WorldWideScience

Sample records for basidiomycota

  1. Fungal Sex: The Basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marco A; Bakkeren, Guus; Sun, Sheng; Hood, Michael E; Giraud, Tatiana

    2017-06-01

    Fungi of the Basidiomycota, representing major pathogen lineages and mushroom-forming species, exhibit diverse means to achieve sexual reproduction, with particularly varied mechanisms to determine compatibilities of haploid mating partners. For species that require mating between distinct genotypes, discrimination is usually based on both the reciprocal exchange of diffusible mating pheromones, rather than sexes, and the interactions of homeodomain protein signals after cell fusion. Both compatibility factors must be heterozygous in the product of mating, and genetic linkage relationships of the mating pheromone/receptor and homeodomain genes largely determine the complex patterns of mating-type variation. Independent segregation of the two compatibility factors can create four haploid mating genotypes from meiosis, referred to as tetrapolarity. This condition is thought to be ancestral to the basidiomycetes. Alternatively, cosegregation by linkage of the two mating factors, or in some cases the absence of the pheromone-based discrimination, yields only two mating types from meiosis, referred to as bipolarity. Several species are now known to have large and highly rearranged chromosomal regions linked to mating-type genes. At the population level, polymorphism of the mating-type genes is an exceptional aspect of some basidiomycete fungi, where selection under outcrossing for rare, intercompatible allelic variants is thought to be responsible for numbers of mating types that may reach several thousand. Advances in genome sequencing and assembly are yielding new insights by comparative approaches among and within basidiomycete species, with the promise to resolve the evolutionary origins and dynamics of mating compatibility genetics in this major eukaryotic lineage.

  2. Taxonomy of Pseudolagarobasidium (Polyporales, Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen K. Nakasone; Daniel L. Lindner

    2012-01-01

    Pseudolagarobasidium (Polyporales, Basidiomycota) is a small, monophyletic genus of crustose, wood-inhabiting fungi with spines and a saprobic, endophytic, or parasitic habit. Seven species are accepted in the genus including two new species, P. belizense from Belize and P. pusillum from Australia. Sequence...

  3. Annotated checklist of fungi in Cyprus Island. 1. Larger Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Torrejón

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of wild fungi living in Cyprus Island has been compiled broughting together all the information collected from the different works dealing with fungi in this area throughout the three centuries of mycology in Cyprus. This part contains 363 taxa of macroscopic Basidiomycota.

  4. Mayamontana coccolobae (Basidiomycota), a new sequestrate taxon from Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Castellano; James M. Trappe; D. Jean Lodge

    2007-01-01

    A new semi-hypogeous, sequestrate genus and species in the Basidiomycota is described from the Maya Mountains of Belize, where it was fruiting in association with Coccoloba belizensis. Mayamontana coccolobae is characterized by small, bright orange basidiomata with a friable, loculate, red-orange to red gleba and bilaterally...

  5. Classification of marine Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, E. B. Gareth; Suetrong, Satinee; Sakayaroj, Jariya; Bahkali, Ali H.; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed A.; Boekhout, Teun; Pang, Ka-Lai

    This paper lists the accepted names and classification of marine fungi, updating the scheme presented in 2009. The classification includes 1,112 species (in 472 genera): Ascomycota 805 (in 352 genera), Basidiomycota 21 species (in 17 genera), Chytridiomycota and related phyla 26 species (in 13

  6. Morphology of some rare and threatened Polish Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Wojewoda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological analysis and orginal illustrations of microscopic elements of 20 species of Basidiomycota (19 of Basidiomycetes and 1 of Urediniomycetes are the subject of this article. The species arc rare in Poland according to recent distributional maps. The maps of 17 of them: Amylocorticium cebennese, A. subincamatum, A. subsulphureum, Bovista paludosa, Clavariadelphus truncatus, Clavulicium macounii, Conohypha albocremea, Daedaleopsis tricolor, Fomitiporia hippophaeicola, Hymenochaele cruenta, Irpicodon pendulus, Punclularia strigisozonata, Scotomyces subviolaceus, Syzygospora pallida, Thanatephorus sterigmaticus, Trichaptum biforme and Tubulicrinis borealis, were published by Wojewoda (2002 in the "Atlas of the geographical distribution of fungi in Poland", Fasc. 2. The further 3 maps of Coniophora olivacea, Helicobasidium pupureum and Veluticeps ambigua will be published soon in the same series in Fasc. 3.

