WorldWideScience

Sample records for basidiomycota

  1. Biocatalytic portfolio of Basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Basidiomycota fungi have received little attention for applications in biocatalysis and biotechnology and remain greatly understudied despite their importance for carbon recycling, ecosystem functioning and medicinal properties. The steady influx of genome data has facilitated detailed studies aimed at understanding the evolution and function of fungal lignocellulose degradation. These studies and recent explorations into the secondary metabolomes have uncovered large portfolios of enzymes useful for biocatalysis and biosynthesis. This review will provide an overview of the biocatalytic repertoires of Basidiomycota characterized to date with the hope of motivation more research into the chemical toolkits of this diverse group of fungi. PMID:26812494

  2. New records of Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota) in the Atlantic Rain Forest in Northeast Brazil Novos registros de Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota) em Mata Atlântica no Nordeste brasileiro

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Baptista Gibertoni; Leif Ryvarden; Maria Auxiliadora de Queiroz Cavalcanti

    2004-01-01

    Non-poroid Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota) in areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest in Northeast Brazil are reported. Auriscalpium villipes (Lloyd) Snell & E.A. Dick, Climacodon pulcherrimus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Nikol., Gloeodontia discolor (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Boidin, Irpex lacteus (Fr.: Fr.) Fr. and Scytinostroma duriusculum (Berk. & Broome) Donk are new records to Northeast Brazil.Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota) não poróides foram registrados em áreas de Mata Atlântica do Nordeste brasileiro...

  3. New records of Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota in the Atlantic Rain Forest in Northeast Brazil Novos registros de Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota em Mata Atlântica no Nordeste brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Baptista Gibertoni

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-poroid Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota in areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest in Northeast Brazil are reported. Auriscalpium villipes (Lloyd Snell & E.A. Dick, Climacodon pulcherrimus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Nikol., Gloeodontia discolor (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Boidin, Irpex lacteus (Fr.: Fr. Fr. and Scytinostroma duriusculum (Berk. & Broome Donk are new records to Northeast Brazil.Aphyllophorales (Basidiomycota não poróides foram registrados em áreas de Mata Atlântica do Nordeste brasileiro. Auriscalpium villipes (Lloyd Snell & E.A. Dick, Climacodon pulcherrimus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Nikol., Gloeodontia discolor (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Boidin, Irpex lacteus (Fr.: Fr. Fr. e Scytinostroma duriusculum (Berk. & Broome Donk são novas ocorrências para o Nordeste do Brasil.

  4. Ascomycota has a faster evolutionary rate and higher species diversity than Basidiomycota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lumbsch; H.; THORSTEN

    2010-01-01

    Differences in rates of nucleotide or amino acid substitutions among major groups of organisms are repeatedly found and well documented. A growing body of evidence suggests a link between the rate of neutral molecular change within populations and the evolution of species diversity. More than 98% of terrestrial fungi belong to the phyla Ascomycota or Basidiomycota. The former is considerably richer in number of species than the latter. We obtained DNA sequences of 21 protein-coding genes from the lichenized fungus Rhizoplaca chrysoleuca and used them together with sequences from GenBank for subsequent analyses. Three datasets were used to test rate discrepancies between Ascomycota and Basidiomycota and that within Ascomycota: (i) 13 taxa including 105 protein-coding genes, (ii) nine taxa including 21 protein-coding genes, and (iii) nuclear LSU rDNA of 299 fungal species. Based on analyses of the 105 protein-coding genes and nuclear LSU rDNA datasets, we found that the evolutionary rate was higher in Ascomycota than in Basidiomycota. The differences in substitution rates between Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were significant. Within Ascomycota, the species-rich Sordariomycetes has the fastest evolutionary rate, while Leotiomycetes has the slowest. Our results indicate that the main contribution to the higher substitution rates in Ascomycota does not come from mutualism, ecological conditions, sterility, metabolic rate or shorter generation time, but is possibly caused by the founder effect. This is another example of the correlation between species number and evolutionary rates, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the founder effect is responsible for accelerated substitution rates in diverse clades.

  5. Extracellular polysaccharides from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota: production conditions, biochemical characteristics, and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Jaroszuk-Ściseł, Jolanta; Szałapata, Katarzyna; Nowak, Artur; Jaszek, Magdalena; Ozimek, Ewa; Majewska, Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Fungal polysaccharides (PSs) are the subject of research in many fields of science and industry. Many properties of PSs have already been confirmed and the list of postulated functions continues to grow. Fungal PSs are classified into different groups according to systematic affinity, structure (linear and branched), sugar composition (homo- and heteropolysaccharides), type of bonds between the monomers (β-(1 → 3), β-(1 → 6), and α-(1 → 3)) and their location in the cell (cell wall PSs, exoPSs, and endoPSs). Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are most frequently studied fungal PSs but their definition, classification, and origin are still not clear and should be explained. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota fungi producing EPS have different ecological positions (saprotrophic and endophytic, pathogenic or symbiotic-mycorrhizae fungi); therefore, EPSs play different biological functions, for example in the protection against environmental stress factors and in interactions with other organisms. EPSs obtained from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota fungal cultures are known for their antioxidant, immunostimulating, antitumor, and antimicrobial properties. The major objective of the presented review article was to provide a detailed description of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the effectiveness of EPS production by filamentous and yeast Ascomycota and Basidiomycota fungi and techniques of derivation of EPSs, their biochemical characteristics, and biological properties allowing comprehensive analysis as well as indication of similarities and differences between these fungal groups. Understanding the role of EPSs in a variety of processes and their application in food or pharmaceutical industries requires improvement of the techniques of their derivation, purification, and characterization. The detailed analyses of data concerning the derivation and application of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota EPSs can facilitate development and trace the direction of application of these EPSs

  6. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bercu, V., E-mail: vbercu@gmail.co [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Negut, C.D., E-mail: dnegut@nipne.r [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Duliu, O.G., E-mail: duliu@b.astral.r [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania)

    2010-12-15

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of {gamma}-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel-Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom-Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle-Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom-Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  7. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  8. Metamorphosis of the Basidiomycota Ustilago maydis: transformation of yeast-like cells into basidiocarps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Ponce, José L; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Verver-Vargas, Aurora; Palma-Tirado, Lourdes; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-10-01

    Ustilago maydis (DC) Cda., a phytopathogenic Basidiomycota, is the causal agent of corn smut. During its life cycle U. maydis alternates between a yeast-like, haploid nonpathogenic stage, and a filamentous, dikaryotic pathogenic form that invades the plant and induces tumor formation. As all the members of the Subphylum Ustilaginomycotina, U. maydis is unable to form basidiocarps, instead it produces teliospores within the tumors that germinate forming a septate basidium (phragmobasidium). We have now established conditions allowing a completely different developmental program of U. maydis when grown on solid medium containing auxins in dual cultures with maize embryogenic calli. Under these conditions U. maydis forms large hemi-spheroidal structures with all the morphological and structural characteristics of gastroid-type basidiocarps. These basidiocarps are made of three distinct hyphal layers, the most internal of which (hymenium) contains non-septate basidia (holobasidia) from which four basidiospores develop. In basidiocarps meiosis and genetic recombination occur, and meiotic products (basidiospores) segregate in a Mendelian fashion. These results are evidence of sexual cycle completion of an Ustilaginomycotina in vitro, and the demonstration that, besides its quasi-obligate biotrophic pathogenic mode of life, U. maydis possesses the genetic program to form basidiocarps as occurs in saprophytic Basidiomycota species.

  9. Escherichia coli as a production host for novel enzymes from basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelena, Katerina; Eisele, Nadine; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-12-01

    Many enzymes from basidiomycota have been identified and more recently characterized on the molecular level. This report summarizes the potential biotechnological applications of these enzymes and evaluates recent advances in their heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Being one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins, there are, however, recurrent problems of recovering substantial yields of correctly folded and active enzymes. Various strategies for the efficient production of recombinant proteins from basidiomycetous fungi are reviewed including the current knowledge on vectors and expression strains, as well as methods for enhancing the solubility of target expression products and their purification. Research efforts towards the refolding of recombinant oxidoreductases and hydrolases are presented to illustrate successful production strategies.

  10. A checklist of gilled mushrooms (Basidiomycota: Agaricomycetes) with diversity analysis in Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    OpenAIRE

    Girish Gogoi; Vipin Parkash

    2015-01-01

    Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary is comprised of five distinct compartments.  A total of 138 species of gilled mushrooms belonging to 48 genera, 23 families, five orders of the class Agaricomycetes, division Basidiomycota, have been collected and analyzed. The order Agaricales was was found with the highest number of species (113), followed by Russulales (14), Polyporales (5), Cantharellales (4) and Boletales (2). The species Coprinellus disseminatus and Megacollybia rodmani have shown t...

  11. Study on the ice nucleation activity of fungal spores (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pummer, B. G.; Atanasova, L.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.; Druzhinina, I. S.; Grothe, H.

    2012-04-01

    Biogenic ice nucleation (IN) in the atmosphere is a topic of growing interest, as, according to IPCC, the impact of IN on global climate is crucial to perform reliable climate model calculations. About 20 years ago IN activity of a few lichen and Fusarium species [1,2] was reported, while all other investigated fungi were IN-negative. However, as the fungal kingdom is vast, many abundant species, especially the Basidiomycota (most mushrooms), were not tested before. Furthermore, the focus of the past studies was on the IN activity of the mycelium as a cryoprotective mechanism, and not on the airborne spores. We carried out oil immersion measurements [3] with spores from 17 different fungal species of ecological, economical or sanitary importance. Most of these species have not been investigated before, like exponents of Aspergillus, Trichoderma and Agaricales (most mushrooms). Apart from F. avenaceum, spores of all measured species showed moderate or no IN activity, supporting the hypothesis that significant IN activity is a rather exclusive property of only a few species within the fungal kingdom. [1] Kieft TL and Ruscetti T: J. Bacteriol. 172, 3519-3523, 1990. [2] Pouleur S et al.: Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 58, 2960-2964, 1992. [3] Marcolli C et al.: Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 5081-5091, 2007.

  12. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds by Basidiomycota and its phenol oxidases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, L; Kotik, M; Marková, E; Homolka, L

    2016-04-01

    The phylum Basidiomycota include organisms with enormous bioremediation potential. A variety of processes were proposed at the lab scale for using these fungi and their phenol oxidases in the degradation of phenolics. Here we present a survey of this topic using literature published mostly over the last 10 years. First, the sources of the enzymes are summarized. The laccase and tyrosinase were mainly from Trametes versicolor and Agaricus bisporus, respectively. Recently, however, new promising wild-type producers of the enzymes have emerged and a number of recombinant strains were also constructed, based mainly on yeasts or Aspergillus strains as hosts. The next part of the study summarizes the enzyme and whole-cell applications for the degradation of phenols, polyphenols, cresols, alkylphenols, naphthols, bisphenols and halogenated (bis)phenols in model mixtures or real wastewaters from the food, paper and coal industries, or municipal and hospital sewage. The enzymes were applied as free (crude or purified) enzymes or as enzymes immobilized in various supports or CLEAs, and optionally recycled or used in continuous mode. Alternatively, growing cultures or harvested mycelia were used instead. The products, which were characterized as quinones and their polymers in some cases, could be eliminated by filtration, flocculation or adsorption onto chitosan. The purity of a treated wastewater was monitored using a sensitive aquatic organism. It is concluded that low-cost sources of these enzymes should be searched for and the benefits of enzymatic, biological and physico-chemical methods could be combined to make the processes fit for industrial use. PMID:26874626

  13. Mining metadata from unidentified ITS sequences in GenBank: A case study in Inocybe (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsson Stig

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of reference sequences from well-identified mycorrhizal fungi often poses a challenge to the inference of taxonomic affiliation of sequences from environmental samples, and many environmental sequences are thus left unidentified. Such unidentified sequences belonging to the widely distributed ectomycorrhizal fungal genus Inocybe (Basidiomycota were retrieved from GenBank and divided into species that were identified in a phylogenetic context using a reference dataset from an ongoing study of the genus. The sequence metadata of the unidentified Inocybe sequences stored in GenBank, as well as data from the corresponding original papers, were compiled and used to explore the ecology and distribution of the genus. In addition, the relative occurrence of Inocybe was contrasted to that of other mycorrhizal genera. Results Most species of Inocybe were found to have less than 3% intraspecific variability in the ITS2 region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. This cut-off value was used jointly with phylogenetic analysis to delimit and identify unidentified Inocybe sequences to species level. A total of 177 unidentified Inocybe ITS sequences corresponding to 98 species were recovered, 32% of which were successfully identified to species level in this study. These sequences account for an unexpectedly large proportion of the publicly available unidentified fungal ITS sequences when compared with other mycorrhizal genera. Eight Inocybe species were reported from multiple hosts and some even from hosts forming arbutoid or orchid mycorrhizae. Furthermore, Inocybe sequences have been reported from four continents and in climate zones ranging from cold temperate to equatorial climate. Out of the 19 species found in more than one study, six were found in both Europe and North America and one was found in both Europe and Japan, indicating that at least many north temperate species have a wide distribution. Conclusion Although DNA

  14. Analysis of indole compounds in fruiting bodies and in mycelia from in vitro cultures of Calocera viscosa (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Muszyńska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Calocera viscosa (Pers.: Fr. Fr. (Basidiomycota from Dacrymycetaceae family is a widespread species of mushroom in Poland. The aim of this study was to investigate the content of indole compounds in fruiting bodies and in mycelium cultured in vitro on solid and liquid medium of this species. Fruiting bodies of Calocera viscosa were collected in coniferous forests in south Poland and were used to derive in vitro cultures. The optimal medium composition for cultures was determined. Fresh material: fruiting bodies and mycelium from culture in vitro was frozen and then dried by lyophilization. The crushed dry biomass was extracted with petroleum ether to remove oil fraction, material was dried and extracted with methanol. Analysis of indole compounds was performed in methanol extracts using chromatographic methods: TLC, UV Vis, EIMS and HPLC. This analysis presented in all three extracts the following indole compounds: L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-methyltryptophan, melatonin and indole (contents fluctuated in the range: 0.37 to 11.88 mg/100 g d.w.. 5-hydroxytryptophan contents in all extracts were significant and amounted to 11.88 mg/100 g d.w. in fruiting bodies, and 11.42 in mycelium from liquid cultures and and 10.59 in mycelium from solid cultures. In addition, the fruiting bodies and mycelium from cultures on liquid medium revealed the presence of serotonin (0.39 and 3.19 mg/100 g d.w. respectively.

  15. A checklist of gilled mushrooms (Basidiomycota: Agaricomycetes with diversity analysis in Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Gogoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary is comprised of five distinct compartments.  A total of 138 species of gilled mushrooms belonging to 48 genera, 23 families, five orders of the class Agaricomycetes, division Basidiomycota, have been collected and analyzed. The order Agaricales was was found with the highest number of species (113, followed by Russulales (14, Polyporales (5, Cantharellales (4 and Boletales (2. The species Coprinellus disseminatus and Megacollybia rodmani have shown the highest (8.26 and the lowest density (0.05, respectively.  A total of 24 species, e.g., Termitomyces albuminosus, Marasmius curreyi, Marasmiellus candidus, Leucocoprinus medioflavus, Mycena leaiana, Hygrocybe miniata, Collybia chrysoropha, Gymnopus confluens were common with frequency percentage of 11.9, whereas Megacollybia rodmani with less frequency percentage (2.4 was found only in few quadrates of the sanctuary.  The highly abundant species were Termitomyces medius (91.7 and Coprinellus disseminatus (86.8, and less abundant species were Psilocybe wayanadensis (1.0 and Lepiota sp. (1.0 in the study site.  The order of the species richness index (R compartment wise was 2>3>4>5>1. Both the Shannon diversity index and Simpson diversity index of agarics was maximum (1.88, 0.98 in compartment 2, whereas minimum (1.72, 0.95 in compartment 1 and 5, respectively.  Moreover, the compartment 2 was found very much similar with compartment 3 and very less similar with compartment 1. 

  16. Cortinarius sect. Brunnei (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) in North Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Tuula; Kytövuori, Ilkka; Liimatainen, Kare

    2009-02-01

    The section Brunnei was extensively studied based on material from North Europe. To stabilise the nomenclature we studied the relevant types of taxa included in this section. Phylogenetic relationships and species limits were investigated using rDNA ITS sequences and the results were compared with the morphological data. We recognised 11 species: Cortinarius brunneus, C. clarobrunneus comb. nov., C. coleoptera, C. ectypus, C. gentilis, C. glandicolor (neotypified), C. pseudorubricosus, and four species described as new C. caesiobrunneus, C. albogaudis, C. carabus, and C. cicindela. They are described here and their taxonomy, ecology, distribution, and relationships are discussed. In addition, a key to species of the section Brunnei is provided. A total of 77 new sequences of 11 species are published including nine type sequences. Also the taxonomic assignments of sequences in the public databases belonging to the section Brunnei are revised. PMID:19027854

  17. A phylogenetic overview of the antrodia clade (Basidiomycota, Polyporales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Santana, Beatriz; Lindner, Daniel L; Miettinen, Otto; Justo, Alfredo; Hibbett, David S

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among members of the antrodia clade were investigated with molecular data from two nuclear ribosomal DNA regions, LSU and ITS. A total of 123 species representing 26 genera producing a brown rot were included in the present study. Three DNA datasets (combined LSU-ITS dataset, LSU dataset, ITS dataset) comprising sequences of 449 isolates were evaluated with three different phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference). We present a phylogenetic overview of the five main groups recovered: the fibroporia, laetiporus, postia, laricifomes and core antrodia groups. Not all of the main groups received strong support in the analyses, requiring further research. We were able to identify a number of well supported clades within the main groups. PMID:23935025

  18. Phylogeny and biogeography of the remarkable genus Bondarzewia (Basidiomycota, Russulales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Jia-Jia; Wang, Min; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Cui, Bao-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Bondarzewia is a conspicuous and widely distributed mushroom genus, but little is known about its origin and biogeography. Here, we investigated the systematics and biogeography of Bondarzewia species using multi-locus phylogenetic analysis. Four genetic markers, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), large nuclear ribosomal RNA subunit (nLSU), elongation factor 1-α (tef1) and mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU), were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of Bondarzewia. We performed Bayesian evolutionary analysis on the gene datasets of the largest and second largest subunits of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2). From the results, we inferred that the maximum crown age of Bondarzewia is approximately 25.5 million-years-ago (Mya) and that tropical East Asia is likely to be its ancestral area, with three possible expansions leading to its distribution in North America, Europe and Oceania. PMID:27680391

  19. Octaviania asterosperma (hypogeous Basidiomycota. Recent data to ecology and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Mleczko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses place Octaviania asterosperma in the Boletales, with Leccinum being the closest relative. Results of the structural investigation of O. asterosperma ectomycorrhiza with Fagus sylvatica confirm this systematic position. In Europe the species is an ectomycorrhizal partner of broad-leaved trees, such as Carpinus, Corylus, Fagus, Quercus and Tilia. This paper aims at presenting the new data to the distribution of O. asterosperma in Central Europe. The description of the basidiocarps discovered in Poland in the recent years is also given, together with evidence for the parasitic relationship of Sepedonium laevigatum with O. asterosperma. We also present the information concerning all known localities of the species in Poland and its distribution map. Data on the ecologz, distribution and status O. asterosperma in Europe, and some structural aspects of basidiocarps and spores, are also summarized.

  20. Noteworthy records of aphyllophoroid fungi in Finland (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panu Kunttu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present new records of noteworthy aphyllophoroid fungi, mainly polypores and corticioids in Finland. The following 19 rare or infrequently collected species are presented with notes on their substrates: Amylocorticium subsulphureum, Antrodiella parasitica, Ceraceomyces sulphurinus, Clavaria atroumbrina, Clavaria rosea, Gloeophyllum carbonarium, Hyphodontia flavipora, Junghuhnia fimbriatella, Lindtneria chordulata, Odonticium septocystidia, Peniophorella guttulifera, Perenniporia tenuis, Postia immitis, Repetobasidium vile, Resinicium pinicola, Sidera vulgaris, Tomentella coerulea, Trechispora laevis and Xylodon pruni. We also list 41 aphyllophoroid fungi as new to some sections of the boreal vegetation zone in Finland.

  1. Catálogo de hongos gasteroides (Basidiomycota de Catamarca, Argentina Catalogue of gasteroid fungi (Basidiomycota from Catamarca, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marta Dios

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un listado de los hongos gasteroides de la provincia de Catamarca (Argentina basado en la bibliografía hasta abril de 2010. En total aparecen citadas 43 especies distribuidas en 2 órdenes, 4 familias y 13 géneros. El número de especies catalogadas es relativamente baja pero este número probablemente se incremente cuando se estudien las zonas aún no muestreadas como son las regiones fitogeográfícas de la Puna y las Yungas.A compiled check list of gasteroid fungi of Catamarca Province (Argentina was made. It was based on literature records, available until April 2010. There were 43 species of fungi distributed in 2 orders, 4 families and 13 genera. The number of species recorded in this area was relatively poor but it is likely to increase with the study of unexplored areas not yet surveyed as the phytogeographical regions of the Puna and Yungas.

  2. Hongos comestibles silvestres: especies exóticas de Suillus (Boletales, Basidiomycota y Lactarius (Russulales, Basidiomycota asociados a cultivos de Pinus elliottii del nordeste argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Niveiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los hongos silvestres comestibles son un recurso económico importante que permite obtenerun producto deshidratado que puede comercializarse fácilmente. En el presente trabajo, y conel objeto de dar a conocer este recurso, se ilustran y describen dos especies de hongosmicorrícicos asociadas a cultivos de Pinus elliottii en el nordeste argentino que no han sidomencionadas anteriormente para la región: Lactarius deliciosus para la provincia de Misionesy Suillus granulatus para las provincias de Corrientes y Misiones

  3. GENERALIDADES DE LOS UREDINALES(Fungi: Basidiomycota Y DE SUS RELACIONES FILOGENÉTICAS Fundamentals Of Rust Fungi (Fungi: BasidiomycotaAnd Their Phylogentic Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALINA MARÍA ZULUAGA

    Full Text Available Los hongos-roya (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes representan uno de los grupos de microorganismos fitoparásitos más diversos y con mayor importancia económica mundial en la producción agrícola y forestal. Se caracterizan por ser patógenos obligados y por presentar una estrecha coevolución con sus hospedantes vegetales. Su taxonomía se ha basado fundamentalmente en el estudio de caracteres morfológicos, resultando en muchos casos en la formación de taxones polifiléticos. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se han tratado de incorporar herramientas moleculares que conduzcan a la generación de sistemas de clasificación basados en afinidades evolutivas. En esta revisión se ofrece una mirada general a las características de los uredinales, enfatizando en el surgimiento reciente de estudios filogenéticos que plantean la necesidad de establecer una profunda revisión de la taxonomía de este grupo. Finalmente se alerta sobre la necesidad de que en dichos estudios taxonómicos se incluya un alto número de especies de royas neotropicales, pues esta zona es reconocida no sólo por su alta diversidad de hongos-royas, sino también por las características únicas de sus ciclos de vida.Rust fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes are one of the most diverse and economically important plant pathogens of crops world-wide. They are obligated parasites and have a close evolutionary relationship with their plant hosts. Taxonomy of this group has been based on morphological treats, resulting in generation of polyphyletic taxa. Recently, different studies have incorporated molecular techniques addressed to establishing evolutionary affinities between these fungi. This review presents a general view of the biological characteristics of rust fungi, with a detailed discussion on the phylogenetic studies regarding the group. Finally, the review proposes the necessity to establish phylogenetic studies on rust fungi from the neotropics, where these fungi present a very high diversity and unique life cycles.

  4. Molecular phylogenetics and delimitation of species in Cortinarius section Calochroi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Jeppesen, Thomas Stjernegaard; Laessøe, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    Cortinarius is the most species rich genus of mushroom forming fungi with an estimated 2000 spp. worldwide. However, species delimitation within the genus is often controversial. This is particularly true in the section Calochroi (incl. section Fulvi), where the number of accepted taxa in Europe...... types were identical to other taxa, and most of these can be readily treated as synonyms. This emphasizes the importance of critical analysis of collections before describing new taxa. The phylogenetic separation of species was, in general, unambiguous and there is considerable potential for using ITS...

  5. GENERALIDADES DE LOS UREDINALES(Fungi: Basidiomycota Y DE SUS RELACIONES FILOGENÉTICAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZULUAGA CATALINA MARÍA

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    RESUMEN

    Los hongos-roya (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes representan uno de los grupos de microorganismos fitoparásitos más diversos y con mayor importancia económica mundial en la producción agrícola y forestal. Se caracterizan por ser patógenos obligados y por presentar una estrecha coevolución con sus hospedantes vegetales. Su taxonomía se ha basado fundamentalmente en el estudio de caracteres morfológicos, resultando en muchos casos en la formación de taxones polifiléticos. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se han tratado de incorporar herramientas moleculares que conduzcan a la generación de sistemas de clasificación basados en afinidades evolutivas. En esta revisión se ofrece una mirada general a las características de los uredinales, enfatizando en el surgimiento reciente de estudios filogenéticos que plantean la necesidad de establecer una profunda revisión de la taxonomía de este grupo. Finalmente se alerta sobre la necesidad de que en dichos estudios taxonómicos se incluya un alto número de especies de royas neotropicales, pues esta zona es reconocida no sólo por su alta diversidad de hongos-royas, sino también por las características únicas de sus ciclos de vida.

    Palabras clave: filogenia, hongos-roya, Puccinia, secuenciación, teliosporas.


    ABSTRACT

    Rust fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes are one of the most diverse and economically important plant pathogens of crops world-wide. They are obligated parasites and have a close evolutionary relationship with their plant hosts. Taxonomy of this group has been based on morphological treats, resulting in generation of polyphyletic taxa. Recently, different studies have incorporated molecular techniques addressed to establishing evolutionary affinities between these fungi. This review presents a general view of the biological characteristics of rust fungi, with a detailed discussion on the phylogenetic studies regarding the group. Finally, the review proposes the necessity to establish phylogenetic studies on rust fungi from the neotropics, where these fungi present a very high diversity and unique life cycles.

    Key words: phylogeny, Puccinia, rust fungi, sequencing, teliospores.

  6. Molecular phylogeny and morphology reveal a new species of Amyloporia (Basidiomycota) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bao-Kai; Dai, Yu-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Amyloporia pinea sp. nov. is described and illustrated on the basis of collections from southern China. Morphology and phylogenetic analysis of rDNA ITS sequences support this new species. Morphologically, it is characterized by resupinate, annual basidiocarps, cream to yellowish buff pore surface when fresh, which becomes yellowish brown to clay-buff upon drying, a dimitic hyphal system with clamped generative hyphae and inamyloid skeletal hyphae, fusoid cystidioles, and cylindrical basidiospores; moreover, it causes a brown rot. Molecular phylogeny inferred from ITS sequence data suggested a close relationship between A. pinea and Amyloporia crassa sensu lato. Antrodia subxantha has amyloid skeletal hyphae, and grouped within the Amyloporia clade, hence, it is transferred to Amyloporia, and a new combination Amyloporia subxantha is proposed. PMID:23912447

  7. New records of agaricoid fungi (Basidiomycota from Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altielys Casale Magnago

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a list of eighteen species of agaricoid fungi collected in the Atlantic Forest in the state of Paraíba. Hygrocybe subcaespitosa and Marasmius similis are new records for Brazil. Sixteen species are new records for Paraíba.

  8. New records of agaricoid fungi (Basidiomycota) from Paraíba, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Altielys Casale Magnago; Ariadne Nóbrega Marinho Furtado; Salomé Urrea-Valencia; Anne Falcão Freitas; Maria Alice Neves

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a list of eighteen species of agaricoid fungi collected in the Atlantic Forest in the state of Paraíba. Hygrocybe subcaespitosa and Marasmius similis are new records for Brazil. Sixteen species are new records for Paraíba.

  9. Irpex(Basidiomycota,Steccherinaceae)in China%中国耙齿菌属小记

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴玉成; 熊红霞

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of Irpex in China is summarized,and three species in the genus were found.Irpex hydnoides is newly found in China,and it is different from other species in the genus by its yellowish pore surface when fresh,and by ellipsoid basidiospores.The illustrated description of the species is given based on the Chinese materials.

  10. Plunging hands into the mushroom jar: a phylogenetic framework for Lyophyllaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, J-M; Moreau, P-A; Corriol, G; Bidaud, A; Chalange, R; Dudova, Z; Richard, F

    2015-04-01

    During the last two decades, the unprecedented development of molecular phylogenetic tools has propelled an opportunity to revisit the fungal kingdom under an evolutionary perspective. Mycology has been profoundly changed but a sustained effort to elucidate large sections of the astonishing fungal diversity is still needed. Here we fill this gap in the case of Lyophyllaceae, a species-rich and ecologically diversified family of mushrooms. Assembly and genealogical concordance multigene phylogenetic analysis of a large dataset that includes original, vouchered material from expert field mycologists reveal the phylogenetic topology of the family, from higher (generic) to lower (species) levels. A comparative analysis of the most widely used phylogenetic markers in Fungi indicates that the nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, along with the 5.8S rDNA (ITS) and portions of the genes for RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) is the most performing combination to resolve the broadest range of taxa within Lyophyllaceae. Eleven distinct evolutionary lineages are identified, that display partial overlap with traditional genera as well as with the phylogenetic framework previously proposed for the family. Eighty phylogenetic species are delineated, which shed light on a large number of morphological concepts, including rare and poorly documented ones. Probing these novel phylogenetic species to the barcoding method of species limit delineation, indicates that the latter method fully resolves Lyophyllaceae species, except in one clade. This case study provides the first comprehensive phylogenetic overview of Lyophyllaceae, a necessary step towards a taxonomical, ecological and nomenclatural revision of this family of mushrooms. It also proposes a set of methodological guidelines that may be of relevance for future taxonomic works in other groups of Fungi.

  11. Phylogenetic analyses reveal deeply divergent species lineages in the genus Sphaerobolus (Phallales: Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geml, József; Davis, Donald D; Geiser, David M

    2005-05-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 27 artillery fungus (Sphaerobolus sp.) isolates were conducted to identify species boundaries in the genus Sphaerobolus. Multiple gene genealogies inferred from maximum likelihood, Bayesian, and maximum-parsimony analyses of sequence data from individual loci (mtSSU, ITS, EF 1-alpha, and LSU) and a combined dataset (mtSSU, ITS, and EF 1-alpha) concordantly indicate the existence of three deeply divergent lineages in the genus Sphaerobolus, each representing a phylogenetic species. These three phylogenetic species correspond to two known species: Sphaerobolus iowensis and Sphaerobolus stellatus, and a newly discovered species. Suprageneric phylogenetic analyses of the mtSSU and LSU datasets containing representatives of related genera of the gomphoid-phalloid clade of Homobasidiomycetes suggested that the undescribed taxon likely is more closely related to S. stellatus than to S. iowensis. PMID:15804406

  12. In vitro wood decay of teak (Tectona grandis by Rigidoporus cf. microporus (Meripiliaceae, Polyporales, Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sarmiento S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of exotic species like teak for industry demands has increased over the last decades in Central America, however its vulnerability to decay by saprophytic fungi has not been well studied. Among these fungi, Rigidoporus spp. have been described as white rotters of dead hardwoods and conifers worldwide. In Costa Rica, R. microporus has been found growing on teak stumps. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of this white rot fungus on the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of teak wood from trees of different ages. Six and ten year old sapwood and heartwood samples were used in the assays. Severe anatomical damage and the highest weight and resistance losses were observed on 6 yr. old sapwood samples. There was an increase in the quantity of soluble materials in 1% NaOH (relative values and lignin content in all the samples analyzed, after 3 months exposure and up to the end of the experiment. Mass loss reduction and increased resistance of wood to compressive strength parallel to the grain were related to both the type of wood and the age of the tree. Knowledge of the potential damage that this fungus can cause to teak wood might help in a better selection of wood and developing more effective protection measures against decay in the field or in construction wood.

  13. A gilled mushroom, Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. (Basidiomycota: Agaricales), in Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, George

    2016-09-01

    A densely scaled small mushroom in Baltic amber is described as Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. and is characterized by a convex pileus 1.0 mm in diameter, distant to subdistant lamellae with smooth margins and a centrally inserted cylindrical, solid stipe. Its taxonomic placement is uncertain. This is the first mushroom described from Baltic amber. PMID:27567715

  14. 中国附毛孔菌属小记%Trichaptum(Basidiomycota,Polyporaceae)in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴玉成; 崔宝凯

    2008-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the knowledge of Trichaptum in China,and 10 species in the genus were found.Trichaptum brastagii was newly found in China,and its illustrated description is given based on the Chinese materials.A key to the Chinese species of the genus is given.

  15. Chemical composition and cytotoxic activity of the polysaccharide fractions in Sarcodon imbricatus (Basidiomycota)

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Sułkowska-Ziaja; Bożena Muszyńska; Halina Ekiert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was chemical analysis of polysaccharide fractions from sporocarps of Sarcodon imbricatus collected in natural sites and from the mycelium of in vitro cultures. Three polysaccharide fractions (FOI, FOII, FOIII) were isolated from sporocarps and two (FKI, FKII) from in vitro cultures. Qualitative analysis by HPLC method showed that they are composed of galactose and fucose (FOI, FKI) or glucose and fucose (FOII, FKII). FOIII fraction of the sporocarps consisted of glucose o...

  16. Chemical composition and cytotoxic activity of the polysaccharide fractions in Sarcodon imbricatus (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Sułkowska-Ziaja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was chemical analysis of polysaccharide fractions from sporocarps of Sarcodon imbricatus collected in natural sites and from the mycelium of in vitro cultures. Three polysaccharide fractions (FOI, FOII, FOIII were isolated from sporocarps and two (FKI, FKII from in vitro cultures. Qualitative analysis by HPLC method showed that they are composed of galactose and fucose (FOI, FKI or glucose and fucose (FOII, FKII. FOIII fraction of the sporocarps consisted of glucose only. Molecular weights of isolated fractions ranged from 3.8 to 16.3 kDa for fractions from the sporocarps and from 5.8 to 14.7 kDa for that ones isolated from in vitro culture. The total percentage of sugar content for all fractions ranged from 97.8% to 99.1%. The percentage of uronic acids contents in acidic fractions was 2.6% and 2.7% for the FOI and FKI respectively. The work included also an assessment of cytotoxic activity of polysaccharide fractions in relation to tumor cell lines of human breast cancer MCV-7. FOI polysaccharide fraction of the sporocarps inhibited the growth of cancer cells in 50% compared to the control at a concentration of 0.0125%, while the polysaccharide fraction FKI from in vitro cultures inhibited cell growth in a concentration of 0.016%.

  17. Diversidade de Agaricales (Basidiomycota) na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brasil Diversity of Agaricales (Basidiomycota) in the Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Helenires Queiroz de Souza; Izonete de Jesus Araújo Aguiar

    2004-01-01

    Foi realizado um estudo dos representantes da Ordem Agaricales Clements (Hymenomycetes, Basidiomycotina), ocorrentes na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, situada na Estrada AM-010, Manaus-Itacoatiara, Km 64, Latitude 02° 43' S e Longitude 59° 47' W, Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas. A área abrange 709 ha de floresta de terra firme primária. As coletas foram realizadas no período de dezembro de 2000 a junho de 2001 e seguiu-se a metodologia usual para identificação de Agaricales. Foram estudadas um to...

  18. Diversidade de Agaricales (Basidiomycota na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brasil Diversity of Agaricales (Basidiomycota in the Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenires Queiroz de Souza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo dos representantes da Ordem Agaricales Clements (Hymenomycetes, Basidiomycotina, ocorrentes na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, situada na Estrada AM-010, Manaus-Itacoatiara, Km 64, Latitude 02° 43' S e Longitude 59° 47' W, Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas. A área abrange 709 ha de floresta de terra firme primária. As coletas foram realizadas no período de dezembro de 2000 a junho de 2001 e seguiu-se a metodologia usual para identificação de Agaricales. Foram estudadas um total de 39 espécies, distribuídas em 13 gêneros e seis famílias: Polyporaceae: Pleurotus sp.; Hygrophoraceae: Hygrocybe cf. megistospora, Hygrocybe aff. miniceps, Hygrocybe occidentalis var. scarletina, e mais oito espécies de Hygrocybe indeterminadas; Tricholomataceae: Clitocybe sp., Hydropus sp.1 e Hydropus sp.2, Macrocystidia sp., Marasmiellus sp., Marasmius bellus, Marasmius haedinus var. haedinus,Marasmius cf. leoninus, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. ruber,Marasmius cf. setulosifolius, Marasmius tageticolor, Marasmius cf. variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, Marasmius sp.1, Marasmius sp.2, Marasmius sp.3 e Marasmius sp.4, Tricholoma sp.; Agaricaceae: Agaricus sp.1 e Agaricus sp.2, Lepiota sp., Cystoderma sp.; Entolomataceae: Entoloma cf. azureoviride, Entoloma cf. cystidiophorum, Entoloma strigosissima, Entoloma sp.; Russulaceae: Lactarius panuoides. Destas, Entoloma azureoviride, Hygrocybe miniceps, Lactarius panuoides, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius e Marasmius variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, provavelmente, estão sendo aqui citadas pela primeira vez, para o Brasil. Com exceção de Marasmius tageticolor, as demais espécies são citadas pela primeira vez, para a Reserva Egler. São fornecidas tabelas com a ocorrência das espécies de acordo com o gradiente topográfico (baixio, vertente, platô e seus respectivos habitats.A study of the order Agaricales Clements (Hymenomycetes, Basidiomycotina, occurring in the Reserva Biológica Walter Egler was carried out from December 2000 to June 2001. The area of study is situated at Road AM-010, Manaus-Itacoatiara, km 64, Latitude 02° 43' S and Longitude 59° 47' W, Rio Preto da Eva, in the State of Amazonas, with a total area of 709 ha of terra firme rain forest. The fungi collected were identified based on traditional methodology for identification of Agaricales. A total of 39 species were studied, distributed in 13 genera and six families: Polyporaceae: Pleurotus sp.; Hygrophoraceae: Hygrocybe cf. megistospora, Hygrocybe aff. miniceps, Hygrocybe occidentalis var. scarletina and eight indeterminate species of Hygrocybe; Tricholomataceae: Clitocybe sp., Hydropus sp.1 and Hydropus sp.2, Macrocystidia sp., Marasmiellus sp., Marasmius bellus, Marasmius haedinus var. haedinus, Marasmius cf. leoninus, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. ruber, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius, Marasmius tageticolor, Marasmius cf. variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, Marasmius sp.1, Marasmius sp.2, Marasmius sp.3 and Marasmius sp.4, Tricholoma sp.; Agaricaceae: Agaricus sp.1 and Agaricus sp.2, Lepiota sp., Cystoderma sp.; Entolomataceae: Entoloma cf. azureoviride, Entoloma cf. cystidiophorum, Entoloma strigosissima, Entoloma sp.; Russulaceae: Lactarius panuoides. Entoloma azureoviride, Hygrocybe miniceps, Lactarius panuoides, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius and Marasmius variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, apparently are here cited for the first time from Brazil. With exception of Marasmius tageticolor, all species are cited here for the first time as occurring in Egler Forest. The tables with the species occurrence, in accordance with the topographical gradient (sand bank, incline, plateau and its respective habitat, are supplied.

