although credit is given to Sir William Gull for highlighting the clinical picture of subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1859, we discuss a case presented by Mr. Egerton A. Jennings, Fellow of the Linnaean Society, published 23 years earlier in the 1836 edition of the Transactions of the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association. This case, probably the first reported in the English language of a basilar aneurysm rupture, is of medico-historical interest. Jennings provided a remarkably accurate and detailed description of the patient, who experienced coma as a result of the severity of subarachnoid hemorrhage. The detailed clinical observations on initial assessment and the description of the patient's deterioration to the time of death are a succinct representation of the natural history of this disease. The author's discussion provides evidence of a philosophy committed to medical education and progress at the time based on principles of rational observation, meticulous clinical acumen, insight into experimental physiology, and the awareness of ethical boundaries. In provincial 1836 England, similar to most of Europe, cerebral localization was elementary. Nonetheless, this case report highlights the attempt at linking structure to function by means of observation on the effects of lesioning. It provides evidence of an established thought process already in progress in England in the 19th century. It is characteristic that this thought process came from a surgical practitioner. The cultivation of practical observation in British surgical culture would allow the late 19th century surgeon scientists to match the contributions of British neurologists with landmark steps in the development and establishment of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of ketamine hydrochloride administered as a basilar sesamoid nerve block in alleviating foot pain in horses caused by natural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, J; DeGraves, F; Cesar, F; Duran, S

    2014-09-01

    A local anaesthetic agent capable of temporarily resolving lameness after being administered perineurally would be helpful because rapid return of lameness would allow for other analgesic techniques to be performed within a short period of time. To determine if a 3% solution of ketamine hydrochloride (HCl), administered around the palmar nerves at the level of the base of the proximal sesamoid bones, can improve naturally occurring lameness that can be improved or abolished with a basilar sesamoid nerve block performed using lidocaine HCl and to compare the change in gait produced using lidocaine to the change in gait produced using ketamine by using objective lameness assessment. Experimental trial using research horses with naturally occurring lameness. Seven horses, chronically lame on a thoracic limb, were chosen for the study. A wireless, inertial, sensor-based, motion analysis system was used to evaluate lameness before and after administration of 2% lidocaine and later, before and after administration of 3% ketamine over the palmar digital nerves at the base of the proximal sesamoid bones (a basilar sesamoid nerve block) at 5 min intervals for 30 min. Lameness scores obtained before and after administration of lidocaine and ketamine HCl were compared using repeated measures analysis. Gait significantly improved after basilar sesamoid nerve blocks using 2% lidocaine, but gait did not significantly improve after performing the same nerve block using 3% ketamine HCl. Ketamine (3%) administered perineurally for regional anaesthesia of the digit does not desensitise the digit to the same extent as does lidocaine and thus 3% ketamine appears to have no value as a local anaesthetic agent for diagnostic regional anaesthesia. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  10. Anharmonic oscillator and Bogoliubov transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattnayak, G.C.; Torasia, S.; Rath, B.

    1990-01-01

    The anharmonic oscillator occupies a cornerstone in many problems in physics. It was observed that none of the authors have tested Bogoliubov transformation to study anharmonic oscillator. The groundstate energy of the anharmonic oscillator is studied using Bogoliubov transformation and the results presented. (author)

  11. Bimodal oscillations in nephron autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The individual functional unit of the kidney (the nephron) displays oscillations in its pressure and flow regulation at two different time scales: fast oscillations associated with a myogenic dynamics of the afferent arteriole, and slower oscillations arising from a delay in the tubuloglomerular ...

  12. Observation and analysis of oscillations in linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following on oscillation in linear accelerators: Betatron Oscillations; Betatron Oscillations at High Currents; Transverse Profile Oscillations; Transverse Profile Oscillations at High Currents.; Oscillation and Profile Transient Jitter; and Feedback on Transverse Oscillations

  13. Reactor oscillator - Proposal of the organisation for oscillator operation; Reaktorski oscilator - Predlog organizacije rada na oscilatoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Loloc, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The organizational structure for operating the reactor with the reactor oscillator describes the duties of the reactor operators; staff responsible for operating the oscillator who are responsible for measurements, preparation of the samples and further treatment of the obtained results.

  14. Quenching oscillating behaviors in fractional coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongkui; Xiao, Rui; Yang, Xiaoli; Xu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Oscillation quenching has been widely studied during the past several decades in fields ranging from natural sciences to engineering, but investigations have so far been restricted to oscillators with an integer-order derivative. Here, we report the first study of amplitude death (AD) in fractional coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with partial and/or complete conjugate couplings to explore oscillation quenching patterns and dynamics. It has been found that the fractional-order derivative impacts the AD state crucially. The area of the AD state increases along with the decrease of the fractional-order derivative. Furthermore, by introducing and adjusting a limiting feedback factor in coupling links, the AD state can be well tamed in fractional coupled oscillators. Hence, it provides one an effective approach to analyze and control the oscillating behaviors in fractional coupled oscillators.

  15. Pattern formation in arrays of chemical oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical oscillators; phase flip; oscillation death. PACS No. 05.45 .... array oscillate (with varying amplitudes and frequencies), while the others experience oscillation death .... Barring the boundary cells, one observes near phase flip and near ...

  16. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range. (paper)

  17. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M.; Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [Universita degli Studi di Salerno Via Ponte don Melillon, Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica, Fisciano SA (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo collegato di Salerno - Baronissi SA (Italy); Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [CNR-INFM Coherentia - Napoli (Italy); Blasone, M. [ISI Foundation for Scientific Interchange, Torino (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  18. Nonlinear (Anharmonic Casimir Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Razmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We want to study the dynamics of a simple linear harmonic micro spring which is under the influence of the quantum Casimir force/pressure and thus behaves as a (an nonlinear (anharmonic Casimir oscillator. Generally, the equation of motion of this nonlinear micromechanical Casimir oscillator has no exact solvable (analytical solution and the turning point(s of the system has (have no fixed position(s; however, for particular values of the stiffness of the micro spring and at appropriately well-chosen distance scales and conditions, there is (are approximately sinusoidal solution(s for the problem (the variable turning points are collected in a very small interval of positions. This, as a simple and elementary plan, may be useful in controlling the Casimir stiction problem in micromechanical devices.

  19. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, M.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.; Blasone, M.

    2009-01-01

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  20. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  1. Discrete repulsive oscillator wavefunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Carlos A; Rueda-Paz, Juvenal; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    For the study of infinite discrete systems on phase space, the three-dimensional Lorentz algebra and group, so(2,1) and SO(2,1), provide a discrete model of the repulsive oscillator. Its eigenfunctions are found in the principal irreducible representation series, where the compact generator-that we identify with the position operator-has the infinite discrete spectrum of the integers Z, while the spectrum of energies is a double continuum. The right- and left-moving wavefunctions are given by hypergeometric functions that form a Dirac basis for l 2 (Z). Under contraction, the discrete system limits to the well-known quantum repulsive oscillator. Numerical computations of finite approximations raise further questions on the use of Dirac bases for infinite discrete systems.

  2. Neutrino Masses and Oscillations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Treille, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos.

  3. Oscillations in quasineutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the limit, as the vacuum electric permittivity goes to zero, of a plasma physics system, deduced from the Vlasov-Poisson system for special initial data (distribution functions which are analytic in the space variable, with compact support in velocity), a limit also called open-quotes quasineutral regimeclose quotes of the plasma, and the related oscillations of the electric field, with high frequency in time. 20 refs

  4. Density oscillations within hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.; Barshay, S.

    1976-01-01

    In models of extended hadrons, in which small bits of matter carrying charge and effective mass exist confined within a medium, oscillations in the matter density may occur. A way of investigating this possibility experimentally in high-energy hadron-hadron elastic diffraction scattering is suggested, and the effect is illustrated by examining some existing data which might be relevant to the question [fr

  5. Simple Excitation of Standing Waves in Rubber Bands and Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortel, Adolf

    2004-04-01

    Many methods to excite standing waves in strings, plates, membranes, rods, tubes, and soap bubbles have been described. Usually a loudspeaker or a vibrating reed is driven by the amplified output of an audio oscillator. A novel and simple method consists of using a tuning fork or a singing rod to excite transversal standing waves in stretched rubber membranes sprinkled with fine sand.

  6. Neutrino Oscillations Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    We review the status of the neutrino oscillations physics, with a particular emphasis on the present knowledge of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters. We consider first the νμ → ντ flavor transitions of atmospheric neutrinos. It is found that standard oscillations provide the best description of the SK+K2K data, and that the associated mass-mixing parameters are determined at ±1σ (and NDF = 1) as: Δm2 = (2.6 ± 0.4) × 10-3 eV2 and sin 2 2θ = 1.00{ - 0.05}{ + 0.00} . Such indications, presently dominated by SK, could be strengthened by further K2K data. Then we point out that the recent data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, together with other relevant measurements from solar and reactor neutrino experiments, in particular the KamLAND data, convincingly show that the flavor transitions of solar neutrinos are affected by Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effects. Finally, we perform an updated analysis of two-family active oscillations of solar and reactor neutrinos in the standard MSW case.

  7. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  8. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  9. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect.

  10. Y stenting assisted coiling using a new low profile visible intraluminal support device for wide necked basilar tip aneurysms: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcelo D; Brasiliense, Leonardo B C; Richie, Alexa N; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2014-05-01

    Many endovascular techniques have been described in recent years for the management of wide necked aneurysms. The Y stent assisted technique has been generally used for coil embolization of wide necked bifurcation aneurysms. This technique was first described for the treatment of basilar tip aneurysms in combination with several different devices, demonstrating encouraging results. We report the results of the first two cases of wide necked basilar tip aneurysms treated with Y stent assisted coil embolization using a new low profile visible intraluminal stent (LVIS Jr; MicroVention, Tustin, California, USA) delivered through a 0.017 inch microcatheter. We also reviewed the literature comparing other endovascular techniques (coiling alone, stent assisted coiling, and Y stent assisted coiling) for wide necked aneurysms. The LVIS Jr device offers a new option for the treatment of these challenging lesions, with clear advantages over currently available intracranial stents. Larger series and long term results are needed to confirm the applicability and durability of this technique/technology.

  11. Contribuição ao estudo das malformações occipito-cervical, particularmente da impressão basilar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio M. Canelas

    1952-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors outline the development of the spine and skull, particularly of axis, atlas and occipital bone. As neuro-skeletal dysmorphisms, the occipito-cervical malformations belong to the neurodysplastic group. They are classified as skeletal anomalies, associated nervous malformations and meningeal reactions. Vertebralization of the occipital bone and occipitalization of atlas, subluxation of odontoid process, dysplasia of the occipital bone, dystrophia brevicollis and other anomalies are discussed. Special care is given to the study of basilar impression; its concept, history, incidence, clinical and neurological symptoms, radiological characterization (craniographic, perimyelographic and iodoventriculographic aspects and surgical treatment are reviewed. The authors report five cases of occipito-cervical malformations, which are the first references in Brazilian literature. In case 1 the anomalies (manifestation of occipital vertebra and Arnold-Chiari deformity were disclosed at an operation for cisticercosis of the posterior fossa. In the following four cases invagination of the basilar portion of the occipital bone (basilar impression could be radiologically demonstrated; in case 2 a suboccipital craniectomy and a laminectomy of atlas and axis were performed but the patient died a week later and the necroscopic examination confirmed the neuro-skeletal anomalies. In all cases there were several associated malformations. In case 2 there were occipitalization of the atlas, fusion of the first and second cervical vertebrae, supernumerary rib of the seventh cervical vertebra, supernumerary lumbar vertebra, and Arnold-Chiari deformity; at necropsy it was found a syringomyelic cyst on the cervical cord and a fibrous dural ring over the foramen magnum. Case 3 showed the syndrome of Klippel-Feil, besides supernumerary ribs of the seventh cervical and first dorsal vertebrae, Arnold-Chiari malfotmation and probable aplasia of cell groups in the

  12. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  13. Cell Type-specific Intrinsic Perithreshold Oscillations in Hippocampal GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Jin; Lewis, Hannah Elisabeth Smashey; Young, Mason William; Govindaiah, Gubbi; Greenfield, Lazar John; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2018-04-15

    The hippocampus plays a critical role in learning, memory, and spatial processing through coordinated network activity including theta and gamma oscillations. Recent evidence suggests that hippocampal subregions (e.g., CA1) can generate these oscillations at the network level, at least in part, through GABAergic interneurons. However, it is unclear whether specific GABAergic interneurons generate intrinsic theta and/or gamma oscillations at the single-cell level. Since major types of CA1 interneurons (i.e., parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PVBCs), cannabinoid type 1 receptor-positive basket cells (CB 1 BCs), Schaffer collateral-associated cells (SCAs), neurogliaform cells and ivy cells) are thought to play key roles in network theta and gamma oscillations in the hippocampus, we tested the hypothesis that these cells generate intrinsic perithreshold oscillations at the single-cell level. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from GABAergic interneurons in the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus in the presence of synaptic blockers to identify intrinsic perithreshold membrane potential oscillations. The majority of PVBCs (83%), but not the other interneuron subtypes, produced intrinsic perithreshold gamma oscillations if the membrane potential remained above -45 mV. In contrast, CB 1 BCs, SCAs, neurogliaform cells, ivy cells, and the remaining PVBCs (17%) produced intrinsic theta, but not gamma, oscillations. These oscillations were prevented by blockers of persistent sodium current. These data demonstrate that the major types of hippocampal interneurons produce distinct frequency bands of intrinsic perithreshold membrane oscillations. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quasioptical Josephson oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengler, M.J.; Pance, A.; Liu, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the authors' work with large 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions for submillimeter power generation. The basic design of the Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator (QJO) is presented. The reasons for each design decision are discussed. Superconducting devices have not yet been fabricated, but scale models and computer simulations have been done. A method for characterizing array rf coupling structures is described, and initial results with this method are presented. Microwave scale models of the radiation structure are built and a series of measurements are made with a network analyzer

  15. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  16. Oscillations in nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Jack K

    2015-01-01

    By focusing on ordinary differential equations that contain a small parameter, this concise graduate-level introduction to the theory of nonlinear oscillations provides a unified approach to obtaining periodic solutions to nonautonomous and autonomous differential equations. It also indicates key relationships with other related procedures and probes the consequences of the methods of averaging and integral manifolds.Part I of the text features introductory material, including discussions of matrices, linear systems of differential equations, and stability of solutions of nonlinear systems. Pa

  17. Neutrino oscillations at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.; Choi, C.; Donohue, J.

    1985-01-01

    Work at Argonne continues on the construction of the neutrino oscillation experiment (E645). Construction of detector supports and active shield components were completed at the Provo plant of the principal contractor for the project (the Pittsburgh-Des Moines Corporation). Erection of the major experimental components was completed at the LAMPF experimental site in mid-March 1985. Work continues on the tunnel which will house the detector. Construction of detector components (scintillators and proportional drift tubes) is proceeding at Ohio State University and Louisiana State University. Consolidation of these components into the 20-ton neutrino detector is beginning at LAMPF

  18. Theory of oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich; Vitt, Aleksandr Adolfovich

    1966-01-01

    Theory of Oscillators presents the applications and exposition of the qualitative theory of differential equations. This book discusses the idea of a discontinuous transition in a dynamic process. Organized into 11 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the simplest type of oscillatory system in which the motion is described by a linear differential equation. This text then examines the character of the motion of the representative point along the hyperbola. Other chapters consider examples of two basic types of non-linear non-conservative systems, namely, dissipative systems and self-

  19. Solar and stellar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossat, E.

    1981-01-01

    We try to explain in simple words what a stellar oscillation is, what kind of restoring forces and excitation mechanisms can be responsible for its occurence, what kind of questions the theoretician asks to the observer and what kind of tools the latter is using to look for the answers. A selected review of the most striking results obtained in the last few years in solar seismology and the present status of their consequences on solar models is presented. A brief discussion on the expected extension towards stellar seismology will end the paper. A selected bibliography on theory as well as observations and recent papers is also included. (orig.)

  20. Coupled nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, J; Scott, A C

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include transitions in weakly coupled nonlinear oscillators, singularly perturbed delay-differential equations, and chaos in simple laser systems. Papers are presented on truncated Navier-Stokes equations in a two-dimensional torus, on frequency locking in Josephson point contacts, and on soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions. Attention is also given to the nonlinear coupling of radiation pulses to absorbing anharmonic molecular media, to aspects of interrupted coarse-graining in stimulated excitation, and to a statistical analysis of long-term dynamic irregularity in an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model.