  7. Cartilosoma rene-hentic (Basidiomycota, Polyporales), a new species in the Antrodia ramentacea-group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rivoire, B.; Trichies, G.; Vlasák, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, 1-2 (2015), s. 5-18 ISSN 0366-1326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Polypore * Antrodia * Cartilosoma Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.067, year: 2015

  8. Phylogeny of the Pluteaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota): taxonomy and character evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Alfredo; Vizzini, Alfredo; Minnis, Andrew M; Menolli, Nelson; Capelari, Marina; Rodríguez, Olivia; Malysheva, Ekaterina; Contu, Marco; Ghignone, Stefano; Hibbett, David S

    2011-01-01

    The phylogeny of the genera traditionally classified in the family Pluteaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) was investigated using molecular data from nuclear ribosomal genes (nSSU, ITS, nLSU) and consequences for taxonomy and character evolution were evaluated. The genus Volvariella is polyphyletic, as most of its representatives fall outside the Pluteoid clade and shows affinities to some hygrophoroid genera (Camarophyllus, Cantharocybe). Volvariella gloiocephala and allies are placed in a different clade, which represents the sister group of Pluteus, and a new generic name, Volvopluteus, is proposed to accommodate these taxa. Characters such as basidiospore size and pileipellis structure can be used to separate Pluteus, Volvariella and Volvopluteus. The genus Pluteus is monophyletic and includes species with partial veil traditionally classified in the genus Chamaeota. The evolution of morphological features used in the infrageneric taxonomy of the genus, such as metuloid cystidia and pileipellis structure, was analyzed. Agreement between the molecular phylogeny and morphological subdivision of Pluteus is, generally speaking, good, though some rearrangements are necessary: (i) species with non-metuloid pleurocystidia and pileipellis as a cutis are placed either in sect. Celluloderma, together with the species characterized by a hymenidermal pipeipellis, or in sect. Pluteus, with the metuloid bearing species; (ii) subdivision of sect. Celluloderma according to the presence/absence of cystidioid elements in the pileipellis is not supported by molecular data. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Adaptation of the spore discharge mechanism in the basidiomycota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Stolze-Rybczynski

    Full Text Available Spore discharge in the majority of the 30,000 described species of Basidiomycota is powered by the rapid motion of a fluid droplet, called Buller's drop, over the spore surface. In basidiomycete yeasts, and phytopathogenic rusts and smuts, spores are discharged directly into the airflow around the fungal colony. Maximum discharge distances of 1-2 mm have been reported for these fungi. In mushroom-forming species, however, spores are propelled over much shorter ranges. In gilled mushrooms, for example, discharge distances of <0.1 mm ensure that spores do not collide with opposing gill surfaces. The way in which the range of the mechanism is controlled has not been studied previously.In this study, we report high-speed video analysis of spore discharge in selected basidiomycetes ranging from yeasts to wood-decay fungi with poroid fruiting bodies. Analysis of these video data and mathematical modeling show that discharge distance is determined by both spore size and the size of the Buller's drop. Furthermore, because the size of Buller's drop is controlled by spore shape, these experiments suggest that seemingly minor changes in spore morphology exert major effects upon discharge distance.This biomechanical analysis of spore discharge mechanisms in mushroom-forming fungi and their relatives is the first of its kind and provides a novel view of the incredible variety of spore morphology that has been catalogued by traditional taxonomists for more than 200 years. Rather than representing non-selected variations in micromorphology, the new experiments show that changes in spore architecture have adaptive significance because they control the distance that the spores are shot through air. For this reason, evolutionary modifications to fruiting body architecture, including changes in gill separation and tube diameter in mushrooms, must be tightly linked to alterations in spore morphology.