  19. Cyathus species (Basidiomycota: Fungi from the Atlantic Forest of Pernambuco, Brazil: taxonomy and ecological notes Especies de Cyathus (Basidiomycota: Fungi del bosque atlántico de Pernambuco: taxonomía y notas ecológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Trierveiler-Pereira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyathus specimens were collected over a one-year period in 4 remnants of the Atlantic Forest in Pernambuco, Brazil. According to traditional morphological analysis, the following species were identified: C. intermedius, C. montagnei, C. setosus and C. triplex. These 4 species had previously been recorded from Brazil, but C. setosus is reported for the first time from northeastern Brazil. The holotype of C. setosus was examined and we found differences in the spore dimensions from those described in the original publication. An identification key for the species of Cyathus recorded from Pernambuco is provided.Se recolectaron ejemplares de Cyathus durante 1 año en 4 vestigios de bosque atlántico en Pernambuco, Brasil. Según el análisis morfológico tradicional, se identificaron: C. intermedius, C. montagnei, C. setosus y C. triplex, las cuales se conocen en el país, pero C. setosus es registrada por primera vez en la región noreste de Brasil. El holotipo de C. setosus se examinó encontrándose diferencias en el tamaño de las esporas con la publicación original. Se presenta una clave de identificación para las especies de Cyathus conocidas en Pernambuco.

  20. Report of wood decay fungus Inonotus tropicalis (phylum Basidiomycota) from a dog with a granulomatous mediastinal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Barbara J; McGrath, Elizabeth; Giuffrida, Michelle; Craft, Serena L M; Kung, Chung Yee; Smith, Matthew E

    2013-09-01

    A 75.9-kg, 3.5-year-old male Irish Wolfhound dog with a 2-3-week history of gagging and eating difficulties was referred to the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Hospital (Gainesville, Florida) for evaluation of a large cranial mediastinal mass suspected to be a thymoma or lymphosarcoma. The patient had 4 months of nearly 10 kg progressive weight loss with severe flank sensitivity and radiographically apparent lumbar vertebral changes interpreted as discospondylitis. Lab work revealed hyperglobulinemia, mild proteinuria, normal T4, negative Brucella canis titer, and negative blood and urine bacterial cultures. A thoracotomy revealed a nonresectable, destructive, space-occupying mediastinal mass resulting in euthanasia without surgical recovery. Biopsies from the mass were collected during surgery for histology. Microscopic examination revealed extensive granulomatous cellulitis and lymphadenitis characterized by central cavitated necrotic areas containing debris and degenerate neutrophils, intermediate zones of fibrovascular proliferation with marked mixed inflammation, peripheral fibrosis, frequent multinucleated macrophages, and scattered mineralization. The necrotic material contained dense mats of 2 µm wide by 8-15 µm long fungal hyphae with parallel walls, acute angle branching, frequent septae, and occasional bulb-like dilations. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region confirmed the presence of a fungus in the Inonotus tropicalis group. Inonotus tropicalis is primarily a wood decay fungus that is found on dead wood from angiosperms in tropical and subtropical habitats. Isolates of the I. tropicalis group have been detected a few times from immunosuppressed human beings with X-linked granulomatous disease. PMID:23929678

  1. Determining threshold values for barcoding fungi: lessons from Cortinarius (Basidiomycota), a highly diverse and widespread ectomycorrhizal genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica, Sigisfredo; Schön, Max Emil; Abarenkov, Kessy; Riess, Kai; Liimatainen, Kare; Niskanen, Tuula; Dima, Bálint; Soop, Karl; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Jeppesen, Thomas Stjernegaard; Peintner, Ursula; Kuhnert-Finkernagel, Regina; Brandrud, Tor Erik; Saar, Günter; Oertel, Bernhard; Ammirati, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Different distance-based threshold selection approaches were used to assess and compare use of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to distinguish among 901 Cortinarius species represented by >3000 collections. Sources of error associated with genetic markers and selection approaches were explored and evaluated using MOTUs from genus and lineage based-alignments. Our study indicates that 1%-2% more species can be distinguished by using the full-length ITS barcode as compared to either the ITS1 or ITS2 regions alone. Optimal threshold values for different picking approaches and genetic marker lengths inferred from a subset of species containing major lineages ranged from 97.0% to 99.5% sequence similarity using clustering optimization and UNITE SH, and from 1% to 2% sequence dissimilarity with CROP. Errors for the optimal cutoff ranged from 0% to 70%, and these can be reduced to a maximum of 22% when excluding species lacking a barcode gap. A threshold value of 99% is suitable for distinguishing species in the majority of lineages in the genus using the entire ITS region but only 90% of the species could be identified using just the ITS1 or ITS2 region. Prior identification of species, lacking barcode gaps and their subsequent separate analyses, maximized the accuracy of threshold approaches. PMID:26929438

  2. Evolutionary history of Serpulaceae (Basidiomycota: molecular phylogeny, historical biogeography and evidence for a single transition of nutritional mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauserud Håvard

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal genus Serpula (Serpulaceae, Boletales comprises several saprotrophic (brown rot taxa, including the aggressive house-infecting dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. Recent phylogenetic analyses have indicated that the ectomycorrhiza forming genera Austropaxillus and Gymnopaxillus cluster within Serpula. In this study we use DNA sequence data to investigate phylogenetic relationships, historical biogeography of, and nutritional mode transitions in Serpulaceae. Results Our results corroborate that the two ectomycorrhiza-forming genera, Austropaxillus and Gymnopaxillus, form a monophyletic group nested within the saprotrophic genus Serpula, and that the Serpula species S. lacrymans and S. himantioides constitute the sister group to the Austropaxillus-Gymnopaxillus clade. We found that both vicariance (Beringian and long distance dispersal events are needed to explain the phylogeny and current distributions of taxa within Serpulaceae. Our results also show that the transition from brown rot to mycorrhiza has happened only once in a monophyletic Serpulaceae, probably between 50 and 22 million years before present. Conclusions This study supports the growing understanding that the same geographical barriers that limit plant- and animal dispersal also limit the spread of fungi, as a combination of vicariance and long distance dispersal events are needed to explain the present patterns of distribution in Serpulaceae. Our results verify the transition from brown rot to ECM within Serpulaceae between 50 and 22 MyBP.

  3. Dentipellis (Hericiaceae, Basidiomycota)in China%中国的软齿菌属的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏玉莲; 余长军; 戴玉成

    2005-01-01

    The genus of hydnaceous fungi Dentipellis Donk in China is studied, and a key for the Chinese species is supplied. D. separans (Peck) Donk is newly recorded from China,and the illustration of the species and other Chinese species of the genus are given.%详细描述了软齿菌属在中国的种类,其中稀软齿菌[Dentipellis separans(Peck)Donk]为中国新记录种,并根据中国的材料时3个种进行了详细描述和绘图.

  4. 海南真菌一新纪录种——挂钟菌(担子菌纲)%Calyptella capula (Basidiomycota)-A Fungus New to Hainan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏玉莲; 李冠华

    2009-01-01

    挂钟菌(Calyptella capula)采于海南省尖峰岭自然保护区的棕榈树腐烂木上,为海南挂钟菌属的首次报道.该种最在主要的特征为子实体倒杯状,菌丝系统一体系.本文给出了该菌的详细描述并绘图.%Calyptella capula(Holmsk.)Quél.is newly recorded from Hainan Province.The main characteristics of the species are the fruiting body consisting of a stalked,erect or pendant small cup,and its hyphae system is monomitic.Its illustrated description is given based on specimen collected on rotten palm wood from Jianfengling Nature Reserve.This is the first report of Calyptella from Hainan,China.

  5. Proposal to conserve the name Olivea tectonae (T.S. Ramakr. & K. Ramakr.) R.L. Mulder against Olivea tectonae (Racib.) Thirum (Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teak rust is a problematic disease of Tectona grandis L.f., teak (Lamiaceae), that has its most devastating effects on nursery plants and young plantations where it may cause severe growth stunting due to defoliation. The teak rust fungus is considered to be a threat to forest, horticultural, and a...

  6. Riqueza de fungos poliporoides (Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) em uma floresta ombrófila densa no Amapá, Amazônia brasileira

    OpenAIRE

    Adriene Mayra da Silva Soares; Helen Maria Pontes Sotão; Priscila Sanjuan de Medeiros; Tatiana Baptista Gibertoni

    2014-01-01

    Em uma floresta ombrófila densa da Amazônia, Amapá, Brasil). Este estudo apresenta os resultados de um inventário taxonômico de fungos poliporoides realizado em uma área de floresta da Amazônia brasileira, localizada na Floresta Nacional do Amapá. Foram identificados 637 espécimes, representando 97 espécies, em oito famílias de Agaricomycetes (Bondarzewiaceae, Fomitopsidaceae, Ganodermataceae, Hymenochaetaceae, Meripilaceae, Meruliaceae, Polyporaceae e Schizoporaceae). Todas as espécies repre...

  7. Riqueza de fungos poliporoides (Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota em uma floresta ombrófila densa no Amapá, Amazônia brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriene Mayra da Silva Soares

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Em uma floresta ombrófila densa da Amazônia, Amapá, Brasil. Este estudo apresenta os resultados de um inventário taxonômico de fungos poliporoides realizado em uma área de floresta da Amazônia brasileira, localizada na Floresta Nacional do Amapá. Foram identificados 637 espécimes, representando 97 espécies, em oito famílias de Agaricomycetes (Bondarzewiaceae, Fomitopsidaceae, Ganodermataceae, Hymenochaetaceae, Meripilaceae, Meruliaceae, Polyporaceae e Schizoporaceae. Todas as espécies representam primeiro registro para a FLONA do Amapá, entre as quais 77 são novos registros para o estado do Amapá, sendo Wrightoporia tropicalis e Junghuhnia subundata novos registros para a Amazônia brasileira. Os estimadores de riqueza apontam para a área até 121 espécies, sugerindo a necessidade de um maior esforço amostral. Cerca de 83% das espécies tiveram sua frequência relativa considerada rara. Este estudo ampliou o conhecimento da riqueza destes organismos, fornecendo dados adicionais sobre sua distribuição geográfica na Amazônia brasileira

  8. Anatomical changes in Willow Wood Decayed by the brown rot fungus Coriolellus malicola (Basidiomycota Modificaciones anatómicas en madera de sauce por acción Coriolellus malicola (Aphyllophorales agente de pudrición castaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica A. Murace

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina, Salix wood is employed mainly in pulp and paper industry. In this country, the brown rotter C oriolellus malicola was found in association with willow plantations. The purpose of this work was to study the anatomical changes caused by C. malicola in willow wood in order to provide information on the effects of brown rot decay in the yield and quality of pulp. Two willow clones were employed: Salix nigra 4 and Salix babylonica x Salix alba cv I 131-25 . Two exposure times were used: 75 and 150 days. The percentages of weight loss produced by this fungus in both clones was ca. 30% at 75 days and ca. 60% at 150 days of decay. C. malicola degraded mainly fibre walls. Microscopically, the loss of cell shape, the presence of transwall fractures and the loss of birefringence were the main anatomical modifications observed. According to our observations decayed Salix wood by C. malicola seems to be inadequate for pulp industry.En la República Argentina la madera de Salix es empleada principalmente en la industria papelera. En este país el hongo de pudrición castaña C oriolellus malicola se encontró asociado a plantaciones comerciales de sauce. El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar las modificaciones anatómicas causada por C. malicola en la madera de sauce con el fin de aportar información sobre los efectos de la pudrición castaña en los rendimientos y calidad de la pulpa para papel. Se emplearon dos clones: Salix nigra 4 y Salix babylonica x Salix alba cv I. 131-25 . Se trabajó con dos tiempos de exposición: 75 y 150 días. Las pérdidas de peso producidas por esta cepa en ambos clones fueron de ca. del 30% a los 75 días y de ca. del 60% a los 150 días de incubación. C. malicola degradó principalmente las paredes de las fibras. Microscópicamente, las principales modificaciones anatómicas observadas fueron: deformación del tejido, presencia de fracturas transversales en las paredes celulares y pérdida de birrefringencia. De acuerdo con nuestras observaciones la madera de Salix degradada por C. malicola sería inadecuada para la industria del pulpado.

  9. Plant or fungal sequences? An alternative optimized PCR protocol to avoid ITS (nrDNA) misamplification

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Fernandes Oliveira de Miranda; Vanderlei Geraldo Martins; Antonio Furlan; Maurício Bacci Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) from leaves of Drosera (Droseraceae) were amplified using "universal" primers. The analysis of the products demonstrated most samples were a molecular mixture as a result of unsuccessful and non-specific amplifications. Among the obtained sequences, two were from Basidiomycota fungi. Homologous sequences of Basidiomycota were obtained from GenBank database and added to a data set with sequences from Drosera leaves. Parsimo...

  10. Distribution of introns in fungal histone genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Soo Yun

    Full Text Available Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lack intron in their histone genes, except for an intron in one of histone H4 genes of Yarrowia lipolytica. On the other hand, Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina have introns in their histone genes. We compared the distributions of 81, 47, 79, and 98 introns in the fungal histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Based on the multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of histones, we identified 19, 13, 31, and 22 intron insertion sites in the histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Surprisingly only one hot spot of introns in the histone H2A gene is shared between Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina, suggesting that most of introns of Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina were acquired independently. Our findings suggest that the common ancestor of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota maybe had a few introns in the histone genes. In the course of fungal evolution, Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lost the histone introns; Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina acquired other introns independently. In addition, most of the introns have sequence similarity among introns of phylogenetically close species, strongly suggesting that horizontal intron transfer events between phylogenetically distant species have not occurred recently in the fungal histone genes.

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of fungi and wood-borers in the coastal tropical waters of Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vishwakiran, Y.; Thakur, N.L.; Raghukumar, S.; Yennawar, P.L.; Anil, A.C.

    fungi (20 Ascomycota, 1 Basidiomycota, 12 Mitosporic fungi) and 8 wood-borers (7 Teredinids and 1 Pholad) were recorded. A wide gamut of distribution patterns of fungi and wood-borers was found. A high frequency of occurrence (greater than 20%) and a...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the White-Rot Fungus Obba rivulosa 3A-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Otto; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P; Hainaut, Matthieu; Hatakka, Annele; Henrissat, Bernard; Hildén, Kristiina; Kuo, Rita; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Mäkelä, Miia R; Sandor, Laura; Spatafora, Joseph W; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulosa (Polyporales, Basidiomycota), a polypore known for its lignin-decomposing ability. The genome is based on the homokaryon 3A-2 originating in Finland. The genome is typical in size and carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZy) content for wood-decomposing basidiomycetes. PMID:27634999

  13. Community Structure and Succession Regulation of Fungal Consortia in the Lignocellulose-Degrading Process on Natural Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyu Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate fungal community structures and dynamic changes in forest soil lignocellulose-degrading process. rRNA gene clone libraries for the samples collected in different stages of lignocellulose degradation process were constructed and analyzed. A total of 26 representative RFLP types were obtained from original soil clone library, including Mucoromycotina (29.5%, unclassified Zygomycetes (33.5%, Ascomycota (32.4%, and Basidiomycota (4.6%. When soil accumulated with natural lignocellulose, 16 RFLP types were identified from 8-day clone library, including Basidiomycota (62.5%, Ascomycota (36.1%, and Fungi incertae sedis (1.4%. After enrichment for 15 days, identified 11 RFLP types were placed in 3 fungal groups: Basidiomycota (86.9%, Ascomycota (11.5%, and Fungi incertae sedis (1.6%. The results showed richer, more diversity and abundance fungal groups in original forest soil. With the degradation of lignocellulose, fungal groups Mucoromycotina and Ascomycota decreased gradually, and wood-rotting fungi Basidiomycota increased and replaced the opportunist fungi to become predominant group. Most of the fungal clones identified in sample were related to the reported lignocellulose-decomposing strains. Understanding of the microbial community structure and dynamic change during natural lignocellulose-degrading process will provide us with an idea and a basis to construct available commercial lignocellulosic enzymes or microbial complex.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the White-Rot Fungus Obba rivulosa 3A-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P.; Hainaut, Matthieu; Hatakka, Annele; Henrissat, Bernard; Kuo, Rita; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Mäkelä, Miia R.; Sandor, Laura; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulosa (Polyporales, Basidiomycota), a polypore known for its lignin-decomposing ability. The genome is based on the homokaryon 3A-2 originating in Finland. The genome is typical in size and carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZy) content for wood-decomposing basidiomycetes. PMID:27634999

  15. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up some 37% of the described fungi and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To b...

  16. Biochemical and functional characterization of recombinant fungal immunomodulatory proteins (rFIPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaan-Net, S.; Chanput, W.; Hertz, A.; Zwittink, R.D.; Mes, J.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study two novel FIPs have been identified and characterized. The first is FIP-nha, identified in the ascomycete Nectria haematococca, and as such, FIP-nha would be the first FIP to be identified outside the order of Basidiomycota. The second is LZ-9, an LZ-8 like protein identified in Ganode

  17. Mating and Progeny Isolation in The Corn Smut Fungus Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The corn smut pathogen, Ustilago maydis (U. maydis) (DC.) Corda, is a semi-obligate plant pathogenic fungus in the phylum Basidiomycota (Alexopoulos, Mims and Blackwell, 1996). The fungus can be easily cultured in its haploid yeast phase on common laboratory media. However, to complete its sexual cy...

  18. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade ...

  19. Sarcodon in the Neotropics II : four new species from Colombia and a key to the regional species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grupe, Arthur; Vasco-Palacios, Aida Marcela; Smith, Matthew E; Boekhout, Teun; Henkel, Terry W

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on four species of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tooth fungus genusSarcodon(Bankeraceae, Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) recently discovered in the Colombian Amazon.Sarcodon colombiensissp. nov.,Sarcodon rufobrunneussp. nov.,Sarcodon pallidogriseussp. nov. andSarcodon bairdiisp. nov. are

  20. Fungal endophyte diversity in Sarracenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from four species of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia: S. minor, S. oreophila, S. purpurea, and S. psittacina. Twelve taxa of fungi, eight within the Ascomycota and four within the Basidiomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing ...

  1. The lichen genus Multiclavula R.H.Petersen in China%中国棒瑚菌属地衣的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾泽峰; 任强; 赵遵田

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 INTRODUCTION The genus Multiclavula R.H.Petersen is a member of the family Clavariaceae belonging to Agaricales in Basidiomycota.The Multiclavula was erected by Petersen(1967),who segregated it from Lentaria based on unbranched basidiomata of small size usually lichenized with algae.

  2. Manglicolous fungi from Chorao mangroves, Goa, West coast of India: Diversity and frequency of occurrence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; Raghukumar, S.

    were recorded from 166 wood and prop root samples: 31 species belonging to Ascomycota, 2 to Basidiomycota and 12 to the asexual fungi. Aigialus grandis (15.3%) was found to be the most frequently occurring fungus followed by Trichocladium achrasporum (8...

  3. Thai marine fungal diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattaket Choeyklin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine fungal diversity of Thailand was investigated and 116 Ascomycota, 3 Basidiomycota, 28 anamorphic fungi, 7 Stramenopiles recorded, with 30 tentatively identified. These species have primarily been collected from driftwood and attached decayed wood of mangrove trees. The holotype number of 15 taxa is from Thailand and 33 are new records from the country.

  4. Contrasting diversity and host association of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes versus root-associated ascomycetes in a dipterocarp rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Toju, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Root-associated fungi, including ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi, are among the most diverse and important belowground plant symbionts in dipterocarp rainforests. Our study aimed to reveal the biodiversity, host association, and community structure of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and root-associated Ascomycota (including root-endophytic Ascomycota) in a lowland dipterocarp rainforest in Southeast Asia. The host plant chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) region and fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region were sequenced using tag-encoded, massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing to identify host plant and root-associated fungal taxa in root samples. In total, 1245 ascomycetous and 127 putative ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous taxa were detected from 442 root samples. The putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota were likely to be associated with closely related dipterocarp taxa to greater or lesser extents, whereas host association patterns of the root-associated Ascomycota were much less distinct. The community structure of the putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota was possibly more influenced by host genetic distances than was that of the root-associated Ascomycota. This study also indicated that in dipterocarp rainforests, root-associated Ascomycota were characterized by high biodiversity and indistinct host association patterns, whereas ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota showed less biodiversity and a strong host phylogenetic preference for dipterocarp trees. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that root-associated Ascomycota, which might be mainly represented by root-endophytic fungi, have biodiversity hotspots in the tropics, whereas biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota increases with host genetic diversity. PMID:25884708

  5. Contrasting diversity and host association of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes versus root-associated ascomycetes in a dipterocarp rainforest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotoshi Sato

    Full Text Available Root-associated fungi, including ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi, are among the most diverse and important belowground plant symbionts in dipterocarp rainforests. Our study aimed to reveal the biodiversity, host association, and community structure of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and root-associated Ascomycota (including root-endophytic Ascomycota in a lowland dipterocarp rainforest in Southeast Asia. The host plant chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL region and fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 region were sequenced using tag-encoded, massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing to identify host plant and root-associated fungal taxa in root samples. In total, 1245 ascomycetous and 127 putative ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous taxa were detected from 442 root samples. The putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota were likely to be associated with closely related dipterocarp taxa to greater or lesser extents, whereas host association patterns of the root-associated Ascomycota were much less distinct. The community structure of the putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota was possibly more influenced by host genetic distances than was that of the root-associated Ascomycota. This study also indicated that in dipterocarp rainforests, root-associated Ascomycota were characterized by high biodiversity and indistinct host association patterns, whereas ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota showed less biodiversity and a strong host phylogenetic preference for dipterocarp trees. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that root-associated Ascomycota, which might be mainly represented by root-endophytic fungi, have biodiversity hotspots in the tropics, whereas biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota increases with host genetic diversity.

  6. New primers for promising single-copy genes in fungal phylogenetics and systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, I; Crespo, A; Divakar, P K; Fankhauser, J D; Herman-Sackett, E; Kalb, K; Nelsen, M P; Nelson, N A; Rivas-Plata, E; Shimp, A D; Widhelm, T; Lumbsch, H T

    2009-12-01

    Developing powerful phylogenetic markers is a key concern in fungal phylogenetics. Here we report degenerate primers that amplify the single-copy genes Mcm7 (MS456) and Tsr1 (MS277) across a wide range of Pezizomycotina (Ascomycota). Phylogenetic analyses of 59 taxa belonging to the Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, Lichinomycetes and Sordariomycetes, indicate the utility of these loci for fungal phylogenetics at taxonomic levels ranging from genus to class. We also tested the new primers in silico using sequences of Saccharomycotina, Taphrinomycotina and Basidiomycota to predict their potential of amplifying widely across the Fungi. The analyses suggest that the new primers will need no, or only minor sequence modifications to amplify Saccharomycotina, Taphrinomycotina and Basidiomycota. PMID:20198159

  7. Ecology of fungi in the denitrification zones of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.

    obtained from the anoxic Mediterranean basin, anoxic Meromictic Lake sediment and marine anoxic Bolinas Lagoon DNA and a few common culturable forms such as Penicillium and Aspergillus sp. Three clusters were seen within the basidiomycota belonging... aspects of P450nor came from studying the gene sequence. A cDNA sequence revealed that the polypeptide was about 403 amino 114 Ecology of fungi in the denitrification zones of the Arabian Sea acid residues, corresponding to a molecular weight of 44...

  8. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.; Lundell, T.; Floudas, D.; Nagy, L. G.; Barrasa, J. M.; Hibbett, D.S.; Martinez, A.T.

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phl...

  9. Serum immunoglobulin E and immunoglobulin G reactivity to Agaricus bisporus proteins in mushroom cultivation workers

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Khakzad; Hedayati, Mohammad T; Safarali Mahdian; Sabah Mayahi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Although molds are regarded as the main fungal allergen sources, evidence indicates that spores of Basidiomycota including Agaricus bisporus (A. bisporus) can be also found at high concentrations in the environment and may cause as many respiratory allergies as molds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against A. bisporus via immunoblotting technique in individuals working at mushroom culti...

  10. Contrasting Diversity and Host Association of Ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycetes versus Root-Associated Ascomycetes in a Dipterocarp Rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Toju, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Root-associated fungi, including ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi, are among the most diverse and important belowground plant symbionts in dipterocarp rainforests. Our study aimed to reveal the biodiversity, host association, and community structure of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and root-associated Ascomycota (including root-endophytic Ascomycota) in a lowland dipterocarp rainforest in Southeast Asia. The host plant chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large...

  11. Composted versus Raw Olive Mill Waste as Substrates for the Production of Medicinal Mushrooms: An Assessment of Selected Cultivation and Quality Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Zervakis, Georgios I.; Georgios Koutrotsios; Panagiotis Katsaris

    2013-01-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW, “alperujo”) is a highly biotoxic sludge-like effluent of the olive-oil milling process with a huge seasonal production. One of the treatment approaches that has so far received little attention is the use of TPOMW as substrate for the cultivation of edible mushrooms. Fifteen fungal strains belonging to five species (Basidiomycota), that is, Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. pulmonarius, were evaluated for their eff...

  12. Seed-borne fungi of the afromontane tree species Podocarpus falcatus and Prunus africana in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gure, Abdella

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is comprised of four studies regarding seed-borne fungi of the afromontane forest trees, Podocarpus falcatus (Thunb. Mirb.) and Prunus africana (Hook. F.) Kalkman, in Ethiopia. Based on morphology and molecular data from the rDNA (ITS) region, a diverse group of mainly Ascomycota, some Basidiomycota and a few Zygomycota were identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences revealed several clades differentiated according to the host. Some of these fungi were previously repor...

  13. Defects in Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal β-Oxidation Influence Virulence in the Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of metabolic adaptation during the colonization of plants by phytopathogenic fungi is critical for developing strategies to protect crops. Lipids are abundant in plant tissues, and fungal phytopathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. Previously, we demonstrated a role for the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme Mfe2 in the filamentous growth, virulence, and sporulation of the maiz...

  14. The genome of the xerotolerant mold Wallemia sebi reveals adaptations to osmotic stress and suggests cryptic sexual reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajabeen, Padamsee; Kumas, T. K. Arun; Riley, Robert; Binder, Manfred; Boyd, Alex; Calvo, Ann M.; Furukawa, Kentaro; Hesse, Cedar; Hohmann, Stefan; James, Tim Y.; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Miller, Kari; Shantappa, Sourabha; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.; McLaughlin, David J.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Aime, Mary C.

    2011-09-03

    Wallemia (Wallemiales, Wallemiomycetes) is a genus of xerophilic Fungi of uncertain phylogenetic position within Basidiomycota. Most commonly found as food contaminants, species of Wallemia have also been isolated from hypersaline environments. The ability to tolerate environments with reduced water activity is rare in Basidiomycota. We sequenced the genome of W. sebi in order to understand its adaptations for surviving in osmotically challenging environments, and we performed phylogenomic and ultrastructural analyses to address its systematic placement and reproductive biology. W. sebi has a compact genome (9.8 Mb), with few repeats and the largest fraction of genes with functional domains compared with other Basidiomycota. We applied several approaches to searching for osmotic stress-related proteins. In silico analyses identied 93 putative osmotic stress proteins; homology searches showed the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) pathway to be mostly conserved. Despite the seemingly reduced genome, several gene family expansions and a high number of transporters (549) were found that also provide clues to the ability of W. sebito colonize harsh environments. Phylogenetic analyses of a 71-protein dataset support the position of Wallemia as the earliest diverging lineage of Agaricomycotina, which is conrmed by septal pore ultrastructure that shows the septal pore apparatus as a variant of the Tremella-type. Mating type gene homologs were idented although we found no evidence of meiosis during conidiogenesis, suggesting there may be aspects of the life cycle of W. sebi that remain cryptic

  15. Molecular diversity of fungi from marine oxygen-deficient environments (ODEs)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Forster, D.; Kauff, F.; Stoeck, T.

    have been identified from various habitats such as the deep-sea regions (Lai et al. 2007), anoxic basins (Dawson and Pace 2002; Alexander et al. 2009; Jebaraj et al. 2010) and hydrothermal vent regions (López-García et al. 2007). The life style... based on the ITS region may also have some disadvantages as in some instances members belonging to only to phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were amplified (Lai et al. 2007). These 12 discrepancies may arise because not all of the fungal...

  16. Advances in the phylogenesis of Agaricales and its higher ranks and strategies for establishing phylogenetic hypotheses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-lin ZHAO; Dennis E. DESJARDIN; Kasem SOYTONG; Kevin D. HYDE

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of previous research results on the molecular phylogenetic analyses in Agaricales and its higher ranks (Agaricomycetes/Agaricomycotina/Basidiomycota) along with the most recent treatments of taxonomic systems in these taxa. Establishing phylogenetic hypotheses using DNA sequences, from which an understanding of the natural evolutionary relationships amongst clades may be derived, requires a robust dataset. It has been recognized that single-gene phylogenies may not truly represent organismal phylogenies, but the concordant phylogenetic genealogies from multiple-gene datasets can resolve this problem. The genes commonly used in mushroom phylogenetic research are summarized.

  17. Amino and Fatty Acids of Wild Edible Mushrooms of the Genus Boletus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri O. Levitsky

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on the free amino acids of 15 wild edible mushroom species belonging to the genus Boletus (phylum Basidiomycota was developed. The major amino acids in the fruit bodies were arginine , alanine, glutamine, and glutamic acid. The most abundant fatty acids were oleic ( 9- 18:1, linoleic acid (9,12-18:2 , and palmitic acid (16:0, but a great variation of the ester composition from one to another one was found. Chemical constituents were characterized by GC-MS, and other chemical methods.

  18. Macromicetos del Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, municipio de Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, México Macrofungi from Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, Municipality of Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Freddy Chanona-Gómez; René H. Andrade-Gallegos; Jorge Castellanos-Albores; José E Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    El presente estudio tuvo como objetivos contribuir al conocimiento de los macromicetos que crecen en el Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica (PELB), en Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas y determinar el índice de diversidad de Simpson y similitud de Sorensen de la micobiota existente en los diferentes tipos de vegetación. Se realizaron 24 exploraciones micológicas durante un año, encontrándose 144 especies (24 Ascomycota y 120 Basidiomycota). El índice de diversidad, mostró que la vegetación con la...

  19. Some Useful Wild Macrofungi from Liuxihe National Forest Park, Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYinglong; KANGLihua; DELLBernie

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Forty species of Basidiomycota from 21 genera in 15 families, collected from Liuxihe National Forest Park, Guangzhou, China, have values for use by local people. More than half of the species collected are edible, and some (Lactarius deliciosus, Boletus spp.) are gathered for commercial consumption in South China. Ten species have medicinal properties, and include Dictyophora, Ganoderma, Pisolithus and Scleroderma. Over 60% species (26 taxa) are ectomycorrhizal involving 12 edible fungi. The most abundant families were the Amanitaceae, Boletaceae and Sclerodermataceae, which form important ectomycorrhizal associations with coniferous and mixed broad-leafed trees in the Park. Prospective uses of these macrofungi are discussed.

  20. Variegatic acid from Serpula lacyrmans reduces FeIII and interacts with other fungal metabolites for location-specific generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yuan; MAHANEY, JAMES; Jellison, Jody; Cao, Jinzhen; Gressler, Julia; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Goodell, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the role of variegatic acid (VA) secreted from Serpula lacyrmans in a chelator-mediated Fenton (CMF) system, including FeIII reduction and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of H2O2 and oxalate. As the principle component of the fungal extracellular matrix (ECM), β-glucan isolated from Basidiomycota species was also assessed in scavenging ROS with regard to its potential as a protective barrier for fungal hyphae. Our results demonstrate ...

  1. Activity of the novel fungicide SYP-Z048 against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengping; Han, Ping; Liu, Pengfei; Si, Naiguo; Liu, Junli; Liu, Xili

    2014-01-01

    In in vitro tests with 18 plant pathogens, the fungicide 3-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinyl] pyridine (SYP-Z048) was highly effective on inhibiting mycelial growth of various ascomycota and basidiomycota, with EC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 1.140 μg/ml. SYP-Z048 had much weaker activity against growth of oomycota with EC50 values > 100 μg/ml. In a second in vitro test with Monilinia fructicola isolates, SYP-Z048 inhibited mycelial growth (EC50 = 0.013 μg/ml), germ tube elongation (EC50 = 0.007 μg/ml), and sporulation but did not affect spore germination. In a detached pear fruit assay inoculated with M. fructicola isolates, SYP-Z048 showed protective and curative activity. Field tests indicated that SYP-Z048 was an efficacious fungicide for control of brown rot disease in two peach orchards. When applied to a single spot on a tomato leaflet in a compound leaf, SYP-Z048 suppressed the growth of Botrytis cinerea isolates on the rest 4 leaflets, indicating that the fungicide has systemic movement in plant tissues. These results indicate that SYP-Z048 has potential for management of brown rot causing by M. fructicola and other diseases caused by ascomycota and basidiomycota. PMID:25253681

  2. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  3. Application of ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Compare the Cell Materials of Wood Decay Fungi with Wood Mould Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Shankar Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood fungi create vast damage among standing trees and all types of wood materials. The objectives of this study are to (a characterize the cell materials of two major wood decay fungi (Basidiomycota, namely, Trametes versicolor and Postia placenta, and (b compare the cell materials of decay fungi with four wood mould fungi (Ascomycota, namely, Aureobasidium pullulans, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Ulocladium atrum. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy is used to characterize the microbial cellular materials. The results showed that the IR bands for the fatty acid at ∼2900 cm−1 were different for the two-decay-fungi genre. Postia placenta shows more absorbance peaks at the fatty acid region. Band ratio indices for amide I and amide II from protein amino acids were higher for the mould fungi (Ascomycota than the decay fungi (Basidiomycota. Similarly, the band ratio index calculated for the protein end methyl group was found to be higher for the mould fungi than the decay fungi. Mould fungi along with the decay fungi demonstrated a positive correlation (R2=0.75 between amide I and amide II indices. The three-component multivariate, principal component analysis showed a strong correlation of amide and protein band indices.

  4. Characterization of active and total fungal communities in the atmosphere over the Amazon rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Womack

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and may play an important role in atmospheric processes. We investigated the composition and diversity of fungal communities over the Amazon rainforest canopy and compared these communities to fungal communities found in terrestrial environments. We characterized the total fungal community and the metabolically active portion of the community using high-throughout DNA and RNA sequencing and compared these data to predictions generated by a mass-balance model. We found that the total community was primarily comprised of fungi from the phylum Basidiomycota. In contrast, the active community was primarily composed of members of the phylum Ascomycota and included a high relative abundance of lichen fungi, which were not detected in the total community. The relative abundance of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota in the total and active communities was consistent with our model predictions, suggesting that this result was driven by the relative size and number of spores produced by these groups. When compared to other environments, fungal communities in the atmosphere were most similar to communities found in tropical soils and leaf surfaces, suggesting that inputs of fungi to the atmosphere are from local, rather than distant, sources. Our results demonstrate that there are significant differences in the composition of the total and active fungal communities in the atmosphere, and that lichen fungi, which have been shown to be efficient ice nucleators, may be abundant members of active atmospheric fungal communities over the forest canopy.

  5. Novel and highly diverse fungal endophytes in soybean revealed by the consortium of two different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Leite, Tiago; Cnossen-Fassoni, Andréia; Pereira, Olinto Liparini; Mizubuti, Eduardo Seiti Gomide; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2013-02-01

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from the leaves of soybean cultivars in Brazil using two different isolation techniques - fragment plating and the innovative dilution-to-extinction culturing - to increase the species richness, frequency of isolates and diversity. A total of 241 morphospecies were obtained corresponding to 62 taxa that were identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The Phylum Ascomycota predominated, representing 99% and 95.2% of isolates in the Monsoy and Conquista cultivars, respectively, whereas the Phylum Basidiomycota represented 1% and 4.8% of isolates, respectively. The genera Ampelomyces, Annulohypoxylon, Guignardia, Leptospora, Magnaporthe, Ophiognomonia, Paraconiothyrium, Phaeosphaeriopsis, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, and Xylaria for the first time were isolated from soybean; this suggests that soybean harbours novel and highly diverse fungi. The yeasts genera Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces (subphylum Pucciniomycotina) represent the Phylum Basidiomycota. The species richness was greater when both isolation techniques were used. The diversity of fungal endophytes was similar in both cultivars when the same isolation technique was used except for Hill's index, N1. The use of ITS region sequences allowed the isolates to be grouped according to Order, Class and Phylum. Ampelomyces, Chaetomium, and Phoma glomerata are endophytic species that may play potential roles in the biological control of soybean pathogens. This study is one of the first to apply extinction-culturing to isolate fungal endophytes in plant leaves, thus contributing to the development and improvement of this technique for future studies.

  6. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power and Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power and plasma technologies are described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power are developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as germination control of plants such as Basidiomycota and arabidopsis inactivation of bacteria in soil and liquid medium of hydroponics; extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables; decontamination of air and liquid, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power and plasma are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei. This paper mainly describes the application of the pulsed power for the germination control of Basidiomycota i.e. mushroom, inactivation of fungi in the soil and the liquid medium in hydroponics, and extraction of polyphenol from skins of grape.