  1. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  2. Bounded-oscillation Pushdown Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ganty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an underapproximation for context-free languages by filtering out runs of the underlying pushdown automaton depending on how the stack height evolves over time. In particular, we assign to each run a number quantifying the oscillating behavior of the stack along the run. We study languages accepted by pushdown automata restricted to k-oscillating runs. We relate oscillation on pushdown automata with a counterpart restriction on context-free grammars. We also provide a way to filter all but the k-oscillating runs from a given PDA by annotating stack symbols with information about the oscillation. Finally, we study closure properties of the defined class of languages and the complexity of the k-emptiness problem asking, given a pushdown automaton P and k >= 0, whether P has a k-oscillating run. We show that, when k is not part of the input, the k-emptiness problem is NLOGSPACE-complete.

  3. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin-lightening creams Systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and other autoimmune disorders The disorder occurs at ... diagnosis. The following tests can help determine the cause of membranous nephropathy: Antinuclear antibodies test Anti-double- ...

  4. Single ICCII Sinusoidal Oscillators Employing Grounded Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Horng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two inverting second-generation current conveyors (ICCII based sinusoidal oscillators are presented. The first sinusoidal oscillator is composed of one ICCII, two grounded capacitors and two resistors. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency can be orthogonally controllable. The second sinusoidal oscillator is composed of one ICCII, two grounded capacitors and three resistors. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency can be independently controllable through different resistors.

  5. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  6. Isotropic oscillator: spheroidal wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, L.G.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Ter-Antonyan, V.M.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Solutions of the Schroedinger equation are found for an isotropic oscillator (10) in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates. It is shown that the obtained solutions turn into spherical and cylindrical bases of the isotropic oscillator at R→0 and R→ infinity (R is the dimensional parameter entering into the definition of prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates). The explicit form is given for both prolate and oblate basis of the isotropic oscillator for the lowest quantum states

  7. Neutrino oscillations. Theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical schemes on neutrino oscillations are considered. The experimental data on neutrino oscillations obtained in the Super-Kamiokande (Japan) and SNO (Canada) experiments are given. Comparison of these data with the predictions obtained in the theoretical schemes is done. Conclusion is made that the experimental data confirm only the scheme with transitions (oscillations) between aromatic ν e -, ν μ -, ν τ - neutrinos with maximal angle mixings. (author)

  8. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  9. The Wien Bridge Oscillator Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic of the ampli......A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic...

  10. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ...... in the circuit. The performance of the circuit is investigated by means of numerical integration of appropriate differential equations, PSPICE simulations, and hardware experiment.......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  11. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  12. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.

    1961-12-01

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction

  13. Time domain oscillating poles: Stability redefined in Memristor based Wien-oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    poles. The idea is verified using a Memristor based Wien oscillator. Sustained oscillations are observed without having the poles of the system fixed on the imaginary axis and the oscillating behavior of the system poles is reported. The oscillating

  14. Dendritic calcium conductances generate high-frequency oscillation in thalamocortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroarena, Christine; Llinás, Rodolfo

    1997-01-01

    Cortical-projecting thalamic neurons, in guinea pig brain slices, display high-frequency membrane potential oscillations (20–80 Hz), when their somata are depolarized beyond −45 mV. These oscillations, preferentially located at dendritic sites, are supported by the activation of P/Q type calcium channels, as opposed to the expected persistent sodium conductance responsible for such rhythmic behavior in other central neurons. Short hyperpolarizing pulses reset the phase and transiently increas...

  15. Damping of Coherent oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    1996-01-01

    Damping of coherent oscillations by feedback is straightforward in principle. It has been a vital ingredient for the safe operation of accelerators since a long time. The increasing dimensions and beam intensities of the new generation of hadron colliders impose unprecedented demands on the performance of future systems. The arguments leading to the specification of a transverse feedback system for the CERN SPS in its role as LHC injector and the LHC collider itself are developped to illustrate this. The preservation of the transverse emittance is the guiding principle during this exercise keeping in mind the hostile environment which comprises: transverse impedance bent on developping coupled bunch instabilities, injection errors, unwanted transverse excitation, unavoidable tune spreads and noise in the damping loop.

  16. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them...

  17. Photospheric oscillations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossat, E.; Ricort, G.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations in the wings of the Fraunhofer line Na D 1 5896 have been recorded for about two hundred hours at the focus of the Nice coude refractor, using a sodium optical resonance device. Because of the large beam aperture available, records have been made on circular apertures from 22'' up to 32' diameter (the whole sun). The principal results from the analysis of these date are: As shown by White and Cha, the five-minute oscillation has a gaussian random character with a mean lifetime of about 20 min. Its two-dimensional spatial power spectrum is roughly gaussian for every temporal frequency between 2 and 6 MHz. The width of this gaussian spectrum is near 5 x 10 -5 km -1 (i.e. π = 20,000 km). (orig./BJ) [de

  18. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  19. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  20. Hyperchaos in coupled Colpitts oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenys, Antanas; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Baziliauskas, Antanas

    2003-01-01

    The paper suggests a simple solution of building a hyperchaotic oscillator. Two chaotic Colpitts oscillators, either identical or non-identical ones are coupled by means of two linear resistors R-k. The hyperchaotic output signal v(t) is a linear combination, specifically the mean of the individual...

  1. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  2. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are derived, and the relevant properties and features of oscillating solitons are illustrated. Oscillating solitons are controlled by the reciprocal of the group velocity and Kerr nonlinearity. Results of this paper will be valuable to the study of dispersion-managed optical communication system and mode-locked fibre lasers.

  3. Augmenting cognition by neuronal oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horschig, J.M.; Zumer, J.; Bahramisharif, A.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical oscillations have been shown to represent fundamental functions of a working brain, e.g., communication, stimulus binding, error monitoring, and inhibition, and are directly linked to behavior. Recent studies intervening with these oscillations have demonstrated effective modulation of both

  4. Hypercapnic vasodilatation in isolated rat basilar arteries is exerted via low pH and does not involve nitric oxide synthase stimulation or cyclic GMP production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, J P; Wang, Qian; Zhang, W

    1994-01-01

    this relaxation by 54% and 70%, respectively. The effect of L-NOARG was completely reversed by L-arginine. Blockade of nerve excitation with tetrodotoxin (TTX) had no affect on the 15% CO2 elicited vasodilatation. Measurements of cGMP in vessel segments showed no significant increase in cGMP content in response...... to hypercapnia. L-NOARG and MB, but not TTX, significantly reduced the basal cGMP content in cerebral vessels. Adding 1.5% halothane to the incubation medium did not result in a significant increase in cGMP content. Lowering the pH by cumulative application of 0.12 M HCl resulted in relaxation identical...... elicits vasodilatation of isolated rat basilar arteries by a mechanism independent of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. The markedly reduced basal cGMP levels in cerebral vessels by L-NOARG and MB suggest that there exists a basal NO formation in the cerebral vessel wall....

  5. Oscillating universe with quintom matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Huahui; Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Piao Yunsong; Zhang Xinmin

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, we study the possibility of building a model of the oscillating universe with quintom matter in the framework of 4-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. Taking the two-scalar-field quintom model as an example, we find in the model parameter space there are five different types of solutions which correspond to: (I) a cyclic universe with the minimal and maximal values of the scale factor remaining the same in every cycle, (II) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor increasing cycle by cycle, (III) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always increasing, (IV) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor decreasing cycle by cycle, and (V) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always decreasing

  6. Axionic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurilia, A.; Spallucci, E.

    1992-01-01

    A metal ring removed from a soap-water solution encloses a film of soap which can be mathematically described as a minimal surface having the ring as its only boundary. This is known to everybody. In this letter we suggest a relativistic extension of the above fluidodynamic system where the soap film is replaced by a Kalb-Ramand gauge potential B μν (x) and the ring by a closed string. The interaction between the B μν field and the string current excites a new configuration of the system consisting of a relativistic membrane bounded by the string. We call such a classical solution of the equation of motion an axionic membrane. As a dynamical system, the axionic membrane admits a Hamilton-Jacobi formulation which is an extension of the HJ theory of electromagnetic strings. (orig.)

  7. Brain Stem Infarction Due to Basilar Artery Dissection in a Patient with Moyamoya Disease Four Years after Successful Bilateral Revascularization Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takatsugu; Fujimura, Miki; Mugikura, Shunji; Endo, Hidenori; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-06-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease with an unknown etiology and is characterized by intrinsic fragility in the intracranial vascular walls such as the affected internal elastic lamina and thinning medial layer. The association of MMD with intracranial arterial dissection is extremely rare, whereas that with basilar artery dissection (BAD) has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old woman developed brain stem infarction due to BAD 4 years after successful bilateral superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for ischemic-onset MMD. She presented with sudden occipitalgia and subsequently developed transient dysarthria and mild hemiparesis. Although a transient ischemic attack was initially suspected, her condition deteriorated in a manner that was consistent with left hemiplegia with severe dysarthria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed brain stem infarction, and MR angiography delineated a double-lumen sign in the basilar artery, indicating BAD. She was treated conservatively and brain stem infarction did not expand. One year after the onset of brain stem infarction, her activity of daily living is still dependent (modified Rankin Scale of 4), and there were no morphological changes associated with BAD or recurrent cerebrovascular events during the follow-up period. The association of MMD with BAD is extremely rare. While considering the common underlying pathology such as an affected internal elastic lamina and fragile medial layer, the occurrence of BAD in a patient with MMD in a stable hemodynamic state is apparently unique. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  9. Gamma oscillation maintains stimulus structure-dependent synchronization in cat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonds, Jason M; Bonds, A B

    2005-01-01

    Visual cortical cells demonstrate both oscillation and synchronization, although the underlying causes and functional significance of these behaviors remain uncertain. We simultaneously recorded single-unit activity with microelectrode arrays in supragranular layers of area 17 of cats paralyzed and anesthetized with propofol and N(2)O. Rate-normalized autocorrelograms of 24 cells reveal bursting (100%) and gamma oscillation (63%). Renewal density analysis, used to explore the source of oscillation, suggests a contribution from extrinsic influences such as feedback. However, a bursting refractory period, presumably membrane-based, could also encourage oscillatory firing. When we investigated the source of synchronization for 60 cell pairs we found only moderate correlation of synchrony with bursts and oscillation. We did, nonetheless, discover a possible functional role for oscillation. In all cases of cross-correlograms that exhibited oscillation, the strength of the synchrony was maintained throughout the stimulation period. When no oscillation was apparent, 75% of the cell pairs showed decay in their synchronization. The synchrony between cells is strongly dependent on similar response onset latencies. We therefore propose that structured input, which yields tight organization of latency, is a more likely candidate for the source of synchronization than oscillation. The reliable synchrony at response onset could be driven by spatial and temporal correlation of the stimulus that is preserved through the earlier stages of the visual system. Oscillation then contributes to maintenance of the synchrony to enhance reliable transmission of the information for higher cognitive processing.

  10. Metamaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new class of metamaterial device to achieve separation of compounds by using coordinate transformations and metamaterial theory. By rationally designing the spatial anisotropy for mass diffusion, we simultaneously concentrate different compounds in different spatial locations, leading to separation of mixtures across a metamaterial membrane. The separation of mixtures into their constituent compounds is critically important in biophysics, biomedical, and chemical applications. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen diffusing through a polymeric planar matrix is separated. This work opens doors to new paradigms in membrane separations via coordinate transformations and metamaterials by introducing novel properties and unconventional mass diffusion phenomena. (paper)

  11. Quantum noise of a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with a translucent mechanical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Friedrich, Daniel; Westphal, Tobias; Gossler, Stefan; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman; Somiya, Kentaro; Danilishin, Stefan L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the radiation pressure of light can excite stochastic motions of mechanical oscillators thereby realizing a linear quantum opto-mechanical coupling. When performing a precise measurement of the position of an oscillator, this coupling results in quantum radiation pressure noise. Up to now this effect has not been observed yet. Generally speaking, the strength of radiation pressure noise increases when the effective mass of the oscillator is decreased or when the power of the reflected light is increased. Recently, extremely light SiN membranes (≅100 ng) with high mechanical Q values at room temperature (≥10 6 ) have attracted attention as low thermal noise mechanical oscillators. However, the power reflectance of these membranes is much lower than unity (<0.4 at a wavelength of 1064 nm) which makes the use of advanced interferometer recycling techniques to amplify the radiation pressure noise in a standard Michelson interferometer inefficient. Here, we propose and theoretically analyze a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer that includes the membrane as a common end mirror for the Michelson interferometer part. In this topology, both power and signal recycling can be used even if the reflectance of the membrane is much lower than unity. In particular, signal recycling is a useful tool because it does not involve a power increase at the membrane. We derive the formulas for the quantum radiation pressure noise and the shot noise of an oscillator position measurement and compare them with theoretical models of the thermal noise of a SiN membrane with a fundamental resonant frequency of 75 kHz and an effective mass of125 ng. We find that quantum radiation pressure noise should be observable with a power of 1 W at the central beam splitter of the interferometer and a membrane temperature of 1 K.

  12. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco; Hilke, Roland

    2015-01-01

    microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  13. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics. (paper)

  14. Neutrino oscillation: status and outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedelec, P.

    1994-01-01

    Whether the neutrinos are massive or not is one of the most puzzling question of physics today. If they are massive, they can contribute significantly to the Dark Matter of the Universe. An other consequence of a non-zero mass of neutrinos is that they might oscillate from one flavor to another. This oscillation process is by now the only way to detect a neutrino with a mass in the few eV range. Several neutrino experiments are currently looking for such an oscillation, in different modes, using different techniques. An overview of the experimental situation for neutrino experiments at accelerators is given. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Synchronous Oscillations in Microtubule Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M. F.; Melki, R.; Pantaloni, D.; Hill, T. L.; Chen, Y.

    1987-08-01

    Under conditions where microtubule nucleation and growth are fast (i.e., high magnesium ion and tubulin concentrations and absence of glycerol), microtubule assembly in vitro exhibits an oscillatory regime preceding the establishment of steady state. The amplitude of the oscillations can represent >50% of the maximum turbidity change and oscillations persist for up to 20 periods of 80 s each. Oscillations are accompanied by extensive length redistribution of microtubules. Preliminary work suggests that the oscillatory kinetics can be simulated using a model in which many microtubules undergo synchronous transitions between growing and rapidly depolymerizing phases, complicated by the kinetically limiting rate of nucleotide exchange on free tubulin.

  16. Rabi oscillation between states of a coupled harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Jun

    2003-01-01

    Rabi oscillation between bound states of a single potential is well known. However the corresponding formula between the states of two different potentials has not been obtained yet. In this work, we derive Rabi formula between the states of a coupled harmonic oscillator which may be used as a simple model for the electron transfer. The expression is similar to typical Rabi formula for a single potential. This result may be used to describe transitions between coupled diabatic potential curves

  17. Oscillations in Mathematical Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    The papers in this volume are based on talks given at a one day conference held on the campus of Adelphi University in April 1982. The conference was organized with the title "Oscillations in Mathematical Biology;" however the speakers were allowed considerable latitutde in their choice of topics. In the event, the talks all concerned the dynamics of non-linear systems arising in biology so that the conference achieved a good measure of cohesion. Some of the speakers cho~e not to submit a manuscript for these proceedings, feeling that their material was too conjectural to be committed to print. Also the paper of Rinzel and Troy is a distillation of the two separate talks that the authors gave. Otherwise the material reproduces the conference proceedings. The conference was made possible by the generous support of the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Adelphi. The bulk of the organization of the conference was carried out by Dr. Ronald Grisell whose energy was in large measure responsib...

  18. Principal oscillation patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, H. von; Buerger, G.; Storch, J.S. von

    1993-01-01

    The Principal Oscillation Pattern (POP) analysis is a technique which is used to simultaneously infer the characteristic patterns and time scales of a vector time series. The POPs may be seen as the normal modes of a linearized system whose system matrix is estimated from data. The concept of POP analysis is reviewed. Examples are used to illustrate the potential of the POP technique. The best defined POPs of tropospheric day-to-day variability coincide with the most unstable modes derived from linearized theory. POPs can be derived even from a space-time subset of data. POPs are successful in identifying two independent modes with similar time scales in the same data set. The POP method can also produce forecasts which may potentially be used as a reference for other forecast models. The conventional POP analysis technique has been generalized in various ways. In the cyclostationary POP analysis, the estimated system matrix is allowed to vary deterministically with an externally forced cycle. In the complex POP analysis not only the state of the system but also its ''momentum'' is modeled. Associated correlation patterns are a useful tool to describe the appearance of a signal previously identified by a POP analysis in other parameters. (orig.)

  19. The Duffing oscillator with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to the differential equation describing the Duffing oscillator with damping is presented. The damping term of the differential equation and the initial conditions satisfy an algebraic equation, and thus the solution is specific for this type of damping. The nonlinear term...... of the differential equation is allowed to be considerable compared to the linear term. The solution is expressed in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions by including a parameter-dependent elliptic modulus. The analytical solution is compared to the numerical solution, and the agreement is found to be very good....... It is established that the period of oscillation is shorter compared to that of a linearized model but increasing with time and asymptotically approaching the period of oscillation of the linear damped model. An explicit expression for the period of oscillation has been derived, and it is found to be very accurate....