  10. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds by Basidiomycota and its phenol oxidases: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Kotík, Michael; Marková, Eva; Homolka, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, APR 2016 (2016), s. 373-382 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12049; GA TA ČR TA04021212 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Laccase * Tyrosinase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  11. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  12. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bercu, V., E-mail: vbercu@gmail.co [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Negut, C.D., E-mail: dnegut@nipne.r [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Duliu, O.G., E-mail: duliu@b.astral.r [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania)

    2010-12-15

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of {gamma}-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel-Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom-Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle-Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom-Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  13. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C.D.; Duliu, O.G.

    2010-01-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel-Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom-Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle-Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom-Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of Tuberculina species (Helicobasidiales) reveals an unique mode of conidiogenesis within Basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayeva, Dilzara N; Lutz, Matthias; Piątek, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculina species represent the asexual life stage of the plant-parasitic sexual genus Helicobasidium. Tuberculina species are distributed all over the world, living in antagonistic symbiosis with over 150 rust species from at least 15 genera. Within the Basidiomycota, besides the spermogonia of rust fungi, only Tuberculina species develop distinct fructifications in the haplophase. However, the knowledge of conidiogenesis in Tuberculina is meagre. Therefore, conidial development in Tuberculina maxima, Tuberculina persicina, and Tuberculina sbrozzii was studied using transmission electron microscopy, and compared to each other as well as to spermatia formation in rust fungi. Significant ultrastructural characteristics such as the movement of nuclei in the process of conidium formation, and formation of the initial and late stages of conidiogenesis are documented. The mode of conidiogenesis of Tuberculina species is unique within the Basidiomycota in that (1) it is realized by haploid fructifications, (2) it is holoblastic, without annellidic proliferation, (3) the nucleus of the conidiogenous cell moves towards the forming conidium, divides, and no daughter nucleus remains inside the conidiogenous cell, and (4) the conidiogenous cell retains only cytoplasmic residues after the development of a single conidium, and a successive conidium is not produced. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Escherichia coli as a production host for novel enzymes from basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelena, Katerina; Eisele, Nadine; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-12-01

    Many enzymes from basidiomycota have been identified and more recently characterized on the molecular level. This report summarizes the potential biotechnological applications of these enzymes and evaluates recent advances in their heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Being one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins, there are, however, recurrent problems of recovering substantial yields of correctly folded and active enzymes. Various strategies for the efficient production of recombinant proteins from basidiomycetous fungi are reviewed including the current knowledge on vectors and expression strains, as well as methods for enhancing the solubility of target expression products and their purification. Research efforts towards the refolding of recombinant oxidoreductases and hydrolases are presented to illustrate successful production strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on the ice nucleation activity of fungal spores (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pummer, B. G.; Atanasova, L.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.; Druzhinina, I. S.; Grothe, H.

    2012-04-01

    Biogenic ice nucleation (IN) in the atmosphere is a topic of growing interest, as, according to IPCC, the impact of IN on global climate is crucial to perform reliable climate model calculations. About 20 years ago IN activity of a few lichen and Fusarium species [1,2] was reported, while all other investigated fungi were IN-negative. However, as the fungal kingdom is vast, many abundant species, especially the Basidiomycota (most mushrooms), were not tested before. Furthermore, the focus of the past studies was on the IN activity of the mycelium as a cryoprotective mechanism, and not on the airborne spores. We carried out oil immersion measurements [3] with spores from 17 different fungal species of ecological, economical or sanitary importance. Most of these species have not been investigated before, like exponents of Aspergillus, Trichoderma and Agaricales (most mushrooms). Apart from F. avenaceum, spores of all measured species showed moderate or no IN activity, supporting the hypothesis that significant IN activity is a rather exclusive property of only a few species within the fungal kingdom. [1] Kieft TL and Ruscetti T: J. Bacteriol. 172, 3519-3523, 1990. [2] Pouleur S et al.: Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 58, 2960-2964, 1992. [3] Marcolli C et al.: Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 5081-5091, 2007.