  7. Contrasting land uses in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral systems generated patchy diversity patterns of vascular plants and below-ground microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagella, Simonetta; Filigheddu, Rossella; Caria, Maria Carmela; Girlanda, Mariangela; Roggero, Pier Paolo

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this paper were (i) to define how contrasting land uses affected plant biodiversity in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral-systems across a gradient of disturbance regimes: cork oak forests, secondary grasslands, hay crops, grass covered vineyards, tilled vineyards; (ii) to determine whether these patterns mirrored those of below-ground microorganisms and whether the components of γ-diversity followed a similar model. The disturbance regimes affected plant assemblage composition. Species richness decreased with increasing land use intensity, the Shannon index showed the highest values in grasslands and hay crops. Plant assemblage composition patterns mirrored those of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Richness in Basidiomycota, denitrifying bacteria and microbial biomass showed the same trend as that observed for vascular plant richness. The Shannon index pattern of below-ground microorganisms was different from that of plants. The plant γ-diversity component model weakly mirrored those of Ascomycota. Patchy diversity patterns suggest that the maintenance of contrasting land uses associated with different productions typical of agro-silvo-pastoral-systems can guarantee the conservation of biodiversity.

  8. Characterization of active and total fungal communities in the atmosphere over the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, A. M.; Artaxo, P. E.; Ishida, F. Y.; Mueller, R. C.; Saleska, S. R.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Bohannan, B. J. M.; Green, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and may play an important role in atmospheric processes. We investigated the composition and diversity of fungal communities over the Amazon rainforest canopy and compared these communities to fungal communities found in terrestrial environments. We characterized the total fungal community and the metabolically active portion of the community using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing and compared these data to predictions generated by a mass-balance model. We found that the total community was primarily comprised of fungi from the phylum Basidiomycota. In contrast, the active community was primarily composed of members of the phylum Ascomycota and included a high relative abundance of lichen fungi, which were not detected in the total community. The relative abundance of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota in the total and active communities was consistent with our model predictions, suggesting that this result was driven by the relative size and number of spores produced by these groups. When compared to other environments, fungal communities in the atmosphere were most similar to communities found in tropical soils and leaf surfaces. Our results demonstrate that there are significant differences in the composition of the total and active fungal communities in the atmosphere, and that lichen fungi, which have been shown to be efficient ice nucleators, may be abundant members of active atmospheric fungal communities over the forest canopy.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of soil fungal communities on Ulleungdo and Dokdo Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yoon-Jong; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kim, Jong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Ulleungdo and Dokdo are volcanic islands that experience a characteristic marine climate, influenced by warm currents. The richness and diversity of the plant species, particularly vascular plants, are higher on Ulleungdo than on Dokdo. In contrast to the native plant life, little is known about the diversity of soil fungi living in the rhizosphere of these two islands. In this study, we utilized the barcoded pyrosequencing method to analyze rhizosphere soil fungi on Ulleungdo and Dokdo. In total, 768 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were analyzed from the Ulleungdo samples, while 640 OTUs and 382 OTUs were analyzed from the Dongdo and Seodo (islets of Dokdo) samples, respectively. Species richness was considerably higher in the Ulleungdo samples than in the Dongdo and Seodo samples, while there was little difference in species diversity between the samples. The taxonomic composition analyses demonstrated that members of the phylum Basidiomycota dominated the Ulleungdo samples, whereas members of the phylum Ascomycota were predominant in the Dokdo samples. Ectomycorrhizal fungi belonging to the phylum Basidiomycota, in particular, were more abundant in the Ulleungdo samples. This finding suggests that the difference in the abundance of the ectomycorrhizal fungi in the rhizospheres of Ulleungdo and Dokdo may have been affected by species richness and diversity of the vascular plants. Our study is the first detailed report of the composition of soil fungal communities on the Ulleungdo and Dokdo islands. In addition, our findings provide a basis for understanding the ecological interactions between plants and fungi. PMID:26227909

  10. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eTavares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 151.5 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi. In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1,800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp. Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94 %. The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7,000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  11. Plant or fungal sequences? An alternative optimized PCR protocol to avoid ITS (nrDNA misamplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Fernandes Oliveira de Miranda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2 from leaves of Drosera (Droseraceae were amplified using "universal" primers. The analysis of the products demonstrated most samples were a molecular mixture as a result of unsuccessful and non-specific amplifications. Among the obtained sequences, two were from Basidiomycota fungi. Homologous sequences of Basidiomycota were obtained from GenBank database and added to a data set with sequences from Drosera leaves. Parsimony analysis demonstrated that one sequence was amplified from an Ustilaginomycetes fungus, and another from a Heterobasidiomycetes. Possibly these fungi were associated to leaves of Drosera, and not because of samples contamination. In order to provide optimization and a better specificity of PCR (polymerase chain reaction, a very successful method was demonstrated using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and bovine serum albumin (BSA in reactions.Os espaçadores internos transcritos do DNA nuclear ribossomal (ITS1 e ITS2 de folhas de Drosera (Droseraceae foram amplificados com o emprego de iniciadores "universais". A análise demonstrou que a maior parte das amostras continha uma mistura resultante de amplificações não-específicas. Dentre as sequências de DNA obtidas, duas delas foram de fungos basidiomicetos. Sequências homólogas foram obtidas do GenBank e analisadas junto às sequências obtidas de folhas de Drosera. Através das análises filogenéticas de máxima parcimônia foi possível identificar uma seqüência como sendo de um Ustilaginomycetes e outra de Heterobasidiomycetes (Basidiomycota. Possivelmente esses organismos estavam associados às folhas de Drosera e assim não sejam resultantes de contaminação. Com o objetivo de otimizar e buscar uma melhor especificidade das reações de PCR, um protocolo bem sucedido foi demonstrado com o uso de dimetilsulfóxido (DMSO e soroalbumina bovina (BSA.

  12. Comparative Metagenomics Reveal Phylum Level Temporal and Spatial Changes in Mycobiome of Belowground Parts of Crocus sativus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Singh, Heikham Russiachand; Gowda, Malali; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Plant-fungal associations have been explored by routine cultivation based approaches and cultivation based approaches cannot catalogue more than 5% of fungal diversity associated with any niche. In the present study, an attempt has been made to catalogue fungal diversity associated with belowground parts i.e. rhizosphere and cormosphere, of Crocus sativus (an economically important herb) during two growth stages, using cultivation independent ITS gene targeted approach, taking bulk soil as reference. The 454 pyrosequencing sequence data analysis suggests that the fungal diversity was niche and growth stage specific. Fungi diversity, in the present case, was not only different between the two organs (roots and corm) but the dominance pattern varies between the cormosphere during two growth stages. Zygomycota was dominant fungal phylum in the rhizosphere whereas Basidiomycota was dominant in cormosphere during flowering stage. However in cormosphere though Basidiomycota was dominant phylum during flowering stage but Zygomycota was dominant during dormant stage. Interestingly, in cormosphere, the phyla which was dominant at dormant stage was rare at flowering stage and vice-versa (Basidiomycota: Flowering = 93.2% Dormant = 0.05% and Zygomycota: Flowering = 0.8% Dormant = 99.7%). At genus level, Rhizopus was dominant in dormant stage but was rare in flowering stage (Rhizopus: Dormant = 99.7% Flowering = 0.55%). This dynamics is not followed by the bulk soil fungi which was dominated by Ascomycota during both stages under study. The genus Fusarium, whose species F. oxysporum causes corm rot in C. sativus, was present during both stages with slightly higher abundance in roots. Interestingly, the abundance of Rhizopus varied a great deal in two stages in cormosphere but the abundance of Fusarium was comparable in two growth stages (Bulk soil Flowering = 0.05%, Rhizosphere Flowering = 1.4%, Cormosphere Flowering = 0.06%, Bulk soil Dormant = 2.47% and cormosphere dormant

  13. Cryopreservation of filamentous micromycetes and yeasts using perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, L; Lisá, L; Kubatová, A; Valqová, M; Janderová, B; Nerud, F

    2007-01-01

    The viability, growth and morphology of 48 strains of Ascomycota (including 17 yeasts) and 20 strains of Zygomycota were determined after a 2-d and then after 1-year storage in liquid nitrogen using a new cryopreservation method with perlite as a particulate solid carrier. In case of Ascomycota, 45 strains (94 %) out of 48 survived both 2-d and 1-year storage in liquid nitrogen, respectively. In case of Zygomycota, all 20 strains survived both storage. In addition, 3 strains of Basidiomycota counted among yeasts were tested and all survived the 1 year storage. In all surviving cultures no negative effects of cryopreservation by this method have been observed after 1-year of storage in liquid nitrogen. The results indicate that the perlite protocol can be successfully used for cryopreservation of taxonomically different groups of fungi and also for fungi which failed to survive other routinely used preservation procedures.

  14. Fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of endemic plant species of Tenerife (Canary Islands): relationship to vegetation zones and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachow, Christin; Berg, Christian; Müller, Henry;

    2008-01-01

    , molecular analysis of fungal communities was determined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis using universal and specific primers for Trichoderma. The highly diverse fungal communities were mainly characterized by ectomycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota and a high proportion of yet......-unidentified species. Besides, Trichoderma-specific SSCP resulted in low diversity of mainly cosmopolitan species, for example Hypocrea lixii/T. harzianum. The dominance of T. harzianum was confirmed by cultivation. All Trichoderma isolates show an extraordinarily high antagonistic potential towards different groups...... of plant pathogens, supporting the hypothesis of extensive colonization by highly competitive Trichoderma species from the continent. In contrast, biodiversity patterns of the whole fungal and plant communities follow the same ecological rules. Furthermore, a high statistical correlation between fungal...

  15. Enhancing our understanding of anatomical diversity in Tomentella ectomycorrhizas: characterization of six new morphotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Erős-Honti, Zsolt; Seress, Diána; Kovács, Gábor M

    2015-08-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) formed by Tomentella species (Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) were collected in beech forests of Hungary and studied using anatomical and molecular phylogenetic methods. The mycobionts were identified by analysing the sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions together with sequences obtained from public databases. At the sampling plots, we found the occurrence of 11 Tomentella morphotypes. Among these, six morphotypes (four identified, Tomentella atroarenicolor, Tomentella bryophila, Tomentella lapida, Tomentella subclavigera, and two unidentified) were morpho-anatomically characterized for the first time. Although the six morphotypes differed anatomically from each other and from Tomentella ectomycorrhizas described previously, they shared anatomical features common to tomentelloid ectomycorrhizas fungi. These results expand our understanding of the diversity of this widely distributed ectomycorrhizal genus. PMID:25564437

  16. Assessment of ectomycorrhizal biodiversity in Tuber macrosporum productive sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Raggi, Lorenzo; Albertini, Emidio; Csorbai, Andrea Gógán; Donnini, Domizia

    2014-05-01

    Tuber macrosporum Vittad. is a truffle with superb organoleptic properties, whose cultivation is still in its infancy. For the first time we have aimed to provide information on ectomycorrhizal communities in natural and cultivated T. macrosporum sites. Ectomycorrhizal morphotypes were identified using ITS nrDNA sequencing and sorted into molecular operational taxonomic unit (MOTU). We detected 16 MOTUs in the T. macrosporum cultivated plantation. Ascomycota were the most abundant (86.4%) with Helvellaceae, Pyronemataceae and Pezizaceae the most common. Twenty-two MOTUs were collected in the natural T. macrosporum site. Basidiomycota morphotypes were plentiful (70.6%) and Thelephoraceae dominated. Each site had different taxa belowground with only T. macrosporum in common, being more abundant in the natural (18.2%) than in the cultivated (14.4%) site. Species richness, Simpson and Shannon diversity indices, taxonomic diversity, distinctness and variation of taxonomic distinctness were lower in the cultivated than in the natural site. PMID:24232503

  17. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  18. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  19. Molecular analysis of microbial diversity in corrosion samples from energy transmission towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Valéria M; Lopes-Oliveira, Patrícia F; Passarini, Michel R Z; Menezes, Claudia B A; Oliveira, Walter R C; Rocha, Adriano J; Sette, Lara D

    2011-04-01

    Microbial diversity in corrosion samples from energy transmission towers was investigated using molecular methods. Ribosomal DNA fragments were used to assemble gene libraries. Sequence analysis indicated 10 bacterial genera within the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. In the two libraries generated from corroded screw-derived samples, the genus Acinetobacter was the most abundant. Acinetobacter and Clostridium spp. dominated, with similar percentages, in the libraries derived from corrosion scrapings. Fungal clones were affiliated with 14 genera belonging to the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota; of these, Capnobotryella and Fellomyces were the most abundant fungi observed. Several of the microorganisms had not previously been associated with biofilms and corrosion, reinforcing the need to use molecular techniques to achieve a more comprehensive assessment of microbial diversity in environmental samples. PMID:21563009

  20. Fungal community analysis in the deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean assessed by comparison of ITS, 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Luo, Zhu-Hua; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the diversity of fungal communities in 6 different deep-sea sediment samples of the Pacific Ocean based on three different types of clone libraries, including internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 18S rDNA, and 28S rDNA regions. A total of 1978 clones were generated from 18 environmental clone libraries, resulting in 140 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 18 OTUs from ITS, 44 OTUs from 18S rDNA, and 78 OTUs from 28S rDNA gene primer sets. The majority of the recovered sequences belonged to diverse phylotypes of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Additionally, our study revealed a total of 46 novel fungal phylotypes, which showed low similarities (gene to describe fungal community in deep-sea environment.

  1. Parasitic fungi of ornamental plants and herbs of Szczecin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Adamska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2000-2001, the occurrence of fungi parasitizing on ornamental plants and herbs cultivated in the Vegetative Hall of the Agricultural University in Szczecin was investigated. The plants represented ca. 200 species. Disease and etiological symptoms were found in 37% of plant species. Most diseased plants came from the family Asteraceae. The plant species most frequently affected was Melisa officinalis. In the laboratory, 35 fungal species were recognized. Most fungi came from the phylum Ascomycota (13 species, and least from the phylum Oomycota (3 species. The phylum Ascomycota was represented only by species of the order Erysiphales. Other relatively frequently found fungi also were members of the phylum Basidiomycota (11 species. Of the fungi recognized, 31 species were earlier frequently recorded in Poland, and three rarely. Erysiphe flexuosa parasitizing Aesculus hippocastanum was not recorded in Poland to date; in Europe this fungus was recognized only in Germany and Switzerland.

  2. Lichensphere: a protected natural microhabitat of the non-lichenised fungal communities living in extreme environments of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Iara F; Soares, Marco Aurélio; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed the diversity, distribution and ecology of non-lichenised fungal communities associated with the Antarctic lichens Usnea antarctica and Usnea aurantiaco-atra across Antarctica. The phylogenetic study of the 438 fungi isolates identified 74 taxa from 21 genera of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Zygomycota. The most abundant taxa were Pseudogymnoascus sp., Thelebolus sp., Antarctomyces psychrotrophicus and Cryptococcus victoriae, which are considered endemic and/or highly adapted to Antarctica. Thirty-five fungi may represent new and/or endemic species. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, the similarity among the communities was variable. After discovering rich and diverse fungal communities composed of symbionts, decomposers, parasites and endemic and cold-adapted cosmopolitan taxa, we introduced the term "lichensphere". We hypothesised that the lichensphere may represent a protected natural microhabitat with favourable conditions able to help non-lichenised fungi and other Antarctic life forms survive and disperse in the extreme environments of Antarctica.

  3. Eighteen new oleaginous yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Chandra, Idelia; Shi, Sandy; Lin, Ting; German, J Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2016-07-01

    Of 1600 known species of yeasts, about 70 are known to be oleaginous, defined as being able to accumulate over 20 % intracellular lipids. These yeasts have value for fundamental and applied research. A survey of yeasts from the Phaff Yeast Culture Collection, University of California Davis was performed to identify additional oleaginous species within the Basidiomycota phylum. Fifty-nine strains belonging to 34 species were grown in lipid inducing media, and total cell mass, lipid yield and triacylglycerol profiles were determined. Thirty-two species accumulated at least 20 % lipid and 25 species accumulated over 40 % lipid by dry weight. Eighteen of these species were not previously reported to be oleaginous. Triacylglycerol profiles were suitable for biodiesel production. These results greatly expand the number of known oleaginous yeast species, and reveal the wealth of natural diversity of triacylglycerol profiles within wild-type oleaginous Basidiomycetes. PMID:27072563

  4. DNA barcoding in Mexico: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Gutiérrez, M; León-Regagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    DNA barcoding has become an important current scientific trend to the understanding of the world biodiversity. In the case of mega-diverse hot spots like Mexico, this technique represents an important tool for taxonomists, allowing them to concentrate in highlighted species by the barcodes instead of analyzing entire sets of specimens. This tendency resulted in the creation of a national network named Mexican Barcode of Life (MEXBOL) which main goals are to train students, and to promote the interaction and collective work among researchers interested in this topic. As a result, the number of records in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) for some groups, such as the Mammalia, Actinopterygii, Polychaeta, Branchiopoda, Ostracoda, Maxillopoda, Nematoda, Pinophyta, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota place Mexico among the top ten countries in the generation of these data. This special number presents only few of the many interesting findings in this region of the world, after the use of this technique and its integration with other methodologies.

  5. New sequestrate fungi from Guyana: Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. (Boletaceae, Boletales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Amses, Kevin R; Elliott, Todd F; Obase, Keisuke; Aime, M Catherine; Henkel, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. are described as new to science. These sequestrate, hypogeous fungi were collected in Guyana under closed canopy tropical forests in association with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) host tree genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae), Aldina (Fabaceae subfam. Papilionoideae), and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Molecular data place these fungi in Boletaceae (Boletales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) and inform their relationships to other known epigeous and sequestrate taxa within that family. Macro- and micromorphological characters, habitat, and multi-locus DNA sequence data are provided for each new taxon. Unique morphological features and a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 185 taxa across the order Boletales justify the recognition of the three new genera. PMID:26732137

  6. Biogeography in the air: fungal diversity over land and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic aerosols are relevant for the Earth system, climate, and public health on local, regional, and global scales. Up to now, however, little is known about the diversity and biogeography of airborne microorganisms. We present the first DNA-based analysis of airborne fungi on global scales, showing pronounced geographic patterns and boundaries. In particular we found that the ratio of species richness between Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is much higher in continental air than in marine air. This may be an important difference between the "blue ocean" and "green ocean" regimes in the formation of clouds and precipitation, for which fungal spores can act as nuclei. Our findings also suggest that air flow patterns and the global atmospheric circulation are important for the evolution of microbial ecology and for the understanding of global changes in biodiversity.

  7. Biogeography in the air: fungal diversity over land and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic aerosols are relevant for the Earth system, climate, and public health on local, regional, and global scales. Up to now, however, little is known about the diversity and biogeography of airborne microorganisms. We present the first DNA-based analysis of airborne fungi on global scales, showing pronounced geographic patterns and boundaries. In particular we find that the ratio of species richness between Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is much higher in continental air than in marine air. This may be an important difference between the "blue ocean" and "green ocean" regimes in the formation of clouds and precipitation, for which fungal spores can act as nuclei. Our findings also suggest that air flow patterns and the global atmospheric circulation are important for the understanding of global changes in biodiversity.

  8. The spectrum of allergic fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan; Caruthers, Carrie; Azmeh, Roua; Dykewicz, Mark S; Slavin, Raymond G; Knutsen, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    Fungi cause a wide spectrum of fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways. There are three main phyla involved in allergic fungal disease: (1) Ascomycota (2) Basidiomycota (3) Zygomycota. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) causes chronic rhinosinusitis symptoms and is caused predominantly by Aspergillus fumigatus in India and Bipolaris in the United States. The recommended treatment approach for AFRS is surgical intervention and systemic steroids. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (APBA) is most commonly diagnosed in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Long term systemic steroids are the mainstay treatment option for ABPA with the addition of an antifungal medication. Fungal sensitization or exposure increases a patient's risk of developing severe asthma and has been termed severe asthma associated with fungal sensitivity (SAFS). Investigating for triggers and causes of a patient's asthma should be sought to decrease worsening progression of the disease. PMID:26776889

  9. Wood-inhabiting Fungi in Tieling, Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIYucheng; CUIBaokai; LIUChunjing

    2004-01-01

    Wood-inhabiting fungi from Chengzishan and B inglashan Forest Park of Tieling, Liaoning Province,were investigated, and 70 species, belonging to 9 families in Basidiomycota, were found. Thirteen species,including Fomitiporia punctata, Funalia trogii, Ganoderma lipsiense, Inonotus hispidus, Inonotus radiatus,Inonotus pruinosus, PhyUoporia ribis, Daedaleopsis confragosa, Oxyporus populinus, Pholiota squarrosa,SchizophyUum commone, SpongipeUis spumeus, Trametes suaveolens are pathogens of living trees in the study area. A list of all species, including host(s) of each species, is given, and most of the species are reported for the first time in the province. The major elements of wood-inhabiting fungi in northern Liaoning are the species which are widely distributed in temperate forests. Almost no virgin forests were found in Liaoning, therefore, the major part of the species is the common wood-inhabiting fungi, and only a few ram species were found in the study area.

  10. The MycoKey 3.1 DVD. Included in Knudsen, H. & Vesterholt, J. (eds.). Funga Nordica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Thomas; Petersen, Jens H.

    2008-01-01

    MycoKey enables the user to identify fungal genera (fruitbody forming Basidiomycota and discomycetes) by means of a digital, synoptical key. This key offers a very different way of choosing between genera than the traditional analytical key and the the two approaches complete each other nicely....... It is, of course, also possible to do a direct search on a name in MycoKey in order to find a genus or a particular species. MycoKey gives access to more than 4,000 illustrations of fungi and more than 17,000 links to references. From within the genera you can also open the Funga Nordica keys in a a pdf...

  11. A deviation from the bipolar-tetrapolar mating paradigm in an early diverged basidiomycete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Coelho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In fungi, sexual identity is determined by specialized genomic regions called MAT loci which are the equivalent to sex chromosomes in some animals and plants. Usually, only two sexes or mating types exist, which are determined by two alternate sets of genes (or alleles at the MAT locus (bipolar system. However, in the phylum Basidiomycota, a unique tetrapolar system emerged in which four different mating types are generated per meiosis. This occurs because two functionally distinct molecular recognition systems, each encoded by one MAT region, constrain the selection of sexual partners. Heterozygosity at both MAT regions is a pre-requisite for mating in both bipolar and tetrapolar basidiomycetes. Tetrapolar mating behaviour results from the absence of genetic linkage between the two regions bringing forth up to thousands of mating types. The subphylum Pucciniomycotina, an early diverged lineage of basidiomycetes encompassing important plant pathogens such as the rusts and saprobes like Rhodosporidium and Sporidiobolus, has been so far poorly explored concerning the content and organization of MAT loci. Here we show that the red yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor has a mating system unlike any previously described because occasional disruptions of the genetic cohesion of the bipolar MAT locus originate new mating types. We confirmed that mating is normally bipolar and that heterozygosity at both MAT regions is required for mating. However, a laboratory cross showed that meiotic recombination may occur within the bipolar MAT locus, explaining tetrapolar features like increased allele number and evolution rates of some MAT genes. This pseudo-bipolar system deviates from the classical bipolar-tetrapolar paradigm and, to our knowledge, has never been observed before. We propose a model for MAT evolution in the Basidiomycota in which the pseudo-bipolar system may represent a hitherto unforeseen gradual form of transition from an ancestral tetrapolar

  12. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  13. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Barbi

    Full Text Available Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5 and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2, active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may

  14. Revealing the unexplored fungal communities in deep groundwater of crystalline bedrock fracture zones in Olkiluoto, Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina eSohlberg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and functional role of fungi, one of the ecologically most important groups of eukaryotic microorganisms, remains largely unknown in deep biosphere environments. In this study we investigated fungal communities in packer-isolated bedrock fractures in Olkiluoto, Finland at depths ranging from 296 m to 798 m below surface level. DNA- and cDNA-based high-throughput amplicon sequencing analysis of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS gene markers was used to examine the total fungal diversity and to identify the active members in deep fracture zones at different depths. Results showed that fungi were present in fracture zones at all depths and fungal diversity was higher than expected. Most of the observed fungal sequences belonged to the phylum Ascomycota. Phyla Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were only represented as a minor part of the fungal community. Dominating fungal classes in the deep bedrock aquifers were Sordariomycetes, Eurotiomycetes and Dothideomycetes from the Ascomycota phylum and classes Microbotryomycetes and Tremellomycetes from the Basidiomycota phylum, which are the most frequently detected fungal taxa reported also from deep sea environments. In addition some fungal sequences represented potentially novel fungal species. Active fungi were detected in most of the fracture zones, which proves that fungi are able to maintain cellular activity in these oligotrophic conditions. Possible roles of fungi and their origin in deep bedrock groundwater can only be speculated in the light of current knowledge but some species may be specifically adapted to deep subsurface environment and may play important roles in the utilization and recycling of nutrients and thus sustaining the deep subsurface microbial community.

  15. Response of Soil Fungi Community Structure to Salt Vegetation Succession in the Yellow River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yun; Guo, Du-Fa

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology was used to reveal the composition and distribution of fungal community structure in the Yellow River Delta under bare land and four kinds of halophyte vegetation (saline seepweed, Angiospermae, Imperata and Apocynum venetum [A. venetum]). The results showed that the soil quality continuously improved with the succession of salt vegetation types. The soil fungi richness of mild-salt communities (Imperata and A. venetum) was relatively higher, with Shannon index values of 5.21 and 5.84, respectively. The soil fungi richness of severe-salt-tolerant communities (saline seepweed, Angiospermae) was relatively lower, with Shannon index values of 4.64 and 4.66, respectively. The UniFrac metric values ranged from 0.48 to 0.67 when the vegetation was in different succession stages. A total of 60,174 valid sequences were obtained for the five vegetation types, and they were classified into Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. Ascomycota had the greatest advantage among plant communities of Imperata and A. venetum, as indicated by relative abundances of 2.69 and 69.97 %, respectively. Basidiomycota had the greatest advantage among mild-salt communities of saline seepweed and Angiospermae, with relative abundances of 9.43 and 6.64 %, respectively. Soil physical and chemical properties were correlated with the distribution of the fungi, and Mucor was significantly correlated with soil moisture (r = 0.985; P < 0.01). Soil quality, salt vegetation and soil fungi were influenced by each other. PMID:27449214

  16. Ice Nucleation of Fungal Spores from the Classes Agaricomycetes, Ustilaginomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes, and the effect on the Atmospheric Transport of these Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, D. I.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Iannone, R.; Wheeler, M. J.; Mason, R.; Chen, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Poschl, U.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2014-08-26

    Ice nucleation on fungal spores may affect the frequency and properties of ice and mixed-phase clouds. We studied the ice nucleation properties of 12 different species of fungal spores chosen from three classes: Agaricomycetes, Ustilagomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes. Agaricomycetes include many types of mushroom species and are cosmopolitan all over the globe. Ustilagomycetes are agricultural pathogens and have caused widespread damage to crops. Eurotiomycetes are found on all types of decaying material and include important human allergens. We focused on these classes since they are thought to be abundant in the atmosphere and because there is very little information on the ice nucleation ability of these classes of spores in the literature. All of the fungal spores investigated were found to cause freezing of water droplets at temperatures warmer than homogeneous freezing. The cumulative number of ice nuclei per spore was 0.001 at temperatures between -19 °C and -29 °C, 0.01 between -25.5 °C and -31 °C, and 0.1 between -26 °C and -36 °C. On average, the order of ice nucleating ability for these spores is Ustilagomycetes > Agaricomycetes ≅ Eurotiomycetes. We show that at temperatures below -20 °C, all of the fungal spores studied here are less efficient ice nuclei compared to Asian mineral dust on a per surface area basis. We used our new freezing results together with data in the literature to compare the freezing temperatures of spores from the phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota, which together make up 98 % of known fungal species found on Earth. The data show that within both phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) there is a wide range of freezing properties, and also that the variation within a phylum is greater than the variation between the average freezing properties of the phyla. Using a global chemistry-climate transport model, we investigated whether ice nucleation on the studied spores, followed by precipitation, can influence the atmospheric

  17. DNA分子标记技术在真菌系统学研究中的应用及影响%DNA molecular marker techniques: application to and influence on fungal systematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余知和; 曾昭清

    2013-01-01

    DNA分子标记技术为真菌系统进化研究提供了许多新的方法,真菌分子系统学已成为一门成熟的学科.简述了真菌分子系统学的发展简史和代表性的研究方法以及对真菌系统学的主要贡献,包括将广义的真菌划分为3个类群,粘菌和卵菌不再属于真菌界成员.真菌生命之树项目的研究结果对真菌界高阶分类系统作出重大调整,将先前的4个门(壶菌门、接合菌门、子囊菌门和担子菌门)变为7个门(微孢子虫门、壶菌门、新丽鞭毛菌门、芽枝霉门、球囊菌门、子囊菌门和担子菌门)和4个亚门,并对真菌各类群概念作出修订.此外,DNA分子标记技术对真菌种概念的认识、有性型-无性型关联及分子生态学等研究领域产生了重要影响.%DNA molecular markers technique has been introduced as new approaches to study fungal phylogeny and evolution. Nowadays, fungal molecular systematics is a mature discipline, and the history of development and representative research approaches of fungal molecular systematics and the main attributions of these approaches to fungal systematics are discussed in this paper. The organisms studied by mycologists, fungi, are divided into three different groups. The slime moulds and oomycetes do not belong to the Kingdom of Fungi. The recent milestone is the AFTOL (Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life) project, in which a higher-level phylogenetic classification of the Fungi is proposed. The kingdom Fungi traditionally consisted of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota, but more recent classifications of the fungal kingdom now include Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Blastocladiomycota, Neocallimastigomycota, Glomeromycota, Microsporidia and several subphyla incertae sedis, including Mucoromycotina, Entomophthoromycotina, Kickxellomycotina and Zoopagomycotina. The concept of the different taxa in fungi has also been revised. Furthermore, the

  18. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Blair, Jaime E.; Venturi, Maria L.; Shoe, Jason L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i) animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii) red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii) choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv) diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v) diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans). Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20-188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene) and concatenated (supergene). Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%): vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma), Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma), Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma), Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma), Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma), Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma), Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma), Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma), Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma), mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma), Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma), Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma), Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma), Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma), Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma), and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma). By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to

  19. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Maria L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. Results Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans. Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20–188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene and concatenated (supergene. Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%: vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma, Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma, Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma, Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma, Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma, Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma, Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma, Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma, Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma, mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma, Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma, Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma, Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma, Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma, Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma, and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma. By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to ~10

  20. Contribución a la identificación de esporas del Reino Fungi en la atmósfera de La Plata, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Nitiu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir del análisis del registro aeromicológico de la ciudad de La Plata se propone la definición de Grupos Morfológicos de esporas del Reino Fungi. Este estudio constituye un aporte metodológico a la identificación y recuento de una fracción de la micobiota atmosférica. Para la definición de los grupos, se han tenido en cuenta los criterios de Saccardo (1886 y reformulado los agrupamientos de Díaz et al. (1998 y Aira et al. (2005. Se han creando 4 nuevos grupos y se han incorporando otros tipos esporales a las clasificaciones previas. Cada grupo, incluye entre 2 y 6 tipos de esporas pertenecientes a los Phylum Zygomycota, Basidiomycota y Ascomycota y sus anamorfos, que han sido asignados a nivel genérico. Los caracteres que definen dichas asociaciones son: Grupo Absidia, amerosporas hialinas; Grupo Cortinarius, amerosporas pigmentadas amigdaliformes; Grupo Didymella, didimosporas hialinas o levemente coloreadas; Grupo Didymosphaeria, didimosporas y didimoconidios pigmentados; Grupo Lepthosphaeria, fragmosporas septadas hialinas a pigmentadas y Grupo Helminthosporium, fragmosporas distoseptadas hialinas a pigmentadas. Esta investigación aspira a proporcionar una herramienta que facilite el procesamiento de datos y aporte nuevos elementos cualitativos a las clasificaciones previas, contribuyendo en la compleja problemática de identificación de las esporas fúngicas.Based on the aeromycological analysis of La Plata city, artificial Morphological Groups of fungal spores were defined. This study is a methodological contribution to the identification and counting of a fraction of the atmospheric micobiota. For the definition of groups, the criteria of Saccardo (1886 were taken into account and the groupings created by Díaz et al. (1998 and Aira et al. (2005 have been reformulated. Four new groups have been created and other sporal types have been incorporated to previous classifications. Each of them includes 2 to 6 spore types

  1. Fungal spore content of the atmosphere of the Cave of Nerja (southern Spain): diversity and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Silvia; Trigo, M Mar; Recio, Marta; Melgar, Marta; García-Sánchez, José; Cabezudo, Baltasar

    2011-01-15

    Fungal spores are of great interest in aerobiology and allergy due to their high incidence in both outdoor and indoor environments and their widely recognized ability to cause respiratory diseases and other pathologies. In this work, we study the spore content of the atmosphere of the Cave of Nerja, a karstic cavity and an important tourist attraction situated on the eastern coast of Malaga (southern Spain), which receives more than half a million visitors every year. This study was carried out over an uninterrupted period of 4 years (2002-2005) with the aid of two Hirst-type volumetric pollen traps (Lanzoni VPPS 2000) situated in different halls of the cave. In the atmosphere of the Cave of Nerja, 72 different spore types were detected during the studied period and daily mean concentrations of up to 282,195 spores/m(3) were reached. Thirty-five of the spore types detected are included within Ascomycota and Basidiomycota (19 and 16 types, respectively). Of the remaining spore types, 32 were categorized within the group of so-called imperfect fungi, while Oomycota and Myxomycota were represented by 2 and 3 spore types, respectively. Aspergillus/Penicillium was the most abundant spore type with a yearly mean percentage that represented 50% of the total, followed by Cladosporium. Finally, the origin of the fungal spores found inside the cave is discussed on the basis of the indoor/outdoor concentrations and the seasonal behaviour observed. PMID:21138779

  2. Microbial hitchhikers on intercontinental dust: catching a lift in Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favet, Jocelyne; Lapanje, Ales; Giongo, Adriana; Kennedy, Suzanne; Aung, Yin-Yin; Cattaneo, Arlette; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Brown, Christopher T; Kort, Renate; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Schnetger, Bernhard; Chappell, Adrian; Kroijenga, Jaap; Beck, Andreas; Schwibbert, Karin; Mohamed, Ahmed H; Kirchner, Timothy; de Quadros, Patricia Dorr; Triplett, Eric W; Broughton, William J; Gorbushina, Anna A

    2013-04-01

    Ancient mariners knew that dust whipped up from deserts by strong winds travelled long distances, including over oceans. Satellite remote sensing revealed major dust sources across the Sahara. Indeed, the Bodélé Depression in the Republic of Chad has been called the dustiest place on earth. We analysed desert sand from various locations in Chad and dust that had blown to the Cape Verde Islands. High throughput sequencing techniques combined with classical microbiological methods showed that the samples contained a large variety of microbes well adapted to the harsh desert conditions. The most abundant bacterial groupings in four different phyla included: (a) Firmicutes-Bacillaceae, (b) Actinobacteria-Geodermatophilaceae, Nocardiodaceae and Solirubrobacteraceae, (c) Proteobacteria-Oxalobacteraceae, Rhizobiales and Sphingomonadaceae, and (d) Bacteroidetes-Cytophagaceae. Ascomycota was the overwhelmingly dominant fungal group followed by Basidiomycota and traces of Chytridiomycota, Microsporidia and Glomeromycota. Two freshwater algae (Trebouxiophyceae) were isolated. Most predominant taxa are widely distributed land inhabitants that are common in soil and on the surfaces of plants. Examples include Bradyrhizobium spp. that nodulate and fix nitrogen in Acacia species, the predominant trees of the Sahara as well as Herbaspirillum (Oxalobacteraceae), a group of chemoorganotrophic free-living soil inhabitants that fix nitrogen in association with Gramineae roots. Few pathogenic strains were found, suggesting that African dust is not a large threat to public health. PMID:23254516

  3. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  4. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  5. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Young

    Full Text Available Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes. Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  6. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Peter K; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  7. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen. PMID:25391237

  8. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuttichai Mhuantong

    Full Text Available The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas.