  20. Electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Valeriu

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two types of active configurations for realizing electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators. The type-1 network employs two grounded scaled resistances KR 1 and KR 2 , where K is scaling factor. The frequency of oscillation W 0 is controlled conveniently by adjusting K, since W 0 appears in the form W 0 =1/K √ R 1 C 1 R 2 C 2 . For realizing the scaled resistances, an active configuration is proposed, which realizes KR 1 =R 1 /(1+f(V B )), where f(V B ) denotes a function of a controlling voltage V B . Thus the frequency tuning can be effected by controlling a voltage V B . The type-2 oscillator uses two periodically switched conductances. It is shown that the tuning of oscillation frequency can be done by varying the pulse width-to-period ratio (t/T) of the periodically switched conductances. (author)

  1. Thermoelastic Loss in Microscale Oscillators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Houston, B. H; Photiadis, D. M; Marcus, M. H; Bucaro, J. A; Liu, Xiao; Vignola, J. F

    2001-01-01

    ...) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) oscillators. The theory defines a flexural modal participation factor, the fraction of potential energy stored in flexure, and approximates the internal friction by assuming the energy loss to occur solely via...

  2. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  3. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated

  4. Modelling solar-like oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggenberger, P; Miglio, A [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique de l' Universite de Liege, 17 Allee du 6 Aout, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Carrier, F [Institute of Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Mathis, S [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA/Saclay, AIM-Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA-CNRS-Universite Paris VII, UMR 7158, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: eggenberger@Qastro.ulg.ac.be

    2008-10-15

    The computation of models of stars for which solar-like oscillations have been observed is discussed. After a brief intoduction on the observations of solar-like oscillations, the modelling of isolated stars and of stars belonging to a binary system is presented with specific examples of recent theoretical calibrations. Finally the input physics introduced in stellar evolution codes for the computation of solar-type stars is discussed with a peculiar emphasis on the modelling of rotation for these stars.

  5. GHz Yb:KYW oscillators in time-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changxiu; Krauß, Nico; Schäfer, Gerhard; Ebner, Lukas; Kliebisch, Oliver; Schmidt, Johannes; Winnerl, Stephan; Hettich, Mike; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    A high-speed asynchronous optical sampling system (ASOPS) based on Yb:KYW oscillators with 1-GHz repetition rate is reported. Two frequency-offset-stabilized diode-pumped Yb:KYW oscillators are employed as pump and probe source, respectively. The temporal resolution of this system within 1-ns time window is limited to 500 fs and the noise floor around 10-6 (ΔR/R) close to the shot-noise level is obtained within an acquisition time of a few seconds. Coherent acoustic phonons are investigated by measuring multilayer semiconductor structures with multiple quantum wells and aluminum/silicon membranes in this ASOPS system. A wavepacket-like phonon sequence at 360 GHz range is detected in the semiconductor structures and a decaying sequence of acoustic oscillations up to 200 GHz is obtained in the aluminum/silicon membranes. Coherent acoustic phonons generated from semiconductor structures are further manipulated by a double pump scheme through pump time delay control.

  6. Modeling nonlinearities in MEMS oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Woodhouse, Jim; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2013-08-01

    We present a mathematical model of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) oscillator that integrates the nonlinearities of the MEMS resonator and the oscillator circuitry in a single numerical modeling environment. This is achieved by transforming the conventional nonlinear mechanical model into the electrical domain while simultaneously considering the prominent nonlinearities of the resonator. The proposed nonlinear electrical model is validated by comparing the simulated amplitude-frequency response with measurements on an open-loop electrically addressed flexural silicon MEMS resonator driven to large motional amplitudes. Next, the essential nonlinearities in the oscillator circuit are investigated and a mathematical model of a MEMS oscillator is proposed that integrates the nonlinearities of the resonator. The concept is illustrated for MEMS transimpedance-amplifier- based square-wave and sine-wave oscillators. Closed-form expressions of steady-state output power and output frequency are derived for both oscillator models and compared with experimental and simulation results, with a good match in the predicted trends in all three cases.

  7. Analysis of Neural Oscillations on Drosophila’s Subesophageal Ganglion Based on Approximate Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Mei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The suboesophageal ganglion (SOG, which connects to both central and peripheral nerves, is the primary taste-processing center in the Drosophila’s brain. The neural oscillation in this center may be of great research value yet it is rarely reported. This work aims to determine the amount of unique information contained within oscillations of the SOG and describe the variability of these patterns. The approximate entropy (ApEn values of the spontaneous membrane potential (sMP of SOG neurons were calculated in this paper. The arithmetic mean (MA, standard deviation (SDA and the coefficient of variation (CVA of ApEn were proposed as the three statistical indicators to describe the irregularity and complexity of oscillations. The hierarchical clustering method was used to classify them. As a result, the oscillations in SOG were divided into five categories, including: (1 Continuous spike pattern; (2 Mixed oscillation pattern; (3 Spikelet pattern; (4 Busting pattern and (5 Sparse spike pattern. Steady oscillation state has a low level of irregularity, and vice versa. The dopamine stimulation can distinctly cut down the complexity of the mixed oscillation pattern. The current study provides a quantitative method and some critera on mining the information carried in neural oscillations.

  8. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-06-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  9. Some comparison of two fractional oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yonggang; Zhang Xiu'e

    2010-01-01

    The other form of fractional oscillator equation comparing to the widely discussed one is ushered in. The properties of vibration of two fractional oscillators are discussed under the influence of different initial conditions. The interpretation of the characteristics of the fractional oscillators using different method is illustrated. Based on two fractional oscillator equations, two linked bodies and the continuous system are studied.

  10. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  11. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2009-01-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  12. On the mechanism of oscillations in neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Barington, Torben; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the oscillatory generation of H(2)O(2) and oscillations in shape and size in neutrophils in suspension. The oscillations are independent of cell density and hence do not represent a collective phenomena. Furthermore, the oscillations are independent...... of the external glucose concentration and the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production are 180 degrees out of phase with the oscillations in NAD(P)H. Cytochalasin B blocked the oscillations in shape and size whereas it increased the period of the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. 1- and 2-butanol also blocked...... the oscillations in shape and size, but only 1-butanol inhibited the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. We conjecture that the oscillations are likely to be due to feedback regulations in the signal transduction cascade involving phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). We have tested this using a simple mathematical...

  13. Complicações pós-operatórias em 139 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, foram analisadas as complicações pós-operatórias observadas em 139 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Os autores chamam a atenção para a menor ocorrência de complicações e de mortalidade verificadas nos pacientes que foram submetidos à plástica da dura-mater da fossa posterior.

  14. Autonomous Voltage Oscillations in a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jéssica A.; Peña Arias, Ivonne K.; Hanke-Rauschenbach, Richard; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Varela, Hamilton; Sundmacher, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells fed with H_2/CO mixtures at the anode have a considerably lower performance than fuel cells fed with pure hydrogen. However, when operated in an autonomous oscillatory regime, the overall voltage loss decreases due to a self-cleaning mechanism. Another molecule, also widely used as feed in the fuel cell and susceptible to kinetic instabilities, is methanol. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on autonomous voltage oscillations in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The purpose of this work was to explore if such instabilities also occur in the DMFC system. Initially, half-cell experiments with a gas diffusion electrode were performed. Then, a DMFC was operated under current control and studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The half-cell measurements revealed that the induction period for oscillations depends on the mass transfer conditions, where on stagnant electrode the induction time was shorter than in the case of forced convection. The DMFC showed also autonomous voltage oscillations above a certain threshold current. The results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy give evidence of a negative differential resistance in the fuel cell, hitherto not described in the literature, which can be related to the appearance of oscillations during galvanostatic methanol electro-oxidation. These results open the possibility to evaluate the performance of low-temperature fuel cells fed with carbon-containing fuels under oscillatory operating conditions.

  15. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I; Reaktorski oscilator - I-III, I Deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction.

  16. Flashing oscillation in pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi; Hazuku, Tatsuya

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of high-pressure saturated water discharging into the pool water. The purpose of the experiment is to clarify the phenomena that occur in blow-down of high-pressure saturated water from the pressure vessel into the water-filled containment in the case of a wall-crack accident or a LOCA in an advanced reactor. The results revealed that a flashing oscillation (FO) occurs when high-pressure saturated water discharges into the pool water, under specified experimental settings. The range of the flashing oscillates between a point very close to and some distance from the vent hole. The pressures in the vent tube and pool water vary according to the flashing oscillation. The pressure oscillation and frequency of flashing position might be caused by the balancing action between the supply of saturated water, flashing at the control volume and its condensation on the steam-water interface. A linear analysis was conducted using a spherical flashing bubble model. The period of the flashing oscillation in the experiments can be explained by theoretical analysis

  17. Neutrino oscillations at proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments

  18. Neutrino Oscillations at Proton Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-12-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  19. Restoration of oscillation in network of oscillators in presence of direct and indirect interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majhi, Soumen; Bera, Bidesh K. [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India); Bhowmick, Sourav K. [Department of Electronics, Asutosh College, Kolkata-700026 (India); Ghosh, Dibakar, E-mail: diba.ghosh@gmail.com [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

    2016-10-23

    The suppression of oscillations in coupled systems may lead to several unwanted situations, which requires a suitable treatment to overcome the suppression. In this paper, we show that the environmental coupling in the presence of direct interaction, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified by introducing a feedback factor in the coupling scheme in order to restore the oscillation. We inspect how the introduction of the feedback factor helps to resurrect oscillation from various kinds of death states. We numerically verify the resurrection of oscillations for two paradigmatic limit cycle systems, namely Landau–Stuart and Van der Pol oscillators and also in generic chaotic Lorenz oscillator. We also study the effect of parameter mismatch in the process of restoring oscillation for coupled oscillators. - Highlights: • Amplitude death is observed using direct and indirect coupling. • Revival of oscillation using feedback parameter is discussed. • Restoration of oscillation is observed in limit cycle and chaotic systems.

  20. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-01-01

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper

  1. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  2. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  3. Association between an aplastic basilar artery, unaccompanied by a primitive carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, and multiple aneurysms on the dominant posterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Sanjay; Krishna, Himanshu; Kumar, Marakani V Kiran; Sawlani, Vijay; Phadke, Rajendra V; Jain, Vijendra K

    2004-05-01

    Basilar artery (BA) aplasia when unaccompanied by a primitive carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis is exceedingly rare. The association of BA aplasia with two aneurysms on the dominant posterior communicating artery (PCoA) has not been previously reported. This 40-year-old man presented in a state of drowsiness and responded to simple commands only after being coaxed. He had complete left cranial third nerve palsy, right hemiparesis, and persisting signs of meningeal irritation. A computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. An angiogram revealed BA aplasia. The right PCoA followed a sinuous course with multiple loops and provided the dominant supply to the posterior circulation. This vessel harbored two aneurysms, one at the origin of the PCoA from the internal carotid artery and the other at the looping segment just proximal to the brainstem. The left PCoA was extremely thin. The pterional transsylvian approach was used to clip the two aneurysms on the PCoA. The hemodynamic changes produced by the BA aplasia may have produced alterations in the cerebral vasculature leading to aneurysm formation and consequent subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  4. Incremental Value of Plaque Enhancement in Patients with Moderate or Severe Basilar Artery Stenosis: 3.0 T High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanqian; Yang, Qi; Li, Debiao; Fan, Zhaoyang; Bi, Xiaoming; Du, Xiangying; Wu, Fang; Wu, Ye; Li, Kuncheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the clinical relevance of plaque's morphological characteristics and distribution pattern using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) in patients with moderate or severe basilar artery (BA) atherosclerosis stenosis. Fifty-seven patients (33 symptomatic patients and 24 asymptomatic patients) were recruited for 3.0 T HRMRI scan; all of them had >50% stenosis on the BA. The intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), contrast-enhancement pattern, and distribution of BA plaques were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Factors potentially associated with posterior ischemic stroke were calculated by multivariate analyses. Enhancement of BA plaque was more frequently observed in symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients (27/33, 81.8% versus 11/24, 45.8%; p 50%. Plaques were mainly distributed at the ventral site (39.3%) or involved more than two arcs (21.2%) in the symptomatic group but were mainly distributed at left (33.3%) and right (25.0%) sites in the asymptomatic group.

  5. Spontaneous oscillations in microfluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Daniel; Angilella, Jean-Regis; Motter, Adilson

    2017-11-01

    Precisely controlling flows within microfluidic systems is often difficult which typically results in systems being heavily reliant on numerous external pumps and computers. Here, I present a simple microfluidic network that exhibits flow rate switching, bistablity, and spontaneous oscillations controlled by a single pressure. That is, by solely changing the driving pressure, it is possible to switch between an oscillating and steady flow state. Such functionality does not rely on external hardware and may even serve as an on-chip memory or timing mechanism. I use an analytic model and rigorous fluid dynamics simulations to show these results.

  6. Oscillating liquid flow ICF Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Oscillating liquid flow in a falling molten salt inertial confinement fusion reactor is predicted to rapidly clear driver beam paths of residual liquid droplets. Oscillating flow will also provide adequate neutron and x-ray protection for the reactor structure with a short (2-m) fall distance permitting an 8 Hz repetition rate. A reactor chamber configuration is presented with specific features to clear the entire heavy-ion beam path of splashed molten salt. The structural components, including the structure between beam ports, are shielded. 3 refs., 12 figs

  7. Neutrino oscillation measurements with reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, R.D. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided important information on the neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  8. Egg CD9 protein tides correlated with sperm oscillations tune the gamete fusion ability in mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaux, Benjamin; Favier, Sophie; Perez, Eric; Gourier, Christine

    2018-01-23

    Mammalian fertilization involves membrane events -adhesion, fusion, sperm engulfment, membrane block to polyspermy- whose causes remain largely unknown. Recently, specific oscillations of the sperm in contact with the egg were shown to be necessary for fusion. Using a microfluidic chip to impose the venue for the encounter of two gametes allowed real-time observation of the membrane remodelling occurring at the sperm/egg interface. The spatiotemporal mapping of egg CD9 revealed that this protein concentrates at the egg/sperm interface as a result of sperm oscillations, until a CD9-rich platform is nucleated on which fusion immediately takes place. Within 2 to 5 minutes after fusion, most of the CD9 leaves the egg for the external aqueous medium. Then an egg membrane wave engulfs the sperm head in approximately 25 minutes. These results show that sperm oscillations initiate the CD9 recruitment that causes gamete fusion after which CD9 and associated proteins leave the membrane in a process likely to contribute to block polyspermy. They highlight that the gamete fusion story in mammals is an unexpected interplay between mechanical constraints and proteins. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  9. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    discovered that the subcellular distribution of a tagged version of ALG-2 could be directed by physiological external stimuli (including ATP, EGF, prostaglandin, histamine), which provoke intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Cellular stimulation led to a redistribution of ALG-2 from the cytosol to a punctate...

  10. Dynamic analysis of the conditional oscillator underlying slow waves in thalamocortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eDavid

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca2+ channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (<1 Hz waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs, and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e. ITwindow is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states (grouped-delta slow waves requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations.

  11. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between digital and analogue is often constructed as one of opposition. The perception that the world is permeated with underlying patterns of data, describing events and matter alike, suggests that information can be understood apart from the substance to which it is associated......, and that its encoded logic can be constructed and reconfigured as an isolated entity. This disembodiment of information from materiality implies that an event like a thunderstorm, or a material like a body, can be described equally by data, in other words it can be read or written. The following prototypes......, Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  12. TOWARDS THRESHOLD FREQUENCY IN CHAOTIC COLPITTS OSCILLATOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Mykolaitis, Gytis

    2007-01-01

    A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations at the funda......A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations...

  13. Capacitive Micro Pressure Sensor Integrated with a Ring Oscillator Circuit on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yang Liu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates a capacitive micro pressure sensor integrated with a ring oscillator circuit on a chip. The integrated capacitive pressure sensor is fabricated using the commercial CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor process and a post-process. The ring oscillator is employed to convert the capacitance of the pressure sensor into the frequency output. The pressure sensor consists of 16 sensing cells in parallel. Each sensing cell contains a top electrode and a lower electrode, and the top electrode is a sandwich membrane. The pressure sensor needs a post-CMOS process to release the membranes after completion of the CMOS process. The post-process uses etchants to etch the sacrificial layers, and to release the membranes. The advantages of the post-process include easy execution and low cost. Experimental results reveal that the pressure sensor has a high sensitivity of 7 Hz/Pa in the pressure range of 0–300 kPa.

  14. Neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, L

    2000-01-01

    These lectures review direct measurements of neutrino masses and the status of neutrino oscillation searches using both natural neutrino sources (the Sun and cosmic rays interacting in the Earth atmosphere) and artificial neutrinos (produced by nuclear reactors and accelerators). Finally, future experiments and plans are presented. (68 refs).