  17. Guyanagaster, a new wood-decaying sequestrate fungal genus related to Armillaria (Physalacriaceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Terry W; Smith, Matthew E; Aime, M Catherine

    2010-09-01

    Sequestrate basidiomycete fungi (e.g. "gasteromycetes") have foregone ballistospory and evolved alternative, often elaborate mechanisms of basidiospore dispersal with highly altered basidioma morphology. Sequestrate fungi have independently evolved in numerous Agaricomycete lineages, confounding taxonomic arrangements of these fungi for decades. Understanding the multiple origins and taxonomic affinities of sequestrate fungi provides insight into the evolutionary forces that can drastically alter basidioma morphology. In the neotropical rainforests of the Guiana Shield, we encountered a remarkable sequestrate fungus fruiting directly on decaying hardwood roots. The fungus' singular combination of traits include a wood-decaying habit; black, verrucose peridium; reduced stipe; and gelatinized basidiospore mass. • Guyanagaster necrorhiza gen. et sp. nov. is described. Macro- and micromorphological characters were assessed and compared to most similar taxa. To determine the phylogenetic affinities of the fungus, DNA sequence data were obtained for the 18S, ITS, and 28S rDNA, RBP2, and EF1α regions and subjected to single- and multi-gene analyses. DNA sequences from fungal vegetative organs growing on decaying woody roots confirmed the wood-inhabiting lifestyle of Guyanagaster. • Guyanagaster is morphologically unique among sequestrate fungi worldwide. Phylogenetic evidence places Guyanagaster in close relation to the wood-decaying mushroom genus Armillaria in the Physalacriaceae (Agaricales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota). • Guyanagaster represents an independently evolved sequestrate form within the Physalacriaceae. Although molecular data confirm that Guyanagaster is closely related to Armillaria, the unusual features of this fungus suggest a case of radically divergent morphological evolution.

  18. High concentration of basidiolichens in a single family of agaricoid mushrooms (Basidiomycota: Agaricales: Hygrophoraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrey, James D; Lücking, Robert; Sipman, Harrie J M; Chaves, José L; Redhead, Scott A; Bungartz, Frank; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2009-10-01

    The Agaricales is the largest and most diverse order of mushroom-forming Basidiomycota, with over 100 natural groups recognized in recent Fungal Tree of Life studies. Most agarics are either saprotrophic or ectomycorrhizal fungi, but the family Hygrophoraceae is in part characterized by a unique and remarkable diversity of lichenized forms. The most familiar of these is the chlorolichen genus Lichenomphalia, whose phylogenetic position in the Agaricales has been established. Recent limited evidence suggested that Hygrophoraceae also contains cyanolichens in the genus Dictyonema, which indicates a remarkable concentration and diversity of lichen-formers in a single family of agarics. To demonstrate the relationships of lichen-formers to other fungi in the family, we assembled ribosomal sequences from 52 species representing recognized groups within the Hygrophoraceae, among them new sequences representing Acantholichen and most species and forms of Dictyonema. The molecular data were evaluated using parsimony, likelihood, Bayesian, and distance analyses, including coding of ambiguous regions by means of INAASE and ARC, all of which indicate that Dictyonema and Acantholichen form a monophyletic clade derived from the primarily bryophilous genus Arrhenia and sister to the enigmatic Athelia pyriformis, a species unrelated to the Atheliales for which we are proposing a new genus name Eonema. The chlorolichen genus Lichenomphalia may be polyphyletic. Fungi in the Dictyonema-Acantholichen clade are typically tropical, entirely lichenized, and associate with cyanobacterial photobionts. Our data indicate a transition from agaricoid-omphalinoid basidiomes observed in Arrhenia to stereoid-corticioid forms in Dictyonema, and also support a previous suggestion of a connection between loss of clamp connections and lichenization. The diverse basidiome and thallus morphologies and nutritional ecologies of these fungi indicate a remarkable evolutionary flexibility that appears to