  9. Chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites in the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus and submerged culture strategies for up-regulating their production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhang, Meimei; Pan, Shenyuan; Dai, Yucheng

    2010-07-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat is a white rot fungus belonging to the family Hymenochaetaceae in the Basidiomycota. In nature, this fungus rarely forms a fruiting body but usually an irregular shape of sclerotial conk called 'Chaga'. Characteristically, I. obliquus produces massive melanins released to the surface of Chaga. As early as in the sixteenth century, Chaga was used as an effective folk medicine in Russia and Northern Europe to treat several human malicious tumors and other diseases in the absence of any unacceptable toxic side effects. Chemical investigations show that I. obliquus produces a diverse range of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, melanins, and lanostane-type triterpenoids. Among these are the active components for antioxidant, antitumoral, and antiviral activities and for improving human immunity against infection of pathogenic microbes. Geographically, however, this fungus is restricted to very cold habitats and grows very slowly, suggesting that Chaga is not a reliable source of these bioactive compounds. Attempts for culturing this fungus axenically all resulted in a reduced production of bioactive metabolites. This review examines the current progress in the discovery of chemical diversity of Chaga and their biological activities and the strategies to modulate the expression of desired pathways to diversify and up-regulate the production of bioactive metabolites by the fungus grown in submerged cultures for possible drug discovery. PMID:20532760

  10. On the Evolutionary History of Uleiella chilensis, a Smut Fungus Parasite of Araucaria araucana in South America: Uleiellales ord. nov. in Ustilaginomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Kai; Schön, Max E; Lutz, Matthias; Butin, Heinz; Oberwinkler, Franz; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary history, divergence times and phylogenetic relationships of Uleiella chilensis (Ustilaginomycotina, smut fungi) associated with Araucaria araucana were analysed. DNA sequences from multiple gene regions and morphology were analysed and compared to other members of the Basidiomycota to determine the phylogenetic placement of smut fungi on gymnosperms. Divergence time estimates indicate that the majority of smut fungal orders diversified during the Triassic-Jurassic period. However, the origin and relationships of several orders remain uncertain. The most recent common ancestor between Uleiella chilensis and Violaceomyces palustris has been dated to the Lower Cretaceous. Comparisons of divergence time estimates between smut fungi and host plants lead to the hypothesis that the early Ustilaginomycotina had a saprobic lifestyle. As there are only two extant species of Araucaria in South America, each hosting a unique Uleiella species, we suggest that either coevolution or a host shift followed by allopatric speciation are the most likely explanations for the current geographic restriction of Uleiella and its low diversity. Phylogenetic and age estimation analyses, ecology, the unusual life-cycle and the peculiar combination of septal and haustorial characteristics support Uleiella chilensis as a distinct lineage among the Ustilaginomycotina. Here, we describe a new ustilaginomycetous order, the Uleiellales to accommodate Uleiella. Within the Ustilaginomycetes, Uleiellales are sister taxon to the Violaceomycetales. PMID:26790149

  11. On the Evolutionary History of Uleiella chilensis, a Smut Fungus Parasite of Araucaria araucana in South America: Uleiellales ord. nov. in Ustilaginomycetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Riess

    Full Text Available The evolutionary history, divergence times and phylogenetic relationships of Uleiella chilensis (Ustilaginomycotina, smut fungi associated with Araucaria araucana were analysed. DNA sequences from multiple gene regions and morphology were analysed and compared to other members of the Basidiomycota to determine the phylogenetic placement of smut fungi on gymnosperms. Divergence time estimates indicate that the majority of smut fungal orders diversified during the Triassic-Jurassic period. However, the origin and relationships of several orders remain uncertain. The most recent common ancestor between Uleiella chilensis and Violaceomyces palustris has been dated to the Lower Cretaceous. Comparisons of divergence time estimates between smut fungi and host plants lead to the hypothesis that the early Ustilaginomycotina had a saprobic lifestyle. As there are only two extant species of Araucaria in South America, each hosting a unique Uleiella species, we suggest that either coevolution or a host shift followed by allopatric speciation are the most likely explanations for the current geographic restriction of Uleiella and its low diversity. Phylogenetic and age estimation analyses, ecology, the unusual life-cycle and the peculiar combination of septal and haustorial characteristics support Uleiella chilensis as a distinct lineage among the Ustilaginomycotina. Here, we describe a new ustilaginomycetous order, the Uleiellales to accommodate Uleiella. Within the Ustilaginomycetes, Uleiellales are sister taxon to the Violaceomycetales.

  12. Molecular Detection of Verticillium albo-atrum by PCR Based on Its Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We developed one species-specific PCR assays for rapid and accurate detection of the pathogenic fungi Verticilliumalbo-atrum in diseased plant tissues and soil. Based on differences in internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences ofVerticilliun spp., a pair of species-specific primers, Vaa1/Vaa2, was synthesized. After screening 17 isolates of V. albo-atrum, 121 isolates from the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Deuteromycota, and Oomycota, the Vaa1/Vaa2 primers amplifiedonly a single PCR band of approximately 330 bp from V. albo-atrum. The detection sensitivity with primers Vaa1/Vaa2 was10 fg of genomic DNA. Using ITS1/ITS4 as the first-round primers, combined with Vaa1/Vaa2, the nested PCR procedureswere developed, and the detection sensitivity increased 1 000-fold to 10 ag. The detection sensitivity for the soil pathogenswas 100-conidiag-1 soil. The PCR-based methods developed here could simplify both plant disease diagnosis and pathogen monitoring as well as guide plant disease management.

  13. The active microbial diversity drives ecosystem multifunctionality and is physiologically related to carbon availability in Mediterranean semi-arid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Felipe; Torres, Irene F; Moreno, José L; Baldrian, Petr; Ondoño, Sara; Ruiz-Navarro, Antonio; Hernández, Teresa; Richnow, Hans H; Starke, Robert; García, Carlos; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical processes and ecosystemic functions are mostly driven by soil microbial communities. However, most methods focus on evaluating the total microbial community and fail to discriminate its active fraction which is linked to soil functionality. Precisely, the activity of the microbial community is strongly limited by the availability of organic carbon (C) in soils under arid and semi-arid climate. Here, we provide a complementary genomic and metaproteomic approach to investigate the relationships between the diversity of the total community, the active diversity and ecosystem functionality across a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) gradient in southeast Spain. DOC correlated with the ecosystem multifunctionality index composed by soil respiration, enzyme activities (urease, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase) and microbial biomass (phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). This study highlights that the active diversity (determined by metaprotoemics) but not the diversity of the whole microbial community (evaluated by amplicon gene sequencing) is related to the availability of organic C and it is also connected to the ecosystem multifunctionality index. We reveal that DOC shapes the activities of bacterial and fungal populations in Mediterranean semi-arid soils and determines the compartmentalization of functional niches. For instance, Rhizobales thrived at high-DOC sites probably fuelled by metabolism of one-C compounds. Moreover, the analysis of proteins involved in the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates revealed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota occupied different nutritional niches. The functional mechanisms for niche specialization were not constant across the DOC gradient.

  14. Diversity of ectomycorrhizal Thelephoraceae in Tuber melanosporum-cultivated orchards of Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel, Ana María; Águeda, Beatriz; Sáez, Raimundo; Sánchez, Sergio; Parladé, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Truffles are edible hypogeous ascomycetes highly appreciated worldwide, especially the black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.). In recent decades, the cultivation of the black truffle has expanded across the Mediterranean climate regions in and outside its native range. Members of the Thelephoraceae (Thelephorales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) are commonly found in truffle plantations, but their co-occurrence with Tuber species and other members of the fungal community has been scarcely reported. Thelephoraceae is one of the most represented families of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community in boreal and Mediterranean forests. To reveal the diversity of these fungi in T. melanosporum-cultivated plantations, ten orchards located in the Navarra region (Northern Spain) were surveyed for 2 years. Morphological and molecular approaches were used to detect and identify the Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas present in those plantations. Ten different mycorrhizal types were detected and described. Four of them were morphologically identified as Tomentella galzinii, Quercirhiza cumulosa, Q. squamosa, and T39 Thelephoraceae type. Molecular analyses revealed 4-6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), depending on the nucleotide database used, but similarities remained under 95 % and no clear species assignments could be done. The results confirm the diversity and abundance of this fungal family in the ectomycorrhizal community of black truffle plantations, generally established in Mediterranean areas. The occurrence and relative abundance of Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas is discussed in relation to their possible influence on truffle production. PMID:26458929

  15. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M; Lee, Junghoon; Edwards, David P; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads) observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest. PMID:25405609

  16. Divergence Times and Phylogenetic Patterns of Sebacinales, a Highly Diverse and Widespread Fungal Lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigisfredo Garnica

    Full Text Available Patterns of geographic distribution and composition of fungal communities are still poorly understood. Widespread occurrence in terrestrial ecosystems and the unique richness of interactions of Sebacinales with plants make them a target group to study evolutionary events in the light of nutritional lifestyle. We inferred diversity patterns, phylogenetic structures and divergence times of Sebacinales with respect to their nutritional lifestyles by integrating data from fossil-calibrated phylogenetic analyses. Relaxed molecular clock analyses indicated that Sebacinales originated late Permian within Basidiomycota, and their split into Sebacinaceae and Serendipitaceae nom. prov. likely occurred during the late Jurassic and the early Cretaceous, coinciding with major diversifications of land plants. In Sebacinaceae, diversification of species with ectomycorrhizal lifestyle presumably started during the Paleocene. Lineage radiations of the core group of ericoid and cavendishioid mycorrhizal Sebacinales started probably in the Eocene, coinciding with diversification events of their hosts. The diversification of Sebacinales with jungermannioid interactions started during the Oligocene, and occurred much later than the diversification of their hosts. Sebacinales communities associated either with ectomycorrhizal plants, achlorophyllous orchids, ericoid and cavendishioid Ericaceae or liverworts were phylogenetically clustered and globally distributed. Major Sebacinales lineage diversifications started after the continents had drifted apart. We also briefly discuss dispersal patterns of extant Sebacinales.

  17. Divergence Times and Phylogenetic Patterns of Sebacinales, a Highly Diverse and Widespread Fungal Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica, Sigisfredo; Riess, Kai; Schön, Max E; Oberwinkler, Franz; Setaro, Sabrina D

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of geographic distribution and composition of fungal communities are still poorly understood. Widespread occurrence in terrestrial ecosystems and the unique richness of interactions of Sebacinales with plants make them a target group to study evolutionary events in the light of nutritional lifestyle. We inferred diversity patterns, phylogenetic structures and divergence times of Sebacinales with respect to their nutritional lifestyles by integrating data from fossil-calibrated phylogenetic analyses. Relaxed molecular clock analyses indicated that Sebacinales originated late Permian within Basidiomycota, and their split into Sebacinaceae and Serendipitaceae nom. prov. likely occurred during the late Jurassic and the early Cretaceous, coinciding with major diversifications of land plants. In Sebacinaceae, diversification of species with ectomycorrhizal lifestyle presumably started during the Paleocene. Lineage radiations of the core group of ericoid and cavendishioid mycorrhizal Sebacinales started probably in the Eocene, coinciding with diversification events of their hosts. The diversification of Sebacinales with jungermannioid interactions started during the Oligocene, and occurred much later than the diversification of their hosts. Sebacinales communities associated either with ectomycorrhizal plants, achlorophyllous orchids, ericoid and cavendishioid Ericaceae or liverworts were phylogenetically clustered and globally distributed. Major Sebacinales lineage diversifications started after the continents had drifted apart. We also briefly discuss dispersal patterns of extant Sebacinales. PMID:26938104

  18. Forest Age and Plant Species Composition Determine the Soil Fungal Community Composition in a Chinese Subtropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Fungal diversity and community composition are mainly related to soil and vegetation factors. However, the relative contribution of the different drivers remains largely unexplored, especially in subtropical forest ecosystems. We studied the fungal diversity and community composition of soils sampled from 12 comparative study plots representing three forest age classes (Young: 10-40 yrs; Medium: 40-80 yrs; Old: ≥80 yrs in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve in South-eastern China. Soil fungal communities were assessed employing ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing. Members of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota dominated the fungal community, with 22 putative ectomycorrhizal fungal families, where Russulaceae and Thelephoraceae were the most abundant taxa. Analysis of similarity showed that the fungal community composition significantly differed among the three forest age classes. Forest age class, elevation of the study plots, and soil organic carbon (SOC were the most important factors shaping the fungal community composition. We found a significant correlation between plant and fungal communities at different taxonomic and functional group levels, including a strong relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungal and non-ectomycorrhizal plant communities. Our results suggest that in subtropical forests, plant species community composition is the main driver of the soil fungal diversity and community composition.

  19. Moth outbreaks alter root-associated fungal communities in subarctic mountain birch forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravesi, Karita; Aikio, Sami; Wäli, Piippa R; Ruotsalainen, Anna Liisa; Kaukonen, Maarit; Huusko, Karoliina; Suokas, Marko; Brown, Shawn P; Jumpponen, Ari; Tuomi, Juha; Markkola, Annamari

    2015-05-01

    Climate change has important implications on the abundance and range of insect pests in forest ecosystems. We studied responses of root-associated fungal communities to defoliation of mountain birch hosts by a massive geometrid moth outbreak through 454 pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the ITS2 rDNA region. We compared fungal diversity and community composition at three levels of moth defoliation (intact control, full defoliation in one season, full defoliation in two or more seasons), replicated in three localities. Defoliation caused dramatic shifts in functional and taxonomic community composition of root-associated fungi. Differentially defoliated mountain birch roots harbored distinct fungal communities, which correlated with increasing soil nutrients and decreasing amount of host trees with green foliar mass. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) abundance and richness declined by 70-80 % with increasing defoliation intensity, while saprotrophic and endophytic fungi seemed to benefit from defoliation. Moth herbivory also reduced dominance of Basidiomycota in the roots due to loss of basidiomycete EMF and increases in functionally unknown Ascomycota. Our results demonstrate the top-down control of belowground fungal communities by aboveground herbivory and suggest a marked reduction in the carbon flow from plants to soil fungi following defoliation. These results are among the first to provide evidence on cascading effects of natural herbivory on tree root-associated fungi at an ecosystem scale. PMID:25687127

  20. Differences in soil fungal communities between European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. dominated forests are related to soil and understory vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Wubet

    Full Text Available Fungi are important members of soil microbial communities with a crucial role in biogeochemical processes. Although soil fungi are known to be highly diverse, little is known about factors influencing variations in their diversity and community structure among forests dominated by the same tree species but spread over different regions and under different managements. We analyzed the soil fungal diversity and community composition of managed and unmanaged European beech dominated forests located in three German regions, the Schwäbische Alb in Southwestern, the Hainich-Dün in Central and the Schorfheide Chorin in the Northeastern Germany, using internal transcribed spacer (ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing. Multiple sequence quality filtering followed by sequence data normalization revealed 1655 fungal operational taxonomic units. Further analysis based on 722 abundant fungal OTUs revealed the phylum Basidiomycota to be dominant (54% and its community to comprise 71.4% of ectomycorrhizal taxa. Fungal community structure differed significantly (p≤0.001 among the three regions and was characterized by non-random fungal OTUs co-occurrence. Soil parameters, herbaceous understory vegetation, and litter cover affected fungal community structure. However, within each study region we found no difference in fungal community structure between management types. Our results also showed region specific significant correlation patterns between the dominant ectomycorrhizal fungal genera. This suggests that soil fungal communities are region-specific but nevertheless composed of functionally diverse and complementary taxa.

  1. Conservation of biotrophy in Hygrophoraceae inferred from combined stable isotope and phylogenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzman, Brian H; Ouimette, Andrew; Mixon, Rachel L; Hobbie, Erik A; Hibbett, David S

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional modes of genera in Hygrophoraceae (Basidiomycota: Agaricales), apart from the ectomycorrhizal Hygrophorus and lichen-forming taxa, are uncertain. New δ(15)N and δ(13)C values were obtained from 15 taxa under Hygrophoraceae collected in central Massachusetts and combined with isotopic datasets from five prior studies including a further 12 species using a data standardization method to allow cross-site comparison. Based on these data, we inferred the probable nutritional modes for species of Hygrophorus, Hygrocybe, Humidicutis, Cuphophyllus and Gliophorus. A phylogeny of Hygrophoraceae was constructed by maximum likelihood analysis of nuclear ribosomal 28S and 5.8S sequences and standardized δ(15)N and δ(13)C values were used for parsimony optimization on this phylogeny. Our results supported a mode of biotrophy in Hygrocybe, Humidicutis, Cuphophyllus and Gliophorus quantitatively unlike that in more than 450 other fungal taxa sampled in the present and prior studies. Parsimony optimization of stable isotope data suggests moderate conservation of nutritional strategies in Hygrophoraceae and a single switch to a predominantly ectomycorrhizal life strategy in the lineage leading to Hygrophorus. We conclude that Hygrophoraceae of previously unknown nutritional status are unlikely to be saprotrophs and are probably in symbiosis with bryophytes or other understory plants. PMID:21139028

  2. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation.

  3. Unearthing microbial diversity of Taxus rhizosphere via MiSeq high-throughput amplicon sequencing and isolate characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Song, Si Meng; Mu, Jun; Hu, Wen Li; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2016-04-01

    The species variability and potential environmental functions of Taxus rhizosphere microbial community were studied by comparative analyses of 15 16S rRNA and 15 ITS MiSeq sequencing libraries from Taxus rhizospheres in subtropical and temperate regions of China, as well as by isolating laccase-producing strains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading strains. Total reads could be assigned to 2,141 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) belonging to 31 bacteria phyla and 2,904 OTUs of at least seven fungi phyla. The abundance of Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi was higher in T. cuspidata var. nana and T. × media rhizospheres than in T. mairei rhizosphere (NF), while Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, and unclassified bacteria were more abundant in the latter. Ascomycota and Zygomycota were predominant in NF, while two temperate Taxus rhizospheres had more unclassified fungi, Basidiomycota, and Chytridiomycota. The bacterial/fungal community richness and diversity were lower in NF than in other two. Three dye decolorizing fungal isolates were shown to be highly efficient in removing three classes of reactive dye, while two PAH-degrading fungi were able to degrade recalcitrant benzo[a]pyrene. The present studies extend the knowledge pedigree of the microbial diversity populating rhizospheres, and exemplify the method shift in research and development of resource plant rhizosphere.

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  5. Metagenomic Analysis of Fungal Diversity on Strawberry Plants and the Effect of Management Practices on the Fungal Community Structure of Aerial Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Wisniewski, Michael; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Cacciola, Santa Olga

    2016-01-01

    An amplicon metagenomic approach based on the ITS2 region of fungal rDNA was used to identify the composition of fungal communities associated with different strawberry organs (leaves, flowers, immature and mature fruits), grown on a farm using management practices that entailed the routine use of various chemical pesticides. ITS2 sequences clustered into 316 OTUs and Ascomycota was the dominant phyla (95.6%) followed by Basidiomycota (3.9%). Strawberry plants supported a high diversity of microbial organisms, but two genera, Botrytis and Cladosporium, were the most abundant, representing 70–99% of the relative abundance (RA) of all detected sequences. According to alpha and beta diversity analyses, strawberry organs displayed significantly different fungal communities with leaves having the most diverse fungal community, followed by flowers, and fruit. The interruption of chemical treatments for one month resulted in a significant modification in the structure of the fungal community of leaves and flowers while immature and mature fruit were not significantly affected. Several plant pathogens of other plant species, that would not be intuitively expected to be present on strawberry plants such as Erysiphe, were detected, while some common strawberry pathogens, such as Rhizoctonia, were less evident or absent. PMID:27490110

  6. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Feng Sun

    Full Text Available Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  7. Molecular diversity of fungal phylotypes co-amplified alongside nematodes from coastal and deep-sea marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punyasloke Bhadury

    Full Text Available Nematodes and fungi are both ubiquitous in marine environments, yet few studies have investigated relationships between these two groups. Microbial species share many well-documented interactions with both free-living and parasitic nematode species, and limited data from previous studies have suggested ecological associations between fungi and nematodes in benthic marine habitats. This study aimed to further document the taxonomy and distribution of fungal taxa often co-amplified from nematode specimens. A total of 15 fungal 18S rRNA phylotypes were isolated from nematode specimens representing both deep-sea and shallow water habitats; all fungal isolates displayed high pairwise sequence identities with published data in Genbank (99-100% and unpublished high-throughput 454 environmental datasets (>95%. BLAST matches indicate marine fungal sequences amplified in this study broadly represent taxa within the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, and several phylotypes showed robust groupings with known taxa in phylogenetic topologies. In addition, some fungal phylotypes appeared to be present in disparate geographic habitats, suggesting cosmopolitan distributions or closely related species complexes in at least some marine fungi. The present study was only able to isolate fungal DNA from a restricted set of nematode taxa; further work is needed to fully investigate the taxonomic scope and function of nematode-fungal interactions.

  8. Characterization of the fungal microbiota (mycobiome in healthy and dandruff-afflicted human scalps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kuk Park

    Full Text Available The human scalp harbors a vast community of microbial mutualists, the composition of which is difficult to elucidate as many of the microorganisms are not culturable using current culture techniques. Dandruff, a common scalp disorder, is known as a causative factor of a mild seborrheic dermatitis as well as pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. Lipophilic yeast Malassezia is widely accepted to play a role in dandruff, but relatively few comprehensive studies have been reported. In order to investigate fungal biota and genetic resources of dandruff, we amplified the 26S rRNA gene from samples of healthy scalps and dandruff-afflicted scalps. The sequences were analyzed by a high throughput method using a GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencer. Of the 74,811 total sequence reads, Basidiomycota (Filobasidium spp. was the most common phylum associated with dandruff. In contrast, Ascomycota (Acremonium spp. was common in the healthy scalps. Our results elucidate the distribution of fungal communities associated with dandruff and provide new avenues for the potential prevention and treatment of dandruff.

  9. Characterization of the Fungal Microbiome (Mycobiome in Fecal Samples from Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lauren Foster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and phylogenetic description of fungal organisms and their role as part of the intestinal ecosystem have not yet been studied extensively in dogs. This study evaluated the fungal microbiome of 19 dogs (12 healthy dogs and 7 dogs with acute diarrhea using fungal tag-encoded FLX-Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. Five distinct fungal phyla were identified, with Ascomycota (medians: 97.9% of obtained sequences in healthy dogs and 98.2% in diseased dogs and Basidiomycota (median 1.0% in healthy dogs and median 0.5% in diseased dogs being the most abundant fungal phyla. A total of 219 fungal genera were identified across all 19 dogs with a median (range of 28 (4–69 genera per sample. Candida was the most abundant genus found in both the diseased dogs (median: 1.9%, range: 0.2%–38.5% of sequences and healthy dogs (median: 5.2%, range: 0.0%–63.1% of sequences. Candida natalensis was the most frequently identified species. No significant differences were observed in the relative proportions of fungal communities between healthy and diseased dogs. In conclusion, fecal samples of healthy dogs and dogs with acute diarrhea harbor various fungal genera, and their role in gastrointestinal health and disease warrants further studies.

  10. Screening of cloud microorganisms isolated at the Puy de Dôme (France) station for the production of biosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Pascal; Canet, Isabelle; Sancelme, Martine; Wirgot, Nolwenn; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    A total of 480 microorganisms collected from 39 clouds sampled at the Puy de Dôme station (alt. 1465 m; 45°46'19'' N, 2°57'52'' E; Massif Central, France) were isolated and identified. This unique collection was screened for biosurfactant (surfactants of microbial origin) production by measuring the surface tension (σ) of the crude extracts, comprising the supernatants of the pure cultures, using the pendant drop technique. The results showed that 41 % of the tested strains were active producers (σ yeast genus (Udeniomyces) from the Basidiomycota phylum (11 %). Some Bacillus strains from the Firmicutes phylum were also active but represented a small fraction of the collected population. Strains from the Actinobacteria phylum in the collection examined in the present study showed moderate biosurfactant production (45<σ < 55 mN m-1). Pseudomonas (Υ-Proteobacteria), the most frequently detected genus in clouds, with some species issued from the phyllosphere, was the dominant group for the production of biosurfactants. We observed some correlations between the chemical composition of cloud water and the presence of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, suggesting the "biogeography" of this production. Moreover, the potential impact of the production of biosurfactants by cloud microorganisms on atmospheric processes is discussed.

  11. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of coastal bioaerosols using culture dependent and independent techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, R.; Palenik, B.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-02-01

    Bioaerosols are emerging as important yet poorly understood players in atmospheric processes. Microorganisms can impact atmospheric chemistry through metabolic reactions and can potentially influence physical processes by participating in ice nucleation and cloud droplet formation. Microbial roles in atmospheric processes are thought to be species-specific and potentially dependent on cell viability. Using a coastal pier monitoring site as a sampling platform, culture-dependent (i.e. agar plates) and culture-independent (i.e. DNA clone libraries from filters) approaches were combined with 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene targeting to obtain insight into the local atmospheric microbial composition. From 13 microbial isolates and 42 DNA library clones, a total of 55 sequences were obtained representing four independent sampling events. Sequence analysis revealed that in these coastal samples two fungal phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, predominate among eukaryotes while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominate among bacteria. Furthermore, our culture-dependent study verifies the viability of microbes from all four phyla detected through our culture-independent study. Contrary to our expectations and despite oceanic air mass sources, common marine planktonic bacteria and phytoplankton were not typically found. The abundance of terrestrial and marine sediment-associated microorganisms suggests a potential importance for bioaerosols derived from beaches and/or coastal erosion processes.

  12. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E Kuramae

    Full Text Available We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA. The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most "active" fungi (as recovered via RNA. Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production. Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time.

  13. Comparisons of the fungal and protistan communities among different marine sponge holobionts by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Liu, Fang; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Ren, Yi; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-05-01

    To date, the knowledge of eukaryotic communities associated with sponges remains limited compared with prokaryotic communities. In a manner similar to prokaryotes, it could be hypothesized that sponge holobionts have phylogenetically diverse eukaryotic symbionts, and the eukaryotic community structures in different sponge holobionts were probably different. In order to test this hypothesis, the communities of eukaryota associated with 11 species of South China Sea sponges were compared with the V4 region of 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene using 454 pyrosequencing. Consequently, 135 and 721 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi and protists were obtained at 97 % sequence similarity, respectively. These sequences were assigned to 2 phyla of fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) and 9 phyla of protists including 5 algal phyla (Chlorophyta, Haptophyta, Streptophyta, Rhodophyta, and Stramenopiles) and 4 protozoal phyla (Alveolata, Cercozoa, Haplosporidia, and Radiolaria) including 47 orders (12 fungi, 35 protists). Entorrhizales of fungi and 18 orders of protists were detected in marine sponges for the first time. Particularly, Tilletiales of fungi and Chlorocystidales of protists were detected for the first time in marine habitats. Though Ascomycota, Alveolata, and Radiolaria were detected in all the 11 sponge species, sponge holobionts have different fungi and protistan communities according to OTU comparison and principal component analysis at the order level. This study provided the first insights into the fungal and protistan communities associated with different marine sponge holobionts using pyrosequencing, thus further extending the knowledge on sponge-associated eukaryotic diversity.

  14. Superimposed pristine limestone aquifers with marked hydrochemical differences exhibit distinct fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eNawaz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are one important group of eukaryotic microorganisms in a diverse range of ecosystems, but their diversity in groundwater ecosystems is largely unknown. We used DNA-based pyro-tag sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS rDNA gene to investigate the presence and community structure of fungi at different sampling sites of two superimposed limestone aquifers ranging from 8.5 to 84 m depth in the newly established Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory (Hainich CZE. We detected a diversity of fungal OTUs in groundwater samples of all sampling sites. The relative percentage abundance of Basidiomycota was higher in the upper aquifer assemblage, whilst Ascomycota dominated the lower one. In parallel to differences in the hydrochemistry we found distinct fungal communities at all sampling sites. Classification into functional groups revealed an overwhelming majority of saprotrophs. Finding taxa common to all analyzed groundwater sites, point to a groundwater specific fungal microbiome. The presence of different functional groups and, in particular plant and cattle pathogens that are not typical of subsurface habitats, suggests links between the surface and subsurface biogeosphere due to rapid transportation across the fracture networks typical of karstic regions during recharge episodes. However further studies including sampling series extended in both time and space are necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

  15. The link between morphotype transition and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqi Wang

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. This pathogen can undergo morphotype transition between the yeast and the filamentous form and such morphological transition has been implicated in virulence for decades. Morphotype transition is typically observed during mating, which is governed by pheromone signaling. Paradoxically, components specific to the pheromone signaling pathways play no or minimal direct roles in virulence. Thus, the link between morphotype transition and virulence and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that filamentation can occur independent of pheromone signaling and mating, and both mating-dependent and mating-independent morphotype transition require the transcription factor Znf2. High expression of Znf2 is necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain sex-independent filamentous growth under host-relevant conditions in vitro and during infection. Importantly, ZNF2 overexpression abolishes fungal virulence in murine models of cryptococcosis. Thus, Znf2 bridges the sex-independent morphotype transition and fungal pathogenicity. The impacts of Znf2 on morphological switch and pathogenicity are at least partly mediated through its effects on cell adhesion property. Cfl1, a Znf2 downstream factor, regulates morphogenesis, cell adhesion, biofilm formation, and virulence. Cfl1 is the first adhesin discovered in the phylum Basidiomycota of the Kingdom Fungi. Together with previous findings in other eukaryotic pathogens, our findings support a convergent evolution of plasticity in morphology and its impact on cell adhesion as a critical adaptive trait for pathogenesis.

  16. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident. PMID:25105247

  17. Impact of Amazon land use on the community of soil fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle G. M. Fracetto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considered as one of the most biodiverse biomes, the Amazon has a featured role in the discovery of new species of plants, animals and microorganisms, which may be important for the functionality of different ecosystems. However, studies on the impacts resulted from changes in the Amazon land use on microbial communities and their functions are still limited. In this context, the soil fungal diversity can act as an important indicator of environmental stress caused by land use of the Amazon. This study describes changes in soil fungal communities caused by different systems of land use (primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. Communities were observed in each of the areas using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 18S rRNA gene combined with the non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS. Unique bands indicated the dominance of particular fungal groups in each of the specific treatments, mainly in areas converted to pasture, which differed greatly from samples of other systems of land use (SLU. The analysis of partial sequence of the 18S rRNA gene of fungi in soils under primary forest, agriculture and pasture showed differences (p = 0.001, evidencing the fungal community response to such changes. Most abundant phyla were the Zygomycota in the soil under primary forest and agricultural land, and Basidiomycota in the soil under pasture. The results show that the Amazon soil is an ecosystem susceptible to environmental changes in regarding the fungi community inhabiting this niche.

  18. Unravelling the diversity of grapevine microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Pinto

    Full Text Available Vitis vinifera is one of the most widely cultivated fruit crops with a great economic impact on the global industry. As a plant, it is naturally colonised by a wide variety of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms that interact with grapevine, having either beneficial or phytopathogenic effects, who play a major role in fruit yield, grape quality and, ultimately, in the evolution of grape fermentation and wine production. Therefore, the objective of this study was to extensively characterize the natural microbiome of grapevine. Considering that the majority of microorganisms are uncultivable, we have deeply studied the microflora of grapevine leaves using massive parallel rDNA sequencing, along its vegetative cycle. Among eukaryotic population the most abundant microorganisms belonged to the early diverging fungi lineages and Ascomycota phylum, whereas the Basidiomycota were the least abundant. Regarding prokaryotes, a high diversity of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria was unveiled. Indeed, the microbial communities present in the vineyard during its vegetative cycle were shown to be highly structured and dynamic. In all cases, the major abundant microorganisms were the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium and the prokaryotic Enterobacteriaceae. Herein, we report the first complete microbiome landscape of the vineyard, through a metagenomic approach, and highlight the analysis of the microbial interactions within the vineyard and its importance for the equilibrium of the microecosystem of grapevines.

  19. Unravelling the diversity of grapevine microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Cátia; Pinho, Diogo; Sousa, Susana; Pinheiro, Miguel; Egas, Conceição; Gomes, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vitis vinifera is one of the most widely cultivated fruit crops with a great economic impact on the global industry. As a plant, it is naturally colonised by a wide variety of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms that interact with grapevine, having either beneficial or phytopathogenic effects, who play a major role in fruit yield, grape quality and, ultimately, in the evolution of grape fermentation and wine production. Therefore, the objective of this study was to extensively characterize the natural microbiome of grapevine. Considering that the majority of microorganisms are uncultivable, we have deeply studied the microflora of grapevine leaves using massive parallel rDNA sequencing, along its vegetative cycle. Among eukaryotic population the most abundant microorganisms belonged to the early diverging fungi lineages and Ascomycota phylum, whereas the Basidiomycota were the least abundant. Regarding prokaryotes, a high diversity of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria was unveiled. Indeed, the microbial communities present in the vineyard during its vegetative cycle were shown to be highly structured and dynamic. In all cases, the major abundant microorganisms were the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium and the prokaryotic Enterobacteriaceae. Herein, we report the first complete microbiome landscape of the vineyard, through a metagenomic approach, and highlight the analysis of the microbial interactions within the vineyard and its importance for the equilibrium of the microecosystem of grapevines. PMID:24454903

  20. Metabarcoding-based fungal diversity on coarse and fine particulate organic matter in a first-order stream in Nova Scotia, Canada [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wurzbacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most streams receive substantial inputs of allochthonous organic material in the form of leaves and twigs (CPOM, coarse particulate organic matter. Mechanical and biological processing converts this into fine particulate organic matter (FPOM. Other sources of particles include flocculated dissolved matter and soil particles. Fungi are known to play a role in the CPOM conversion process, but the taxonomic affiliations of these fungi remain poorly studied. The present study seeks to shed light on the composition of fungal communities on FPOM and CPOM as assessed in a natural stream in Nova Scotia, Canada. Maple leaves were exposed in a stream for four weeks and their fungal community evaluated through pyrosequencing. Over the same period, four FPOM size fractions were collected by filtration and assessed. Particles had much lower ergosterol contents than leaves, suggesting major differences in the extent of fungal colonization. Pyrosequencing documented a total of 821 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTU, of which 726 were exclusive to particles and 47 to leaf samples. Most fungal phyla were represented, including yeast lineages (e.g., Taphrinaceae and Saccharomycotina, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Cryptomycota, but several classes of Pezizomycontina (Ascomycota dominated. Cluster dendrograms clearly separated fungal communities from leaves and from particles. Characterizing fungal communities may shed some light on the processing pathways of fine particles in streams and broadens our view of the phylogenetic composition of fungi in freshwater ecosystems.

  1. Moth outbreaks alter root-associated fungal communities in subarctic mountain birch forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravesi, Karita; Aikio, Sami; Wäli, Piippa R; Ruotsalainen, Anna Liisa; Kaukonen, Maarit; Huusko, Karoliina; Suokas, Marko; Brown, Shawn P; Jumpponen, Ari; Tuomi, Juha; Markkola, Annamari

    2015-05-01

    Climate change has important implications on the abundance and range of insect pests in forest ecosystems. We studied responses of root-associated fungal communities to defoliation of mountain birch hosts by a massive geometrid moth outbreak through 454 pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the ITS2 rDNA region. We compared fungal diversity and community composition at three levels of moth defoliation (intact control, full defoliation in one season, full defoliation in two or more seasons), replicated in three localities. Defoliation caused dramatic shifts in functional and taxonomic community composition of root-associated fungi. Differentially defoliated mountain birch roots harbored distinct fungal communities, which correlated with increasing soil nutrients and decreasing amount of host trees with green foliar mass. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) abundance and richness declined by 70-80 % with increasing defoliation intensity, while saprotrophic and endophytic fungi seemed to benefit from defoliation. Moth herbivory also reduced dominance of Basidiomycota in the roots due to loss of basidiomycete EMF and increases in functionally unknown Ascomycota. Our results demonstrate the top-down control of belowground fungal communities by aboveground herbivory and suggest a marked reduction in the carbon flow from plants to soil fungi following defoliation. These results are among the first to provide evidence on cascading effects of natural herbivory on tree root-associated fungi at an ecosystem scale.

  2. Novel chytrid lineages dominate fungal sequences in diverse marine and freshwater habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, André M.; Vincent, Warwick F.; Bernier, Louis; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-07-01

    In aquatic environments, fungal communities remain little studied despite their taxonomic and functional diversity. To extend the ecological coverage of this group, we conducted an in-depth analysis of fungal sequences within our collection of 3.6 million V4 18S rRNA pyrosequences originating from 319 individual marine (including sea-ice) and freshwater samples from libraries generated within diverse projects studying Arctic and temperate biomes in the past decade. Among the ~1.7 million post-filtered reads of highest taxonomic and phylogenetic quality, 23,263 fungal sequences were identified. The overall mean proportion was 1.35%, but with large variability; for example, from 0.01 to 59% of total sequences for Arctic seawater samples. Almost all sample types were dominated by Chytridiomycota-like sequences, followed by moderate-to-minor contributions of Ascomycota, Cryptomycota and Basidiomycota. Species and/or strain richness was high, with many novel sequences and high niche separation. The affinity of the most common reads to phytoplankton parasites suggests that aquatic fungi deserve renewed attention for their role in algal succession and carbon cycling.

  3. Mating type gene homologues and putative sex pheromone-sensing pathway in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, a presumably asexual plant root symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halary, Sébastien; Daubois, Laurence; Terrat, Yves; Ellenberger, Sabrina; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The fungal kingdom displays a fascinating diversity of sex-determination systems. Recent advances in genomics provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of sex, mating type determination, and evolution of sexual reproduction in many fungal species in both ancient and modern phylogenetic lineages. All major fungal groups have evolved sexual differentiation and recombination pathways. However, sexuality is unknown in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of the phylum Glomeromycota, an ecologically vital group of obligate plant root symbionts. AMF are commonly considered an ancient asexual lineage dating back to the Ordovician, approximately 460 M years ago. In this study, we used genomic and transcriptomic surveys of several AMF species to demonstrate the presence of conserved putative sex pheromone-sensing mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, comparable to those described in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. We also find genes for high mobility group (HMG) transcription factors, homologous to SexM and SexP genes in the Mucorales. The SexM genes show a remarkable sequence diversity among multiple copies in the genome, while only a single SexP sequence was detected in some isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis. In the Mucorales and Microsporidia, the sexM gene is flanked by genes for a triosephosphate transporter (TPT) and a RNA helicase, but we find no evidence for synteny in the vicinity of the Sex locus in AMF. Nonetheless, our results, together with previous observations on meiotic machinery, suggest that AMF could undergo a complete sexual reproduction cycle.

  4. Phylogeny of the Zygomycota based on nuclear ribosomal sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Merlin M; James, Timothy Y; O'Donnell, Kerry; Cafaro, Matías J; Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Sugiyama, Junta

    2006-01-01

    The Zygomycota is an ecologically heterogenous assemblage of nonzoosporic fungi comprising two classes, Zygomycetes and Trichomycetes. Phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the phylum is polyphyletic; two of four orders of Trichomycetes are related to the Mesomycetozoa (protists) that diverged near the fungal/animal split. Current circumscription of the Zygomycota includes only orders with representatives that produce zygospores. We present a molecular-based phylogeny including recognized representatives of the Zygomycetes and Trichomycetes with a combined dataset for nuclear rRNA 18S (SSU), 5.8S and 28S (LSU) genes. Tree reconstruction by Bayesian analyses suggests the Zygomycota is paraphyletic. Although 12 clades were identified only some of these correspond to the nine orders of Zygomycota currently recognized. A large superordinal clade, comprising the Dimargaritales, Harpellales, Kickxellales and Zoopagales, grouping together many symbiotic fungi, also is identified in part by a unique septal structure. Although Harpellales and Kickxellales are not monophyletic, these lineages are distinct from the Mucorales, Endogonales and Mortierellales, which appear more closely related to the Ascomycota + Basidiomycota + Glomeromycota. The final major group, the insect-associated Entomophthorales, appears to be polyphyletic. In the present analyses Basidiobolus and Neozygites group within Zygomycota but not with the Entomophthorales. Clades are discussed with special reference to traditional classifications, mapping morphological characters and ecology, where possible, as a snapshot of our current phylogenetic perspective of the Zygomycota.