  15. Harmonic oscillator in Snyder space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The harmonic oscillator in Snyder space is investigated in its classical and quantum versions. The classical trajectory is obtained and the semiclassical quantization from the phase space trajectories is discussed. An effective cut-off to high frequencies is found. The quantum version is developed and an equivalent usual ...

  16. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  17. Ellipsoidal basis for isotropic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallies, W.; Lukac, I.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    The solutions of the Schroedinger equation are derived for the isotropic oscillator potential in the ellipsoidal coordinate system. The explicit expression is obtained for the ellipsoidal integrals of motion through the components of the orbital moment and Demkov's tensor. The explicit form of the ellipsoidal basis is given for the lowest quantum numbers. 10 refs.; 1 tab. (author)

  18. The relativistic harmonic oscillator reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofsaess, T.

    1978-01-01

    The bound states of scalar quarks interacting through a scalar harmonic oscillator are investigated. In the presence of this interaction the dressed quark propagator differs substantially from the free one. This leads to a Bethe Salpeter equation which does not allow for any stable bound states of positive mass. (orig.) [de

  19. Inverse problem of solar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekii, T.; Shibahashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present some preliminary results of numerical simulation to infer the sound velocity distribution in the solar interior from the oscillation data of the Sun as the inverse problem. They analyze the acoustic potential itself by taking account of some factors other than the sound velocity, and infer the sound velocity distribution in the deep interior of the Sun

  20. Sum rules for neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzarev, I.Yu.; Martemyanov, B.V.; Okun, L.B.; Schepkin, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sum rules for neutrino oscillations are obtained. The derivation of the general form of the s matrix for two stage process lsub(i)sup(-)→ν→lsub(k)sup(+-) (where lsub(i)sup(-)e, μ, tau, ... are initial leptons with flavor i and lsub(k)sup(+-) is final lepton) is presented. The consideration of two stage process lsub(i)sup(-)→ν→lsub(k)sup(+-) gives the possibility to take into account neutrino masses and to obtain the expressions for the oscillating cross sections. In the case of Dirac and left-handed Majorana neutrino is obtained the sum rule for the quantities 1/Vsub(K)σ(lsub(i)sup(-)→lsub(K)sup(+-)), (where Vsub(K) is a velocity of lsub(K)). In the left-handed Majorana neutrino case there is an additional antineutrino admixture leading to lsub(i)sup(-)→lsub(K)sup(+) process. Both components (neutrino and antineutrino) oscillate independently. The sums Σsub(K)1/Vsub(k)σ(lsub(i)sup(-) - lsub(K)sup(+-) then oscillate due to the presence of left-handed antineutrinos and right-handed neutrinos which do not take part in weak interactions. If right-handed currents are added sum rules analogous to considered above may be obtained. All conclusions are valid in the general case when CP is not conserved [ru

  1. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of solitons in those physical systems reveals some exciting .... With the following power series expansions for g(z,t) and f(z,t): g(z,t) = εg1(z,t) + ... If nonlinearity γ (z) is also taken as a function in figure 1b, the periodic and oscillation.

  2. Low-Vibration Oscillating Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Oscillating compressor momentum compensated: produces little vibration in its supporting structure. Compressure requires no lubrication and virtually free of wear. Compresses working fluids such as helium, nitrogen or chlorfluorocarbons for Stirling-cycle refrigeration or other purposes. Compressor includes two mutually opposed ferromagnetic pistons of same shape and mass. Electromagnetic flux links both pistons, causing magnetic attraction between them.

  3. Matter effects in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    After a review of the relevant aspects of neutrino oscillations for propagation in vacuum and in material media, this paper discuss the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism and its application to a solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. The elementary level of the talk is suitable to people not working in neutrino physics

  4. Mesino oscillation in MFV SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Joshua [Cornell University, Department of Physics, LEPP, Ithaca, NY (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Csaki, Csaba; Grossman, Yuval; Heidenreich, Ben [Cornell University, Department of Physics, LEPP, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-04-15

    R-parity violating supersymmetry in a Minimal Flavor Violation paradigm can produce same-sign dilepton signals via direct sbottom-LSP pair production. Such signals arise when the sbottom hadronizes and the resulting mesino oscillates into an antimesino. The first bounds on the sbottom mass are placed in this scenario using current LHC results. (orig.)

  5. Chimera States in Neural Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sonya; Glaze, Tera

    2014-03-01

    Chimera states have recently been explored both theoretically and experimentally, in various coupled nonlinear oscillators, ranging from phase-oscillator models to coupled chemical reactions. In a chimera state, both coherent and incoherent (or synchronized and desynchronized) states occur simultaneously in populations of identical oscillators. We investigate chimera behavior in a population of neural oscillators using the Huber-Braun model, a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model originally developed to characterize the temperature-dependent bursting behavior of mammalian cold receptors. One population of neurons is allowed to synchronize, with each neuron receiving input from all the others in its group (global within-group coupling). Subsequently, a second population of identical neurons is placed under an identical global within-group coupling, and the two populations are also coupled to each other (between-group coupling). For certain values of the coupling constants, the neurons in the two populations exhibit radically different synchronization behavior. We will discuss the range of chimera activity in the model, and discuss its implications for actual neural activity, such as unihemispheric sleep.

  6. Generalized oscillator systems and their parabosonic interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, A J [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics

    1994-12-31

    The Fock space description of various bosonic oscillator systems are carried out. All descriptions are based on a single creation - annihilation pair. Special attention is paid to the q-deformed Calogero-Vasiliev oscillator. 23 refs.

  7. Analytic Neutrino Oscillation Probabilities in Matter: Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen J. [Fermilab; Denton, Peter B. [Copenhagen U.; Minakata, Hisakazu [Madrid, IFT

    2018-01-02

    We summarize our recent paper on neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter, explaining the importance, relevance and need for simple, highly accurate approximations to the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter.

  8. Characterizing brain oscillations in cognition and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, H.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuronal oscillations play a fundamental role for shaping the functional architecture of the working brain. This thesis investigates brain oscillations in rat, human healthy population and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. A novel measurement termed

  9. Two particle states, lepton mixing and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M; Schönert, S

    2000-01-01

    Discussions of lepton mixing and oscillations consider generally only flavor oscillations of neutrinos and neglect the accompanying charged leptons. In cases of experimental interest like pion or nuclear beta decay an oscillation pattern is expected indeed only for neutrinos if only one of the two produced particles is observed. We argue that flavor oscillations of neutrinos without detecting the accompanying lepton is a peculiarity of the two-particle states $|l\

  10. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact...... oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics....

  11. Pile oscillator ROB-1, cooperation NPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, M; Markovic, V; Obradovic, D; Kocic, A; Velickovic, LJ; Jovanovic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    The present paper explains the purpose of the work on reactor kinetics and separately deals with the region for which the ROB-1 reactor oscillator is constructed. The theoretical part concerns the basic principles on which the oscillator operates. the paper also discusses the details of the oscillator, the procedure for preparation and measurement, and analyzes the source of errors. In addition several examples of the use of oscillator are given. (author)

  12. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing

    2010-06-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  13. Comparison of Methods for Oscillation Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares a selection of methods for detecting oscillations in control loops. The methods are tested on measurement data from a coal-fired power plant, where some oscillations are occurring. Emphasis is put on being able to detect oscillations without having a system model and without...... using process knowledge. The tested methods show potential for detecting the oscillations, however, transient components in the signals cause false detections as well, motivating usage of models in order to remove the expected signals behavior....

  14. Pile oscillator ROB-1, cooperation NPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, M.; Markovic, V.; Obradovic, D.; Kocic, A.; Velickovic, LJ.; Jovanovic, S.

    1965-11-01

    The present paper explains the purpose of the work on reactor kinetics and separately deals with the region for which the ROB-1 reactor oscillator is constructed. The theoretical part concerns the basic principles on which the oscillator operates. the paper also discusses the details of the oscillator, the procedure for preparation and measurement, and analyzes the source of errors. In addition several examples of the use of oscillator are given. (author)

  15. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing; Arcak, Murat; Salama, Khaled N.

    2010-01-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  16. Myosin IIA interacts with the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton to control red blood cell membrane curvature and deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alyson S; Nowak, Roberta B; Zhou, Sitong; Giannetto, Michael; Gokhin, David S; Papoin, Julien; Ghiran, Ionita C; Blanc, Lionel; Wan, Jiandi; Fowler, Velia M

    2018-05-08

    The biconcave disk shape and deformability of mammalian RBCs rely on the membrane skeleton, a viscoelastic network of short, membrane-associated actin filaments (F-actin) cross-linked by long, flexible spectrin tetramers. Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) motors exert force on diverse F-actin networks to control cell shapes, but a function for NMII contractility in the 2D spectrin-F-actin network of RBCs has not been tested. Here, we show that RBCs contain membrane skeleton-associated NMIIA puncta, identified as bipolar filaments by superresolution fluorescence microscopy. MgATP disrupts NMIIA association with the membrane skeleton, consistent with NMIIA motor domains binding to membrane skeleton F-actin and contributing to membrane mechanical properties. In addition, the phosphorylation of the RBC NMIIA heavy and light chains in vivo indicates active regulation of NMIIA motor activity and filament assembly, while reduced heavy chain phosphorylation of membrane skeleton-associated NMIIA indicates assembly of stable filaments at the membrane. Treatment of RBCs with blebbistatin, an inhibitor of NMII motor activity, decreases the number of NMIIA filaments associated with the membrane and enhances local, nanoscale membrane oscillations, suggesting decreased membrane tension. Blebbistatin-treated RBCs also exhibit elongated shapes, loss of membrane curvature, and enhanced deformability, indicating a role for NMIIA contractility in promoting membrane stiffness and maintaining RBC biconcave disk cell shape. As structures similar to the RBC membrane skeleton exist in many metazoan cell types, these data demonstrate a general function for NMII in controlling specialized membrane morphology and mechanical properties through contractile interactions with short F-actin in spectrin-F-actin networks.

  17. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  18. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwetz, T.

    2005-01-01

    In this talk the present status of neutrino oscillations is reviewed, based on a global analysis of world neutrino oscillation data from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments. Furthermore, I discuss the expected improvements in the determination of neutrino parameters by future oscillation experiments within a timescale of 10 years. (author)

  19. Neutrino oscillations in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K.

    1990-01-01

    The oscillations of electron neutrinos into inert neutrinos may have resonant behaviour in the heat bath of the early Universe. It is shown that any initial neutrino asymmetry will be washed away by the oscillations. Neutrino oscillations would affect also primordial helium production, which implies stringent limits on the neutrino mixing parameters. (orig.)

  20. The supersymmetric Pegg-Barnett oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2005-01-01

    The su(n) Lie algebraic structure of the Pegg-Barnett oscillator that possesses a finite-dimensional number-state space is demonstrated. The supersymmetric generalization of the Pegg-Barnett oscillator is suggested. it is shown that such a supersymmetric Pegg-Barnett oscillator may have some potential applications, e.g., the mass spectrum of the charged leptons

  1. Three flavour oscillation interpretation of neutrino data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To explain the atmospheric neutrino problem in terms of neutrino oscillations, ЖС¾ of about 10-¿. eV. ¾. [8] is needed whereas the neutrino oscil- lation solution to the solar neutrino problem requires ЖС¾ ~10- eV. ¾ . Hence both solar and atmospheric neutrino problems cannot be explained in terms of e ° μ oscillations.

  2. Slow oscillations orchestrating fast oscillations and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Slow-wave sleep (SWS) facilitates the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. Based on the standard two-stage memory model, we propose that memory consolidation during SWS represents a process of system consolidation which is orchestrated by the neocortical memory. The slow oscillations temporally group neuronal activity into up-states of strongly enhanced neuronal activity and down-states of neuronal silence. In a feed-forward efferent action, this grouping is induced not only in the neocortex but also in other structures relevant to consolidation, namely the thalamus generating 10-15Hz spindles, and the hippocampus generating sharp wave-ripples, with the latter well known to accompany a replay of newly encoded memories taking place in hippocampal circuitries. The feed-forward synchronizing effect of the slow oscillation enables the formation of spindle-ripple events where ripples and accompanying reactivated hippocampal memory information become nested into the single troughs of spindles. Spindle-ripple events thus enable reactivated memory-related hippocampal information to be fed back to neocortical networks in the excitable slow oscillation up-state where they can induce enduring plastic synaptic changes underlying the effective formation of long-term memories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhouse, Christopher James [Oriel College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0

  4. Time domain oscillating poles: Stability redefined in Memristor based Wien-oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-07-28

    Traditionally, the necessary and sufficient condition for any system to be oscillating is that its poles are located on the imaginary (jω) axis. In this paper, for the first time, we have shown that systems can oscillate with time-domain oscillating poles. The idea is verified using a Memristor based Wien oscillator. Sustained oscillations are observed without having the poles of the system fixed on the imaginary axis and the oscillating behavior of the system poles is reported. The oscillating resistance and triangular shape of FFT are also demonstrated with mathematical reasoning and simulation results to support the unusual and surprising characteristics. © 2009 IEEE.

  5. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.; Choi, Seung Hak

    2012-01-01

    . The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane

  6. Y-configuration double-stent-assisted coiling using two closed-cell stents for wide-neck basilar tip aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Byung Moon; Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong I K; Park, Keun Young

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate clinical and angiographic outcomes of Y-configuration double-stent-assisted (Y-stent) coiling using two closed-cell stents for wide-necked basilar tip aneurysm (BTA). A total of 25 patients underwent Y-stent coiling using two closed-cell stents as a first-time treatment in 18 (3 ruptured) BTAs, retreatment in 2 BTAs and as a third treatment in 5 wide-necked BTAs. Clinical and angiographic outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment-related complications were three (12.0 %) thromboembolic infarctions due to two acute in-stent thromboses and one embolism. Twenty-two (88 %) patients had favorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale score [mRS], 0-2) during the follow-up period (mean, 30 months; range, 6-54 months). Two patients died: one from initial subarachnoid hemorrhage and the other from intracerebral hemorrhage due to underlying Moyamoya disease. Post-treatment angiograms showed complete occlusion in nine aneurysms, residual neck in 11 aneurysms and residual sac in five aneurysms. Follow-up angiograms were available at least once between 5 to 34 months (mean, 16 months) in 21 patients. Nineteen patients showed improved or stable states (complete occlusion, n = 17; residual neck, n = 2). Major recurrences occurred in two BTAs (9.5 %). Those two major recurrent aneurysms had been large-sized aneurysms at the initial coiling procedure. Both showed not only coil compaction but also progressive growth to giant-sized aneurysms and intra-aneurysmal thrombus formation at the Y-stent coiling as a third-time treatment. Y-stent coiling using two closed-cell stents is a safe and durable treatment option for wide-necked BTA, but may have limited efficacy for large/giant sized and thrombosed aneurysms.

  7. Accelerator studies of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Ereditato, A

    2000-01-01

    The question of whether the neutrino has a non-vanishing mass plays acrucial role in particle physics. A massive neutrino would unambiguously reveal the existence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, it could have profound implications on astrophysics and cosmology, with effects on the evolution of the Universe. Experiments aiming at direct neutrino-mass measurements based on kinematics have not been able, so far, to measure the very small neutrino mass. Indirect measurements can be performed by exploiting reactions which may only occur for massive neutrinos. Neutrino oscillation is one of those processes. The mass difference between neutrino mass-eigenstates can be inferred from a phase measurement. This feature allows for high sensitivity experiments. Neutrinos from different sources can be used to search for oscillations: solar neutrinos, neutrinos produced in the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and artificially produced neutrinos from nuclear reactors and particle accelera...

  8. Oscillators that sync and swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Hong, Hyunsuk; Strogatz, Steven H

    2017-11-15

    Synchronization occurs in many natural and technological systems, from cardiac pacemaker cells to coupled lasers. In the synchronized state, the individual cells or lasers coordinate the timing of their oscillations, but they do not move through space. A complementary form of self-organization occurs among swarming insects, flocking birds, or schooling fish; now the individuals move through space, but without conspicuously altering their internal states. Here we explore systems in which both synchronization and swarming occur together. Specifically, we consider oscillators whose phase dynamics and spatial dynamics are coupled. We call them swarmalators, to highlight their dual character. A case study of a generalized Kuramoto model predicts five collective states as possible long-term modes of organization. These states may be observable in groups of sperm, Japanese tree frogs, colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, and other biological and physical systems in which self-assembly and synchronization interact.

  9. Experimental studies of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur McDonald "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Takaaki Kajita of Tokyo University is a Japanese physicist, known for neutrino experiments at the Kamiokande and its successor, Super-Kamiokande. This volume of collected works of Kajita on neutrino oscillations provides a good glimpse into as well as a record of the rise and the role of Asian research in the frontiers of neutrino physics. Japan is now a major force in the study of the 3 families of neutrinos. Much remains to be done to clarify the Dirac vs. Majorana nature of the neutrino, and the cosmological implications of the neutrino. The collected works of Kajita and his Super-Kamiokande group will leave an indelible foot-print in the history of big and better science.

  10. Torsional oscillations of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snodgrass, H.B.; Howard, R.; National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ)

    1985-01-01

    The sun's differential rotation has a cyclic pattern of change that is tightly correlated with the sunspot, or magnetic activity, cycle. This pattern can be described as a torsional oscillation, in which the solar rotation is periodically sped up or slowed down in certain zones of latitude while elsewhere the rotation remains essentially steady. The zones of anomalous rotation move on the sun in wavelike fashion, keeping pace with and flanking the zones of magnetic activity. It is uncertain whether this torsional oscillation is a globally coherent ringing of the sun or whether it is a local pattern caused by and causing local changes in the magnetic fields. In either case, it may be an important link in the connection between the rotation and the cycle that is widely believed to exist but is not yet understood. 46 references

  11. Cubication of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear and cubic terms depend on the initial amplitude, A, while in a Taylor expansion of the restoring force these coefficients are independent of A. The replacement of the original nonlinear equation by an approximate Duffing equation allows us to obtain an approximate frequency-amplitude relation as a function of the complete elliptic integral of the first kind. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of this scheme.

  12. Coding of Information in Limit Cycle Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Stemmler, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Starting from a general description of noisy limit cycle oscillators, we derive from the Fokker-Planck equations the linear response of the instantaneous oscillator frequency to a time-varying external force. We consider the time series of zero crossings of the oscillator’s phase and compute the mutual information between it and the driving force. A direct link is established between the phase response curve summarizing the oscillator dynamics and the ability of a limit cycle oscillator, such as a heart cell or neuron, to encode information in the timing of peaks in the oscillation.

  13. Quantum oscillations of conductivity in bismuth wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the resistance of bismuth nanowires with several diameters and different quality reveal oscillations on the dependence of resistance under uniaxial strain at T = 4.2 K. Amplitude of oscillations is significant (38 %) at helium temperature and becomes smearing at T = 77 K. Observed oscillations originate from quantum size effect. A simple evaluation of period of oscillations allows us to identify the groups of carriers involved in transport. Calculated periods of 42.2 and 25.9 nm satisfy approximately the ratio 2:1 for two experimentally observed sets of oscillations from light and heavy electrons.

  14. Memristor-based reactance-less oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-10-02

    The first reactance-less oscillator is introduced. By using a memristor, the oscillator can be fully implemented on-chip without the need for any capacitors or inductors, which results in an area-efficient fully integrated solution. The concept of operation of the proposed oscillator is explained and detailed mathematical analysis is introduced. Closed-form expressions for the oscillation frequency and oscillation conditions are derived. Finally, the derived equations are verified with circuit simulations showing excellent agreement. © 2011 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  15. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li-Qiu; Han Liang; Yu Da-Ren; Guo Ning

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. (review)

  16. Memristor-based reactance-less oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.; Omran, Hesham; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    The first reactance-less oscillator is introduced. By using a memristor, the oscillator can be fully implemented on-chip without the need for any capacitors or inductors, which results in an area-efficient fully integrated solution. The concept of operation of the proposed oscillator is explained and detailed mathematical analysis is introduced. Closed-form expressions for the oscillation frequency and oscillation conditions are derived. Finally, the derived equations are verified with circuit simulations showing excellent agreement. © 2011 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  17. Harmonic oscillator on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, J.P.; Bonnier, B.; Hontebeyrie, M.; Meyers, C.

    1983-01-01

    The continuum limit of the ground state energy for the harmonic oscillator with discrete time is derived for all possible choices of the lattice derivative. The occurrence of unphysical values is shown to arise whenever the lattice laplacian is not strictly positive on its Brillouin zone. These undesirable limits can either be finite and arbitrary (multiple spectrum) or infinite (overlapping sublattices with multiple spectrum). (orig.)

  18. Multipartite entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Particle mixing is related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states The occupation number of both flavor eigenstates and mass eigenstates can be used to define a multiqubit space. In such a framework, flavor neutrino states can be interpreted as multipartite mode-entangled states. By using two different entanglement measures, we analyze the behavior of multipartite entanglement in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  19. Multipartite entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell' Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio, E-mail: blasone@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    Particle mixing is related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states The occupation number of both flavor eigenstates and mass eigenstates can be used to define a multiqubit space. In such a framework, flavor neutrino states can be interpreted as multipartite mode-entangled states. By using two different entanglement measures, we analyze the behavior of multipartite entanglement in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  20. Invariants of collective neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Y.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We consider the flavor evolution of a dense neutrino gas by taking into account both vacuum oscillations and self-interactions of neutrinos. We examine the system from a many-body perspective as well as from the point of view of an effective one-body description formulated in terms of the neutrino polarization vectors. We show that, in the single angle approximation, both the many-body picture and the effective one-particle picture possess several constants of motion. We write down these constants of motion explicitly in terms of the neutrino isospin operators for the many-body case and in terms of the polarization vectors for the effective one-body case. The existence of these constants of motion is a direct consequence of the fact that the collective neutrino oscillation Hamiltonian belongs to the class of Gaudin Hamiltonians. This class of Hamiltonians also includes the (reduced) BCS pairing Hamiltonian describing superconductivity. We point out the similarity between the collective neutrino oscillation Hamiltonian and the BCS pairing Hamiltonian. The constants of motion manifest the exact solvability of the system. Borrowing the well established techniques of calculating the exact BCS spectrum, we present exact eigenstates and eigenvalues of both the many-body and the effective one-particle Hamiltonians describing the collective neutrino oscillations. For the effective one-body case, we show that spectral splits of neutrinos can be understood in terms of the adiabatic evolution of some quasiparticle degrees of freedom from a high-density region where they coincide with flavor eigenstates to the vacuum where they coincide with mass eigenstates. We write down the most general consistency equations which should be satisfied by the effective one-body eigenstates and show that they reduce to the spectral split consistency equations for the appropriate initial conditions.

  1. Oscillations and Waves in Sunspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Khomenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A magnetic field modifies the properties of waves in a complex way. Significant advances have been made recently in our understanding of the physics of sunspot waves with the help of high-resolution observations, analytical theories, as well as numerical simulations. We review the current ideas in the field, providing the most coherent picture of sunspot oscillations as by present understanding.

  2. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  3. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Khashab, Niveen M.; Zaher, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  4. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  5. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  6. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Experiment at JHF

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    T2K is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to investigate how neutrinos change from one flavor to another as they travel (neutrino oscillations). An intense beam of muon neutrinos is generated at the J-PARC nuclear physics site on the East coast of Japan and directed across the country to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in the mountains of western Japan. The beam is measured once before it leaves the J-PARC site, using the near detector ND280, and again at Super-K, 295 km away: the change in the measured intensity and composition of the beam is used to provide information on the properties of neutrinos. The high intensity neutrino beam is produced in an off-axis configuration. The peak neutrino energy is tuned to the oscillation maximum of ∼ 0.6 GeV to maximize the sensitivity to neutrino oscillations. The science goals of T2K can be summarized as follows: •\tsearch for CP violation in the neutrino sector •\tdiscovery of νμ → νe ( i.e. the confirmation that θ13 > 0 ) •\tprecision ...

  8. Superconducting low-noise oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riebman, L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a cryogenic oscillator having low phase noise and low noise. It comprises resonant circuit means formed of superconducting material for generating a signal at a desired frequency; linear amplifier means electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at first and second locations thereon; limiter means electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at a third location thereon; and buffer amplifier means for applying the signal generated by the resonant circuit means to a load and electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at a fourth location thereon. This patent also describes a method of minimizing phase noise and 1/f noise in an oscillator circuit of the type having a resonant circuit driving a load and at least a linear amplifier connected to the resonant circuit defining a closed loop having a loop gain greater than unity, and having a limiter for stabilizing the oscillator. It comprises connecting between the resonant circuit and the load a buffer amplifier and connecting the linear amplifier and the buffer amplifier to the resonant circuit

  9. Boltzmann map for quantum oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streater, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors define a map tau on the space of quasifree states of the CCR or CAR of more than one harmonic oscillator which increases entropy except at fixed points of tau. The map tau is the composition of a double stochastic map T*, and the quasifree reduction Q. Under mixing conditions on T, iterates of tau take any initial state to the Gibbs states, provided that the oscillator frequencies are mutually rational. They give an example of a system with three degrees of freedom with energies omega 1 , omega 2 , and omega 3 mutually irrational, but obeying a relation n 1 omega 1 + n 2 omega 2 = n 3 omega 3 , n/sub i/epsilon Z. The iterated Boltzmann map converges from an initial state rho to independent Gibbs states of the three oscillators at betas (inverse temperatures) β 1 , β 2 , β 3 obeying the equation n 1 omega 1 β 1 + n 2 omega 3 β 1 number. The equilibrium state can be rewritten as a grand canonical state. They show that for two, three, or four fermions we can get the usual rate equations as a special case

  10. Neutrino Oscillations:. a Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Palazzo, A.; Rotunno, A. M.; Montanino, D.

    We review the status of the neutrino oscillations physics, with a particular emphasis on the present knowledge of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters. We consider first the νμ → ντ flavor transitions of atmospheric neutrinos. It is found that standard oscillations provide the best description of the SK+K2K data, and that the associated mass-mixing parameters are determined at ±1σ (and NDF = 1) as: Δm2 = (2.6 ± 0.4) × 10-3 eV2 and sin 2 2θ = 1.00{ - 0.05}{ + 0.00} . Such indications, presently dominated by SK, could be strengthened by further K2K data. Then we point out that the recent data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, together with other relevant measurements from solar and reactor neutrino experiments, in particular the KamLAND data, convincingly show that the flavor transitions of solar neutrinos are affected by Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effects. Finally, we perform an updated analysis of two-family active oscillations of solar and reactor neutrinos in the standard MSW case.

  11. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  12. Nonlinearity induced synchronization enhancement in mechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Lopez, Omar; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Antonio, Dario; Arroyo, Sebastian I.; Zanette, Damian H.

    2018-05-08

    An autonomous oscillator synchronizes to an external harmonic force only when the forcing frequency lies within a certain interval, known as the synchronization range, around the oscillator's natural frequency. Under ordinary conditions, the width of the synchronization range decreases when the oscillation amplitude grows, which constrains synchronized motion of micro- and nano-mechanical resonators to narrow frequency and amplitude bounds. The present invention shows that nonlinearity in the oscillator can be exploited to manifest a regime where the synchronization range increases with an increasing oscillation amplitude. The present invention shows that nonlinearities in specific configurations of oscillator systems, as described herein, are the key determinants of the effect. The present invention presents a new configuration and operation regime that enhances the synchronization of micro- and nano-mechanical oscillators by capitalizing on their intrinsic nonlinear dynamics.

  13. Nonlocal synchronization in nearest neighbour coupled oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, H.F.; Elgazzar, A.S.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    2002-02-01

    We investigate a system of nearest neighbour coupled oscillators. We show that the nonlocal frequency synchronization, that might appear in such a system, occurs as a consequence of the nearest neighbour coupling. The power spectra of nonadjacent oscillators shows that there is no complete coincidence between all frequency peaks of the oscillators in the nonlocal cluster, while the peaks for neighbouring oscillators approximately coincide even if they are not yet in a cluster. It is shown that nonadjacent oscillators closer in frequencies, share slow modes with their adjacent oscillators which are neighbours in space. It is also shown that when a direct coupling between non-neighbours oscillators is introduced explicitly, the peaks of the spectra of the frequencies of those non-neighbours coincide. (author)

  14. Impressão basilar e malformação de Arnold-Chiari: considerações técnico-cirúrgicas a propósito de 13 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Gonçalves da Silva

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores empregaram detalhes técnicos pessoais para descompressão da fossa posterior em casos de impressão basilar e/ou maliormação de Arnold-Chiari, consistente em intuoação endotraqueal sem retroflexão da cabeça do paciente, sendo o mesmo operado em posição sentada e com a cabeça ereta. Foi realizada plástica da paquimeninge da fossa posterior com dura-mater de cadáver conservada em glicerina.

  15. Endovascular treatment of basilar and ICA termination aneurysms: effects of the use of HydroCoils on treatment stability in a subgroup of patients prone to a higher recurrence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Cekirge, Saruhan; Saatci, Isil

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of occlusion of terminal bifurcation aneurysms after embolization with hydrogel-coated coils. Of 35 bifurcation aneurysms, 34 were treated with hydrogel-coated coils in combination with platinum coils, and 1 was treated with hydrogel-coated coils only. Aneurysms were located at the basilar tip in 17 patients, and the internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation in 18 patients. The patient population consisted of 20 women and 15 men with ages ranging from 21 to 65 years. The aneurysm was found in 16 patients on presentation for subarachnoid hemorrhage, and in 19 patients the finding was incidental. Of the 35 aneurysms, 25 were small, 9 were large and 1 was giant. The giant aneurysm was located at the basilar tip and showed partial thrombosis. All except two basilar tip aneurysms were treated with balloon assistance. The remaining two basilar tip aneurysms were embolized with the assistance of an aneurysmal neck bridge device. The mean percentage occluded aneurysm volume for all devices was in the range 34-100%. Follow-up angiograms were obtained at 1 year in 6 patients, 2 years in 11 patients, and 3 years in 18 patients. Angiograms obtained immediately after embolization demonstrated a Raymond class 1 occlusion in 29 patients (82.9%) and a Raymond class 2 occlusion in 6 patients (17.1%). In four of these six patients follow-up angiograms demonstrated regrowth with resultant Raymond class 3 occlusion. In the other two patients, Raymond class 2 occlusion remained stable on follow-up angiograms. In patients who had a Raymond class 1 occlusion on the angiogram obtained immediately after embolization, no regrowth was seen on the follow-up angiograms. The overall recanalization rate was 11.4% (three large, one giant) at 6 months. Retreatment was not considered in three of these patients and they were to be followed; the other patient was retreated. Our initial procedural data demonstrate that higher volumetric occlusion was

  16. Endovascular treatment of basilar and ICA termination aneurysms: effects of the use of HydroCoils on treatment stability in a subgroup of patients prone to a higher recurrence rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Cekirge, Saruhan; Saatci, Isil [Hacettepe University Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology Unit, Radiology Department, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of occlusion of terminal bifurcation aneurysms after embolization with hydrogel-coated coils. Of 35 bifurcation aneurysms, 34 were treated with hydrogel-coated coils in combination with platinum coils, and 1 was treated with hydrogel-coated coils only. Aneurysms were located at the basilar tip in 17 patients, and the internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation in 18 patients. The patient population consisted of 20 women and 15 men with ages ranging from 21 to 65 years. The aneurysm was found in 16 patients on presentation for subarachnoid hemorrhage, and in 19 patients the finding was incidental. Of the 35 aneurysms, 25 were small, 9 were large and 1 was giant. The giant aneurysm was located at the basilar tip and showed partial thrombosis. All except two basilar tip aneurysms were treated with balloon assistance. The remaining two basilar tip aneurysms were embolized with the assistance of an aneurysmal neck bridge device. The mean percentage occluded aneurysm volume for all devices was in the range 34-100%. Follow-up angiograms were obtained at 1 year in 6 patients, 2 years in 11 patients, and 3 years in 18 patients. Angiograms obtained immediately after embolization demonstrated a Raymond class 1 occlusion in 29 patients (82.9%) and a Raymond class 2 occlusion in 6 patients (17.1%). In four of these six patients follow-up angiograms demonstrated regrowth with resultant Raymond class 3 occlusion. In the other two patients, Raymond class 2 occlusion remained stable on follow-up angiograms. In patients who had a Raymond class 1 occlusion on the angiogram obtained immediately after embolization, no regrowth was seen on the follow-up angiograms. The overall recanalization rate was 11.4% (three large, one giant) at 6 months. Retreatment was not considered in three of these patients and they were to be followed; the other patient was retreated. Our initial procedural data demonstrate that higher volumetric occlusion was

  17. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  18. Separation control with fluidic oscillators in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H.-J.; Woszidlo, R.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2017-08-01

    The present study assesses the applicability of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water. The first part of this work evaluates the properties of the fluidic oscillators including frequency, cavitation effects, and exerted thrust. Derived from the governing internal dynamics, the oscillation frequency is found to scale directly with the jet's exit velocity and the size of the fluidic oscillator independent of the working fluid. Frequency data from various experiments collapse onto a single curve. The occurrence of cavitation is examined by visual inspection and hydrophone measurements. The oscillation frequency is not affected by cavitation because it does not occur inside the oscillators. The spectral information obtained with the hydrophone provide a reliable indicator for the onset of cavitation at the exit. The performance of the fluidic oscillators for separation control on a bluff body does not seem to be affected by the presence of cavitation. The thrust exerted by an array of fluidic oscillators with water as the working fluid is measured to be even larger than theoretically estimated values. The second part of the presented work compares the performance of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water with previous results in air. The array of fluidic oscillators is installed into the rear end of a bluff body model. The drag improvements based on force balance measurements agree well with previous wind tunnel experiments on the same model. The flow field is examined by pressure measurements and with particle image velocimetry. Similar performance and flow field characteristics are observed in both water and air.