  5. BasicS oli Physicochemical Properties and Soil Fungal Diversti y under Different Forest Ty pes of Urban Forest%城市森林不同林型下土壤基本理化特性及土壤真菌多样性1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高微微; 康颖; 卢宏; 王秋玉

    2016-01-01

    .mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis var.mukdensis, Picea koraiensis, and forest edge grassland as control to de-termine the main soil physicochemical properties including soil pH , relative water content and electrical conductivity , and detected the soil fungal metagenomics diversity .There were significant variation among different soil samples in three soil basic properties, such as 4.597-7.393 for pH value,4.11%-10.90%for relative water content, 953.000-3 443.333μs· cm-1 for soil electrical conductivity .The pH value and soil electrical conductivity were highest for soil of Juglans mandshu-rica plantation, and the lowest for Larix gmelinii plantation.There were great difference in soil fungal metagenomics among eight soil samples.Total of 362 species, 211 genera, 124 families, 63 orders and 24 classes, 8 eumycota were in all soil samples.There were clear changes in the level of Eumycophyta and Eumycetes , including Ascomycota , Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota , Zygomycota , and Glomeromycota .An ancient mycorrhizal fungi of Ascomycota newly discovered in recent years was found in the forest soil of Pinus tabulaeformis var.Mukdensis, while Agaricostibomycete fungi of pucciniomycoti-na, Basidiomycota were detected in the control samples and Glomeromycota fungi in the forest soil of Juglans mandshurica and Fraxinus mandshurica, Exobasidiomycete fungi of Ustilaginomycotina Basidiomycota were only detected in the forest soil of Picea koraiensis and control. The dominant species were the fungi of Ascomycota phylum in the forest soil of Juglans mandshurica, Fraxinus mandshurica, Larix gmelinii, Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica, and Basidiomycota fungi in the forest soil of Betula platyphylla, Pinus tabulaeformis var.Mukdensis, Picea koraiensis in Eumycophyta level .The dominate spe-cies in Eumycetes level were mainly Agaricomycetes fungi , in which sordariomycetes fungi of Pezizomycotina , Ascomycota as the dominate species were only found in the soil sample of Fraxinus mandshurica.

  6. Phylogeny of the glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi): recent developments and new gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redecker, Dirk; Raab, Philipp

    2006-01-01

    The fungal symbionts of arbuscular mycorrhiza form a monophyletic group in the true Fungi, the phylum Glomeromycota. Fewer than 200 described species currently are included in this group. The only member of this clade known to form a different type of symbiosis is Geosiphon pyriformis, which associates with cyanobacteria. Because none of these fungi has been cultivated without their plant hosts or cyanobacterial partners, progress in obtaining multigene phylogenies has been slow and the nuclear-encoded ribosomal RNA genes have remained the only widely accessible molecular markers. rDNA phylogenies have revealed considerable polyphyly of some glomeromycotan genera that has been used to reassess taxonomic concepts. Environmental studies using phylogenetic methods for molecular identification have recovered an amazing diversity of unknown phylotypes, suggesting considerable cryptic species diversity. Protein gene sequences that have become available recently have challenged the rDNA-supported sister group relationship of the Glomeromycota with Asco/Basidiomycota. However the number of taxa analyzed with these new markers is still too small to provide a comprehensive picture of intraphylum relationships. We use nuclear-encoded rDNA and rpb1 protein gene sequences to reassess the phylogeny of the Glomeromycota and discuss possible implications.

  7. Mating type gene homologues and putative sex pheromone-sensing pathway in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, a presumably asexual plant root symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Halary

    Full Text Available The fungal kingdom displays a fascinating diversity of sex-determination systems. Recent advances in genomics provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of sex, mating type determination, and evolution of sexual reproduction in many fungal species in both ancient and modern phylogenetic lineages. All major fungal groups have evolved sexual differentiation and recombination pathways. However, sexuality is unknown in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota, an ecologically vital group of obligate plant root symbionts. AMF are commonly considered an ancient asexual lineage dating back to the Ordovician, approximately 460 M years ago. In this study, we used genomic and transcriptomic surveys of several AMF species to demonstrate the presence of conserved putative sex pheromone-sensing mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases, comparable to those described in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. We also find genes for high mobility group (HMG transcription factors, homologous to SexM and SexP genes in the Mucorales. The SexM genes show a remarkable sequence diversity among multiple copies in the genome, while only a single SexP sequence was detected in some isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis. In the Mucorales and Microsporidia, the sexM gene is flanked by genes for a triosephosphate transporter (TPT and a RNA helicase, but we find no evidence for synteny in the vicinity of the Sex locus in AMF. Nonetheless, our results, together with previous observations on meiotic machinery, suggest that AMF could undergo a complete sexual reproduction cycle.

  8. Massive parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse fecal bacterial and fungal communities in healthy dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handl, Stefanie; Dowd, Scot E; Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluated the fecal microbiota of 12 healthy pet dogs and 12 pet cats using bacterial and fungal tag-encoded FLX-Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. A total of 120,406 pyrosequencing reads for bacteria (mean 5017) and 5359 sequences (one pool each for dogs and cats) for fungi were analyzed. Additionally, group-specific 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for Bifidobacterium spp. and lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) were constructed. The most abundant bacterial phylum was Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes in dogs and Actinobacteria in cats. The most prevalent bacterial class in dogs and cats was Clostridia, dominated by the genera Clostridium (clusters XIVa and XI) and Ruminococcus. At the genus level, 85 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in dogs and 113 OTUs in cats. Seventeen LAB and eight Bifidobacterium spp. were detected in canine feces. Ascomycota was the only fungal phylum detected in cats, while Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Glomeromycota, and Zygomycota were identified in dogs. Nacaseomyces was the most abundant fungal genus in dogs; Saccharomyces and Aspergillus were predominant in cats. At the genus level, 33 different fungal OTUs were observed in dogs and 17 OTUs in cats. In conclusion, this study revealed a highly diverse bacterial and fungal microbiota in canine and feline feces.

  9. Fungal Community Successions in Rhizosphere Sediment of Seagrasses Enhalus acoroides under PAHs Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ling

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows represent one of the highest productive marine ecosystems and are of great ecological and economic values. Recently, they have been confronted with worldwide decline. Fungi play important roles in sustaining the ecosystem health as degraders of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, but fewer studies have been conducted in seagrass ecosystems. Hence, we investigated the dynamic variations of the fungal community succession under PAH stress in rhizosphere sediment of seagrasses Enhalus acoroides in this study. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE, quantitative PCR (qPCR and a clone library have been employed to analyze the fungal community’s shifts. Sequencing results of DGGE and the clone library showed that the predominant species belong to phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The abundance of three groups decreased sharply over the incubation period, whereas they demonstrated different fungal diversity patterns. Both the exposure time and the PAH concentrations affected the microbial diversity as assessed by PCR-DGGE analysis. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that significant factors driving community shifts were ammonium and pH (p < 0.05. Significant amounts of the variations (31.1% were explained by pH and ammonium, illustrating that those two parameters were the most likely ones to influence or be influenced by the fungal communities’ changes. Investigation results also indicated that fungal communities in seagrass meadow were very sensitive to PAH-induced stress and may be used as potential indicators for the PAH contamination.

  10. The pep4 gene encoding proteinase A is involved in dimorphism and pathogenesis of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberanes-Gutiérrez, Cinthia V; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Olguín-Rodríguez, Omar; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Vacuole proteases have important functions in different physiological processes in fungi. Taking this aspect into consideration, and as a continuation of our studies on the analysis of the proteolytic system of Ustilago maydis, a phytopathogenic member of the Basidiomycota, we have analysed the role of the pep4 gene encoding the vacuolar acid proteinase PrA in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of the fungus. After confirmation of the location of the protease in the vacuole using fluorescent probes, we obtained deletion mutants of the gene in sexually compatible strains of U. maydis (FB1 and FB2), and analysed their phenotypes. It was observed that the yeast to mycelium dimorphic transition induced by a pH change in the medium, or the use of a fatty acid as sole carbon source, was severely reduced in Δpep4 mutants. In addition, the virulence of the mutants in maize seedlings was reduced, as revealed by the lower proportion of plants infected and the reduction in size of the tumours induced by the pathogen, when compared with wild-type strains. All of these phenotypic alterations were reversed by complementation of the mutant strains with the wild-type gene. These results provide evidence of the importance of the pep4 gene for the morphogenesis and virulence of U. maydis.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of the dimorphic transition of Ustilago maydis induced in vitro by a change in pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Soto, Domingo; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-01-01

    Dimorphism is the property of fungi to grow as budding yeasts or mycelium, depending on the environmental conditions. This phenomenon is important as a model of differentiation in eukaryotic organisms, and since a large number of fungal diseases are caused by dimorphic fungi, its study is important for practical reasons. In this work, we examined the transcriptome during the dimorphic transition of the basidiomycota phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis using microarrays, utilizing yeast and mycelium monomorphic mutants as controls. This way, we thereby identified 154 genes of the fungus that are specifically involved in the dimorphic transition induced by a pH change. Of these, 82 genes were up-regulated, and 72 were down-regulated. Differential categorization of these genes revealed that they mostly belonged to the classes of metabolism, cell cycle and DNA processing, transcription and protein fate, transport and cellular communication, stress, cell differentiation and biogenesis of cellular components, while a significant number of them corresponded to unclassified proteins. The data reported in this work are important for our understanding of the molecular bases of dimorphism in U. maydis, and possibly of other fungi.

  12. Conserved and Distinct Functions of the “Stunted” (StuA)-Homolog Ust1 During Cell Differentiation in the Corn Smut Fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Montañez, Lourdes; Gold, Scott E; Espeso, Eduardo A; García-Pedrajas, María D

    2015-01-01

    Ustilago maydis, causal agent of corn smut, can proliferate saprobically in a yeast form but its infectious filamentous form is an obligate parasite. Previously, we showed that Ust1, the first APSES (Asm1p, Phd1p, Sok2p, Efg1p, and StuAp) transcription factor functionally characterized in the phylum Basidiomycota, controlled morphogenesis and virulence in this species. Here, we further analyzed Ust1 function using multiple experimental approaches and determined that i) Ust1 activity was able to partially reverse stuA− conidiophore defects in Aspergillus nidulans; ii) in U. maydis, normal development and virulence were strongly dependent on precise induction or repression of Ust1 activity; iii) consistent with its role as a transcription factor regulating multiple processes, Ust1 accumulated in the nucleus at various stages of the life cycle; iv) however, it was undetectable at specific stages of pathogenic growth, indicating that Ust1 repression is part of normal development in planta; v) StuA response elements upstream of the ust1 open reading frame exhibited affinity for U. maydis DNA-binding proteins; vi) however, loss of regulated ust1 transcription had minor phenotypic effects; and vii) Ust1 was subject to post-translational phosphorylation but is not a target of cAMP signaling. Thus, the broad functional conservation between Ust1 and Ascomycota APSES proteins does not extend to the mechanisms regulating their activity.

  13. Analysis of the regulation of the Ustilago maydis proteome by dimorphism, pH or MAPK and GCN5 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salgado, José L; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Pacheco, Alberto Barrera; Ruiz-Herrera, José; de la Rosa, Ana P Barba

    2013-02-21

    Ustilago maydis is a dimorphic corn pathogenic basidiomycota whose haploid cells grow in yeast form at pH7, while at pH3 they grow in the mycelial form. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with LC-ESI/MS-MS was used to analyze the differential accumulation of proteins in yeast against mycelial morphologies. 2-DE maps were obtained in the pH range of 5-8 and 404 total protein spots were separated. From these, 43 were differentially accumulated when comparing strains FB2wt, constitutive yeast CL211, and constitutive mycelial GP25 growing at pH7 against pH3. Differentially accumulated proteins in response to pH are related with defense against reactive oxygen species or toxic compounds. Up-accumulation of CipC and down-accumulation of Hmp1 were specifically related with mycelial growth. Changes in proteins that were affected by mutation in the gene encoding the adaptor of a MAPK pathway (CL211 strain) were UM521* and transcription factors Btf3, Sol1 and Sti1. Mutation of GCN5 (GP25 strain) affected the accumulation of Rps19-ribosomal protein, Mge1-heath shock protein, and Lpd1-dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Our results complement the information about the genes and proteins related with the dimorphic transition in U. maydis and changes in proteins affected by mutations in a MAPK pathway and GCN5 gene.

  14. Defects in mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation influence virulence in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W

    2012-08-01

    An understanding of metabolic adaptation during the colonization of plants by phytopathogenic fungi is critical for developing strategies to protect crops. Lipids are abundant in plant tissues, and fungal phytopathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. Previously, we demonstrated a role for the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme Mfe2 in the filamentous growth, virulence, and sporulation of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. However, mfe2 mutants still caused disease symptoms, thus prompting a more detailed investigation of β-oxidation. We now demonstrate that a defect in the had1 gene encoding hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase for mitochondrial β-oxidation also influences virulence, although its paralog, had2, makes only a minor contribution. Additionally, we identified a gene encoding a polypeptide with similarity to the C terminus of Mfe2 and designated it Mfe2b; this gene makes a contribution to virulence only in the background of an mfe2Δ mutant. We also show that short-chain fatty acids induce cell death in U. maydis and that a block in β-oxidation leads to toxicity, likely because of the accumulation of toxic intermediates. Overall, this study reveals that β-oxidation has a complex influence on the formation of disease symptoms by U. maydis that includes potential metabolic contributions to proliferation in planta and an effect on virulence-related morphogenesis.

  15. Brh2 and Rad51 promote telomere maintenance in Ustilago maydis, a new model system of DNA repair proteins at telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eun Young; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K; Lue, Neal F

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies implicate a number of DNA repair proteins in mammalian telomere maintenance. However, because several key repair proteins in mammals are missing from the well-studied budding and fission yeast, their roles at telomeres cannot be modeled in standard fungi. In this report, we explored the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis as an alternative model for telomere research. This fungus, which belongs to the phylum Basidiomycota, has a telomere repeat unit that is identical to the mammalian repeat, as well as a constellation of DNA repair proteins that more closely mimic the mammalian collection. We showed that the two core components of homology-directed repair (HDR) in U. maydis, namely Brh2 and Rad51, both promote telomere maintenance in telomerase positive cells, just like in mammals. In addition, we found that Brh2 is localized to telomeres in vivo, suggesting that it acts directly at chromosome ends. We surveyed a series of mutants with DNA repair defects, and found many of them to have short telomeres. Our results indicate that factors involved in DNA repair are probably also needed for optimal telomere maintenance in U. maydis, and that this fungus is a useful alternative model system for telomere research.

  16. Regulation of genes involved in cell wall synthesis and structure during Ustilago maydis dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Briones, Mariana; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-02-01

    The cell wall is the structure that provides the shape to fungal cells and protects them from the difference in osmotic pressure existing between the cytosol and the external medium. Accordingly, changes in structure and composition of the fungal wall must occur during cell differentiation, including the dimorphic transition of fungi. We analyzed, by use of microarrays, the transcriptional regulation of the 639 genes identified to be involved in cell wall synthesis and structure plus the secretome of the Basidiomycota species Ustilago maydis during its dimorphic transition induced by a change in pH. Of these, 189 were differentially expressed during the process, and using as control two monomorphic mutants, one yeast like and the other mycelium constitutive, 66 genes specific of dimorphism were identified. Most of these genes were up-regulated in the mycelial phase. These included CHS genes, genes involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, N-glycosylation, and proteins containing a residue of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, and a number of genes from the secretome. The possible significance of these data on cell wall plasticity is discussed.

  17. Characterization of rhizosphere and endophytic fungal communities from roots of Stipa purpurea in alpine steppe around Qinghai Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dengxue; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Denghong; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Xiuzhuang; Zhao, Yuhui; Han, Rongbing; Qin, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Stipa purpurea is among constructive endemic species in the alpine steppe on the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. To reveal the fungal community structure and diversity in the rhizosphere and roots of this important grass and to analyze the potential influence of different habitats on the structure of fungal communities, we explored the root endophyte and the directly associated rhizosphere communities of S. purpurea by using internal transcribed spacer rRNA cloning and sequencing methods. We found that the roots of S. purpurea are associated with a diverse consortium of Basidiomycota (59.8%) and Ascomycota (38.5%). Most fungi obtained from rhizosphere soil in S. purpurea have been identified as Ascomycetes, while the high proportion detected in roots were basidiomycetous endophytes. The species richness, diversity, and evenness of fungal assemblages were higher in roots than in the rhizosphere soil. Fungi inhabiting the rhizosphere and roots of S. purpurea are significantly different, and the rhizosphere and endophyte communities are largely independent with little overlap in the dominant phyla or operational taxonomic units. Taken together, these results suggested that a wide variety of fungal communities are associated with the roots and rhizosphere soil of S. purpurea and that the fungal assemblages are strongly influenced by different habitats. PMID:27348421

  18. Sebacinales - one thousand and one interactions with land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Michael; Waller, Frank; Zuccaro, Alga; Selosse, Marc-André

    2016-07-01

    20 I 21 II 21 III 23 IV 29 V 33 VI 35 36 36 References 36 SUMMARY: Root endophytism and mycorrhizal associations are complex derived traits in fungi that shape plant physiology. Sebacinales (Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) display highly diverse interactions with plants. Although early-diverging Sebacinales lineages are root endophytes and/or have saprotrophic abilities, several more derived clades harbour obligate biotrophs forming mycorrhizal associations. Sebacinales thus display transitions from saprotrophy to endophytism and to mycorrhizal nutrition within one fungal order. This review discusses the genomic traits possibly associated with these transitions. We also show how molecular ecology revealed the hyperdiversity of Sebacinales and their evolutionary diversification into two sister families: Sebacinaceae encompasses mainly ectomycorrhizal and early-diverging saprotrophic species; the second family includes endophytes and lineages that repeatedly evolved ericoid, orchid and ectomycorrhizal abilities. We propose the name Serendipitaceae for this family and, within it, we transfer to the genus Serendipita the endophytic cultivable species Piriformospora indica and P. williamsii. Such cultivable Serendipitaceae species provide excellent models for root endophytism, especially because of available genomes, genetic tractability, and broad host plant range including important crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We review insights gained with endophytic Serendipitaceae species into the molecular mechanisms of endophytism and of beneficial effects on host plants, including enhanced resistance to abiotic and pathogen stress. PMID:27193559

  19. Rhodotorula glutinis meningitis: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sarala; Gupta, H R; Sequeira, R; Chavan, Shazia; Gholape, D; Amandeep, S; Bhilave, N; Chowdhary, A S

    2014-07-01

    Rhodotorula is ubiquitous saprophytic yeast belonging to phylum Basidiomycota. These encapsulated basidiomycetes are being increasingly recognised as important emerging human pathogens. There are scanty reports of meningitis caused by Rhodurorula spp in HIV infected patients. We present one such case of meningitis by Rhodutorula glutinis in HIV-infected patient. The patient also had a past history of abdominal tuberculosis. The diagnosis of Rhodotorula was confirmed by Gram staining and culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Contamination was ruled out by repeated culturing of CSF from the same patient. Therapy with Amphotericin B showed good results. Patient was discharged from the hospital. However, in the seventh month of follow-up patient was readmitted with complaints of fever, breathlessness, altered sensorium, vomiting and succumbed to his illness. This time the CSF cultures remained negative for Rhodotorula, acid fast bacilli and other pyogenic organisms. Our last 11-year retrospective analysis of 8197 specimens received for mycological work-up showed that this is the first report of R. glutinis isolation from our institute.

  20. Destructuring plant biomass: Focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocalli-mastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  1. A preliminary checklist of macrofungi of Guatemala, with notes on edibility and traditional knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Arzú R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its biological wealth, current knowledge on the macromycetes inhabiting Guatemala is scant, in part because of the prolonged civil war that has prevented exploration of many ecological niches. We provide a preliminary literature–based checklist of the macrofungi occuring in the various ecological regions of Guatemala, supplemented with original observations reported here for the first time. Three hundred and fifty species, 163 genera, and 20 orders in the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota have been reported from Guatemala. Many of the entries pertain to ectomycorrhizal fungal species that live in symbiosis with the several Pinus and Quercus species that form the extensive pine and mixed forests of the highlands (up to 3600 m a.s.l.. As part of an ongoing study of the ethnomycology of the Maya populations in the Guatemalan highlands, we also report on the traditional knowledge about macrofungi and their uses among native people. These preliminary data confirm the impression that Guatemala hosts a macrofungal diversity that is by no means smaller than that recorded in better studied neighboring Mesoamerican areas, such as Mexico and Costa Rica.

  2. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  3. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pei-Feng; Fang, Wei-Ta; Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25464336

  4. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Communities Along an Altitudinal Gradient in Alpine Forest Soils: What Are the Driving Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, José A; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    Shifts in soil microbial communities over altitudinal gradients and the driving factors are poorly studied. Their elucidation is indispensable to gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Here, we investigated soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities at four Alpine forest sites representing a climosequence, over an altitudinal gradient from 545 to 2000 m above sea level (asl), regarding abundance and diversity by using qPCR and Illumina sequencing, respectively. Archaeal community was dominated by Thaumarchaeota, and no significant shifts were detected in abundance or community composition with altitude. The relative bacterial abundance increased at higher altitudes, which was related to increasing levels of soil organic matter and nutrients with altitude. Shifts in bacterial richness and diversity as well as community structure (comprised basically of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) significantly correlated with several environmental and soil chemical factors, especially soil pH. The site at the lowest altitude harbored the highest bacterial richness and diversity, although richness/diversity community properties did not show a monotonic decrease along the gradient. The relative size of fungal community also increased with altitude and its composition comprised Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Changes in fungal richness/diversity and community structure were mainly governed by pH and C/N, respectively. The variation of the predominant bacterial and fungal classes over the altitudinal gradient was the result of the environmental and soil chemical factors prevailing at each site. PMID:26961712

  5. Novel chytrid lineages dominate fungal sequences in diverse marine and freshwater habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, André M; Vincent, Warwick F; Bernier, Louis; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-01-01

    In aquatic environments, fungal communities remain little studied despite their taxonomic and functional diversity. To extend the ecological coverage of this group, we conducted an in-depth analysis of fungal sequences within our collection of 3.6 million V4 18S rRNA pyrosequences originating from 319 individual marine (including sea-ice) and freshwater samples from libraries generated within diverse projects studying Arctic and temperate biomes in the past decade. Among the ~1.7 million post-filtered reads of highest taxonomic and phylogenetic quality, 23,263 fungal sequences were identified. The overall mean proportion was 1.35%, but with large variability; for example, from 0.01 to 59% of total sequences for Arctic seawater samples. Almost all sample types were dominated by Chytridiomycota-like sequences, followed by moderate-to-minor contributions of Ascomycota, Cryptomycota and Basidiomycota. Species and/or strain richness was high, with many novel sequences and high niche separation. The affinity of the most common reads to phytoplankton parasites suggests that aquatic fungi deserve renewed attention for their role in algal succession and carbon cycling. PMID:27444055

  6. Amplicon pyrosequencing reveals the soil microbial diversity associated with invasive Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, V C; Pelletreau, K N; Rumpho, M E

    2014-03-01

    The soil microbial community acts as a reservoir of microbes that directly influences the structure and composition of the aboveground plant community, promotes plant growth, increases stress tolerance and mediates local patterns of nutrient cycling. Direct interactions between plants and rhizosphere-dwelling microorganisms occur at, or near, the surface of the root. Upon introduction and establishment, invasive plants modify the soil microbial communities and soil biochemistry affecting bioremediation efforts and future plant communities. Here, we used tag-encoded FLX amplicon 454 pyrosequencing (TEFAP) to characterize the bacterial and fungal community diversity in the rhizosphere of Berberis thunbergii DC. (Japanese barberry) from invasive stands in coastal Maine to investigate effects of soil type, soil chemistry and surrounding plant cover on the soil microbial community structure. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the dominant bacterial phyla, whereas fungal communities were comprised mostly of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla members, including Agaricomycetes and Sordariomycetes. Bulk soil chemistry had more effect on the bacterial community structure than the fungal community. An effect of geographic location was apparent in the rhizosphere microbial communities, yet it was less significant than the effect of surrounding plant cover. These data demonstrate a high degree of spatial variation in the rhizosphere microbial communities of Japanese barberry with apparent effects of soil chemistry, location and canopy cover on the microbial community structure. PMID:24118303

  7. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  8. Rust fungi on Annonaceae II: the genus Dasyspora Berk. & M.A. Curtis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenken, Ludwig; Zoller, Stefan; Berndt, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Dasyspora gregaria, the single species of the allegedly monotypic rust genus Dasyspora (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales), was investigated by light microscopy and DNA sequencing (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, partial LSU and SSU of the nuclear rDNA, mt cytochrome oxidase subunit 3). Both methods indicated that D. gregaria is not a single species but can be split in 11 distinct taxa, each of which appear confined to a single Xylopia species (Annonaceae) host. Herein nine of these are described as new. Both the phylogenetic analyses and morphology show that the species are grouped into two main clades designated Dasyspora gregaria and D. winteri. The first comprises D. gregaria, the type species of the genus, which is restricted to X. cayennensis, two new species on X. aromatica, D. segregaria from northern South America and D. echinata from Brazil. The second clade is formed by D. winteri, recombined from Puccinia winteri on X. sericea, and the new species D. amazonica on X. amazonica, D. emarginatae on X. emarginata, D. frutescentis on X. frutescens, D. ferrugineae on X. frutescens var. ferruginea, D. guianensis on X. benthamii, D. mesoamericana on X. frutescens, and D. nitidae on X. nitida. Dasyspora frutescentis and D. mesoamericana were not clearly distinguishable by their morphology and host associations but differed from another in their sequences and geographic distributions. They are considered cryptic species. An identification key and the distributions are given for all recognized species. Along with molecular data we discuss the systematic position of Dasyspora in the Pucciniales.

  9. Ploidy-specific symbiotic interactions: divergence of mycorrhizal fungi between cytotypes of the Gymnadenia conopsea group (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Těšitelová, Tamara; Jersáková, Jana; Roy, Mélanie; Kubátová, Barbora; Těšitel, Jakub; Urfus, Tomáš; Trávníček, Pavel; Suda, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Polyploidy is widely recognized as a major mechanism of sympatric speciation in plants, yet little is known about its effects on interactions with other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi are among the most common plant symbionts and play an important role in plant nutrient supply. It remains to be understood whether mycorrhizal associations of ploidy-variable plants can be ploidy-specific. We examined mycorrhizal associations in three cytotypes (2x, 3x, 4x) of the Gymnadenia conopsea group (Orchidaceae), involving G. conopsea s.s. and G. densiflora, at different spatial scales and during different ontogenetic stages. We analysed: adults from mixed- and single-ploidy populations at a regional scale; closely spaced adults within a mixed-ploidy site; and mycorrhizal seedlings. All Gymnadenia cytotypes associated mainly with saprotrophic Tulasnellaceae (Basidiomycota). Nonetheless, both adults and seedlings of diploids and their autotetraploid derivatives significantly differed in the identity of their mycorrhizal symbionts. Interploidy segregation of mycorrhizal symbionts was most pronounced within a site with closely spaced adults. This study provides the first evidence that polyploidization of a plant species can be associated with a shift in mycorrhizal symbionts. This divergence may contribute to niche partitioning and facilitate establishment and co-existence of different cytotypes. PMID:23731358

  10. U12 type introns were lost at multiple occasions during evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartschat Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two categories of introns are known, a common U2 type and a rare U12 type. These two types of introns are removed by distinct spliceosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs that are characteristic of the U12 spliceosome, i.e. the U11, U12, U4atac and U6atac RNAs, suggest that U12 spliceosomes were lost in many phylogenetic groups. We have now examined the distribution of U2 and U12 introns in many of these groups. Results U2 and U12 introns were predicted by making use of available EST and genomic sequences. The results show that in species or branches where U12 spliceosomal components are missing, also U12 type of introns are lacking. Examples are the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, Entamoeba histolytica, green algae, diatoms, and the fungal lineage Basidiomycota. Furthermore, whereas U12 splicing does not occur in Caenorhabditis elegans, U12 introns as well as U12 snRNAs are present in Trichinella spiralis, which is deeply branching in the nematode tree. A comparison of homologous genes in T. spiralis and C. elegans revealed different mechanisms whereby U12 introns were lost. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of U12 introns and spliceosomal RNAs give further support to an early origin of U12 dependent splicing. In addition, this distribution identifies a large number of instances during eukaryotic evolution where such splicing was lost.

  11. 辽宁树莓园红鬼笔发生初报及种类鉴定%Preliminary Occurred and Species Identification of Red Phalloidin in Liaoning Raspberry Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅俊范; 林秋君; 严雪瑞; 周如军; 代汉萍; 彭超; 王琦

    2011-01-01

    在沈阳市东陵区祝家屯镇下楼子村树莓栽培园田间地表首次发现一种大量生长的奇特真菌,经鉴定确认该菌为红鬼笔(Phallus rubicundus (Bosc.)Fr.),属于属真菌门,担子菌亚门,腹菌纲,鬼笔目,鬼笔菌属.通过田间发生调查、菌种分离鉴定及室内培育观察,对红鬼笔生态、形态与生长特征进行了初步研究.%The first time found a large number of surface growth of filed exotic fungi in xia louzi Village, ZhuJiaTun zhen Dongling District of Shenyang, raspberry cultivation park,it was identified as red phalloidin ( Phallus rubicundus (Bosc.) Fr.) , this fungi belonging to the Eumycota, Basidiomycota, Gasteromycetes, Phallales, Phallus.Through field investigation, species separation and identification, and the indoor training observation,the red phalloidin' s ecology,morphology and growth characteristics were studied.

  12. Phylogenetic placement of plant pathogenic Sclerotium species among teleomorph genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihan; Harrington, Thomas C; Gleason, Mark L; Batzer, Jean C

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses and morphological characteristics were used to assess the taxonomic placement of eight plant-pathogenic Sclerotium species. Members of this genus produce only sclerotia and no fruiting bodies or spores, so Sclerotium species have been difficult to place taxonomically. Sequences of rDNA large subunit (LSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were determined for isolates of Sclerotium cepivorum, S. coffeicola, S. denigrans, S. hydrophilum, Ceratorhiza oryzae-sativae, S. perniciosum, S. rhizodes, S. rolfsii and S. rolfsii var. delphinii. Parsimony analysis grouped two species previously thought to be in the Basidiomycota, S. denigrans and S. perniciosum, within the Ascomycota; these species were found to have affinities with the teleomorph genera Sclerotinia and Stromatinia and the asexual Sclerotium cepivorum, which was known earlier to be related to Sclerotinia species. The other Sclerotium species were placed in one of two basidiomycetous groups, genera Athelia or Ceratobasidium. Based on rDNA analysis and morphology the basidiomycetous Sclerotium hydrophilum and S. rhizodes were transferred to genus Ceratorhiza, the anamorph of Ceratobasidium species. Sclerotium coffeicola was found to be close to S. rolfsii var. delphinii and S. rolfsii var. rolfsii, which was shown earlier to have an Athelia teleomorph. PMID:20361501

  13. Estudio micológico de El Canal y Los Tiles (La Palma, Islas Canarias. V. Datos adicionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal, Julio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An annotated catalogue of 66 taxa, collected in the early MAB Reserve El Canal y Los Tiles is presented. Among these taxa, 11 species are new for La Palma island and 5 are recorded for the first time in the Canary Islands. Taxonomic comments on some critical species and information about the distribution in the Macaronesian bioregion of all the studied taxa are given. Based on our previous publications, global data on biodiversity, substrates and distribution of the mycobiota in the different plant communities present in the sampled area are analyzed.

    Se presenta un estudio sobre 66 especies, pertenecientes a las divisiones Myxomycota (21, Ascomycota (29 y Basidiomycota (16, encontradas en la antigua Reserva de la Biosfera El Canal y Los Tiles. De ellas 11 se citan por primera vez para la isla de La Palma, siendo 5 de éstas nuevas para Canarias. Se hacen comentarios taxonómicos sobre algunos táxones conflictivos, además de amplia información sobre su distribución en la Región Macaronésica. En base a publicaciones propias anteriores, se aportan datos globales sobre biodiversidad, sustratos y distribución de la micobiota en las diferentes unidades ambientales presentes en el área de estudio.

  14. Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov., a tremellaceous yeast species isolated from plants and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Brandão, Luciana R; Barbosa, Anne C; Ramos, Jesus P; Safar, Silvana V B; Gomes, Fatima C O; Sousa, Francisca M P; Morais, Paula B; Broetto, Leonardo; Leoncini, Orílio; Ribeiro, José Roberto; Fungsin, Bundit; Takashima, Masako; Nakase, Takashi; Lee, Ching-Fu; Vainstein, Marilene H; Fell, Jack W; Scorzetti, Gloria; Vishniac, Helen S; Rosa, Carlos A; Valente, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Several independent surveys of yeasts associated with different plant materials and soil led to the proposal of a novel yeast species belonging to the Tremellales clade (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota). Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and internal transcribed spacer region of the large subunit of the rRNA gene suggested affinity to a phylogenetic lineage that includes Hannaella coprosmaensis, Hannaella oryzae and Hannaella sinensis. Thirty-two isolates were obtained from different sources, including bromeliads, nectar of Heliconia psittacorum (Heliconiaceae), flowers of Pimenta dioica (Myrtaceae), roots and leaves of sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) in Brazil, leaves of Cratoxylum maingayi, Arundinaria pusilla and Vitis vinifera in Thailand, soil samples in Taiwan, and prairie soil in the USA. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the novel species differs from Hannaella coprosmaensis and Hannaella oryzae by 36 and 46 nt substitutions, respectively. A novel species is suggested to accommodate these isolates, for which the name Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BI118(T) ( = CBS 11142(T) = ATCC MYA-4530(T)).

  15. Bacterial selection by mycospheres of Atlantic Rainforest mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Joshua Andrew; de Cássia Pereira E Silva, Michele; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on the selection exerted on bacterial communities in the mycospheres of mushrooms collected in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. A total of 24 paired samples (bulk soil vs. mycosphere) were assessed to investigate potential interactions between fungi and bacteria present in fungal mycospheres. Prevalent fungal families were identified as Marasmiaceae and Lepiotaceae (both Basidiomycota) based on ITS partial sequencing. We used culture-independent techniques to analyze bacterial DNA from soil and mycosphere samples. Bacterial communities in the samples were distinguished based on overall bacterial, alphaproteobacterial, and betaproteobacterial PCR-DGGE patterns, which were different in fungi belonging to different taxa. These results were confirmed by pyrosequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene (based on five bulk soil vs. mycosphere pairs), which revealed the most responsive bacterial families in the different conditions generated beneath the mushrooms, identified as Bradyrhizobiaceae, Burkholderiaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae. The bacterial families Acetobacteraceae, Chrhoniobacteraceae, Planctomycetaceae, Conexibacteraceae, and Burkholderiaceae were found in all mycosphere samples, composing the core mycosphere microbiome. Similarly, some bacterial groups identified as Koribacteriaceae, Acidobacteria (Solibacteriaceae) and an unclassified group of Acidobacteria were preferentially present in the bulk soil samples (found in all of them). In this study we depict the mycosphere effect exerted by mushrooms inhabiting the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest, and identify the bacteria with highest response to such a specific niche, possibly indicating the role bacteria play in mushroom development and dissemination within this yet-unexplored environment. PMID:27411813

  16. CULTURE DESCRIPTION OF SOME SPONTANEOUS LIGNICOLOUS MACROMYCETES SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALAEŞ TIBERIUS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 24 species of lignicolous macromycetes from 4 taxonomic families and 2 orders, Class Agaricomycetes, Phyllum Basidiomycota, have been analyzed. The cultural characters of these isolates had been observed, some of them being little studied till now. The dikaryotic mycelium from the trama of the sporoms was used for the isolation purpose. The fungal isolates were cultivated onto malt extract-agar media (malt extract 20g l-1 and incubated at 25 °C, in the dark, for 6 weeks. The cultures were observed directly and using a Nikon stereomicroscope in order to measure the growth rhythm and to observe the changes of the colonies: edge, surface, reverse, shape, colour, smell, presence or absence of the exudates. After 6 weeks from the inoculation, microscopic slides were made in order to investigate the types of hyphae, the colour and the structure of the mycelium and to note the presence of particular elements: cuticle, chlamydospors, arthrospores, conidia, and basidia. We noticed that the analyzed species present similar characters but also significant differences between them.

  17. Ice Nucleation Activity in the Widespread Soil Fungus Mortierella alpina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological residues in soil dust are a potentially strong source of atmospheric ice nuclei (IN. So far, however, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, and role of biological – in particular, fungal – IN in soil dust have not been characterized. By analysis of the culturable fungi in topsoils, from a range of different land use and ecosystem types in south-east Wyoming, we found ice nucleation active (INA fungi to be both widespread and abundant, particularly in soils with recent inputs of decomposable organic matter. Across all investigated soils, 8% of fungal isolates were INA. All INA isolates initiated freezing at −5 to −6 °C, and belonged to a single zygomycotic species, Mortierella alpina (Mortierellales, Mortierellomycotina. By contrast, the handful of fungal species so far reported as INA all belong within the Ascomycota or Basidiomycota phyla. M. alpina is known to be saprobic, widespread in soil and present in air and rain. Sequencing of the ITS region and the gene for γ-linolenic-elongase revealed four distinct clades, affiliated to different soil types. The IN produced by M. alpina seem to be proteinaceous, <300 kDa in size, and can be easily washed off the mycelium. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium will ramify topsoils and probably also release cell-free IN into it. If these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, their contribution might accumulate over time, perhaps to be transported with soil dust and influencing its ice nucleating properties.

  18. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of coastal bioaerosols using culture dependent and independent techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Urbano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosols are emerging as important yet poorly understood players in atmospheric processes. Microorganisms can impact atmospheric chemistry through metabolic reactions and can potentially influence physical processes by participating in ice nucleation and cloud droplet formation. Microbial roles in atmospheric processes are thought to be species-specific and potentially dependent on cell viability. Using a coastal pier monitoring site as a sampling platform, culture-dependent (i.e. agar plates and culture-independent (i.e. DNA clone libraries from filters approaches were combined with 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene targeting to obtain insight into the local atmospheric microbial composition. From 13 microbial isolates and 42 DNA library clones, a total of 55 sequences were obtained representing four independent sampling events. Sequence analysis revealed that in these coastal samples two fungal phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, predominate among eukaryotes while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominate among bacteria. Furthermore, our culture-dependent study verifies the viability of microbes from all four phyla detected through our culture-independent study. Contrary to our expectations and despite oceanic air mass sources, common marine planktonic bacteria and phytoplankton were not typically found. The abundance of terrestrial and marine sediment-associated microorganisms suggests a potential importance for bioaerosols derived from beaches and/or coastal erosion processes.