  19. Clusters in nonsmooth oscillator networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, Rachel; Chambon, Lucie; Coombes, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    For coupled oscillator networks with Laplacian coupling, the master stability function (MSF) has proven a particularly powerful tool for assessing the stability of the synchronous state. Using tools from group theory, this approach has recently been extended to treat more general cluster states. However, the MSF and its generalizations require the determination of a set of Floquet multipliers from variational equations obtained by linearization around a periodic orbit. Since closed form solutions for periodic orbits are invariably hard to come by, the framework is often explored using numerical techniques. Here, we show that further insight into network dynamics can be obtained by focusing on piecewise linear (PWL) oscillator models. Not only do these allow for the explicit construction of periodic orbits, their variational analysis can also be explicitly performed. The price for adopting such nonsmooth systems is that many of the notions from smooth dynamical systems, and in particular linear stability, need to be modified to take into account possible jumps in the components of Jacobians. This is naturally accommodated with the use of saltation matrices. By augmenting the variational approach for studying smooth dynamical systems with such matrices we show that, for a wide variety of networks that have been used as models of biological systems, cluster states can be explicitly investigated. By way of illustration, we analyze an integrate-and-fire network model with event-driven synaptic coupling as well as a diffusively coupled network built from planar PWL nodes, including a reduction of the popular Morris-Lecar neuron model. We use these examples to emphasize that the stability of network cluster states can depend as much on the choice of single node dynamics as it does on the form of network structural connectivity. Importantly, the procedure that we present here, for understanding cluster synchronization in networks, is valid for a wide variety of systems in

  20. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  1. Modeling of Coupled Chaotic Oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.; Grebogi, C.

    1999-01-01

    Chaotic dynamics may impose severe limits to deterministic modeling by dynamical equations of natural systems. We give theoretical argument that severe modeling difficulties may occur for high-dimensional chaotic systems in the sense that no model is able to produce reasonably long solutions that are realized by nature. We make these ideas concrete by investigating systems of coupled chaotic oscillators. They arise in many situations of physical and biological interests, and they also arise from discretization of nonlinear partial differential equations. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Magnus approximation in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, Mario A; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A; D'Olivo, J C

    2011-01-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some anomalous experimental observations. In a four-neutrino (three active plus one sterile) mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos with energies of the order of a few GeV, taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  3. Waves and Oscillations in Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pecseli, Hans L

    2012-01-01

    The result of more than 15 years of lectures in plasma sciences presented at universities in Denmark, Norway, and the United States, Waves and Oscillations in Plasmas addresses central issues in modern plasma sciences. The book covers fluid models as well as kinetic plasma models, including a detailed discussion of, for instance, collisionless Landau damping. Offering a clear separation of linear and nonlinear models, the book can be tailored for readers of varying levels of expertise.Designed to provide basic training in linear as well as nonlinear plasma dynamics, and practical in areas as d

  4. Pair creation and plasma oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses

  5. Wave Physics Oscillations - Solitons - Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Nettel, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This textbook is intended for those second year undergraduates in science and engineering who will later need an understanding of electromagnetic theory and quantum mechanics. The classical physics of oscillations and waves is developed at a more advanced level than has been customary for the second year, providing a basis for the quantum mechanics that follows. In this new edition the Green's function is explained, reinforcing the integration of quantum mechanics with classical physics. The text may also form the basis of an "introduction to theoretical physics" for physics majors. The concluding chapters give special attention to topics in current wave physics: nonlinear waves, solitons, and chaotic behavior.

  6. Ih tunes theta/gamma oscillations and cross-frequency coupling in an in silico CA3 model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Neymotin

    Full Text Available Ih channels are uniquely positioned to act as neuromodulatory control points for tuning hippocampal theta (4-12 Hz and gamma (25 Hz oscillations, oscillations which are thought to have importance for organization of information flow. contributes to neuronal membrane resonance and resting membrane potential, and is modulated by second messengers. We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells, contained type-appropriate isoforms of . Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via 's ability to set pyramidal excitability. Our model predicts that in vivo neuromodulatory control of allows flexibly controlling CFC and the timing of gamma discharges at particular theta phases.

  7. Characterization of reliability of spike timing in spinal interneurons during oscillating inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Ulrik; Nielsen, Carsten D.; Ryge, Jesper

    2001-01-01

    that interneurons can respond with a high reliability of spike timing, but only by combining fast and slow oscillations is it possible to obtain a high reliability of firing during rhythmic locomotor movements. Theoretical analysis of the rotation number provided new insights into the mechanism for obtaining......The spike timing in rhythmically active interneurons in the mammalian spinal locomotor network varies from cycle to cycle. We tested the contribution from passive membrane properties to this variable firing pattern, by measuring the reliability of spike timing, P, in interneurons in the isolated...... the analysis we used a leaky integrate and fire (LIF) model with a noise term added. The LIF model was able to reproduce the experimentally observed properties of P as well as the low-pass properties of the membrane. The LIF model enabled us to use the mathematical theory of nonlinear oscillators to analyze...

  8. Coupled oscillators with parity-time symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoy, Eduard N., E-mail: etsoy@uzsci.net

    2017-02-05

    Different models of coupled oscillators with parity-time (PT) symmetry are studied. Hamiltonian functions for two and three linear oscillators coupled via coordinates and accelerations are derived. Regions of stable dynamics for two coupled oscillators are obtained. It is found that in some cases, an increase of the gain-loss parameter can stabilize the system. A family of Hamiltonians for two coupled nonlinear oscillators with PT-symmetry is obtained. An extension to high-dimensional PT-symmetric systems is discussed. - Highlights: • A generalization of a Hamiltonian system of linear coupled oscillators with the parity-time (PT) symmetry is suggested. • It is found that an increase of the gain-loss parameter can stabilize the system. • A family of Hamiltonian functions for two coupled nonlinear oscillators with PT-symmetry is obtained.

  9. Phase noise and frequency stability in oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Presenting a comprehensive account of oscillator phase noise and frequency stability, this practical text is both mathematically rigorous and accessible. An in-depth treatment of the noise mechanism is given, describing the oscillator as a physical system, and showing that simple general laws govern the stability of a large variety of oscillators differing in technology and frequency range. Inevitably, special attention is given to amplifiers, resonators, delay lines, feedback, and flicker (1/f) noise. The reverse engineering of oscillators based on phase-noise spectra is also covered, and end-of-chapter exercises are given. Uniquely, numerous practical examples are presented, including case studies taken from laboratory prototypes and commercial oscillators, which allow the oscillator internal design to be understood by analyzing its phase-noise spectrum. Based on tutorials given by the author at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, international IEEE meetings, and in industry, this is a useful reference for acade...

  10. Driven, autoresonant three-oscillator interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, O.; Friedland, L.; Henis, Z.

    2007-01-01

    An efficient control scheme of resonant three-oscillator interactions using an external chirped frequency drive is suggested. The approach is based on formation of a double phase-locked (autoresonant) state in the system, as the driving oscillation passes linear resonance with one of the interacting oscillators. When doubly phase locked, the amplitudes of the oscillators increase with time in proportion to the driving frequency deviation from the linear resonance. The stability of this phase-locked state and the effects of dissipation and of the initial three-oscillator frequency mismatch on the autoresonance are analyzed. The associated autoresonance threshold phenomenon in the driving amplitude is also discussed. In contrast to other nonlinear systems, driven, autoresonant three-oscillator excitations are independent of the sign of the driving frequency chirp rate

  11. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, Daniela, E-mail: dani@astro.bas.bg [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Astronomy and NAO (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-15

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and {nu} oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant {nu} oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through {nu} oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with {nu}{sub e}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub s} oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile {nu} mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global {nu} data.

  12. Controlled vesicle deformation and lysis by single oscillating bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2003-05-01

    The ability of collapsing (cavitating) bubbles to focus and concentrate energy, forces and stresses is at the root of phenomena such as cavitation damage, sonochemistry or sonoluminescence. In a biomedical context, ultrasound-driven microbubbles have been used to enhance contrast in ultrasonic images. The observation of bubble-enhanced sonoporation-acoustically induced rupture of membranes-has also opened up intriguing possibilities for the therapeutic application of sonoporation as an alternative to cell-wall permeation techniques such as electroporation and particle guns. However, these pioneering experiments have not been able to pinpoint the mechanism by which the violently collapsing bubble opens pores or larger holes in membranes. Here we present an experiment in which gentle (linear) bubble oscillations are sufficient to achieve rupture of lipid membranes. In this regime, the bubble dynamics and the ensuing sonoporation can be accurately controlled. The use of microbubbles as focusing agents makes acoustics on the micrometre scale (microacoustics) a viable tool, with possible applications in cell manipulation and cell-wall permeation as well as in microfluidic devices.

  13. A Survey on Forced Oscillations in Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbaniparvar, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations in a power system can be categorized into free oscillations and forced oscillations. Many algorithms have been developed to estimate the modes of free oscillations in a power system. Recently, forced oscillations caught many attentions. Techniques are proposed to detect forced oscillations and locate their sources. In addition, forced oscillations may have negative impact on the estimation of mode and mode-shape if they are not properly accounted for. To improve the power system ...

  14. Phase-locked Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, T.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Grønbech-Jensen, N.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed experimental characterization of the phase-locking at both DC and at microwave frequencies is presented for two closely spaced Josephson soliton (fluxon) oscillators. In the phase-locked state, the radiated microwave power exhibited an effective gain. With one common bias source......, a frequency tunability of the phase-locked oscillators up to 7% at 10 GHz was observed. The interacting soliton oscillators were modeled by two inductively coupled nonlinear transmission lines...

  15. Chimera States in Mechanical Oscillator Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi; Fourrière, Antoine; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The synchronization of coupled oscillators is a fascinating manifestation of self-organization that nature uses to orchestrate essential processes of life, such as the beating of the heart. Although it was long thought that synchrony and disorder were mutually exclusive steady states for a network of identical oscillators, numerous theoretical studies in recent years have revealed the intriguing possibility of “chimera states,” in which the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into...

  16. Oscillations of neutral B mesons systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boucrot, J.

    1999-01-01

    The oscillation phenomenon in the neutral B mesons systems is now well established. The motivations and principles of the measurements are given; then the most recent results from the LEP experiments, the CDF collaboration at Fermilab and the SLD collaboration at SLAC are reviewed. The present world average of the $\\bd$ meson oscillation frequency is $\\dmd = 0.471 \\pm 0.016 \\ps$ and the lower limit on the $\\bs$ oscillation frequency is

  17. Recent Progress in Silicon Mems Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    MEMS oscillator. As shown, a MEMS resonator is connected to an IC. The reference oscillator, which is basically a transimpedance amplifier ...small size), and (3) DC bias voltage required to operate the resonators. As a result, instead of Colpitts or Pierce architecture, a transimpedence ... amplifier is typically used for sustain the oscillation. The frequency of the resonators is determined by both material properties and geometry of

  18. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here......: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus....

  19. Electrochemical Oscillation of Vanadium Ions in Anolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Peng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodic electrochemical oscillation of the anolyte was reported for the first time in a simulated charging process of the vanadium redox flow batteries. The electrochemical oscillation could be explained in terms of the competition between the growth and the chemical dissolution of V2O5 film. Also, the oscillation phenomenon was possible to regular extra power consumption. The results of this paper might enable new methods to improve the charge efficiency and energy saving for vanadium redox flow batteries.

  20. Cardiogenic oscillation induced ventilator autotriggering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kaloria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiogenic oscillation during mechanical ventilation can auto-trigger the ventilator resembling patient initiated breadth. This gives a false sense of intact respiratory drive and determination brain death, even if other tests are positive, is not appropriate in such a situation. It will prolong the ICU stay and confound the brain-death determination. In this case report, we describe a 35 year old man who was brought to the hospital after many hours of critical delay following multiple gun shot injuries. The patient suffered a cardiac arrest while on the way from another hospital. After an emergency laparotomy, patient was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score of E1VTM1 and was mechanically ventilated. Despite absence of brainstem reflexes, the ventilator continued to be triggered on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP mode and the patient maintained normal oxygen saturation and acceptable levels of carbon dioxide. An apnoea test confirmed absent respiratory drive. Ventilatory waveform graph analysis, revealed cardiogenic oscillation as the cause for autotrigerring.

  1. Energy measurements from betatron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Thompson, K.

    1989-03-01

    In the Stanford Linear Collider the electron beam is accelerated from 1--50 GeV in a distance of 3 km. The energy is measured and corrected at the end with an energy feedback loop. There are no bends within the linear accelerator itself, so no intermediate energy measurements are made. Errors in the energy profile due to mis-phasing of the rf, or due to calibration errors in the klystrons' rf outputs are difficult to detect. As the total betatron phase advance down the accelerator is about 30 /times/ 2π, an energy error of a few percent can cause a large error in the total phase advance. This in turn degrades the performance of auto-steering programs. We have developed a diagnostic program which generates and measures several betatron oscillations in the accelerator. It then analyzes this oscillation, looking for frequency changes which indicate energy errors. One can then compensate for or correct these energy errors. 6 refs., 1 fig

  2. Noise-Induced Transition in a Voltage-Controlled Oscillator Neuron Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huizhang; Liu Xuemei; Li Zhibing; Ai Baoquan; Liu Lianggang

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of Gaussian white noise, we study the properties of voltage-controlled oscillator neuron model and discuss the effects of the additive and multiplicative noise. It is found that the additive noise can accelerate and counterwork the firing of neuron, which depends on the value of central frequency of neuron itself, while multiplicative noise can induce the continuous change or mutation of membrane potential

  3. Stochastic Kuramoto oscillators with discrete phase states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, David J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a generalization of the Kuramoto phase oscillator model in which phases advance in discrete phase increments through Poisson processes, rendering both intrinsic oscillations and coupling inherently stochastic. We study the effects of phase discretization on the synchronization and precision properties of the coupled system both analytically and numerically. Remarkably, many key observables such as the steady-state synchrony and the quality of oscillations show distinct extrema while converging to the classical Kuramoto model in the limit of a continuous phase. The phase-discretized model provides a general framework for coupled oscillations in a Markov chain setting.

  4. Stochastic Kuramoto oscillators with discrete phase states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, David J

    2017-09-01

    We present a generalization of the Kuramoto phase oscillator model in which phases advance in discrete phase increments through Poisson processes, rendering both intrinsic oscillations and coupling inherently stochastic. We study the effects of phase discretization on the synchronization and precision properties of the coupled system both analytically and numerically. Remarkably, many key observables such as the steady-state synchrony and the quality of oscillations show distinct extrema while converging to the classical Kuramoto model in the limit of a continuous phase. The phase-discretized model provides a general framework for coupled oscillations in a Markov chain setting.

  5. Optimal parameters uncoupling vibration modes of oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, K. C.; Pieper, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization concept for an oscillator with two degrees of freedom. By using specially defined motion ratios, we control the action of springs to each degree of freedom of the oscillator. We aim at showing that, if the potential action of the springs in one period of vibration, used as the payoff function for the conservative oscillator, is maximized among all admissible parameters and motions satisfying Lagrange's equations, then the optimal motion ratios uncouple vibration modes. A similar result holds true for the dissipative oscillator having dampers. The application to optimal design of vehicle suspension is discussed.

  6. Neuromorphic computing with nanoscale spintronic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrejon, Jacob; Riou, Mathieu; Araujo, Flavio Abreu; Tsunegi, Sumito; Khalsa, Guru; Querlioz, Damien; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Stiles, Mark D; Grollier, Julie

    2017-07-26

    Neurons in the brain behave as nonlinear oscillators, which develop rhythmic activity and interact to process information. Taking inspiration from this behaviour to realize high-density, low-power neuromorphic computing will require very large numbers of nanoscale nonlinear oscillators. A simple estimation indicates that to fit 10 8 oscillators organized in a two-dimensional array inside a chip the size of a thumb, the lateral dimension of each oscillator must be smaller than one micrometre. However, nanoscale devices tend to be noisy and to lack the stability that is required to process data in a reliable way. For this reason, despite multiple theoretical proposals and several candidates, including memristive and superconducting oscillators, a proof of concept of neuromorphic computing using nanoscale oscillators has yet to be demonstrated. Here we show experimentally that a nanoscale spintronic oscillator (a magnetic tunnel junction) can be used to achieve spoken-digit recognition with an accuracy similar to that of state-of-the-art neural networks. We also determine the regime of magnetization dynamics that leads to the greatest performance. These results, combined with the ability of the spintronic oscillators to interact with each other, and their long lifetime and low energy consumption, open up a path to fast, parallel, on-chip computation based on networks of oscillators.

  7. Introduction to classical and quantum harmonic oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Sylvan C

    2013-01-01

    From conch shells to lasers . harmonic oscillators, the timeless scientific phenomenon As intriguing to Galileo as they are to scientists today, harmonic oscillators have provided a simple and compelling paradigm for understanding the complexities that underlie some of nature's and mankind's most fascinating creations. From early string and wind instruments fashioned from bows and seashells to the intense precision of lasers, harmonic oscillators have existed in various forms, as objects of beauty and scientific use. And harmonic oscillation has endured as one of science's most fascinating con

  8. Theory of a quantum anharmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carusotto, S.

    1988-01-01

    The time evolution of a quantum single-quartic anharmonic oscillator is considered. The study is carried on in operational form by use of the raising and lowering operators of the oscillator. The equation of motion is solved by application of a new integration method based on iteration techniques, and the rigorous solutions that describe the time development of the displacement and momentum operators of the oscillator are obtained. These operators are presented as a Laplace transform and a subsequent inverse Laplace transform of suitable functionals. Finally, the results are employed to describe the time evolution of a quasiclassical anharmonic oscillator

  9. Waves and oscillations in nature an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, A Satya

    2015-01-01

    Waves and oscillations are found in large scales (galactic) and microscopic scales (neutrino) in nature. Their dynamics and behavior heavily depend on the type of medium through which they propagate.Waves and Oscillations in Nature: An Introduction clearly elucidates the dynamics and behavior of waves and oscillations in various mediums. It presents different types of waves and oscillations that can be observed and studied from macroscopic to microscopic scales. The book provides a thorough introduction for researchers and graduate students in assorted areas of physics, such as fluid dynamics,

  10. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  11. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  12. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  13. Membrane with integrated spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many membrane processes are severely influenced by concentration polarisation. Turbulence promoting spacers placed in between the membranes can reduce the diffusional resistance of concentration polarisation by inducing additional mixing. Electrodialysis (ED) used for desalination suffers from

  14. Gel layer formation on membranes in Membrane Bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Brink, P.F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment is hampered by membrane fouling. Fouling increases energy demand, reduces process performance and creates the need for more frequent (chemical) membrane cleaning or replacement. Membrane fouling in MBRs is

  15. Smart membranes for monitoring membrane based desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Karam, Ayman M.

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are related to smart membranes for monitoring membrane based process such as, e.g., membrane distillation processes. In one example, a membrane, includes a porous surface and a plurality of sensors (e.g., temperature, flow and

  16. Oscillations of Difference Equations with Several Oscillating Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Berezansky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the oscillatory behavior of the solutions of the difference equation Δx(n+∑i=1mpi(nx(τi(n=0,n∈N0[∇xn-∑i=1mpinxσin=0, n∈N] where (pi(n, 1≤i≤m are real sequences with oscillating terms, τi(n[σi(n], 1≤i≤m are general retarded (advanced arguments, and Δ[∇] denotes the forward (backward difference operator Δx(n=x(n+1-x(n[∇x(n=x(n-x(n-1]. Examples illustrating the results are also given.

  17. Electrical control of calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells using microsecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Hanna; Andre, Franck M; Mir, Lluis M

    2017-04-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine due to their ability to differentiate into many cellular types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes amongst many other cell types. These cells present spontaneous calcium oscillations implicating calcium channels and pumps of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. These oscillations regulate many basic functions in the cell such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the possibility to mimic or regulate these oscillations might be useful to regulate mesenchymal stem cells biological functions. One or several electric pulses of 100 μs were used to induce Ca 2+ spikes caused by the penetration of Ca 2+ from the extracellular medium, through the transiently electropermeabilized plasma membrane, in human adipose mesenchymal stem cells from several donors. Attached cells were preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and exposed to the electric pulse(s) under the fluorescence microscope. Viability was also checked. According to the pulse(s) electric field amplitude, it is possible to generate a supplementary calcium spike with properties close to those of calcium spontaneous oscillations, or, on the contrary, to inhibit the spontaneous calcium oscillations for a very long time compared to the pulse duration. Through that inhibition of the oscillations, Ca 2+ oscillations of desired amplitude and frequency could then be imposed on the cells using subsequent electric pulses. None of the pulses used here, even those with the highest amplitude, caused a loss of cell viability. An easy way to control Ca 2+ oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells, through their cancellation or the addition of supplementary Ca 2+ spikes, is reported here. Indeed, the direct link between the microsecond electric pulse(s) delivery and the occurrence/cancellation of cytosolic Ca 2+ spikes allowed us to mimic and regulate the Ca 2+ oscillations in these cells. Since microsecond electric pulse delivery

  18. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  19. Idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is a fibrocellular membrane that proliferates on the inner surface of the retina at the macular area. Membrane contraction is an important sight-threatening event and is due to fibrotic remodeling. Methods: Analysis of the current literature

  20. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  1. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  2. Circuit oscillations in odor perception and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory system neural oscillations as seen in the local field potential have been studied for many decades. Recent research has shown that there is a functional role for the most studied gamma oscillations (40-100Hz in rats and mice, and 20Hz in insects), without which fine odor discrimination is poor. When these oscillations are increased artificially, fine discrimination is increased, and when rats learn difficult and highly overlapping odor discriminations, gamma is increased in power. Because of the depth of study on this oscillation, it is possible to point to specific changes in neural firing patterns as represented by the increase in gamma oscillation amplitude. However, we know far less about the mechanisms governing beta oscillations (15-30Hz in rats and mice), which are best associated with associative learning of responses to odor stimuli. These oscillations engage every part of the olfactory system that has so far been tested, plus the hippocampus, and the beta oscillation frequency band is the one that is most reliably coherent with other regions during odor processing. Respiratory oscillations overlapping with the theta frequency band (2-12Hz) are associated with odor sniffing and normal breathing in rats. They also show coupling in some circumstances between olfactory areas and rare coupling between the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The latter occur in specific learning conditions in which coherence strength is negatively or positively correlated with performance, depending on the task. There is still much to learn about the role of neural oscillations in learning and memory, but techniques that have been brought to bear on gamma oscillations (current source density, computational modeling, slice physiology, behavioral studies) should deliver much needed knowledge of these events. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the SR is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole-cell calcium oscillations. At the same time membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... onset of oscillations in membrane potential within the individual cell may underlie sudden intercellular synchronization and the appearance of vasomotion. Key words: Vasomotion, Chloride channel, cGMP, Mathematical model, Calcium waves....

  4. Interplay of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in the generation of high-frequency oscillations in interneuronal networks with irregular spiking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Baroni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii the membrane potential distribution, and iii the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs. For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i and ii, respectively, which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead

  5. Interplay of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in the generation of high-frequency oscillations in interneuronal networks with irregular spiking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Fabiano; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2014-05-01

    High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz) have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF) or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF) neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i) the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii) the membrane potential distribution, and iii) the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs). For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii)) exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i) and ii), respectively), which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead of

  6. Exclusive photorelease of signalling lipids at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, André; Yushchenko, Dmytro A; Müller, Rainer; Stein, Frank; Feng, Suihan; Mulle, Christophe; Carta, Mario; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-12-21

    Photoactivation of caged biomolecules has become a powerful approach to study cellular signalling events. Here we report a method for anchoring and uncaging biomolecules exclusively at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by employing a photocleavable, sulfonated coumarin derivative. The novel caging group allows quantifying the reaction progress and efficiency of uncaging reactions in a live-cell microscopy setup, thereby greatly improving the control of uncaging experiments. We synthesized arachidonic acid derivatives bearing the new negatively charged or a neutral, membrane-permeant coumarin caging group to locally induce signalling either at the plasma membrane or on internal membranes in β-cells and brain slices derived from C57B1/6 mice. Uncaging at the plasma membrane triggers a strong enhancement of calcium oscillations in β-cells and a pronounced potentiation of synaptic transmission while uncaging inside cells blocks calcium oscillations in β-cells and causes a more transient effect on neuronal transmission, respectively. The precise subcellular site of arachidonic acid release is therefore crucial for signalling outcome in two independent systems.

  7. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  8. High-frequency plasma oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhiezer, A I; Fainberg, Y B; Sitenko, A G; Stepanov, K; Kurilko, V; Gorbatenko, M; Kirochkin, U [Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR (USSR)

    1958-07-01

    It is well known that the electrical conductivity of a plasma, the ion-electron equilibration time, and the time required to heat the electron component of the plasma all increase greatly with increasing temperature. Consequently, the usual method of Joule heating a plasma may be difficult to apply in the region of high temperatures (> 10{sup 6}K), especially if the plasma current alone, without any additional measures, is used to generate magnetic fields for the confinement of the plasma. Therefore, it is of interest to study methods of plasma heating that do not directly use Joule heat, especially methods by which energy is directly supplied to the ion component during the time between collisions. Some of these methods make use of ionic resonance as well as other resonance phenomena which can occur in plasma in an external magnetic field. This paper deals with certain aspects of the theory of high-frequency plasma oscillations.

  9. Optimal oscillation-center transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, R.L.

    1984-08-01

    A variational principle is proposed for defining that canonical transformation, continuously connected with the identity transformation, which minimizes the residual, coordinate-dependent part of the new Hamiltonian. The principle is based on minimization of the mean-square generalized force. The transformation reduces to the action-angle transformation in that part of the phase space of an integrable system where the orbit topology is that of the unperturbed system, or on primary KAM surfaces. General arguments in favor of this definition are given, based on Galilean invariance, decay of the Fourier spectrum, and its ability to include external fields or inhomogeneous systems. The optimal oscillation-center transformation for the physical pendulum, or particle in a sinusoidal potential, is constructed

  10. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  11. Membrane voltage changes in passive dendritic trees: a tapering equivalent cylinder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, R R

    1988-01-01

    An exponentially tapering equivalent cylinder model is employed in order to approximate the loss of the dendritic trunk parameter observed from anatomical data on apical and basilar dendrites of CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. This model allows dendritic trees with a relative paucity of branching to be treated. In particular, terminal branches are not required to end at the same electrotonic distance. The Laplace transform method is used to obtain analytic expressions for the Green's function corresponding to an instantaneous pulse of current injected at a single point along a tapering equivalent cylinder with sealed ends. The time course of the voltage in response to an arbitrary input is computed using the Green's function in a convolution integral. Examples of current input considered are (1) an infinitesimally brief (Dirac delta function) pulse and (2) a step pulse. It is demonstrated that inputs located on a tapering equivalent cylinder are more effective at the soma than identically placed inputs on a nontapering equivalent cylinder. Asymptotic solutions are derived to enable the voltage response behaviour over both relatively short and long time periods to be analysed. Semilogarithmic plots of these solutions provide a basis for estimating the membrane time constant tau m from experimental transients. Transient voltage decrement from a clamped soma reveals that tapering tends to reduce the error associated with inadequate voltage clamping of the dendritic membrane. A formula is derived which shows that tapering tends to increase the estimate of the electrotonic length parameter L.

  12. Decay ratio for third order Brownian oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, H.; Kanemoto, S.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained the analytical expressions of the decay ratios for two types of third order Brownian oscillators which are generalizations of the second order Brownian oscillator driven by the Gaussian-white noise. The resulting expressions will provide us useful baseline information for more complicated practical problems and their applications

  13. Electromagnetic Radiation Originating from Unstable Electron Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function.......Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function....

  14. Synchronization of indirectly coupled Lorenz oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchronization of indirectly coupled Lorenz oscillators: An experimental study. Amit Sharma Manish Dev Shrimali. Synchronization, Coupled Systems and Networks Volume 77 Issue 5 November 2011 pp 881-889 ... The in-phase and anti-phase synchronization of indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators reported in Phys. Rev ...

  15. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronization. In this article, we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that synchronization frequency of oscillators in a completely connected ...

  16. Neutrino oscillations and neutrino-electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.; Rosen, S.P.

    1980-10-01

    Neutrino flavor oscillations can significantly alter the cross section for neutrino-electron scattering. As a result, such oscillations can affect the comparison between existing reactor data and theories of neutral-current processes. They may also lead to strikingly large effects in high-energy accelerator experiments

  17. Discontinuous Spirals of Stable Periodic Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sack, Achim; Freire, Joana G.; Lindberg, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental discovery of a remarkable organization of the set of self-generated periodic oscillations in the parameter space of a nonlinear electronic circuit. When control parameters are suitably tuned, the wave pattern complexity of the periodic oscillations is found to increase...

  18. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutrino oscillations in matter can exhibit a specific resonance enhancement - parametric resonance, which is different from the MSW resonance. Oscillations of atmospheric and solar neutrinos inside the earth can undergo parametric enhancement when neutrino trajectories cross the core of the earth. In this paper we ...

  19. Compensation of oscillation coupling induced by solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, A.Yu.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Shcherbakov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for construction of various schemes of oscillation coupling compensation, induced by solenoids in charged particle storage rings, are described. Peculiarities of magnetic structure, enabling to localize oscillation coupling in wide energy range are discussed. Results of calculation of compensation schemes for design of NR-2000 storage ring spin rotation are presented

  20. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, D.; Rameika, G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the neutrino oscillation section of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Beam Facilities. There were very lively discussions about the merits of the different oscillation channels, experiments, and facilities, but the authors believe a substantial consensus emerged

  1. Phase Multistability in Coupled Oscillator Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Postnov, D.E.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2003-01-01

    along the orbit of the individual oscillator. Focusing on the mechanisms underlying the appearance of phase multistability, the paper examines a variety of phase-locked patterns. In particular we demonstrate the nested structure of synchronization regions for oscillations with multicrest wave forms...

  2. Oscillating and rotating sine-Gordon system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between a 2π kink and the background or vacuum is investigated in the pure sine-Gordon system. For an oscillating background (i.e., the k=0 part of the phonon spectrum) the 2π kink oscillates, while for increasing or decreasing vacuum two phenomena have been observed, depending...

  3. Umbral oscillations as a probe of sunspot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelatif, T.E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of the solar five-minute oscillations with a sunspot is thoroughly explored, both on observational and theoretical grounds. Simple theoretical models are developed in order to understand the observations of umbral oscillations. Observations made at the National Solar Observatory detected both the three-minute and five-minute umbral oscillations at photospheric heights. The three-minute oscillations were found to have a kinetic energy density six times higher in the photosphere than in the chromosphere and to be concentrated in the central part of the umbra, supporting the photospheric resonance theory for the three-minute umbral oscillations. The five-minute oscillations are attenuated in the umbra, which appears to act as a filter in selecting some of the peaks in the power spectrum of five-minute oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The k-omega power spectrum of the umbral oscillations shows a shift of power to longer wavelengths. Theoretical models of the transmission of acoustic waves into a magnetic region explain both observed effects

  4. A Class-F CMOS Oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaie, M.; Staszewski, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    An oscillator topology demonstrating an improved phase noise performance is proposed in this paper. It exploits the time-variant phase noise model with insights into the phase noise conversion mechanisms. The proposed oscillator is based on enforcing a pseudo-square voltage waveform around the LC

  5. Oscillator clustering in a resource distribution chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    separate the inherent dynamics of the individual oscillator from the properties of the coupling network. Illustrated by examples from microbiological population dynamics, renal physiology, and electronic oscillator theory, we show how competition for primary resources in a resource distribution chain leads...

  6. Mass and oscillations of Dirac neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collot, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the most economical extension of the standard model, we have presented the theory of massive Dirac neutrinos. We have particularly emphasized that, in this model, a complete analogy between quarks and leptons can be erected and predicts neutrino flavor oscillations. We have reviewed the last experimental results concerning kinetic neutrino mass experiments and neutrino oscillation investigations

  7. A simple approach to nonlinear oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhongfu; He Jihuan

    2009-01-01

    A very simple and effective approach to nonlinear oscillators is suggested. Anyone with basic knowledge of advanced calculus can apply the method to finding approximately the amplitude-frequency relationship of a nonlinear oscillator. Some examples are given to illustrate its extremely simple solution procedure and an acceptable accuracy of the obtained solutions.

  8. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  9. Experiments with elasto-plastic oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup-thomsen, Søren; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1996-01-01

    Plastic displacements of a Gaussian white noise excited three degrees of freedom non-ideal elasto-plastic oscillator are measured in laboratory experiments and the plastic displacements are compared to computer simulated results for the corresponding ideal elasto-plastic oscillator. The comparative...

  10. Experiments with elasto-plastic oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup-Thomsen, S.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1999-01-01

    Plastic displacements of a Gaussian white noise excited three degrees of freedom non-ideal elasto-plastic oscillator are measured in laboratory experiments and the plastic displacements are compared to computer simulated results for the corresponding ideal elasto-plastic oscillator. The comparative...