  19. Strain-level diversity of secondary metabolism in the biocontrol species Aneurinibacillus migulanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Faizah N; Rekik, Imen; Bełka, Marta; Ibrahim, Abrar F; Luptakova, Lenka; Jaspars, Marcel; Woodward, Steve; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2016-01-01

    Aneurinibacillus migulanus strains Nagano and NCTC 7096 show potential in biocontrol against fungal and fungus-like plant pathogens, including a wide range of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Oomycetes. Differences in terms of the range of pathogens that each strain inhibits, however, suggested that production of a single antibiotic cyclic peptide, gramicidin S (GS), by the two strains, is not the sole mechanism of inhibition. The availability of four sequenced genomes of Aneurinibacillus prompted us to apply genome mining techniques to identify the bioactive potential of A. migulanus and to provide insights into the secondary metabolite arsenal of the genus Aneurinibacillus. Up to eleven secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters were present in the three Aneurinibacillus species. Biosynthetic gene clusters specifying bacteriocins, microcins, non-ribosomal peptides, polyketides, terpenes, phosphonates, lasso peptides and linaridins were identified. Chitinolytic potential and iron metabolism regulation were also investigated. With increasing numbers of biocontrol bacterial genomes being sequenced and mined, the use of approaches similar to those described in this paper will lead to an increase in the numbers of environmentally friendly natural products available to use against plant diseases. PMID:26686620

  20. Assembly, Annotation, and Analysis of Multiple Mycorrhizal Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Initiative Consortium, Mycorrhizal Genomics; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-03-08

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze dozens of mycorrhizal genomes of all Basidiomycota and Ascomycota orders and multiple ecological types (ericoid, orchid, and ectomycorrhizal). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput sequencing techniques, and Assembly, RNASeq, and Annotation Pipelines. In 2012 alone we sequenced, assembled, and annotated 12 draft or improved genomes of mycorrhizae, and predicted ~;;232831 genes and ~;;15011 multigene families, All of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm (http://jgi.doe.gov/fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. Preliminary comparisons of the current total of 14 public mycorrhizal genomes suggest that 1) short secreted proteins potentially involved in symbiosis are more enriched in some orders than in others amongst the mycorrhizal Agaricomycetes, 2) there are wide ranges of numbers of genes involved in certain functional categories, such as signal transduction and post-translational modification, and 3) novel gene families are specific to some ecological types.

  1. Exploring fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Guang-Hua; Xu, Xin-Ya; Nong, Xu-Hua; Wang, Jie; Amin, Muhammad; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the fungal diversity in four different deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1). A total of 40,297 fungal ITS1 sequences clustered into 420 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 97% sequence similarity and 170 taxa were recovered from these sediments. Most ITS1 sequences (78%) belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, followed by Basidiomycota (17.3%), Zygomycota (1.5%) and Chytridiomycota (0.8%), and a small proportion (2.4%) belonged to unassigned fungal phyla. Compared with previous studies on fungal diversity of sediments from deep-sea environments by culture-dependent approach and clone library analysis, the present result suggested that Illumina sequencing had been dramatically accelerating the discovery of fungal community of deep-sea sediments. Furthermore, our results revealed that Sordariomycetes was the most diverse and abundant fungal class in this study, challenging the traditional view that the diversity of Sordariomycetes phylotypes was low in the deep-sea environments. In addition, more than 12 taxa accounted for 21.5% sequences were found to be rarely reported as deep-sea fungi, suggesting the deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough harbored a plethora of different fungal communities compared with other deep-sea environments. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing.

  2. Blackpatch of clover, cause of slobbers syndrome: a review of the disease and the pathogen, Rhizoctonia leguminicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Ann Kagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia leguminicola Gough and E.S. Elliott is a widely used name for the causal agent of blackpatch disease of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.. This fungal pathogen produces alkaloids (slaframine and swainsonine that affect grazing mammals. Slaframine causes livestock to salivate profusely, and swainsonine causes neurological problems. Although the blackpatch fungus was classified as a Rhizoctonia species (phylum Basidiomycota, morphological studies have indicated that it is in the phylum Ascomycota, and sequencing data have indicated that it may be a new genus of ascomycete. The effects of the alkaloids on grazing mammals, and their biosynthetic pathways, have been extensively studied. In contrast, few studies have been done on management of the disease, which requires a greater understanding of the pathogen. Methods of disease management have included seed treatments and fungicides, but these have not been investigated since the 1950s. Searches for resistant cultivars have been limited. This review summarizes the biological effects and biosynthetic precursors of slaframine and swainsonine. Emphasis is placed on current knowledge about the epidemiology of blackpatch disease and the ecology and taxonomy of the pathogen. Possibilities for future research and disease management efforts are suggested.

  3. Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov., a tremellaceous yeast species isolated from plants and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Brandão, Luciana R; Barbosa, Anne C; Ramos, Jesus P; Safar, Silvana V B; Gomes, Fatima C O; Sousa, Francisca M P; Morais, Paula B; Broetto, Leonardo; Leoncini, Orílio; Ribeiro, José Roberto; Fungsin, Bundit; Takashima, Masako; Nakase, Takashi; Lee, Ching-Fu; Vainstein, Marilene H; Fell, Jack W; Scorzetti, Gloria; Vishniac, Helen S; Rosa, Carlos A; Valente, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Several independent surveys of yeasts associated with different plant materials and soil led to the proposal of a novel yeast species belonging to the Tremellales clade (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota). Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and internal transcribed spacer region of the large subunit of the rRNA gene suggested affinity to a phylogenetic lineage that includes Hannaella coprosmaensis, Hannaella oryzae and Hannaella sinensis. Thirty-two isolates were obtained from different sources, including bromeliads, nectar of Heliconia psittacorum (Heliconiaceae), flowers of Pimenta dioica (Myrtaceae), roots and leaves of sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) in Brazil, leaves of Cratoxylum maingayi, Arundinaria pusilla and Vitis vinifera in Thailand, soil samples in Taiwan, and prairie soil in the USA. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the novel species differs from Hannaella coprosmaensis and Hannaella oryzae by 36 and 46 nt substitutions, respectively. A novel species is suggested to accommodate these isolates, for which the name Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BI118(T) ( = CBS 11142(T) = ATCC MYA-4530(T)). PMID:24614844

  4. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  5. Woody plant encroachment, and its removal, impact bacterial and fungal communities across stream and terrestrial habitats in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Allison M; Dodds, Walter K; Jumpponen, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Woody plant encroachment has become a global threat to grasslands and has caused declines in aboveground richness and changes in ecosystem function; yet we have a limited understanding on the effects of these phenomena on belowground microbial communities. We completed riparian woody plant removals at Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas and collected soils spanning land-water interfaces in removal and woody vegetation impacted areas. We measured stream sediments and soils for edaphic variables (C and N pools, soil water content, pH) and bacterial (16S rRNA genes) and fungal (ITS2 rRNA gene repeat) communities using Illumina MiSeq metabarcoding. Bacterial richness and diversity decreased with distance from streams. Fungal richness decreased with distance from the stream in wooded areas, but was similar across landscape position while Planctomycetes and Basidiomycota relative abundance was lower in removal areas. Cyanobacteria, Ascomycota, Chytridiomycota and Glomeromycota relative abundance was greater in removal areas. Ordination analyses indicated that bacterial community composition shifted more across land-water interfaces than fungi yet both were marginally influenced by treatment. This study highlights the impacts of woody encroachment restoration on grassland bacterial and fungal communities which likely subsequently affects belowground processes and plant health in this ecosystem. PMID:26347079

  6. Microbial communities associated with Antarctic snow pack and their biogeochemical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Runa; Sanyal, Aritri; Kapse, Neelam; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Thamban, Meloth; Nair, Shanta

    2016-11-01

    Snow ecosystems represent a large part of the Earth's biosphere and harbour diverse microbial communities. Despite our increased knowledge of snow microbial communities, the question remains as to their functional potential, particularly with respect to their role in adapting to and modifying the specific snow environment. In this work, we investigated the diversity and functional capabilities of microorganisms from 3 regions of East Antarctica, with respect to compounds present in snow and tested whether their functional signature reflected the snow environment. A diverse assemblage of bacteria (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia), archaea (Euryarchaeota), and eukarya (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota, Cryptomycota and Rhizaria) were detected through culture-dependent and -independent methods. Although microbial communities observed in the three snow samples were distinctly different, all isolates tested produced one or more of the following enzymes: lipase, protease, amylase, β-galactosidase, cellulase, and/or lignin modifying enzyme. This indicates that the snow pack microbes have the capacity to degrade organic compounds found in Antarctic snow (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, lignin), thus highlighting their potential to be involved in snow chemistry. PMID:27664737

  7. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. PMID:26725152

  8. Resource Partitioning between Bacteria, Fungi, and Protists in the Detritusphere of an Agricultural Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Susanne; Dibbern, Dörte; Moll, Julia; Huenninghaus, Maike; Koller, Robert; Krueger, Dirk; Marhan, Sven; Urich, Tim; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bonkowski, Michael; Buscot, François; Lueders, Tillmann; Kandeler, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The flow of plant-derived carbon in soil is a key component of global carbon cycling. Conceptual models of trophic carbon fluxes in soil have assumed separate bacterial and fungal energy channels in the detritusphere, controlled by both substrate complexity and recalcitrance. However, detailed understanding of the key populations involved and niche-partitioning between them is limited. Here, a microcosm experiment was performed to trace the flow of detritusphere C from substrate analogs (glucose, cellulose) and plant biomass amendments (maize leaves, roots) in an agricultural soil. Carbon flow was traced by rRNA stable isotope probing and amplicon sequencing across three microbial kingdoms. Distinct lineages within the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Basidiomycota, Ascomycota as well as Peronosporomycetes were identified as important primary substrate consumers. A dynamic succession of primary consumers was observed especially in the cellulose treatments, but also in plant amendments over time. While intra-kingdom niche partitioning was clearly observed, distinct bacterial and fungal energy channels were not apparent. Furthermore, while the diversity of primary substrate consumers did not notably increase with substrate complexity, consumer succession and secondary trophic links to bacterivorous and fungivorous microbes resulted in increased food web complexity in the more recalcitrant substrates. This suggests that rather than substrate-defined energy channels, consumer succession as well as intra- and inter-kingdom cross-feeding should be considered as mechanisms supporting food web complexity in the detritusphere. PMID:27725815

  9. Fungi Sailing the Arctic Ocean: Speciose Communities in North Atlantic Driftwood as Revealed by High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämä, Teppo; Davey, Marie L; Nordén, Jenni; Halvorsen, Rune; Blaalid, Rakel; Mathiassen, Geir H; Alsos, Inger G; Kauserud, Håvard

    2016-08-01

    High amounts of driftwood sail across the oceans and provide habitat for organisms tolerating the rough and saline environment. Fungi have adapted to the extremely cold and saline conditions which driftwood faces in the high north. For the first time, we applied high-throughput sequencing to fungi residing in driftwood to reveal their taxonomic richness, community composition, and ecology in the North Atlantic. Using pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons obtained from 49 marine logs, we found 807 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on clustering at 97 % sequence similarity cut-off level. The phylum Ascomycota comprised 74 % of the OTUs and 20 % belonged to Basidiomycota. The richness of basidiomycetes decreased with prolonged submersion in the sea, supporting the general view of ascomycetes being more extremotolerant. However, more than one fourth of the fungal OTUs remained unassigned to any fungal class, emphasising the need for better DNA reference data from the marine habitat. Different fungal communities were detected in coniferous and deciduous logs. Our results highlight that driftwood hosts a considerably higher fungal diversity than currently known. The driftwood fungal community is not a terrestrial relic but a speciose assemblage of fungi adapted to the stressful marine environment and different kinds of wooden substrates found in it. PMID:27147245

  10. Variaciones en la estacionalidad de polen y esporas fúngicas en la atmósfera de la ciudad de La Plata (Argentina Seasonal variation of pollen and fungal spores in the atmosphere of Plata city (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S Nitiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los primeros datos sobre variaciones estacionales de polen y esporas fúngicas en su conjunto en la atmósfera de la ciudad de La Plata durante julio 2000 / junio 2001. El total de bioaerosoles fue de 201889.15 de los cuales el 15% correspondió a 54 tipos polínicos y el 85% a 79 tipos esporales. El Índice Polínico estuvo dado en un 74% por Polen Arbóreo (PA y en un 26% por Polen Herbáceo (PNA. La máxima concentración de PA tuvo lugar en septiembre con granos provenientes de Platanus y Fraxinus. El PNA presentó dos picos, el primero en diciembre procedente de Poaceae y el segundo en marzo debido a Ambrosia. Con respecto al componente fúngico, se identificaron esporas de Oomycota, Zygomycota, Myxomycota, Ascomycota y Basidiomycota. Estos bioaerosoles estuvieron presentes durante todo el año y en altas concentraciones siendo más abundantes en verano - otoño Las mitosporas de Hongos Imperfectos dominan la nube superando el 44% del total del Índice Esporal. El máximo aporte se registró en febrero dado por las esporas de Cladosporium. Se identificaron dos períodos estacionales en los cuales se hallan simultáneamente altas concentraciones de polen y esporas fúngicas. El primero se desarrolla en primavera y está integrado por Platanus, Fraxinus y Aspergillus / Penicillium y el segundo es estival e involucra a Ambrosia, Alternaria y Cladosporium.We present the first data on representativeness and seasonal variation of pollen and fungal spores as a whole in the atmosphere of the city of La Plata during july 2000 / june 2001. Total was 201889.15 bioaerosols, 15% of which was contributed by 54 pollen types and 85% by 79 spore types. The Pollinic Index came from arboreal pollen (PA in 74% and herbaceous pollen (PNA in 26%. The PA maximum concentration took place in september due to Platanus and Fraxinus. The PNA presented two peaks, one in december due to Poaceae, and the other one in march from Ambrosia. In regard to the

  11. Characteristics of the eukaryotic community structure in acid mine drainage lake in Anhui Province, China%安徽某铁矿酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽娜; 郝春博; 王丽华; 李思远; 冯传平

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构特征以及群落结构与环境因子之间的关系.[方法]利用分子生物学方法,通过构建18S rRNA基因克隆文库进行系统发育分析;利用典范对应分析(CCA)方法解析环境因子对真核生物群落结构的影响.[结果]系统发育分析表明:子囊菌门(Ascomycota)普遍存在于4个样品中,并在样品1和样品3中占统治地位,而绿藻门(Chlorophyta)和担子菌门(Basidiomycota)分别为样品2和样品4的优势类群.该酸性矿山废水中的克隆与许多已知的耐酸耐重金属真核生物亲缘关系较近,如Sarcinomyces petricola、Penicillium janthinellum、Coniochaeta velutina、Trichoderma viride、Chlorella protothecoides var.acidicola、Ochromonas sp.等.此外,样品中还存在大量的已知人类病原菌,如Lecythophora hoffmannii、Cryptococcus neoformans.CCA分析表明:TN、SO24-、Fe2+、Eh是影响真核生物群落空间分布的主要因素.[结论]所研究的酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构在时间和空间上均有较大差异,这可能与水体的理化性质有关;高含量人类致病菌的存在是之前研究所未发现的;酸性环境中真核生物的生态学研究有助于开发高效处理酸性矿山废水的方法.%[Objective] We characterized eukaryotic community structure and the relationship between the community structure and environmental factors in acidic mine drainage (AMD) lake of a sulfide mine in Anhui Province, China. [Methods] The 18S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed by using molecular biology techniques to analyze the eukaryotic phylogenetic relationships, and the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyze the relationship between the community structure and environmental factors. [Results] The phylogenetic analysis shows that Ascomycota is widespread in the four samples and dominated in the AMD-1 and AMD-3 clone libraries, whereas Chlorophyta and

  12. Macromicetos del Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, municipio de Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, México Macrofungi from Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, Municipality of Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Chanona-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio tuvo como objetivos contribuir al conocimiento de los macromicetos que crecen en el Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica (PELB, en Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas y determinar el índice de diversidad de Simpson y similitud de Sorensen de la micobiota existente en los diferentes tipos de vegetación. Se realizaron 24 exploraciones micológicas durante un año, encontrándose 144 especies (24 Ascomycota y 120 Basidiomycota. El índice de diversidad, mostró que la vegetación con la micobiota más diversa fue la del bosque de Quercus elliptica (D= 0.9678 la cual presentó mayor similitud con el bosque de Liquidambar stracyflua (Is= 83 %. El sustrato más frecuente fue la madera en descomposición (57.63 %. Se determinaron las especies de macromicetos potencialmente utilizables para el consumo humano (22 especies, lo que determinó el valor micológico del área de estudio en 15.27 %. Del total de especies determinadas 22 son nuevos registros para el estado de Chiapas; 4 Ascomicetos Scutellinia scutellata, Xylaria amphitele, X. persicaria, Chlorociboria aeruginosa, y 18 Basidiomicetos Amanita pantherina, Geastrum striatum, Hydnum repandum, Hygrocybe miniata, Scleroderma verrucosum, Cotylidia diaphana, Lactarius indigo, Phlogiotis helvelloides, Hydnochaete olivaceae, Phellinus ferruginosus, P. contiguus, P.rufitinctus, Thelephora terrestris, T. cervicornis, Perenniporia ohiensis, Diplomitoporus lenis, Schizopora paradoxa y Tremella fuciformis.The objectives of this study were to contribute to the knowledge of macro fungi growing in the "Parque Educativo Laguna Belgica" (PELB, in Chiapas, Mexico and to determine the diversity and similarity indexes for its mycobiota in each type of vegetation. Twenty four mycological explorations were made during a year, resulting in the identification of 144 species (24 Ascomycota and 120 Basidiomycota. The diversity of fungal species was determined through the index of Simpson and the similarity

  13. Microorganismos asociados a la rizosfera de jitomate en un agroecosistema del valle de Guasave, Sinaloa, México Rhizosphere microorganisms associated to tomato in an agroecosystem from Guasave Valley, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Damián Cordero-Ramírez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La diversidad de los microorganismos asociados a la rizosfera de diferentes especies vegetales en los suelos, en México se ha estudiado poco y se ha abordado de manera convencional, con técnicas microbiológicas limitadas debido al elevado porcentaje de microorganismos no-cultivables (95-99%. En el presente trabajo se empleó el análisis por secuenciación del ADN ribosomal (ADNr para evitar esa limitante y explorar mejor la diversidad de los microorganismos cultivables y no-cultivables asociados al jitomate (Solanum lycopersicum L. en un agroecosistema en Sinaloa. Se empleó ADN genómico extraído del suelo rizosférico para amplificar una región hipervariable en el ADNr empleando oligonucleótidos universales para ADNr procariota y eucariota. El an��lisis de 194 y 384 secuencias de ADNr de origen procariota y eucariota, respectivamente, mostró que los phyla eucariotes más abundantes fueron Ascomycota (59%, Chlorophyta (21% y Basidiomycota (12%, y los más abundantes de origen procariote fueron Firmicutes (45%, Proteobacteria (14.7% y Gemmatimonadetes (13.1%. El presente trabajo representa a la fecha la caracterización más completa de la diversidad de microorganismos de la rizosfera del jitomate. Se discute el papel que especies identificadas en este trabajo, pertenecientes a géneros procariotas (Bacillus y Paenibacillus y eucariotas (Alternaría, pudieran desempeñar en la rizosfera del jitomate y en el control biológico de fitopatogénos en esta especie.Rhizosphere microorganism diversity associated to different plant species in Mexican soils has been understudied. Most of those studies have been done using conventional microbiological techniques, which present an important limitation due to their incapacity to detect unculturable microorganisms, which represent 95-99% of the total microorganisms in soils. The present work employs ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequencing to overcome this limitation and to improve exploration of the

  14. Filamentous fungi isolated from the rhizosphere of melon plants (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine cultivated in soil with organic amendments Fungos filamentosos isolados da rizosfera de meloeiros (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine cultivados em solo com compostos orgânicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Paiva Coutinho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere soil samples were collected in a semiarid area, in the region of the São Francisco River valley, Petrolina, Pernambuco state, Brazil, to study the diversity of filamentous fungi in a soil cultivated with melon (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine and receiving different organic amendments: Treatment 1 (control, without organic compost; T2 (77% coconut fiber, 20% goat manure and 3% K2SO4; T3 (10% Ricinus communis leaves and stems, 50% Pennisetum purpureum leaves and 40% goat manure; T4 (77% coconut fiber, 20% goat manure and 3% termophosphate; T5 (47% Pennisetum purpureum leaves, 50% goat manure and 3% K2SO4; and T6 (57% Pennisetum purpureum leaves, 40% goat manure and 3% termophosphate. Fungal isolation was carried out by the serial dilution technique to 1:1000. The Sorensen index of similarity, frequency and distribution of the fungi were evaluated. Seventy-eight species of filamentous fungi were isolated and identified, plus several Basidiomycota (04 and Mycelia sterilia (02. The predominant genera were Aspergillus and Penicillium, with 15 and 13 species, respectively. A greater number of species was found in the sowing period (49, and in relation to the organic fertilization, treatment 6 provided the greatest species diversity (43 species. Most of the species are saprobes and only a few are considered to be potential pathogens on melon plants, such as Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani and Myrothecium roridum.Foram coletadas amostras de solo rizosférico em uma área semiárida, na região do Vale do São Francisco, Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brasil, com o objetivo de conhecer a diversidade dos fungos filamentosos presentes em solo cultivado com melão (Cucumis melo cv. Gold Mine e adubado com diferentes compostos orgânicos: Tratamento 1 (controle, sem adição de compostos orgânicos; T2 (77% de bagaço de côco, 20% de esterco de caprino e 3% de K2SO4; T3 (10% de torta de mamona, 50% de capim elefante e 40% de esterco de caprino; T4 (77% de

  15. Chemical and microbiological characterization of an aged PCB-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, T; Covino, S; Burianová, E; Filipová, A; Křesinová, Z; Voříšková, J; Větrovský, T; Baldrian, P; Cajthaml, T

    2015-11-15

    This study was aimed at complex characterization of three soil samples (bulk soil, topsoil and rhizosphere soil) from a site historically contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). The bulk soil was the most highly contaminated, with a PCB concentration of 705.95 mg kg(-1), while the rhizosphere soil was the least contaminated (169.36 mg kg(-1)). PCB degradation intermediates, namely chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs), were detected in all the soil samples, suggesting the occurrence of microbial transformation processes over time. The higher content of organic carbon in the topsoil and rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil could be linked to the reduced bioaccessibility (bioavailability) of these chlorinated pollutants. However, different proportions of the PCB congener contents and different bioaccessibility of the PCB homologues indicate microbial biotransformation of the compounds. The higher content of organic carbon probably also promoted the growth of microorganisms, as revealed by phospholipid fatty acid (PFLA) quantification. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing analysis showed that the bacterial community structure was significantly similar among the three soils and was predominated by Proteobacteria (44-48%) in all cases. Moreover, analysis at lower taxonomic levels pointed to the presence of genera (Sphingomonas, Bulkholderia, Arthrobacter, Bacillus) including members with reported PCB removal abilities. The fungal community was mostly represented by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota, which accounted for >80% of all the sequences detected in the three soils. Fungal taxa with biodegradation potential (Paxillus, Cryptococcus, Phoma, Mortierella) were also found. These results highlight the potential of the indigenous consortia present at the site as a starting point for PCB bioremediation processes.

  16. Spatial and compositional variation in the fungal communities of organic and conventionally grown apple fruit at the consumer point-of-purchase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir; Schena, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The fungal diversity in harvested apples from organic or conventional management practices was analyzed in different fruit locations (stem end, calyx end, peel, and wounded flesh) shortly after fruit purchase (T1) and after 2 weeks of storage (T5). A total of 5,760,162 high-quality fungal sequences were recovered and assigned to 8,504 Operational Taxonomic Units. Members of the phylum Ascomycota were dominant in all samples and accounted for 91.6% of the total number of detected sequences. This was followed by Basidiomycota (8%), Chytridiomycota (0.1%), and unidentified fungi (0.3%). Alpha and beta diversity analyses revealed the presence of significantly different fungal populations in the investigated fruit parts. Among detected fungi, the genus Penicillium prevailed in the peel and in the wounded flesh while Alternaria spp. prevailed in the calyx and stem end samples that included apple core tissues. Several taxonomic units that appear to be closely related to pathogenic fungi associated with secondary human infections were present in peel and wounds. Moreover, significantly different populations were revealed in organic and conventional apples and this result was consistent in all investigated fruit parts (calyx end, peel, stem end, and wounded flesh). Several unique taxa were exclusively detected in organic apples suggesting that management practices may have been a contributing factor in determining the taxa present. In contrast, little differences were revealed in the two assessment times (T1 and T5). Results of the present study represent an advancement of the current knowledge on the fungal microbiota in collected fruit tissues of apple. PMID:27766161

  17. Microbial diversity of a Mediterranean soil and its changes after biotransformed dry olive residue amendment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Siles

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot, about whose soil microbial diversity little is known. Intensive land use and aggressive management practices are degrading the soil, with a consequent loss of fertility. The use of organic amendments such as dry olive residue (DOR, a waste produced by a two-phase olive-oil extraction system, has been proposed as an effective way to improve soil properties. However, before its application to soil, DOR needs a pre-treatment, such as by a ligninolytic fungal transformation, e.g. Coriolopsis floccosa. The present study aimed to describe the bacterial and fungal diversity in a Mediterranean soil and to assess the impact of raw DOR (DOR and C. floccosa-transformed DOR (CORDOR on function and phylogeny of soil microbial communities after 0, 30 and 60 days. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that bacterial diversity was dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, while 28S-rRNA gene data revealed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota accounted for the majority of phyla in the fungal community. A Biolog EcoPlate experiment showed that DOR and CORDOR amendments decreased functional diversity and altered microbial functional structures. These changes in soil functionality occurred in parallel with those in phylogenetic bacterial and fungal community structures. Some bacterial and fungal groups increased while others decreased depending on the relative abundance of beneficial and toxic substances incorporated with each amendment. In general, DOR was observed to be more disruptive than CORDOR.

  18. Investigating migration inhibition and apoptotic effects of Fomitopsis pinicola chloroform extract on human colorectal cancer SW-480 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw. Ex Fr.m Karst (FPK which belongs to the Basidiomycota fungal class is one of the most popular medical fungi in China. It has been used for many diseases: cancer, heart diseases, diabetes and so on. However, little study on the pro-apoptotic effect and migration inhibition of FPK chloroform extract (FPKc has been reported and the possible involved mechanism has not been illuminated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chemical analysis was performed by HPLC which showed ergosterol (ES concentration was 105 µg/mg. MTT assay revealed that FPKc could selectively inhibit SW-480 cells viability with the IC50 of 190.28 µg/ml. Wound healing and transwell assay indicated that FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells obviously, FPKc could also dramatically decreased the matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, nuclear Hoechst 33342 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis revealed that FPKc and ES could induce SW-480 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis process closely involved in ROS accumulation and depletion of GSH, activation of caspase 3, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP degradation. FPKc could also up-regulate P53 expression and thus lead to G1 phase arrest. When SW-480 cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, the ROS generation, cell viability and apoptotic ratio were partially declined, which indicated that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptosis process induced by FPKc. Moreover, in the whole process, ES which has been previously found in FPKc had the similar effect to FPKc. Thus we could conclude that ES, as one of the highest abundant components in FPKc, might also be one of the active constituents. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells, induce SW-480 cells G1 phase arrest and cause ROS-mediated apoptosis effect. And ES might be one of the effective constituents in the whole process.

  19. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf A; Brown, Daren W; Nagy, Laszlo G; Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika A; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Walton, Jonathan D; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David S; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2014-07-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white-rot/brown-rot classification paradigm, we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically informed principal-components analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white-rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown-rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white-rot and brown-rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay. PMID:24958869

  20. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  1. Colonization history, host distribution, anthropogenic influence and landscape features shape populations of white pine blister rust, an invasive alien tree pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simren Brar

    Full Text Available White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales. This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola. We characterized 1,292 samples of C. ribicola from 66 geographic locations in North America using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and evaluated the effect of landscape features, host distribution, and colonization history on the structure of these pathogen populations. We identified eastern and western genetic populations in North America that are strongly differentiated. Genetic diversity is two to five times higher in eastern populations than in western ones, which can be explained by the repeated accidental introductions of the pathogen into northeastern North America compared with a single documented introduction into western North America. These distinct genetic populations are maintained by a barrier to gene flow that corresponds to a region where host connectivity is interrupted. Furthermore, additional cryptic spatial differentiation was identified in western populations. This differentiation corresponds to landscape features, such as mountain ranges, and also to host connectivity. We also detected genetic differentiation between the pathogen populations in natural stands and plantations, an indication that anthropogenic movement of this pathogen still takes place. These results highlight the importance of monitoring this invasive alien tree pathogen to prevent admixture of eastern and western populations where different pathogen races occur.

  2. Expanding Genomics of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eKuo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant and soil health, and carbon and nutrient cycles. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphological types (e.g. arbuscular [AM], ectomycorrhizal [ECM] in multiple fungal clades (e.g. phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota. The accessibility and culturability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first 3 mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing 3 fungal phyla and 2 mycorrhizal types. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant-degrading enzymes (PDEs and expansion of lineage-specific gene families, including short secreted protein (SSP effectors and other symbiosis genes. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of gene families in contrast to Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other 2 fungi, the symbiosis can involve similar solutions as loss of PDEs and mycorrhiza-induced SSPs. The mycorrhizal community is building on these studies with 3 large-scale initiatives. The Mycorrhizal Genomics Initiative (MGI is sequencing 35 genomes of multiple fungal clades and mycorrhizal types for phylogenomic and population analyses. 17 MGI species whose symbiosis is reconstitutable in vitro are targeted for comprehensive transcriptomics of mycorrhiza formation. MGI genomes are seeding a set of 50+ reference fungal genomes for annotating metatranscriptomes sampled from 7 diverse well-described soil sites. These 3 projects address fundamental questions about the nature and role of a

  3. Arctic root-associated fungal community composition reflects environmental filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaalid, Rakel; Davey, Marie L; Kauserud, Håvard; Carlsen, Tor; Halvorsen, Rune; Høiland, Klaus; Eidesen, Pernille B

    2014-02-01

    There is growing evidence that root-associated fungi have important roles in Arctic ecosystems. Here, we assess the diversity of fungal communities associated with roots of the ectomycorrhizal perennial herb Bistorta vivipara on the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard and investigate whether spatial separation and bioclimatic variation are important structuring factors of fungal community composition. We sampled 160 plants of B. vivipara from 32 localities across Svalbard. DNA was extracted from entire root systems, and 454 pyrosequencing of ITS1 amplicons was used to profile the fungal communities. The fungal communities were predominantly composed of Basidiomycota (55% of reads) and Ascomycota (35%), with the orders Thelephorales (24%), Agaricales (13.8%), Pezizales (12.6%) and Sebacinales (11.3%) accounting for most of the reads. Plants from the same site or region had more similar fungal communities to one another than plants from other sites or regions, and sites clustered together along a weak latitudinal gradient. Furthermore, a decrease in per-plant OTU richness with increasing latitude was observed. However, no statistically significant spatial autocorrelation between sites was detected, suggesting that environmental filtering, not dispersal limitation, causes the observed patterns. Our analyses suggest that while latitudinal patterns in community composition and richness might reflect bioclimatic influences at global spatial scales, at the smaller spatial scale of the Svalbard archipelago, these changes more likely reflect varied bedrock composition and associated edaphic factors. The need for further studies focusing on identifying those specific bioclimatic and edaphic factors structuring root-associated fungal community composition at both global and local scales is emphasized. PMID:24320873

  4. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorsaf Kerfahi

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.

  5. Study of primary biological aerosols to characterize their diversity in particulate matter over the Indian tropical region: assessment for climatic and health impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada R, H.; Muthalagu, A.; R, R.; Verma, R. S.; Philip, L.; Desprès, V.; Poeschl, U.; Gunthe, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs) are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and can influence the biosphere, climate, and public health (Després et al., 2012).To study the importance of the PBAPs, it is important to have an understanding about their origin, seasonal abundance and diversity. The study of PBAPs over the Indian tropical region becomes important as it hosts ~ 18% of the world population and has a distinct climate with a systematic and cyclic monsoon season which is different from the continental climates in Europe and America. In this study, the PBAPs were characterized by the application of molecular genetic techniques involving DNA extraction, PCR amplifications, cloning and DNA sequencing. In addition, characterization of the fungal source emissions was performed to better understand the diversity, abundance, and relative contribution of the fungal aerosols. For the present study, DNA analysis was performed on a one-year air filter set of PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 mm) covering three distinct meteorological seasons, i.e. summer, monsoon, and winter. The results from DNA analysis revealed the presence of bacteria and fungi in the filter samples. The fungal source characterization performed by the DNA analysis revealed the ratio of Basidiomycota to Ascomycota to be 96:4, which is consistent with previously reported studies from airborne fungal communities in the European continental boundary layer air (Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2009). In the study region, the highest species richness was found to be present in the family Agaricaceae (25.3%) followed by Polyporaceae (15.3%) and Marasmiaceae (10.81%). Agaricaceae, Polyporaceae and Psathyrellaceae were dominant families in the study region and the families like Clavariaceae, Nectriaceae, Phanerochaetachae, Pleurotaceae and Strophariaceae were found to be rare. The results will next be compared with the diversity and types of the fungi found in ambient PM10. More details will be presented.

  6. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/ brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitris; Held, Benjamin; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-03-14

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32percent of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white rot/brown rot classification paradigm we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically-informed Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs, but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  7. Morphological characteristics of bioaerosols from contrasting locations in southern tropical India - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy E.; Priyamvada, Hema; Ravikrishna, R.; Després, Viviane R.; Biju, C. V.; Sahu, Lokesh K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Verma, R. S.; Philip, L.; Gunthe, Sachin S.

    2015-12-01

    Bioaerosols, which are ubiquitous in the earth's atmosphere, are poorly characterized in terms of their physical and chemical properties. Improved knowledge of their physical and chemical properties is essential to have a better understanding of their dispersion and long-range transport in the atmosphere and at the same time to assess their role as potential Ice Nuclei (IN). In the present work, possibly for the first time we report the morphological characteristics of bioaerosols from marine urban and high altitude continental regions in Southern India. The samples were collected using polycarbonate filter paper and analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with Energy-dispersive Spectra Detector (EDX/EDS). The observed bioaerosols exhibited great variability in their morphological features over this region of the world. At these contrasting environments, we found that fungal spores constituted the major fraction of the total observed bioaerosols. Pollen grains, plant and insect fragments, and lot of other non-identified bio-particles were also observed constituting the remaining fraction. Further, the classification of fungal spores exhibited strong variability over this region. For example, fungal spores of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota class were seen in abundance in marine environment, while Ascomycota especially Cladosporium were seen in abundance in high altitude continental environment. Our findings also suggest that increase in diversity of bioaerosol particles at marine site appeared to coincide with precipitation. It appears that vast diversity in the morphological features of bioaerosols exists over this region, which should further be studied using advanced online techniques for better quantification under contrasting environments. However, the diversity observed in morphological characteristics of bioaerosols at these two contrasting locations is limited and restricted to these two sites and season of the year, and should therefore

  8. Illumina sequencing of fungi associated with manganese oxide deposits in cave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, B. T.; Santelli, C. M.; Carmichael, S. K.; Pepe-Ranney, C. P.; Roble, L.; Carmichael, M.; Bräuer, S.

    2013-12-01

    The environmental cycling of manganese (Mn) remains relatively poorly characterized when compared with other metals such as iron. However, fungi have been observed to produce Mn(III/IV) oxides resembling buserite, birnessite, and todorokite on the periphery of vegetative hyphae, hyphal branching points and at the base of fruiting bodies. Recent studies indicate that some of these oxides may be generated by a two-stage reaction with soluble Mn(II) and biogenic reactive oxygen species for some groups of fungi, in particular the Ascomycota. These oxides can provide a versatile protective barrier or aid in the capture of trace metals in the environment, although the exact evolutionary function and trigger is unclear. In this study, two caves in the southern Appalachians, a pristine cave and an anthropogenically impacted cave, were compared by analyzing fungal community assemblages in manganese oxide rich deposits. Quantitative PCR data indicated that fungi are present in a low abundance (18S rDNA clone library, over 88% were representative of the phylum Basidiomycota (predominantly Agaricomycetes), 2.74% of Ascomycota, 2.28% of Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota, 0.46% of Zygomycota, and 3.65% of Eukarya or Fungi incertae sedis. Using Illumina's MiSeq to sequence amplicons of the fungal ITS1 gene has yielded roughly 100,000-200,000 paired-end reads per sample. These data are currently being analyzed to compare fungal communities before and after induced Mn oxidation in the field. In addition, sites within the pristine cave are being compared with analogous sites in the impacted cave. Culturing efforts have thus far yielded Mn oxide producing members of the orders Glomerales and Pleosporales as well as two Genus incertae sedis (Fungal sp. YECT1, and Fungal sp. YECT3, growing on discarded electrical tape) that do not appear to be closely related to any other known Mn oxidizing fungi.

  9. Wood-decaying fungi in eastern Himalayas 1.Polypores from Zixishan Nature Reserve, Yunnan Province, China%东喜马拉雅山地区木材腐朽菌研究1.云南紫溪山自然保护区的多孔菌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴玉成; 周丽伟; STEFFENKari

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-seven polypore species were identified from materials collected in the Zixishan Nature Reserve,Yunnan Province,China.A checklist of these species is supplied and the host tree or substrate of each species is listed.Most of the species are reported for the first time in Yunnan Province.Wolfiporia castanopsis Y.C.Dai (Polyporales,Basidiomycota) is described as new.It is characterized by resupinate basidiocarps,cream to ash-grey pore surface,ellipsoid to broadly ellipsoid spores and by growth on wood of Castanopsis.It is similar to Wolfiporia cocos which,however,has cylindrical basidiospores (8- 11 ×3-4μm) and its basidiocarp is normally on sclerotia.%在云南紫溪山自然保护区的木材腐朽菌研究中发现87种多孔菌,其中多数是云南首次报道,给出了每种的寄主和生长基质.锥沃菲卧孔菌Wolfiporia castanopsis为一新种,其特点为子实体平伏,孔口表面奶油色至浅灰色,担孢子椭圆形至广椭圆形,且生长在元江锥腐朽木上;该种与茯苓沃菲卧孔菌Wolfiporia cocos具有相似的孔口,但后者的担孢子为圆柱形,且通常生长在菌核上.