  11. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  12. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  13. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for earth tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  14. Self oscillating PWM modulators, a topological comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2004-01-01

    or fs/ð range respectively, where fs is the switching frequency of the converter. For some applications this will require unacceptable high switching frequency to achieve enough control loop bandwidth for the desired dynamic performance. With self oscillating modulators, the open loop bandwidth is equal...... to fs which makes this type of modulators an excellent choice for a wide range of applications. Self oscillating PWM modulators can be made in a number of ways, either as voltage or current mode modulators, and the self oscillating behavior can be achieved either by using hysteresis control...... or by shaping the open loop function of the modulator so its gain and phase response causes a closed loop natural oscillation. The two main types of self oscillating modulators have many similarities, but differences in dynamic performance and linearity are present. The work presented is related to the author...

  15. New neutrino oscillation results from NOVA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Neutrinos oscillate among flavors as they travel because a neutrino of a particular flavor is also a superposition of multiple neutrinos with slightly different masses.  The interferometric nature of oscillations allows these tiny mass differences to be measured, along with the parameters of the PMNS matrix which governs the mixing. However, since neutrinos only interact weakly, a powerful neutrino source and massive detectors are required to measure them. In this talk I will show recently updated results from NOvA, a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab with two functionally identical scintillator detectors. I will present measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance, and what constraints those measurements put on the remaining open questions in neutrino oscillations: Is the neutrino mass hierarchy "normal" or "inverted?" Do neutrino oscillations violate CP symmetry? Is the mixing in the atmospheric sector maximal? The recent update includes 50%...

  16. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  17. Improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Mosad, Ahmed G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator which offers higher frequency and wider tunning range than the existing reactance-less oscillators. It also has the capability of operating on two positive supplies or alternatively a positive and negative supply. Furthermore, it has the advantage that it can be fully integrated on-chip providing an area-efficient solution. On the other hand, The oscillation concept is discussed then a complete mathematical analysis of the proposed oscillator is introduced. Furthermore, the power consumption of the new relaxation circuit is discussed and validated by the PSPICE circuit simulations showing an excellent agreement. MATLAB results are also introduced to demonstrate the resistance range and the corresponding frequency range which can be obtained from the proposed relaxation oscillator. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  19. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syren, R. M.; Fox, S. W.; Przybylski, A. T.; Stratten, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  20. A novel optogenetically tunable frequency modulating oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Mahajan

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology has enabled the creation of biological reconfigurable circuits, which perform multiple functions monopolizing a single biological machine; Such a system can switch between different behaviours in response to environmental cues. Previous work has demonstrated switchable dynamical behaviour employing reconfigurable logic gate genetic networks. Here we describe a computational framework for reconfigurable circuits in E.coli using combinations of logic gates, and also propose the biological implementation. The proposed system is an oscillator that can exhibit tunability of frequency and amplitude of oscillations. Further, the frequency of operation can be changed optogenetically. Insilico analysis revealed that two-component light systems, in response to light within a frequency range, can be used for modulating the frequency of the oscillator or stopping the oscillations altogether. Computational modelling reveals that mixing two colonies of E.coli oscillating at different frequencies generates spatial beat patterns. Further, we show that these oscillations more robustly respond to input perturbations compared to the base oscillator, to which the proposed oscillator is a modification. Compared to the base oscillator, the proposed system shows faster synchronization in a colony of cells for a larger region of the parameter space. Additionally, the proposed oscillator also exhibits lesser synchronization error in the transient period after input perturbations. This provides a strong basis for the construction of synthetic reconfigurable circuits in bacteria and other organisms, which can be scaled up to perform functions in the field of time dependent drug delivery with tunable dosages, and sets the stage for further development of circuits with synchronized population level behaviour.

  1. Are the North Atlantic oscillation and the southern oscillation related in any time-scale?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Ribera, P.; Hernandez, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas; Gimenoo, L. [Fac. Ciencias, Univ. Vigo, Ourense (Spain)

    2000-02-01

    The north Atlantic oscillation (NAO) and the southern oscillation (SO) are compared from the standpoint of a possible common temporal scale of oscillation. To do this a cross-spectrum of the temporal series of NAO and SO indices was determined, finding a significant common oscillation of 6-8 years. To assure this finding, both series were decomposed in their main oscillations using singular spectrum analysis (SSA). Resulting reconstructed series of 6-8 years' oscillation were then cross-correlated without and with pre-whitened, the latter being significant. The main conclusion is a possible relationship between a common oscillation of 6-8 years that represents about 20% of the SO variance and about 25% of the NAO variance. (orig.)

  2. Mechanistic insights of the Min oscillator via cell-free reconstitution and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.

    2018-05-01

    The MinD and MinE proteins of Escherichia coli self-organize into a standing-wave oscillator on the membrane to help align division at mid-cell. When unleashed from cellular confines, MinD and MinE form a spectrum of patterns on artificial bilayers—static amoebas, traveling waves, traveling mushrooms, and bursts with standing-wave dynamics. We recently focused our cell-free studies on bursts because their dynamics recapitulate many features of Min oscillation observed in vivo. The data unveiled a patterning mechanism largely governed by MinE regulation of MinD interaction with membrane. We proposed that the MinD to MinE ratio on the membrane acts as a toggle switch between MinE-stimulated recruitment and release of MinD from the membrane. In this review, we summarize cell-free data on the Min system and expand upon a molecular mechanism that provides a biochemical explanation as to how these two ‘simple’ proteins can form the remarkable spectrum of patterns.

  3. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  4. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  5. Multivariate Time Series Decomposition into Oscillation Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takeru; Komaki, Fumiyasu

    2017-08-01

    Many time series are considered to be a superposition of several oscillation components. We have proposed a method for decomposing univariate time series into oscillation components and estimating their phases (Matsuda & Komaki, 2017 ). In this study, we extend that method to multivariate time series. We assume that several oscillators underlie the given multivariate time series and that each variable corresponds to a superposition of the projections of the oscillators. Thus, the oscillators superpose on each variable with amplitude and phase modulation. Based on this idea, we develop gaussian linear state-space models and use them to decompose the given multivariate time series. The model parameters are estimated from data using the empirical Bayes method, and the number of oscillators is determined using the Akaike information criterion. Therefore, the proposed method extracts underlying oscillators in a data-driven manner and enables investigation of phase dynamics in a given multivariate time series. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. From monthly mean north-south sunspot number data, the proposed method reveals an interesting phase relationship.

  6. Introduction to Classical and Quantum Harmonic Oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latal, H

    1997-01-01

    As the title aptly states, this book deals with harmonic oscillators of various kinds, from classical mechanical and electrical oscillations up to quantum oscillations. It is written in a lively language, and occasional interspersed anecdotes make the reading of an otherwise mathematically oriented text quite a pleasure. Although the author claims to have written an 'elementary introduction', it is certainly necessary to have a good deal of previous knowledge in physics (mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum theory), electrical engineering and, of course, mathematics in order to follow the general line of his arguments. The book begins with a thorough treatment of classical oscillators (free, damped, forced) that is followed by an elaboration on Fourier analysis. Lagrange and Hamilton formalisms are then introduced before the problem of coupled oscillations is attacked. A chapter on statistical perspectives leads over to the final discussion of quantum oscillations. With the book comes a diskette containing a number of worksheets (Microsoft Excel) that can be used by the reader for instant visualization to get a better qualitative and quantitative understanding of the material. To the reviewer it seems difficult to pinpoint exactly the range of prospective readership of the book. It can certainly not be intended as a textbook for students, but rather as a reference book for teachers of physics or researchers, who want to look up one or other aspect of harmonic oscillations, for which purpose the diskette represents a very valuable tool. (book review)

  7. Distraction, Compression, Extension, and Reduction Combined With Joint Remodeling and Extra-articular Distraction: Description of 2 New Modifications for Its Application in Basilar Invagination and Atlantoaxial Dislocation: Prospective Study in 79 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P Sarat; Prabhu, Manik; Goyal, Nishant; Garg, Ajay; Chauhan, Avnish; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2015-07-01

    Recent strategies for treatment of basilar invagination (BI) and atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) are based on simultaneous posterior reduction and fixation. To describe new modifications of the procedure distraction, compression, extension, and reduction (DCER), ie, joint remodeling (JRM) and extra-articular distraction (EAD) in patients with "vertical" joints, and to quantify the improvement in joint indices, ie, sagittal inclination (SI), craniocervical tilt (CCT), and coronal inclination. Prospective study (May 2010 to September 2014). Joint indices measured included (normal values): SI (87.15 ± 5.65°), CCT (60.2 ± 9.2°), and coronal inclination (110.3 ± 4.23°). Surgical procedures included DCER alone (performed in SI joints (SI >160°, group III). Seventy-nine patients were selected (mean, 22.5 years of age). All conventional indices improved significantly (P 100°). Joint indices provide useful information for surgical strategy and planning.

  8. Precise localization of dysfunctional areas in vertebro-basilar infarction by FDG- and 0-15-H2O-PET using standardized image analysis and image registration to 3-D MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juengling, F.D.; Moser, E.; Nitzsche, E.U.; Kassubek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The advantages of standardized multimodal image analysis are demonstrated in a case of symptomatic tremor after basilar thrombosis. Functionally and structurally lesioned areas were mapped in Talairach space using 3-D MRI, cerebral FDG-PET and O-15-H 2 O-PET. Structural lesions were found in the left midbrain, thalamus, putamen and cerebellar areas. Voxel-based statistics in comparison to a normal data base revealed hypometabolism in the left thalamus, left red nucleus, left cerebellar hemisphere including dentate nucleus and in the left interior olivary nucleus. The O-15-H 2 O-PET investigation revealed metabolic uncoupling along the rubroolivocerebellar loop. Given the delicate anatomy of the structures involved, image registration and standardized image analysis techniques are essential for a synoptic multimodality analysis of morphological and functional pathology and should generally be used for cerebral PET investigations. (orig.) [de

  9. Ion-conducting membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; Sajjad, Syed Dawar; Gao, Yan; Liu, Zengcai; Chen, Qingmei

    2017-12-26

    An anion-conducting polymeric membrane comprises a terpolymer of styrene, vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x. R.sub.s is a positively charged cyclic amine group. R.sub.x is at least one constituent selected from the group consisting Cl, OH and a reaction product between an OH or Cl and a species other than a simple amine or a cyclic amine. The total weight of the vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x groups is greater than 0.3% of the total weight of the membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  10. Gas separation with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, G.; Michele, H.; Werner, U.

    1982-01-01

    Gas separation with membranes has already been tested in numerous fields of application, e.g. uranium enrichment of H 2 separation. In many of these processes the mass transfer units, so-called permeators, have to be connected in tandem in order to achieve high concentrations. A most economical operating method provides for each case an optimization of the cascades with regard to the membrane materials, construction and design of module. By utilization of the concentration gradient along the membrane a new process development has been accomplished - the continuously operating membrane rectification unit. Investment and operating costs can be reduced considerably for a number of separating processes by combining a membrane rectification unit with a conventional recycling cascade. However, the new procedure requires that the specifications for the module construction, flow design, and membrane properties be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  11. Anyons, deformed oscillator algebras and projectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engquist, Johan

    2009-01-01

    We initiate an algebraic approach to the many-anyon problem based on deformed oscillator algebras. The formalism utilizes a generalization of the deformed Heisenberg algebras underlying the operator solution of the Calogero problem. We define a many-body Hamiltonian and an angular momentum operator which are relevant for a linearized analysis in the statistical parameter ν. There exists a unique ground state and, in spite of the presence of defect lines, the anyonic weight lattices are completely connected by the application of the oscillators of the algebra. This is achieved by supplementing the oscillator algebra with a certain projector algebra.

  12. Topological phase in two flavor neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Poonam

    2009-01-01

    We show that the phase appearing in neutrino flavor oscillation formulae has a geometric and topological contribution. We identify a topological phase appearing in the two flavor neutrino oscillation formula using Pancharatnam's prescription of quantum collapses between nonorthogonal states. Such quantum collapses appear naturally in the expression for appearance and survival probabilities of neutrinos. Our analysis applies to neutrinos propagating in vacuum or through matter. For the minimal case of two flavors with CP conservation, our study shows for the first time that there is a geometric interpretation of the neutrino oscillation formulae for the detection probability of neutrino species.

  13. Oscillators - an approach for a better understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this tutorial is to provide an electronic engineer knowledge and insight for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the behaviour of electronic oscillators. A linear oscillator is a mathematical fiction which can only be used as a starting point for the design of a real...... oscillator based on the Barkhausen criteria. Statements in textbooks and papers saying that the nonlinearities are bringing back the poles to the imaginary axis are wrong. The concept of "frozen eigenvalues" is introduced by means of piece-wise-linear modelling of the nonlinear components which are necessary...

  14. Color oscillations and measuring the quark charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    Color oscillations analogous to neutrino oscillations but with very high frequency are shown to be present in hadron states below color threshold. Experiments to distinguish between fractionally charged and integrally charged quark models both below and above color threshold are discussed. The instantaneous quark charge is shown to be measurable only in very fast processes determined by the high energy behavior of transition amplitudes well above color threshold. Results from the naive parton model for deep inelastic processes which indicate that real charges of quarks and gluons can be measured are shown to be in error because of neglect of color oscillations and interference terms. (author)

  15. Quantum electronics maser amplifiers and oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 2: Maser Amplifiers and Oscillators deals with the experimental and theoretical aspects of maser amplifiers and oscillators which are based on the principles of quantum electronics. It shows how the concepts and equations used in quantum electronics follow from the basic principles of theoretical physics.Comprised of three chapters, this volume begins with a discussion on the elements of the theory of quantum oscillators and amplifiers working in the microwave region, along with the practical achievements in this field. Attention is paid to two-level paramagnetic ma

  16. Microwave oscillator with 'whispering gallery' resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, A.Ya.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Filippov, Yu.F.; Lonin, Yu.F.; Papkovich, V.G.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Uvarov, V.T.

    2010-01-01

    It was presented researches of a generation of microwave radiation into system with azimuthally periodical relativistic electron beam current that excites a high-Q quasi-optical dielectric resonator. The Eigen parameters of cylindrical Teflon resonator were determined by numerical computation. Registration of the microwave radiation realizes by a crystal set of 8-mm wavelength range. Research projects of microwave oscillators with high-Q resonators, in which 'whispering gallery' oscillations are excited by an electron flow, are presented. Multiresonator oscillators ideology is based on principles of microwave generation in klystrons with both subcritical and supercritical electron beams currents.

  17. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  18. Torsional oscillations of strange stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannarelli Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strange stars are one of the hypothetical compact stellar objects that can be formed after a supernova explosion. The existence of these objects relies on the absolute stability of strange collapsed quark matter with respect to standard nuclear matter. We discuss simple models of strange stars with a bare quark matter surface, thus standard nuclear matter is completely absent. In these models an electric dipole layer a few hundreds Fermi thick should exist close to the star surface. Studying the torsional oscillations of the electrically charged layer we estimate the emitted power, finding that it is of the order of 1045 erg/s, meaning that these objects would be among the brightest compact sources in the heavens. The associated relaxation times are very uncertain, with values ranging between microseconds and minutes, depending on the crust thickness. Although part of the radiated power should be absorbed by the electrosphere surrounding the strange star, a sizable fraction of photons should escape and be detectable.

  19. From intrusive to oscillating thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold

    2007-10-01

    This paper focused on the possibility that intrusive thoughts (ITs) are a form of an evolutionary, adaptive, and complex strategy to prepare for and resolve stressful life events through schema formation. Intrusive thoughts have been studied in relation to individual conditions, such as traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have also been documented in the average person experiencing everyday stress. In many descriptions of thought intrusion, it is accompanied by thought suppression. Several theories have been put forth to describe ITs, although none provides a satisfactory explanation as to whether ITs are a normal process, a normal process gone astray, or a sign of pathology. There is also no consistent view of the role that thought suppression plays in the process. I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression may be better understood by examining them together as a complex and adaptive mechanism capable of escalating in times of need. The ability of a biological mechanism to scale up in times of need is one hallmark of a complex and adaptive system. Other hallmarks of complexity, including self-similarity across scales, sensitivity to initial conditions, presence of feedback loops, and system oscillation, are also discussed in this article. Finally, I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression are better described together as an oscillatory cycle.

  20. Quantum theory of anharmonic oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Kyoto Univ.

    1983-01-01

    This in investigation of an anharmonic oscillator characterized by the potential ωsub(o) 2 /2 g 2 + lambda'q 4 . By using the equations of motion and the relations obtained by evaluating where O is an arbitrary operator, H is our total Hamiltonian and |i> and |j> are exact eigenstates of H, we derive an exact recurrence formula. This formula allows us to express tau-functions with a higher power of the variables through tau-functions with a lower power of the variables and energy eigenvalues. In this way we derive several exact relations, which are, in a sense, generalizations of the virial theorem and sum rules. These exact relations are the central equations of this paper. On the basis of these exact relations we propose our 'nearest neighbour level' (N.N.L.) approximation, which seems to provide a good approximation scheme. We can also use our exact relations to test the validity of various approximation methods, and as an example, we discuss the 'New-Tamm-Dancoff' (N.T.D)-type of approximation in detail. (Author)