  10. Identification and functional analysis of the erh1(+ gene encoding enhancer of rudimentary homolog from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek K Krzyzanowski

    Full Text Available The ERH gene encodes a highly conserved small nuclear protein with a unique amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure but unknown function. The gene is present in animals, plants, and protists but to date has only been found in few fungi. Here we report that ERH homologs are also present in all four species from the genus Schizosaccharomyces, S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus, which, however, are an exception in this respect among Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The ERH protein sequence is moderately conserved within the genus (58% identity between S. pombe and S.japonicus, but the intron-rich genes have almost identical intron-exon organizations in all four species. In S. pombe, erh1(+ is expressed at a roughly constant level during vegetative growth and adaptation to unfavorable conditions such as nutrient limitation and hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Erh1p localizes preferentially to the nucleus with the exception of the nucleolus, but is also present in the cytoplasm. Cells lacking erh1(+ have an aberrant cell morphology and a comma-like shape when cultured to the stationary phase, and exhibit a delayed recovery from this phase followed by slower growth. Loss of erh1(+ in an auxotrophic background results in enhanced arrest in the G1 phase following nutritional stress, and also leads to hypersensitivity to agents inducing hyperosmotic stress (sorbitol, inhibiting DNA replication (hydroxyurea, and destabilizing the plasma membrane (SDS; this hypersensitivity can be abolished by expression of S. pombe erh1(+ and, to a lesser extent, S. japonicus erh1(+ or human ERH. Erh1p fails to interact with the human Ciz1 and PDIP46/SKAR proteins, known molecular partners of human ERH. Our data suggest that in Schizosaccharomyces sp. erh1(+ is non-essential for normal growth and Erh1p could play a role in response to adverse environmental conditions and in cell cycle regulation.

  11. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  12. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  13. Characterization of fungal spores in ambient particulate matter: A study from the Himalayan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Attri, Arun K.

    2016-10-01

    Fungal spores as a constituent of ambient particulate matter (PM) is of concern; they not only display the physical traits of a particle, but are also potential allergens and health risk. An investigation over fourteen month was undertaken at a rural site located in the Western Himalayan region, to evaluate the PM associated fungal spores' concentration and diversity. The season-wise change in the fungal spores concentration in the Coarse Particulate Matter (CPM) fraction (aerodynamic diameter > 10 μm) varied from 500 to 3899 spores m-3. Their average concentration over 14 months was 1517 spores m-3. Significant diversity of fungal spores in the CPM samples was observed; 27 individual genera of fungal spores were identified, of which many were known allergens. Presence of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota fungal spores was dominant in the samples; ∼20% of the spores were un-characterized. The season-wise variability in fungal spores showed a statistically significant high correlation with CPM load. Maximum number concentration of the spores in CPM was recorded in the summer, while minimum in the winter. The high diversity of spores occurred during monsoon and post monsoon months. The meteorological factors played an important role in the fungal spores' distribution profile. The temporal profile of the spores showed significant correlation with the ambient temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), wind speed (WS) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height. Strong correlation of WS with fungal spores and CPM, and wind back trajectories suggest that re-suspension and wind assisted transport of PM contributes to ambient CPM associated fungal spores.

  14. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelfattah

    Full Text Available The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6% and Basidiomycota (2.8%. A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions.

  15. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Droby, Samir; Schena, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea) was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December) using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6%) and Basidiomycota (2.8%). A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii) was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions. PMID:26132745

  16. Changes in Bacterial and Fungal Communities across Compost Recipes, Preparation Methods, and Composting Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Deborah A.; Weicht, Thomas R.; Bates, Scott T.; Leff, Jonathan W.; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Compost production is a critical component of organic waste handling, and compost applications to soil are increasingly important to crop production. However, we know surprisingly little about the microbial communities involved in the composting process and the factors shaping compost microbial dynamics. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing approaches to assess the diversity and composition of both bacterial and fungal communities in compost produced at a commercial-scale. Bacterial and fungal communities responded to both compost recipe and composting method. Specifically, bacterial communities in manure and hay recipes contained greater relative abundances of Firmicutes than hardwood recipes with hay recipes containing relatively more Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes. In contrast, hardwood recipes contained a large relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi. Fungal communities of compost from a mixture of dairy manure and silage-based bedding were distinguished by a greater relative abundance of Pezizomycetes and Microascales. Hay recipes uniquely contained abundant Epicoccum, Thermomyces, Eurotium, Arthrobotrys, and Myriococcum. Hardwood recipes contained relatively abundant Sordariomycetes. Holding recipe constant, there were significantly different bacterial and fungal communities when the composting process was managed by windrow, aerated static pile, or vermicompost. Temporal dynamics of the composting process followed known patterns of degradative succession in herbivore manure. The initial community was dominated by Phycomycetes, followed by Ascomycota and finally Basidiomycota. Zygomycota were associated more with manure-silage and hay than hardwood composts. Most commercial composters focus on the thermophilic phase as an economic means to insure sanitation of compost from pathogens. However, the community succeeding the thermophilic phase begs further investigation to determine how the microbial dynamics observed here can be best managed

  17. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Grey Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea - A Metagenomic Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Simões, Marta Filipa

    2015-11-05

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea grey mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from grey mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the grey mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  18. Plant and fungal diversity in gut microbiota as revealed by molecular and culture investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gouba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies describing eukaryotic communities in the human gut microbiota have been published. The objective of this study was to investigate comprehensively the repertoire of plant and fungal species in the gut microbiota of an obese patient. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A stool specimen was collected from a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a body mass index of 48.9 who was living in Marseille, France. Plant and fungal species were identified using a PCR-based method incorporating 25 primer pairs specific for each eukaryotic phylum and universal eukaryotic primers targeting 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS and a chloroplast gene. The PCR products amplified using these primers were cloned and sequenced. Three different culture media were used to isolate fungi, and these cultured fungi were further identified by ITS sequencing. A total of 37 eukaryotic species were identified, including a Diatoms (Blastocystis sp. species, 18 plant species from the Streptophyta phylum and 18 fungal species from the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiocomycota phyla. Cultures yielded 16 fungal species, while PCR-sequencing identified 7 fungal species. Of these 7 species of fungi, 5 were also identified by culture. Twenty-one eukaryotic species were discovered for the first time in human gut microbiota, including 8 fungi (Aspergillus flavipes, Beauveria bassiana, Isaria farinosa, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium dipodomyicola, Penicillium camemberti, Climacocystis sp. and Malassezia restricta. Many fungal species apparently originated from food, as did 11 plant species. However, four plant species (Atractylodes japonica, Fibraurea tinctoria, Angelica anomala, Mitella nuda are used as medicinal plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Investigating the eukaryotic components of gut microbiota may help us to understand their role in human health.

  19. Composted versus Raw Olive Mill Waste as Substrates for the Production of Medicinal Mushrooms: An Assessment of Selected Cultivation and Quality Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios I. Zervakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW, “alperujo” is a highly biotoxic sludge-like effluent of the olive-oil milling process with a huge seasonal production. One of the treatment approaches that has so far received little attention is the use of TPOMW as substrate for the cultivation of edible mushrooms. Fifteen fungal strains belonging to five species (Basidiomycota, that is, Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. pulmonarius, were evaluated for their efficacy to colonize media composed of TPOMW, which was used either raw or composted in mixtures with wheat straw in various ratios. Qualified strains exhibited high values of biological efficiency (e.g., 120–135% for Pleurotus spp. and 125% for A. cylindracea and productivity in subsequent cultivation experiments on substrates supplemented with 20–40% composted TPOMW or 20% raw TPOMW. Only when supplementation exceeded 60% for raw TPOMW, a negative impact was noted on mushroom yields which could be attributed to the effluent's toxicity (otherwise alleviated in the respective composted TPOMW medium. Earliness and mushroom size as well as quality parameters such as total phenolic content and antioxidant activity did not demonstrate significant differences versus the control wheat-straw substrate. The substrates hemicellulose content was negatively correlated with mycelium growth rates and yields and positively with earliness; in addition, cellulose: lignin ratio presented a positive correlation with mycelium growth and mushroom weight for A. cylindracea and with earliness for all species examined. TPOMW-based media revealed a great potential for the substitution of traditional cultivation substrates by valorizing environmentally hazardous agricultural waste.

  20. Development of a Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB Specific Gene Model Enables Comparative Genome Analyses between Phytopathogenic R. solani AG1-IA, AG1-IB, AG3 and AG8 Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wibberg

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani, a soil-born plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus, affects various economically important agricultural and horticultural crops. The draft genome sequence for the R. solani AG1-IB isolate 7/3/14 as well as a corresponding transcriptome dataset (Expressed Sequence Tags--ESTs were established previously. Development of a specific R. solani AG1-IB gene model based on GMAP transcript mapping within the eukaryotic gene prediction platform AUGUSTUS allowed detection of new genes and provided insights into the gene structure of this fungus. In total, 12,616 genes were recognized in the genome of the AG1-IB isolate. Analysis of predicted genes by means of different bioinformatics tools revealed new genes whose products potentially are involved in degradation of plant cell wall components, melanin formation and synthesis of secondary metabolites. Comparative genome analyses between members of different R. solani anastomosis groups, namely AG1-IA, AG3 and AG8 and the newly annotated R. solani AG1-IB genome were performed within the comparative genomics platform EDGAR. It appeared that only 21 to 28% of all genes encoded in the draft genomes of the different strains were identified as core genes. Based on Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI and Average Amino-acid Identity (AAI analyses, considerable sequence differences between isolates representing different anastomosis groups were identified. However, R. solani isolates form a distinct cluster in relation to other fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota. The isolate representing AG1-IB encodes significant more genes featuring predictable functions in secondary metabolite production compared to other completely sequenced R. solani strains. The newly established R. solani AG1-IB 7/3/14 gene layout now provides a reliable basis for post-genomics studies.

  1. Multi-year assessment of coastal planktonic fungi reveals environmental drivers of diversity and abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joe D; Cunliffe, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplankton have so far been a neglected component of pelagic marine ecosystems, having been poorly studied relative to other plankton groups. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of how mycoplankton diversity changes through time, and the identity of controlling environmental drivers. Using Fungi-specific high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis of plankton DNA samples collected over 6 years from the coastal biodiversity time series site Station L4 situated off Plymouth (UK), we have assessed changes in the temporal variability of mycoplankton diversity and abundance in relation to co-occurring environmental variables. Mycoplankton diversity at Station L4 was dominated by Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota, with several orders within these phyla frequently abundant and dominant in multiple years. Repeating interannual mycoplankton blooms were linked to potential controlling environmental drivers, including nitrogen availability and temperature. Specific relationships between mycoplankton and other plankton groups were also identified, with seasonal chytrid blooms matching diatom blooms in consecutive years. Mycoplankton α-diversity was greatest during periods of reduced salinity at Station L4, indicative of riverine input to the ecosystem. Mycoplankton abundance also increased during periods of reduced salinity, and when potential substrate availability was increased, including particulate organic matter. This study has identified possible controlling environmental drivers of mycoplankton diversity and abundance in a coastal sea ecosystem, and therefore sheds new light on the biology and ecology of an enigmatic marine plankton group. Mycoplankton have several potential functional roles, including saprotrophs and parasites, that should now be considered within the consensus view of pelagic ecosystem functioning and services. PMID:26943623

  2. Evaluation of the functional roles of fungal endophytes of Phragmites australis from high saline and low saline habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcos Antonio; Li, Hai-Yan; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Bergen, Marshall; Torres, Monica S.; White, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native Phragmites australis decreases biodiversity and produces dense stands in North America. We surveyed the endophyte communities in the stems, leaves and roots of collections of P. australis obtained from two sites with a low and high salt concentration to determine differences in endophyte composition and assess differences in functional roles of microbes in plants from both sites. We found differences in the abundance, richness and diversity of endophytes between the low saline collections (18 species distributed in phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Stramenopiles (Oomycota); from orders Dothideales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Eurotiales, Cantharellales and Pythiales; Shannon H = 2.639; Fisher alpha = 7.335) and high saline collections (15 species from phylum Ascomycota; belonging to orders Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Diaporthales, Xylariales and Dothideales; Shannon H = 2.289; Fisher alpha = 4.181). Peyronellaea glomerata, Phoma macrostoma and Alternaria tenuissima were species obtained from both sites. The high salt endophyte community showed higher resistance to zinc, mercury and salt stress compared to fungal species from the low salt site. These endophytes also showed a greater propensity for growth promotion of rice seedlings (a model species) under salt stress. The results of this study are consistent with the ‘habitat-adapted symbiosis hypothesis’ that holds that endophytic microbes may help plants adapt to extreme habitats. The capacity of P. australis to establish symbiotic relationships with diverse endophytic microbes that enhance its tolerance to abiotic stresses could be a factor that contributes to its invasiveness in saline environments. Targeting the symbiotic associates of P. australis could lead to more sustainable control of non-native P. australis.

  3. Characterizing aeroallergens by infrared spectroscopy of fungal spores and pollen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Fungal spores and plant pollen cause respiratory diseases in susceptible individuals, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Aeroallergen monitoring networks are an important part of treatment strategies, but unfortunately traditional analysis is time consuming and expensive. We have explored the use of infrared spectroscopy of pollen and spores for an inexpensive and rapid characterization of aeroallergens.The study is based on measurement of spore and pollen samples by single reflectance attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SR-ATR FTIR. The experimental set includes 71 spore (Basidiomycota and 121 pollen (Pinales, Fagales and Poales samples. Along with fresh basidiospores, the study has been conducted on the archived samples collected within the last 50 years.The spectroscopic-based methodology enables clear spectral differentiation between pollen and spores, as well as the separation of confamiliar and congeneric species. In addition, the analysis of the scattering signals inherent in the infrared spectra indicates that the FTIR methodology offers indirect estimation of morphology of pollen and spores. The analysis of fresh and archived spores shows that chemical composition of spores is well preserved even after decades of storage, including the characteristic taxonomy-related signals. Therefore, biochemical analysis of fungal spores by FTIR could provide economical, reliable and timely methodologies for improving fungal taxonomy, as well as for fungal identification and monitoring. This proof of principle study shows the potential for using FTIR as a rapid tool in aeroallergen studies. In addition, the presented method is ready to be immediately implemented in biological and ecological studies for direct measurement of pollen and spores from flowers and sporocarps.

  4. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ye Shen

    Full Text Available Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0% and Basidiomycota (2.0%, including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp., B34 (Curvularia sp., B35 (undefined genus 1, B38 (Penicillium sp. and zzz816 (Shiraia sp. displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816 could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which

  5. Genetic Dissection of Sexual Reproduction in a Primary Homothallic Basidiomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Palma, Márcia; Sampaio, José Paulo; Gonçalves, Paula

    2016-06-01

    In fungi belonging to the phylum Basidiomycota, sexual compatibility is usually determined by two genetically unlinked MAT loci, one of which encodes one or more pheromone receptors (P/R) and pheromone precursors, and the other comprehends at least one pair of divergently transcribed genes encoding homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. Most species are heterothallic, meaning that sexual reproduction requires mating between two sexually compatible individuals harboring different alleles at both MAT loci. However, some species are known to be homothallic, one individual being capable of completing the sexual cycle without mating with a genetically distinct partner. While the molecular underpinnings of the heterothallic life cycles of several basidiomycete model species have been dissected in great detail, much less is known concerning the molecular basis for homothallism. Following the discovery in available draft genomes of the homothallic basidiomycetous yeast Phaffia rhodozyma of P/R and HD genes, we employed available genetic tools to determine their role in sexual development. Two P/R clusters, each harboring one pheromone receptor and one pheromone precursor gene were found in close vicinity of each other and were shown to form two redundant P/R pairs, each receptor being activated by the pheromone encoded by the most distal pheromone precursor gene. The HD locus is apparently genetically unlinked to the P/R locus and encodes a single pair of divergently transcribed HD1 and HD2 transcription factors, both required for normal completion of the sexual cycle. Given the genetic makeup of P. rhodozyma MAT loci, we postulate that it is a primarily homothallic organism and we propose a model for the interplay of molecular interactions required for sexual development in this species. Phaffia rhodozyma is considered one of the most promising microbial source of the carotenoid astaxanthin. Further development of this yeast as an industrial organism will benefit from

  6. Genetic Dissection of Sexual Reproduction in a Primary Homothallic Basidiomycete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia David-Palma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In fungi belonging to the phylum Basidiomycota, sexual compatibility is usually determined by two genetically unlinked MAT loci, one of which encodes one or more pheromone receptors (P/R and pheromone precursors, and the other comprehends at least one pair of divergently transcribed genes encoding homeodomain (HD transcription factors. Most species are heterothallic, meaning that sexual reproduction requires mating between two sexually compatible individuals harboring different alleles at both MAT loci. However, some species are known to be homothallic, one individual being capable of completing the sexual cycle without mating with a genetically distinct partner. While the molecular underpinnings of the heterothallic life cycles of several basidiomycete model species have been dissected in great detail, much less is known concerning the molecular basis for homothallism. Following the discovery in available draft genomes of the homothallic basidiomycetous yeast Phaffia rhodozyma of P/R and HD genes, we employed available genetic tools to determine their role in sexual development. Two P/R clusters, each harboring one pheromone receptor and one pheromone precursor gene were found in close vicinity of each other and were shown to form two redundant P/R pairs, each receptor being activated by the pheromone encoded by the most distal pheromone precursor gene. The HD locus is apparently genetically unlinked to the P/R locus and encodes a single pair of divergently transcribed HD1 and HD2 transcription factors, both required for normal completion of the sexual cycle. Given the genetic makeup of P. rhodozyma MAT loci, we postulate that it is a primarily homothallic organism and we propose a model for the interplay of molecular interactions required for sexual development in this species. Phaffia rhodozyma is considered one of the most promising microbial source of the carotenoid astaxanthin. Further development of this yeast as an industrial organism

  7. Composted versus raw olive mill waste as substrates for the production of medicinal mushrooms: an assessment of selected cultivation and quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervakis, Georgios I; Koutrotsios, Georgios; Katsaris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW, "alperujo") is a highly biotoxic sludge-like effluent of the olive-oil milling process with a huge seasonal production. One of the treatment approaches that has so far received little attention is the use of TPOMW as substrate for the cultivation of edible mushrooms. Fifteen fungal strains belonging to five species (Basidiomycota), that is, Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. pulmonarius, were evaluated for their efficacy to colonize media composed of TPOMW, which was used either raw or composted in mixtures with wheat straw in various ratios. Qualified strains exhibited high values of biological efficiency (e.g., 120-135% for Pleurotus spp. and 125% for A. cylindracea) and productivity in subsequent cultivation experiments on substrates supplemented with 20-40% composted TPOMW or 20% raw TPOMW. Only when supplementation exceeded 60% for raw TPOMW, a negative impact was noted on mushroom yields which could be attributed to the effluent's toxicity (otherwise alleviated in the respective composted TPOMW medium). Earliness and mushroom size as well as quality parameters such as total phenolic content and antioxidant activity did not demonstrate significant differences versus the control wheat-straw substrate. The substrates hemicellulose content was negatively correlated with mycelium growth rates and yields and positively with earliness; in addition, cellulose: lignin ratio presented a positive correlation with mycelium growth and mushroom weight for A. cylindracea and with earliness for all species examined. TPOMW-based media revealed a great potential for the substitution of traditional cultivation substrates by valorizing environmentally hazardous agricultural waste. PMID:24027758

  8. 基于454焦磷酸测序法的典型草原土壤真核生物多样性%Eukaryote diversity of typical grassland soil based on 454 pyrosequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    井赵斌; 程积民; 张宝泉; 李红红

    2013-01-01

    利用454焦磷酸测序法对黄土区不同封育时期典型草地土壤真核生物多样性进行了研究.结果表明,选择的V4区引物可以扩增出土壤真核生物中的微生物、动物和植物,其中真菌群落主要由子囊菌门(Ascomycota)、壶菌门(Chyt ridiomycota)、担子菌门(Basidiomycota)、绿藻门(Chlorophyta)、球囊菌门(Glomeromycota)和变形菌门(Proteobacteria)组成;动物群落区系主要包括脊椎动物门(Craniata)、节足动物门(Arthropoda)、线虫门(Nematoda)和环节动物门(Annelida);植物群落包括陆生植物(Embryophyta)和单子叶植物纲(百合纲)(Liliopsida).在不同分类学水平,不同封育时期草地真菌群落组成具有各自的优势菌群;动物群落组成仅在种水平存在差异.草地管理实践中可以结合土壤微生物和土壤养分恢复时间的阈值对封育草地进行合理利用.454焦磷酸测序法可以用于土壤中未知动物、植物和微生物区系的研究.

  9. Fungal diversity from deep marine subsurface sediments (IODP 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redou, V.; Arzur, D.; Burgaud, G.; Barbier, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest regarding micro-eukaryotic communities in extreme environments as a third microbial domain after Bacteria and Archaea. However, knowledge is still scarce and the diversity of micro-eukaryotes in such environments remains hidden and their ecological role unknown. Our research program is based on the deep sedimentary layers of the Canterbury Basin in New Zealand (IODP 317) from the subsurface to the record depth of 1884 meters below seafloor. The objectives of our study are (i) to assess the genetic diversity of fungi in deep-sea sediments and (ii) identify the functional part in order to better understand the origin and the ecological role of fungal communities in this extreme ecosystem. Fingerprinting-based methods using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography were used as a first step to raise our objectives. Molecular fungal diversity was assessed using amplification of ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacer 1) as a biomarker on 11 samples sediments from 3.76 to 1884 meters below seafloor. Fungal molecular signatures were detected throughout the sediment core. The phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were revealed with DNA as well as cDNA. Most of the phylotypes are affiliated to environmental sequences and some to common fungal cultured species. The discovery of a present and metabolically active fungal component in this unique ecosystem allows some interesting first hypotheses that will be further combined to culture-based methods and deeper molecular methods (454 pyrosequencing) to highlight essential informations regarding physiology and ecological role of fungal communities in deep marine sediments.

  10. Optimization of the Liquid Culture Medium Composition to Obtain the Mycelium of Agaricus bisporus Rich in Essential Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowska, Agata; Reczyński, Witold; Muszyńska, Bożena

    2016-09-01

    Agaricus bisporus species (J.E. Lange) Imbach one of the most popular Basidiomycota species was chosen for the research because of its dietary and medicinal value. The presented herein studies included determination of essential mineral accumulation level in the mycelium of A. bisporus, cultivated on liquid cultures in the medium supplemented with addition of the chosen metals' salts. Quantitative analyses of Zn, Cu, Mg, and Fe in liquid cultures made it possible to determine the relationship between accumulation of the selected mineral in A. bisporus mycelium and the culture conditions. Monitoring of the liquid cultures and determination of the elements' concentrations in mycelium of A. bisporus were performed using the flame technique of AAS method. Concentration of Zn in the mycelium, maintained in the medium with the addition of its salt, was in a very wide range from 95.9 to 4462.0 mg/g DW. In the analyzed A. bisporus mycelium, cultured in the medium enriched with copper salt, this metal concentration changed from 89.79 to 7491.50 mg/g DW; considering Mg in liquid cultured mycelium (medium with Mg addition), its concentration has changed from 0.32 to 10.55 mg/g DW. The medium enriched with iron salts has led to bioaccumulation of Fe in mycelia of A. bisporus. Determined Fe concentration was in the range from 0.62 to 161.28 mg/g DW. The proposed method of liquid A. bisporus culturing on medium enriched with the selected macro- and microelements in proper concentrations ratio have led to obtaining maximal growth of biomass, characterized by high efficiency of the mineral accumulation. As a result, a dietary component of increased nutritive value was obtained. PMID:26857993

  11. Composted versus raw olive mill waste as substrates for the production of medicinal mushrooms: an assessment of selected cultivation and quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervakis, Georgios I; Koutrotsios, Georgios; Katsaris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW, "alperujo") is a highly biotoxic sludge-like effluent of the olive-oil milling process with a huge seasonal production. One of the treatment approaches that has so far received little attention is the use of TPOMW as substrate for the cultivation of edible mushrooms. Fifteen fungal strains belonging to five species (Basidiomycota), that is, Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. pulmonarius, were evaluated for their efficacy to colonize media composed of TPOMW, which was used either raw or composted in mixtures with wheat straw in various ratios. Qualified strains exhibited high values of biological efficiency (e.g., 120-135% for Pleurotus spp. and 125% for A. cylindracea) and productivity in subsequent cultivation experiments on substrates supplemented with 20-40% composted TPOMW or 20% raw TPOMW. Only when supplementation exceeded 60% for raw TPOMW, a negative impact was noted on mushroom yields which could be attributed to the effluent's toxicity (otherwise alleviated in the respective composted TPOMW medium). Earliness and mushroom size as well as quality parameters such as total phenolic content and antioxidant activity did not demonstrate significant differences versus the control wheat-straw substrate. The substrates hemicellulose content was negatively correlated with mycelium growth rates and yields and positively with earliness; in addition, cellulose: lignin ratio presented a positive correlation with mycelium growth and mushroom weight for A. cylindracea and with earliness for all species examined. TPOMW-based media revealed a great potential for the substitution of traditional cultivation substrates by valorizing environmentally hazardous agricultural waste.

  12. Chitin Mixed in Potting Soil Alters Lettuce Growth, the Survival of Zoonotic Bacteria on the Leaves and Associated Rhizosphere Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debode, Jane; De Tender, Caroline; Soltaninejad, Saman; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Haegeman, Annelies; Van der Linden, Inge; Cottyn, Bart; Heyndrickx, Marc; Maes, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is a promising soil amendment for improving soil quality, plant growth, and plant resilience. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, to study the effect of chitin mixed in potting soil on lettuce growth and on the survival of two zoonotic bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on the lettuce leaves. Second, to assess the related changes in the microbial lettuce rhizosphere, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and amplicon sequencing of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment and the fungal ITS2. As a result of chitin addition, lettuce fresh yield weight was significantly increased. S. enterica survival in the lettuce phyllosphere was significantly reduced. The E. coli O157:H7 survival was also lowered, but not significantly. Moreover, significant changes were observed in the bacterial and fungal community of the lettuce rhizosphere. PLFA analysis showed a significant increase in fungal and bacterial biomass. Amplicon sequencing showed no increase in fungal and bacterial biodiversity, but relative abundances of the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria and the fungal phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were significantly changed. More specifically, a more than 10-fold increase was observed for operational taxonomic units belonging to the bacterial genera Cellvibrio, Pedobacter, Dyadobacter, and Streptomyces and to the fungal genera Lecanicillium and Mortierella. These genera include several species previously reported to be involved in biocontrol, plant growth promotion, the nitrogen cycle and chitin degradation. These results enhance the understanding of the response of the rhizosphere microbiome to chitin amendment. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the use of soil amendments to control the survival of S. enterica on plant leaves. PMID:27148242

  13. Diversity and antioxidant activity of culturable endophytic fungi from alpine plants of Rhodiola crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Cui

    Full Text Available Rhodiola spp. are rare and endangered alpine plants widely used as medicines and food additives by many civilizations since ancient times. Their main effective ingredients (such as salidroside and p-tyrosol are praised to exhibit pharmacologic effects on high-altitude sickness and possess anti-aging and other adaptogenic capacities based on their antioxidant properties. In this study, 347 endophytic fungi were isolated from R. crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis, and the molecular diversity and antioxidant activities of these fungi were investigated for the first time. These fungi were categorized into 180 morphotypes based on cultural characteristics, and their rRNA gene ITS sequences were analyzed by BLAST search in the GenBank database. Except for 12 unidentified fungi (6.67%, all others were affiliated to at least 57 genera in 20 orders of four phyla, namely, Ascomycota (88.89%, Basidiomycota (2.78%, Zygomycota (1.11%, and Glomeromycota (0.56%, which exhibited high abundance and diversity. Antioxidant assay showed that the DPPH radical-scavenging rates of 114 isolates (63.33% were >50%, and those of five isolates (Rct45, Rct63, Rct64, Rac76, and Rsc57 were >90%. The EC50 values of five antioxidant assays suggested significant potential of these fungi on scavenging DPPH•, O2-•, and OH• radicals, as well as scavenging nitrite and chelating Fe2+, which showed preference and selection between endophytic fungi and their hosts. Further research also provided the first evidence that Rac12 could produce salidrosides and p-tyrosol. Results suggested that versatile endophytic fungi associated with Rhodiola known as antioxidants could be exploited as potential sources of novel antioxidant products.

  14. Diversity and Plant Growth Promoting Capacity of Endophytic Fungi Associated with Halophytic Plants from the West Coast of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalmuratova, Irina; Kim, Hyun; Nam, Yoon-Jong; Oh, Yoosun; Jeong, Min-Ji; Choi, Hye-Rim; You, Young-Hyun; Choo, Yeon-Sik; Lee, In-Jung; Shin, Jae-Ho; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kim, Jong-Guk

    2015-12-01

    Five halophytic plant species, Suaeda maritima, Limonium tetragonum, Suaeda australis, Phragmites australis, and Suaeda glauca Bunge, which are native to the Muan salt marsh of South Korea, were examined for fungal endophytes by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region containing ITS1, 5.8S rRNA, and ITS2. In total, 160 endophytic fungal strains were isolated and identified from the roots of the 5 plant species. Taxonomically, all 160 strains belonged to the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. The most dominant genus was Fusarium, followed by the genera Penicillium and Alternaria. Subsequently, using 5 statistical methods, the diversity indices of the endophytes were determined at genus level. Among these halophytic plants, P. australis was found to host the greatest diversity of endophytic fungi. Culture filtrates of endophytic fungi were treated to Waito-C rice seedlings for plant growth-promoting effects. The fungal strain Su-3-4-3 isolated from S. glauca Bunge provide the maximum plant length (20.1 cm) in comparison with wild-type Gibberella fujikuroi (19.6 cm). Consequently, chromatographic analysis of the culture filtrate of Su-3-4-3 showed the presence of physiologically active gibberellins, GA1 (0.465 ng/mL), GA3 (1.808 ng/mL) along with other physiologically inactive GA9 (0.054 ng/mL) and GA24 (0.044 ng/mL). The fungal isolate Su-3-4-3 was identified as Talaromyces pinophilus. PMID:26839496

  15. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of the Arctic mushroom Lycoperdon molle Pers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima Singh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical adaptations of fungi to the harsh conditions of the Arctic may mean that these organisms have properties useful to people. Using samples of the puffball mushroom Lycoperdon molle Pers. (Basidiomycota, Fungi collected at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, we examined the in vitro antioxidant potential of this species by investigating its free-radical scavenging (FRS activity, inhibition of lipid peroxidation (ILP and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC. The FRS activity of the samples in various organic solvents, including methanol, ethanol, acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, were found to be in the range of 44.00–89.60%, while ILP activities ranged from 32.00 to 54.41%. The methanol extract showed the highest levels of FRS (89.60% and ILP (54.41% compared to standard antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisol and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT. The TEAC value was also found to be higher compared to the standard water soluble vitamin E analogue Trolox (3.9 mM. Antimicrobial screening of Lycoperdon molle extracts was negative to the tested microorganisms. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, we determined that the samples contained compounds such as phosphoethanolamine, monomethyl arsenic acid, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphoionositol, phosphoserine and lysophosphatidyl choline. We found that Lycoperdon molle showed strong antioxidant abilities compared to the standards, suggesting that this and perhaps other Arctic mushrooms could be valuable sources of natural antioxidants for the pharmaceutical industry. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the antioxidant activity in any Arctic mushroom.

  16. Multigene assessment of the species boundaries and sexual status of the basidiomycetous yeasts Cryptococcus flavescens and C. terrestris (Tremellales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Yurkov

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus flavescens and C. terrestris are phenotypically indistinguishable sister species that belong to the order Tremellales (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota and which may be mistaken for C. laurentii based on phenotype. Phylogenetic separation between C. flavescens and C. terrestris was based on rDNA sequence analyses, but very little is known on their intraspecific genetic variability or propensity for sexual reproduction. We studied 59 strains from different substrates and geographic locations, and used a multilocus sequencing (MLS approach complemented with the sequencing of mating type (MAT genes to assess genetic variation and reexamine the boundaries of the two species, as well as their sexual status. The following five loci were chosen for MLS: the rDNA ITS-LSU region, the rDNA IGS1 spacer, and fragments of the genes encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB1, the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1 and the p21-activated protein kinase (STE20. Phylogenetic network analyses confirmed the genetic separation of the two species and revealed two additional cryptic species, for which the names Cryptococcus baii and C. ruineniae are proposed. Further analyses of the data revealed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity within C. flavescens as well as evidence for recombination between lineages detected for this species. Strains of C. terrestris displayed higher levels of similarity in all analysed genes and appear to make up a single recombining group. The two MAT genes (STE3 and SXI1/SXI2 sequenced for C. flavescens strains confirmed the potential for sexual reproduction and suggest the presence of a tetrapolar mating system with a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus and a multiallelic HD locus. In C. terrestris we could only sequence STE3, which revealed a biallelic P/R locus. In spite of the strong evidence for sexual recombination in the two species, attempts at mating compatible strains of both species on culture

  17. Diversity and Composition of Airborne Fungal Community Associated with Particulate Matters in Beijing during Haze and Non-haze Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Zhang, Tao; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Li; Wang, Hao; Fang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diversity and composition of airborne fungi associated with particulate matters (PMs) in Beijing, China, a total of 81 PM samples were collected, which were derived from PM2.5, PM10 fractions, and total suspended particles during haze and non-haze days. The airborne fungal community in these samples was analyzed using the Illumina Miseq platform with fungi-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of the large subunit rRNA gene. A total of 797,040 reads belonging to 1633 operational taxonomic units were observed. Of these, 1102 belonged to Ascomycota, 502 to Basidiomycota, 24 to Zygomycota, and 5 to Chytridiomycota. The dominant orders were Pleosporales (29.39%), Capnodiales (27.96%), Eurotiales (10.64%), and Hypocreales (9.01%). The dominant genera were Cladosporium, Alternaria, Fusarium, Penicillium, Sporisorium, and Aspergilus. Analysis of similarities revealed that both particulate matter sizes (R = 0.175, p = 0.001) and air quality levels (R = 0.076, p = 0.006) significantly affected the airborne fungal community composition. The relative abundance of many fungal genera was found to significantly differ among various PM types and air quality levels. Alternaria and Epicoccum were more abundant in total suspended particles samples, Aspergillus in heavy-haze days and PM2.5 samples, and Malassezia in PM2.5 samples and heavy-haze days. Canonical correspondence analysis and permutation tests showed that temperature (p < 0.01), NO2 (p < 0.01), PM10 (p < 0.01), SO2(p < 0.01), CO (p < 0.01), and relative humidity (p < 0.05) were significant factors that determine airborne fungal community composition. The results suggest that diverse airborne fungal communities are associated with particulate matters and may provide reliable data for studying the responses of human body to the increasing level of air pollution in Beijing.

  18. Evidence for biological shaping of hair ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hofmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An unusual ice type, called hair ice, grows on the surface of dead wood of broad-leaf trees at temperatures slightly below 0 °C. We describe this phenomenon and present physical, chemical, and biological investigations to gain insight in the properties and processes related to hair ice. Tests revealed that the biological activity of a winter-active fungus is required in the wood for enabling the growth of hair ice. We confirmed the fungus hypothesis originally suggested by Wegener (1918 by reproducing hair ice on wood samples. Treatment by heat and fungicide, respectively, suppresses the formation of hair ice. Fruiting bodies of Asco- and Basidiomycota are identified on hair-ice carrying wood. One species, Exidiopsis effusa (Ee, has been present on all investigated samples. Both hair-ice producing wood samples and those with killed fungus show essentially the same temperature variation, indicating that the heat produced by fungal metabolism is very small, that the freezing rate is not influenced by the fungus activity and that ice segregation is the common mechanism of ice growth at the wood surface. The fungus plays the role of shaping the ice hairs and to prevent them from recrystallisation. Melted hair ice indicates the presence of organic matter. Chemical analyses show a complex mixture of several thousand CHO(N,S-compounds similar to fulvic acids in dissolved organic matter (DOM. The evaluation reveals decomposed lignin as the main constituent. Further work is needed to clarify its role in hair-ice growth and to identify the recrystallisation inhibitor.

  19. Evidence for biological shaping of hair ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Preuss, G.; Mätzler, C.

    2015-07-01

    An unusual ice type, called hair ice, grows on the surface of dead wood of broad-leaf trees at temperatures slightly below 0 °C. We describe this phenomenon and present physical, chemical, and biological investigations to gain insight in the properties and processes related to hair ice. Tests revealed that the biological activity of a winter-active fungus is required in the wood for enabling the growth of hair ice. We confirmed the fungus hypothesis originally suggested by Wegener (1918) by reproducing hair ice on wood samples. Treatment by heat and fungicide suppresses the formation of hair ice. Fruiting bodies of Asco- and Basidiomycota are identified on hair-ice-carrying wood. One species, Exidiopsis effusa (Ee), was present on all investigated samples. Both hair-ice-producing wood samples and those with killed fungus show essentially the same temperature variation, indicating that the heat produced by fungal metabolism is very small, that the freezing rate is not influenced by the fungus activity, and that ice segregation is the common mechanism of ice growth on the wood surface. The fungus plays the role of shaping the ice hairs and preventing them from recrystallisation. Melted hair ice indicates the presence of organic matter. Chemical analyses show a complex mixture of several thousand CHO(N,S) compounds similar to fulvic acids in dissolved organic matter (DOM). The evaluation reveals decomposed lignin as being the main constituent. Further work is needed to clarify its role in hair-ice growth and to identify the recrystallisation inhibitor.

  20. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea-A Metagenomic Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Filipa Simoes; Andre Antunes; Cristiane A Ottoni; Mohammad Shoaib Amini; Intikhab Alam; Hanin Alzubaidy; Noor-Azlin Mokhtar; John AC Archer; Vladimir B Bajic

    2015-01-01

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threat-ened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray man-groves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal commu-nities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  1. Edible Macrofungi of Çorum Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Alkan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the scientists, the world's population by 2050 is estimated to exceed 9 billion, in order to meet the nutritional needs of people, it is expected that in the future to need more food production than today. Therefore in the world, food organizations, institutions and communities various action plans provide in the reports published. In these plans, diversification of the production, fast, quick and easy way to produce food, less harmful farming practices to the nature and the environment, and etc. topics are included. In line these plans with last years, the greater the number of species used as food and with ease of cultivation, mushrooms and mushroom cultivations are gaining importance. For this purpose, the determination of the diversity of edible mushrooms in nature and investigation that how can be taken to culture, it will also provide support to the production of different species of mushrooms. In the field studies performed between 2011 and 2013, after taking pictures on their habitats mushroom samples, collected within the Çorum province limits, were brought to the laboratory wrapped in aluminum foil properly. After measuring and studying on special structures under a microscope in the laboratory, they were identified according to the literature. Fungarium tag were prepared for identified mushrooms. These mushrooms, made into the Fungarium materials, were stored in Fungarium of the Directorate of Mushroom Application and Research Centre of Selçuk University. In conclusion, according to the literature four taxa belong to Ascomycota and 52 taxa belong to Basidiomycota, in totally of 56 taxa were found to be edible feature. These 56 taxa were represented by two divisio, four ordo and 14 families. The localities of identified species in the provincial boundaries are given. The names of species known among people with ethno mycological research, done during field studies, also were detected.

  2. Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Yordanova, Petya; Franc, Gary D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Biological residues in soil dust are a potentially strong source of atmospheric ice nucleators (IN). However, the sources and characteristics of biological - in particular, fungal - IN in soil dust have not been characterized. By analysis of the culturable fungi in topsoils, from a range of different land use and ecosystem types in south-east Wyoming, we found ice nucleation active (INA, i.e., inducing ice formation in the probed range of temperature and concentration) fungi to be both widespread and abundant, particularly in soils with recent inputs of decomposable organic matter. For example, in harvested and ploughed sugar beet and potato fields, and in the organic horizon beneath Lodgepole pine forest, their relative abundances and concentrations among the cultivable fungi were 25% (8 x 103 CFU g-1), 17% (4.8 x 103 CFU g-1) and 17% (4 x 103 CFU g-1), respectively. Across all investigated soils, 8% (2.9 x 103 CFU g-1) of fungal isolates were INA. All INA isolates initiated freezing at -5° C to -6° C and all belonged to a single zygomycotic species, Mortierella alpina (Mortierellales, Mortierellomycotina). By contrast, the handful of fungal species so far reported as INA all belong within the Ascomycota or Basidiomycota phyla. Mortierella alpina is known to be saprobic (utilizing non-living organic matter), widespread in soil and present in air and rain. Sequencing of the ITS region and the gene for γ-linolenic elongase revealed four distinct clades, affiliated to different soil types. The IN produced by M. alpina seem to be extracellular proteins of 100-300 kDa in size which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium will ramify topsoils and probably also release cell-free IN into it. If these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, these small cell-free IN might contribute to the as yet uncharacterized pool of atmospheric IN released by soils as dusts.

  3. Microbial profiling of South African acid mine water samples using next generation sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamika, I; Azizi, S; Tekere, M

    2016-07-01

    This study monitored changes in bacterial and fungal structure in a mine water in a monthly basis over 4 months. Over the 4-month study period, mine water samples contained more bacteria (91.06 %) compared to fungi (8.94 %). For bacteria, mine water samples were dominated by Proteobacteria (39.14 to 65.06 %) followed by Firmicutes (26.34 to 28.9 %) in summer, and Cyanobacteria (27.05 %) in winter. In the collected samples, 18 % of bacteria could not be assigned to a phylum and remained unclassified suggesting hitherto vast untapped microbial diversity especially during winter. The fungal domain was the sole eukaryotic microorganism found in the mine water samples with unclassified fungi (68.2 to 91 %) as the predominant group, followed by Basidiomycota (6.9 to 27.8 %). The time of collection, which was linked to the weather, had higher impact on bacterial community than fungal community. The bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) ranged from 865 to 4052 over the 4-month sampling period, while fungal OTUs varied from 73 to 249. The diversity indices suggested that the bacterial community inhabiting the mine water samples were more diverse than the fungal community. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results highlighted that the bacterial community variance had the strongest relationship with water temperature, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) content, as compared to fungi and water characteristics, had the greatest contribution to both bacterial and fungal community variance. The results provided the relationships between microbial community and environmental variables in the studied mining sites. PMID:26980100

  4. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Filipa Simões

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%, while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%, yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  5. Illumina MiSeq investigations on the changes of microbial community in the Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense infected soil during and after reductive soil disinfestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinqi; Liu, Liangliang; Wen, Teng; Zhu, Rui; Zhang, Jinbo; Cai, Zucong

    2015-12-01

    Although reductive soil disinfestation (RSD) is increasingly used for the control of soil-borne diseases, its impact on the soil microbial community during and after RSD remains poorly understood. MiSeq pyrosequencing, real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were performed to investigate the changes of microbial community in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) infected soil during RSD and at the simulative banana cultivation after RSD. The results showed that RSD significantly increased soil microbial populations and a different microbial community with the pathogenic soil was established after RSD. Specifically, the number of Firmicutes mainly containing Ruminococcus and Coprococcus followed by a small part of Clostridium which were the dominant bacterial genera significantly increased during RSD. In contrast, Symbiobacterium and Flavisolibacter were the dominant genera in the flooding soil. When the soils were recovered under aerobic condition, the relative abundances of the bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes increased as alternatives to the reducing Firmicutes. For fungi, the population of F. oxysporum significantly decreased during RSD accompanied with the pH decline, which resulted in the significant decrease of relative abundance in the phylum Ascomycota. Alternatively, the relative abundances of some other fungal species increased, such as Chaetomium spp. and Penicillium spp. belonging to Ascomycota and the family Clavulinaceae belonging to Basidiomycota. Then, the relative abundance of Ascomycota re-increased after RSD with Podospora and Zopfiella as dominant genera, whereas the relative abundance of Fusarium further decreased. Overall, the microbial populations and community re-established by RSD made the soil more disease-suppressive and beneficial to the soil nutrient cycling and plant growth compared with the previous pathogenic soil. PMID:26640050

  6. Microbial Biodiversity in Rhizosphere ofLycium bararumL. Relative to Cultivation History%不同种植年限宁夏枸杞根际微生物多样性变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纳小凡; 郑国琦; 彭励; 雷川怡; 杨红艳; 马玉; 赵强; 石硕矾

    2016-01-01

    Nanliang,Ningxia,China,for analysis of physic-chemical properties,such as pH,electrical conductivity,SOM,total salt,total and readily available N,P and K,etc. Results showed that pH remained unchanged in all the fields,while total salt content,total and readily available phosphorus and electrical conductivity in the soil increased significantly with the age of cultivation. Total genomic DNA was isolated from the rhizosphere soil using a Power Soil DNA Isolation Kit for sequence analysis of V4 sections of 16S rDNA as indicator of bacterial diversity and ITS2 sections of 18S rDNA gene as indicator of fungal diversity,with the aid of the Illumina MiSeq system. Results of the sequencing were assembled and clustered with the FLASH,QIIME,and UPARSE pipeline software packages. In the end,is was found that the α diversity of the rhizosphere bacteria community did not vary much between the fields different in cultivation history,but fungal diversity did, and decreased with the cultivation going on from 5 a to 10 a(p<0.05). For analysis of changes in microbial community structure at the phyla and genus levels,the software of RDA Classifier to denote each OUT by species. It was found thatProteobacteria(22.2%),Crenarchaeota(15.1%),Bacteroidetes(13.9%), Acidobacteria(12.4%),Chloroflexi(10.3%),Gemmatimonadetes(4.8%),Actinobacteria (4.7%),Planctomycetes(4.0%)andVerrucomicrobia(2.0%)were the dominate bacterial groups and Ascomycota(29.5%)andBasidiomycota(11.7%)were the dominant fungal group in the rhizosphere of the plant. However,about 55.8% of the fungi found in the rhizosphere were still unknown in the taxonomy. Besides,the sequencing further demonstrated that soil microbial community structure in the rhizosphere varied sharply between the fields different in cultivation history and stood out uniquely in each field from the others. The variation between fields different in cultivation history was particularly significant in terms of the ratio of

  7. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  8. Diversity and antibacterial activity of fungi associated with South China Sea sponges and corals%中国南海海绵和珊瑚共附生真菌多样性及其抑菌活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹; 蒋群; 李英新; 冯国芳; 孙伟; 张风丽; 李志勇

    2015-01-01

    目的 揭示中国南海海绵和珊瑚共附生真菌多样性及其抗菌活性.方法 采用9种不同的真菌培养基对海绵和珊瑚中的共生真菌进行分离培养和纯化,根据真菌18S rDNA对所分离的真菌进行鉴定,使用MEGA 5.2软件对所分离真菌进行系统发育分析.采用圆形滤纸片法进行抑菌活性筛选.结果 从采自南海的6种海绵与3种珊瑚中共分离得到106株真菌菌株,通过形态分析和序列分析排重得到41株独立真菌菌株.18S rDNA序列比对结果分析显示,分别属于子囊菌门(Ascomycota)的11个目和担子菌门(Basidiomycota)的4个目,共计26个属.其中子囊菌门所占比例最高为93.4%,剩下的6.6%为担子菌门.通过抑菌活性筛选显示部分真菌对革兰氏阳性细菌和革兰氏阴性细菌具有广谱抗菌活性.结论 本研究揭示了中国南海海绵和珊瑚共附生真菌丰富的种群多样性及部分真菌的抑菌活性,为进一步开发利用海绵和珊瑚共附生真菌及生产活性物质奠定了基础.

  9. Microfungal oasis in an oligotrophic desert: diversity patterns and community structure in three freshwater systems of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Pineda, Jaime; Rosique-Gil, Edmundo; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Espinosa-Asuar, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) comprises several oligotrophic aquatic ecosystems limited by phosphorus. These aquatic systems are dominated by a high prokaryotic diversity, shaped by the stress of low nutrient supplies and interspecific competition. Although fungi constitute a diverse and important component of microbial diversity, the microfungal diversity in the CCB remains to be unveiled. With the aim to explore microfungal diversity and ecological patterns in this area, we present the first investigation analyzing cultivable taxa from sediment and water, as well as lignocellulolytic taxa obtained from incubated submerged plant debris, and wood panels in three contrasting freshwater systems in the CCB: Churince, Becerra and Pozas Rojas. We chose a culture-based approach to analyze sediment and water samples in order to obtain fungal cultures, providing opportunities for a posteriori studies, and the possibility of ex situ preservation of the diversity. We evaluated sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer including the 5.8 rDNA region for 126 isolates, revealing 37 OTUs. These OTUs were phylogenetically affiliated to several genera in the fungal phyla: Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Ascomycota. We recorded two OTUs with saline affinity, agreeing with previous findings on the prokaryotic communities with ancestral marine resemblances. All the studied systems showed moderate diversity levels, however discrepancies among the diversity indexes were observed, due to the occurrence of abundant taxa in the samples. Our results indicated that lignocellulolytic microfungal communities are dominated by transient fungal taxa, as resident species were not recorded perhaps as a result of the long-term strong competition with the highly adapted prokaryotic community. Moreover, the obtained microfungal taxa occurred mostly on the resident plant debris, rather than submerged wood panels, perhaps as a result of the high adaptation to specific

  10. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  11. Microbial monitoring in treated stone at the Royal Chapel of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Pinar, Guadalupe; González-Muñoz, Maria Theresa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Biomineralization processes have been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain). In few years, this conservation treatment has gained worth attention as environmentally friendly methodology for protection and consolidation of limestone because of the compatibilities shown between the new calcium carbonate cement and the original stone substrate. Moreover, the success of this approach may be related to the diversity of the microbiota inhabiting the stone and activated upon the biotreatment application and throughout the time. González-Muñoz et al. (2008) proposed a nutritional solution that activate among the bacteria inhabiting the stone those with carbonatogenic activity. In this study, a long-term (one, two and three years) monitoring of the microbiota present on the treated and untreated stones was done using a molecular strategy, including total DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA sequences, construction of clone libraries and fingerprinting by DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA revealed the dominant occurrence of members of Actinobacteria (44.20%), Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24%) and Chloroflexi (25.56%) after one year of the biotreatment. Whereas after two years, members of Cyanobacteria (22.10%) appeared and three years after, the microbiota consisted of only Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria with approximately the same percentage in comparison with the untreated stones, dominated exclusively by Actinobacteria (100%). Fungal diversity followed the same dynamic as bacterial diversity being Ascomicota the predominant order before treatment. After one year, members of Basidiomycota and Viridiplantae appeared on the stone while two years after, the Viridiplantae dominated with a percentage of 84.77%. Finally, three years after the treatment, fungi population started to stabilize again and Ascomicota predominated next to 16.67% of

  12. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota, which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. Results In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. Conclusion On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence

  13. Nitrogen Additions Increase the Diversity of Carbon Compounds Degraded by Fungi in Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, T. B.; Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    Boreal forest soils in North America harbor a large reservoir of organic C, and this region is increasingly exposed to long-range atmospheric N transport from Eurasia. By examining the responses of decomposers to N deposition in these forests, we hope to improve predictions of the fate of boreal carbon pools under global change. We tested the hypothesis that the functional diversity of decomposer fungi would increase under N fertilization in boreal forests where fungal growth was otherwise N-limited, owing to a reduction in competitive exclusion of fungal groups. We collected soil and leaf litter from three Alaskan sites that represent different successional stages at 5, 17, or 80 years following severe forest fire. Each site had been exposed for two years to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization in a factorial design, with four plots per treatment. Nutrient limitation of fungal growth varied depending on successional stage. The standing hyphal length of decomposer fungi in soil (i.e. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) responded to neither N nor P in the 5-year old site, increased under N fertilization in the 17-year old site, and increased where N and P was added simultaneously in the 80-year old site (site x N x P interaction: P = 0.001). We used BIOLOG microplates for filamentous fungi to obtain an index of the diversity of carbon use by decomposer fungi; each of 95 wells of these plates contains a different carbon-based compound, as well as a dye that changes color upon metabolism of the compound. Saline leaf litter extracts were mixed with fungal growth medium and then added to the microplates. The number of wells displaying metabolic activity was counted following incubation for five days. We found that N fertilization raised the average number of positive wells per plate from 14 to 27 (P = 0.012), with no significant differences in responses among sites. Phosphorus additions did not alter functional diversity of fungi in any site. Since increases in functional

  14. Identification and quantification of ice nucleation active microorganisms by digital droplet PCR (ddPCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Martin; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Several bioaerosol types, including bacteria, fungi, pollen and lichen, have been identified as sources of biological ice nucleators (IN) which induce ice formation already at temperatures as high as -10 °C or above. Accordingly, they potentially contribute widely to environmental ice nucleation in the atmosphere and are of great interest in the study of natural heterogenous ice nucleation processes. Ice nucleation active microorganisms have been found and studied among bacteria (Proteobacteria) and fungi (phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota). The mechanisms enabling the microorganisms to ice nucleation are subject to ongoing research. While it has been demonstrated that whole cells can act as ice nucleators in the case of bacteria due to the presence of specific membrane proteins, cell-free ice nucleation active particles seem to be responsible for this phenomenon in fungi and lichen. The identification and quantification of these ice nucleation active microorganisms and their IN in atmospheric samples is crucial to understand their contribution to the pool of atmospheric IN. This is not a trivial task since the respective microorganisms are often prevalent in lowest concentrations and a variety of states, be it viable cells, spores or cell debris from dead cells. Molecular biology provides tools to identify and quantify ice nucleation active microorganisms independent of their state by detecting genetic markers specific for the organism of interest. Those methods are not without their drawbacks in terms of sample material concentration required or reliable standardization. Digital Droplet Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR) was chosen for our demands as a more elegant, quick and specific method in the investigation of ice nucleation active microorganisms in atmospheric samples. The advantages of ddPCR lie in the simultaneous detection and quantification of genetic markers and their original copy numbers in a sample. This is facilitated by the fractionation of the

  15. A Preliminary Study on Diversity of Endophytic Fungi from Wild Dendrobium of ficinale under Different Habitats%不同生境下野生铁皮石斛内生真菌多样性的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛益婷; 代晓宇; 马荣

    2011-01-01

    采集湖南省新宁县崀山世界自然遗产风景名胜区和广西省乐业县雅长兰科植物自然保护区这两个生境中处于生长期的铁皮石斛(Dendrobium officinale)的营养根,并进行分离培养.通过对分离所得的41个菌株进行形态观察和ITS序列测定相结合的鉴定,共获得内生真菌34种.对担子菌和子囊菌分别进行了系统发育树构建结果显示,子囊菌为优势种类(31种),以炭角菌目(Xylariales)和肉座菌目(Hypocreales)的种类为主,担子菌则以胶膜菌科(Tulasnellaceae)为主.Simpson多样性指数分析结果表明,不同生境下野生铁皮石斛内生真菌的多样性都很高,且雅长的高于崀山的.%The nutrition roots of D. officinale in growth period collected from two different habitats : Lang mountain natural heritage scenic area of Xinning county, Hunan province and Orchid resources gene garden of Yachang orchid nature reserve of Leye county,Guangxi province as site of collection of wild D. officinale. The endophytic fungi was isolated in tissue blocks cultivation,and identified by using morphological and molecular techniques. In this study,34 fungi species were isolated from the 41 representative fungi strains. The diversity of endophytic fungi with the phylogenetic diversity of fungi isolate were investigated. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the fungi mainly belonged to Xylariales and Hypocreales of Ascomycota, and Tulasnellaceae of Basidiomycota. The Ascomycota was dominant, containing 31 species. The analysis results of Simpson diversity index indicated that the diversity of endophytic fungi from D. officinale exhibited high diversity,the diversity of Yachang were higher than of Lang mountain.

  16. Friend or foe? Evolutionary history of glycoside hydrolase family 32 genes encoding for sucrolytic activity in fungi and its implications for plant-fungal symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Timothy Y

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many fungi are obligate biotrophs of plants, growing in live plant tissues, gaining direct access to recently photosynthesized carbon. Photosynthate within plants is transported from source to sink tissues as sucrose, which is hydrolyzed by plant glycosyl hydrolase family 32 enzymes (GH32 into its constituent monosaccharides to meet plant cellular demands. A number of plant pathogenic fungi also use GH32 enzymes to access plant-derived sucrose, but less is known about the sucrose utilization ability of mutualistic and commensal plant biotrophic fungi, such as mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. The aim of this study was to explore the distribution and abundance of GH32 genes in fungi to understand how sucrose utilization is structured within and among major ecological guilds and evolutionary lineages. Using bioinformatic and PCR-based analyses, we tested for GH32 gene presence in all available fungal genomes and an additional 149 species representing a broad phylogenetic and ecological range of biotrophic fungi. Results We detected 9 lineages of GH32 genes in fungi, 4 of which we describe for the first time. GH32 gene number in fungal genomes ranged from 0–12. Ancestral state reconstruction of GH32 gene abundance showed a strong correlation with nutritional mode, and gene family expansion was observed in several clades of pathogenic filamentous Ascomycota species. GH32 gene number was negatively correlated with animal pathogenicity and positively correlated with plant biotrophy, with the notable exception of mycorrhizal taxa. Few mycorrhizal species were found to have GH32 genes as compared to other guilds of plant-associated fungi, such as pathogens, endophytes and lichen-forming fungi. GH32 genes were also more prevalent in the Ascomycota than in the Basidiomycota. Conclusion We found a strong signature of both ecological strategy and phylogeny on GH32 gene number in fungi. These data suggest that plant biotrophic fungi

  17. Possible role of Rhodotorula sp. in the formation of jarosite in the AMD environment of Muskau Arch, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Natalia; Chlebicki, Andrzej; Bożęcki, Piotr; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The Muskau Arch is situated in the west of Poland and in the east of Germany. This region is a belt formed by push and frontal moraines during the Middle-Polish (Riss) glaciation, especially during the Wartanian glaciation. The occurrence of glacier caused folding and forming the glacitectonic type of lignit deposits which were mined for over 150 years. Both open pit and underground mining methods has exposed metal sulfides (mainly pyrite) to air and water causing bio-oxidation. Due to this process the acidity of many reservoirs have increased significantly (pH values between 2 and 4). As a consequence of changes in the environment, new mineral phases precipitated from highly acid waters rich in, among others, various forms of Fe and S. Precipitation of ochreous minerals such as schwertmannite, goethite and jarosite was partly catalyzed by many various acidophilic and acid-tolerant microorganisms: bacteria, archaea and probably yeasts. Jarosite KFe33+(OH)6(SO4)2 can be precipitated both in abiotic conditions and as a by-product of the activity of living organisms. The example of biomineralization induced by fungi Purpureocillium lilacinum in similar AMD environment of Rio Tinto is reported (Oggerin et al, 2014). Recently, jarosite is also considered as a possible biosignature of life on Mars. The assessment of microbial participation in formation of jarosite is an elementary step in geomicrobiological and astrobiological research. Isolated by us Rhodotorula sp. is an unicellular pigmented yeast. Fungi from the genus Rhodotorula F.C. Harrison belong to Sporidiobolalas part of phylum Basidiomycota. They are common environmental inhabitants. Some species, known from Rio Tinto, can live in extreme acidic soils at pH of about 2 (Lopez-Archila et al, 2004). For the first time, authors isolated strain Rhodotorula sp. from surface precipitates in Ł ęknica region (Muskau Arch). This ochreous precipitate contains jarosite. The yeast might be an important factor in indirect

  18. Characterising coarse PBA dynamics in real-time above and below a tropical rainforest canopy using a dual channel UV fluorescence aerosol spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabey, A.; Gallagher, M. W.; Burgess, R.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.,; Kaye, P. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Davies, F.; Foot, V. E.

    2009-04-01

    Primary biogenic aerosols (PBA) are used by organisms as a means to propagate their genetic material, either by transport of the organisms themselves, such as bacterial clusters and viruses, or of their reproductive components in the case of fungi and plants that release spores and pollen. Many studies have suggested PBA might be important for initiation of cloud formation and subsequent precipitation evolution by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or possibly as ice nuclei (IN). This link is inferred from laboratory studies demonstrating the high activation efficiency of PBA at warm temperatures, coupled with observations that biological particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Despite more than two hundred years of research (e.g. Ehrenberg, 1830) information on the abundance, composition and more importantly the sources and heterogeneity of PBA on global scales is still lacking. The first estimates of global average PBA emission rates based on observations and budget calculations were provided by Elbert et al. (2007). They demonstrate that fungi contribute a major fraction of the observed coarse PBA PM10 mass (particles with diameters between 1-10 m), particularly Acomycota (AAM) and Basidiomycota (ABM) commonly seen in tropical regions. These species discharge their spores via so-called "active wet" mechanisms that eject spores inside liquid droplets. Elbert et al. (2007) estimate a global average spore emission rate for ABM of ~17-50 Tg yr-1, corresponding to a global average abundance of ~1 g m-3 and a net emission rate for all fungal spores of 50 Tg yr-1. Uncertainty in the latter estimate is significant compared to the result, placed at 50-1000 Tg yr-1. Nonetheless, these calculations demonstrate the potential importance of PBA and particularly fungal spores in the tropics, where up to half of the coarse mode particulate loading is PBA, and potentially in the global organic aerosol budget. Data was collected using the WIBS-3: a low-cost, portable

  19. Cophenetic correlation analysis as a strategy to select phylogenetically informative proteins: an example from the fungal kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echavarri-Erasun Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of robust and well resolved phylogenetic trees is important for our understanding of many, if not all biological processes, including speciation and origin of higher taxa, genome evolution, metabolic diversification, multicellularity, origin of life styles, pathogenicity and so on. Many older phylogenies were not well supported due to insufficient phylogenetic signal present in the single or few genes used in phylogenetic reconstructions. Importantly, single gene phylogenies were not always found to be congruent. The phylogenetic signal may, therefore, be increased by enlarging the number of genes included in phylogenetic studies. Unfortunately, concatenation of many genes does not take into consideration the evolutionary history of each individual gene. Here, we describe an approach to select informative phylogenetic proteins to be used in the Tree of Life (TOL and barcoding projects by comparing the cophenetic correlation coefficients (CCC among individual protein distance matrices of proteins, using the fungi as an example. The method demonstrated that the quality and number of concatenated proteins is important for a reliable estimation of TOL. Approximately 40–45 concatenated proteins seem needed to resolve fungal TOL. Results In total 4852 orthologous proteins (KOGs were assigned among 33 fungal genomes from the Asco- and Basidiomycota and 70 of these represented single copy proteins. The individual protein distance matrices based on 531 concatenated proteins that has been used for phylogeny reconstruction before 14 were compared one with another in order to select those with the highest CCC, which then was used as a reference. This reference distance matrix was compared with those of the 70 single copy proteins selected and their CCC values were calculated. Sixty four KOGs showed a CCC above 0.50 and these were further considered for their phylogenetic potential. Proteins belonging to the cellular

  20. Soil Communities of Central Park, New York City: A Biodiversity Melting Pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, K. S.; Leff, J. W.; Wall, D. H.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    high: >540,000 bacterial and archaeal species; and >97,000 eukaryotic species (as determined using a 97% sequence similarity cutoff). The most dominant bacterial phyla include Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Actinobacteria, and Archaea represent 1-8% of the sequences. Additionally, the distribution patterns of Acidobacteria and consequently beta-diversity, was strongly related to soil pH. The most dominant eukaryotic taxa include many Protists (Rhizara, Gregarinia), Fungi (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota), and Metazoa (Nematodes, Rotifers, Arthropods and Annelids). No single soil factor could predict eukaryotic distribution. Central Park soil diversity was strikingly similar to the diversity of the 57 global soils. Central Park and the global soils had similarities in alpha diversity, taxon abundances. Interestingly, there was significant overlap in a number of dominant species between Central Park and the global soils. Together these results represent the most comprehensive analysis of soil biodiversity conducted to date. Our data suggest that even well-studied locations like Central Park harbor very high levels of unexplored biodiversity, and that Central Park biodiversity is comparable to soil biodiversity found globally.

  1. STUDY OF THE ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF CERTAIN SAPROPHYTIC OBLIGATE MARINE FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyuzhnaya O.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Today promising area of the development and introduction of new antimicrobial agents is to search for new antibiotics from natural sources, namely among marine organisms - microscopic fungi. Such saprophytic fungi as Ascomycota (families Arenariomyces, Ceriosporopsis, Corollospora, Halosphaeria and Basidiomycota (family Nia, which are widely spreaded in Ukraine (salty estuaries and the coast of the Black Sea, are the objects of the study of this work. These types of marine organisms have been provided by the Odessa Branch of the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas after collecting samples of water, sediment, cellulose substrates and subsequent isolation and obtain pure cultures by accumulation in the form fruiting bodies of Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes - ascocarps and basidiocarps that can be stored 3-5 months in sterile seawater. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antimicrobial properties of saprophytic fungi obligate marine, which are characteristic for residents in Ukraine, namely the Black Sea. Materials and methods. At this stage the study of antimicrobial activity was performed by agar diffusion method and method of cocultivation of marine fungi with test strains in liquid culture medium. We have used reference strains of microorganisms: Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 6896, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and opportunistic fungus Candida albicans ATCC 885-653. Results and Discussion. Determination of antimicrobial activity by agar diffusion method showed that all samples had antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive test strains (S. aureus and B. subtilis, effect for the Gramnegative bacteria (E. coli, P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa was much smaller or non-existent, and it isn’t observed against C. albicans (exclusion Nia vibrissa with zone of growth inhibition – 6.2 mm. The results of the counting of cells test strains

  2. Microbial degradation of a metal organic biocide in soils; Mikrobieller Abbau eines im Holzschutz verwendeten metallorganischen Biozids im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Desiree

    2010-06-17

    -fingerprinting technique. Shifts in the bacterial community structure were analyzed by correspondence analysis to explore the effect of WP and incubation time on the microbial community patterns. Bacterial and eukaryotic community structure differed significant between samples with Cu-Amine treated samples and Cu-HDO treated samples. To identify abundant eukaryotic community members a cloning and sequencing approach was carried out. Only few fungal sequences were obtained of the eukaryotic sequence diversity in the interface of wood and soil, which were affiliated to pronounced shifts in the eukaryotic community structure along the incubation time. One of these was the white-rotter Sphaerobolus stellatus (basidiomycota) and the mold-rotter Lecytophora multabilis (ascomycota). The dominant eukaryotic community members were affiliated to the phyla Alveolata, Disicicrista, Amoebozoa, Arthropoda or Nematoda. However, the majority of these phyla are known to have a bacteriovorious lifestyle and are not able to degrade or metabolize wood, WP or WP ingredients. This finding suggests that the majority of eukaryotes grazes on the bacterial population and is rarely involved in Cu-HDO degradation. In conclusion, a defined bacterial population is involved in Cu-HDO degradation and both the bacterial and eukaryotic community was significantly directly and indirectly affected by the presence of Cu-HDO. (orig.)

  3. Predominant Species Dynamic and Diversity of Fungal Endophytes in Barks of Two Populus Cultivars%两种杨树树皮内生真菌多样性及优势种群动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永; 朴春根; 郭利民; 常聚普; 王海明; 贺伟; 谢守江; 郭民伟

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the predominant species dynamic and diversity of fungal endophytes in barks of Populus × euramericana cv.Robusta 94 and triploid of P.tomentosa,the fungal endophytes were isolated from barks of P.× euramericana cv.Robusta 94 and triploid of P.tomentosa by tissue isolation,and identified based on sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer and morphological characterization by microscopic observations.A total of 1 175 fungal endophytes were isolated from 996 bark tissues.The fungal endophytes were classified into 35fungal taxa belonging to 15 genera,including 1 species of Basidiomycota and 34 taxa of Ascomycota.And Alternaria alternata,Botryosphaeria dothidea,Fusarium spp.,and Diaporthe conorum were the predominant species of fungal endophytes in barks of P.× euramericana cv.Robusta 94 and triploid of P.tomentosa,while A.alternata and B.dothidea were the most common predominant species in the barks of the two cultivars.The variation of predominant fungal endophytes of two poplar species in different seasons was detected.%为了解健杨94(转基因抗虫杨94)、三倍体毛白杨2个杨树品种干部树皮内生真菌区系及其优势种群的季节变化情况,本研究利用组织分离法从2个杨树品种996块组织中分离内生真菌1 175株,健杨94和三倍体毛白杨分别分离612、563株.利用形态特征和分子生物学方法鉴定为15个属、35个分类单元,包括担子菌1个分类单元,子囊菌34个分类单元.2个杨树品种内生真菌优势种群包括链格孢、葡萄座腔菌、镰孢属真菌、间座壳属真菌等,其中,仅有链格孢、葡萄座腔菌和桑砖红镰孢是两品种共有的优势种群种类,而且优势种群会随季节变化而变化.在两品种的内生真菌中,链格孢、葡萄座腔菌是最为常见的优势种群.

  4. Field Observations of Bioaerosols: What We've Learned from Fluorescence, Genetic, and Microscopic Techniques (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Després, V. R.; Elbert, W.; Sinha, B.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    biodiversity [3,4]. Filters collected at a semi-urban site in Germany for approximately one year determined that ~34% of the airborne fungal species were Ascomycota (sac fungi), 64% were Basidiomycota (club fungi), and that their relative proportions changed seasonally. Numerical simulations with state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry and climate models are helping to unravel the regional and global distribution and transport of PBA [5]. The atmospheric abundance and environmental effects of PBA are particularly pronounced in tropical regions, where both the biological activity at the Earth’s surface and the physicochemical processes in the atmosphere are particularly intense and important for the Earth system and global climate. If climate change and human activities lead to changes in the abundance and properties of PBA, this might influence the hydrological cycle and provide a feedback to climate change [1]. [1] Elbert et al. (2007) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569 - 4588. [2] Huffman et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 17705 - 17751. [3] Després et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1127-1141. [4] Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2009) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 106, 12814 - 12819. [5] Burrows et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 10829 - 10881.

  5. Fungal flora and population structure of polypores in the Great Xingan Mountains%大兴安岭林区多孔菌的区系组成与种群结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔宝凯; 余长军

    2011-01-01

    在过去10 a野外调查和室内鉴定及分析研究的基础上,对大兴安岭林区多孔菌的区系组成和种群结构进行了分析,发现大兴安岭林区的多孔菌具有较高的多样性,共有5目11科56属129种,占中国多孔菌区系的21.36%,优势科是多孔菌科.种的区系地理成分分为7类,以北温带成分和世界广布成分为主,具有明显的北温带成分的区系特征.大兴安岭的多孔菌常见种较多,种群结构中共生菌3种,寄生菌27种,腐生菌占大多数,有99种.在能够引起木材腐朽的126种真菌中,白腐菌93种,占多数,褐腐菌33种,占少数,但该地区褐腐菌所占比例明显高于全国范围内褐腐菌在多孔菌中的比例.通过对大兴安岭主要树种上的种群结构进行比较,表明阔叶树上的木材腐朽菌绝大部分是白色腐朽菌,而针叶树上的白腐菌与褐腐菌数量相差不大,褐腐菌对于针叶林特别是落叶松的更新具有非常重要的作用.%Polypores are important components of forest biodiversity; most of them are wood-decaying fungi and are critical for the decomposition of coarse woody materials, playing key roles in nutrient cycling and energy flows. The poroid woodinhabiting fungi of the Great Xingan Mountains, China, have been little studied. Difficulties include species identification and lack of relevant information. Our analyses of polypore diversity and population structure in the Great Xingan Mountains are based on 10 years of field investigation and laboratory analyses. Species diversity in this area is rather high , accounting for 21. 36 % of all Chinese polypore species, and including 129 species belonging to five orders, 11 families and 56 genera of Basidiomycota. The dominant family is the Polyporaceae, including 21 genera and 58 species, and another major family is the Fomitopsidaceae , which including 11 genera and 24 species. The majority of polypores in the Great Xingan Mountains are in these two families

  6. Analysis on the Soil Fungal Community Structure in Melia azedarach-Triticum aestivum Agroforestry Ecosystem%苦楝-小麦农林复合生态系统土壤真菌群落结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 周鹏; 季永华

    2015-01-01

    the treatments was divided into three groups. There were no obvious differences in species richness among rhizosphere-associated fungal communities and nonrhizosphere fungal communities. However, the species richness of rhizosphere-associated fungal community from wheat grown under M. azedarach and M. azedarach were higher than nonrhizosphere fungal community. There were significant differences in Shannon-Wiener indexes among rhizosphere-associated fungal communities, while the difference was not significant among nonrhizosphere fungal communities. Additionally,no significant differences were present in equitability index among rhizosphere-associated fungal communities or nonrhizosphere fungal communities,whereas,the equitability index between rhizosphere-associated and nonrhizosphere fungal community of wheat grown under M. azedarach was significantly different,and the same as M. azedarach. Finally,sequencing of eleven dominant DGGE bands showed that 3 of the 11 sequences were uncultured fungi and the rest 8 sequences belonged to Glomeromycota,Basidiomycota,Ascomycota or Deuteromycota. [Conclusion]The species richness,Shannon-Wiener index and equitability index of rhizosphere-associated fungi from wheat grown under M. azedarach were higher than that of monocultured wheat,which indicated that diversity of rhizosphere-associated fungal community of wheat was enriched by trees grown in this agroforestry ecosystem. Our results may provide new reference for agroforestry practice.%【目的】采用18S rDNA PCR-DGGE技术研究苦楝-小麦农林复合生态系统根际及非根际土壤真菌群落结构,以期揭示农林复合生态系统中伴生树种对作物根际真菌群落的影响,为农林复合经营实践提供理论参考。【方法】提取根际和非根际土壤真菌 DNA,采用通用引物 GC-FR1和 FF390扩增18S rDNA 基因目的片段,扩增片段用变性梯度凝胶电泳分析;不同处理间微生物群落结构的相似性采用非

  7. PYROSEQUENCING APPROACH TO STUDY MICROBIAL COMPOSITION IN A RED SOIL PROFILE%一个红壤剖面微生物群落的焦磷酸测序法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁超磊; 贺纪正; 沈菊培; 戴宇; 张丽梅

    2013-01-01

    .Results showed that with increasing soil depth,soil clay increased in content,while organic matter,total nitrogen,and carbon to nitrogen ratio declined.Correspondingly,the numbers of gene copies per gram of dry soil also decreased within the range of 107.09 ~ 109.3 for archaeal 16S rDNA,108.10 ~ 109.70 for bacterial 16S rDNA,106.54 ~ 107.95 for fungal 18S rDNA,107.24 ~ 108.61 for archaeal amoA gene,104.76 ~ 106.25 for bacterial amoA gene,105.94 ~ 107.88 for nirK gene,106.81 ~ l09.21 for nirS gene,and 107.03 ~ 109.46 for nosZ gene.Pyrosequencing generated 6 459 archaeal 16S rDNA sequences with an average length of 496 bp,28 626 bacterial 16S rDNA sequences with an average length of 448 bp,and 4 683 fungal 18S rDNA sequences with an average size of 534 bp.OTU (97% similarity) analysis revealed that the α-diversity was in the order bacteria > fungi > archaea,but there was no significant correlation between microbial α-diversity and soil properties determined.Analysis of the Jaccard dissimilarity indicated that microbial communities in different layers of the same soil profile were closer,compared with the dissimilarity between three surface replicates.Mantel test showed that clay content was the main soil factor explaining the variation of microbial communities.In all the soil samples,archaea was dominated (89%) with Thermoprotei (belonging to Crenarchaeota),of which the distribution was significantly related to soil clay content.The bacterial community consisted mainly of Acidobacteria (33%),Proteobacteria (17%),Chloroflexi (12%),Firmicutes (10%),Actinobacteria (7%),and Bacteria incertae sedis (11%).Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were found to be more abundant in the surface soils than in other soil layers,while the situations of Chloroflexi and Firmicutes were opposite.All fungal sequences belonged to three phyla,i.e.,Ascomycota (87%),Basidiomycota (9%) and Glomeromycota (4%).This work demonstrated the great potential of pyrosequecing