  19. Mycodiversity of xylophilous basidiomycetes (Basidiomycota, Fungi in Mondaí, Santa Catarina, Brazil II: A new addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa de Campos-Santana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2010v23n1p13 Micodiversidade de basidiomicetes (Fungi xilófilos para Mondaí, Santa Catarina, Brasil, II: Nova contribuição. Um levantamento recente da micodiversidade de basidiomicetes xilófilos (Basidiomycota, Fungi no município de Mondaí (Santa Catarina, Brasil resultou na identificação de 15 espécies não registradas anteriormente para a área de estudo; todas elas são causadoras de podridão branca na madeira.

  20. Mining metadata from unidentified ITS sequences in GenBank: A case study in Inocybe (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsson Stig

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of reference sequences from well-identified mycorrhizal fungi often poses a challenge to the inference of taxonomic affiliation of sequences from environmental samples, and many environmental sequences are thus left unidentified. Such unidentified sequences belonging to the widely distributed ectomycorrhizal fungal genus Inocybe (Basidiomycota were retrieved from GenBank and divided into species that were identified in a phylogenetic context using a reference dataset from an ongoing study of the genus. The sequence metadata of the unidentified Inocybe sequences stored in GenBank, as well as data from the corresponding original papers, were compiled and used to explore the ecology and distribution of the genus. In addition, the relative occurrence of Inocybe was contrasted to that of other mycorrhizal genera. Results Most species of Inocybe were found to have less than 3% intraspecific variability in the ITS2 region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. This cut-off value was used jointly with phylogenetic analysis to delimit and identify unidentified Inocybe sequences to species level. A total of 177 unidentified Inocybe ITS sequences corresponding to 98 species were recovered, 32% of which were successfully identified to species level in this study. These sequences account for an unexpectedly large proportion of the publicly available unidentified fungal ITS sequences when compared with other mycorrhizal genera. Eight Inocybe species were reported from multiple hosts and some even from hosts forming arbutoid or orchid mycorrhizae. Furthermore, Inocybe sequences have been reported from four continents and in climate zones ranging from cold temperate to equatorial climate. Out of the 19 species found in more than one study, six were found in both Europe and North America and one was found in both Europe and Japan, indicating that at least many north temperate species have a wide distribution. Conclusion Although DNA

  1. Mining metadata from unidentified ITS sequences in GenBank: a case study in Inocybe (Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Martin; Nilsson, R Henrik; Kristiansson, Erik; Töpel, Mats; Jacobsson, Stig; Larsson, Ellen

    2008-02-18

    The lack of reference sequences from well-identified mycorrhizal fungi often poses a challenge to the inference of taxonomic affiliation of sequences from environmental samples, and many environmental sequences are thus left unidentified. Such unidentified sequences belonging to the widely distributed ectomycorrhizal fungal genus Inocybe (Basidiomycota) were retrieved from GenBank and divided into species that were identified in a phylogenetic context using a reference dataset from an ongoing study of the genus. The sequence metadata of the unidentified Inocybe sequences stored in GenBank, as well as data from the corresponding original papers, were compiled and used to explore the ecology and distribution of the genus. In addition, the relative occurrence of Inocybe was contrasted to that of other mycorrhizal genera. Most species of Inocybe were found to have less than 3% intraspecific variability in the ITS2 region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. This cut-off value was used jointly with phylogenetic analysis to delimit and identify unidentified Inocybe sequences to species level. A total of 177 unidentified Inocybe ITS sequences corresponding to 98 species were recovered, 32% of which were successfully identified to species level in this study. These sequences account for an unexpectedly large proportion of the publicly available unidentified fungal ITS sequences when compared with other mycorrhizal genera. Eight Inocybe species were reported from multiple hosts and some even from hosts forming arbutoid or orchid mycorrhizae. Furthermore, Inocybe sequences have been reported from four continents and in climate zones ranging from cold temperate to equatorial climate. Out of the 19 species found in more than one study, six were found in both Europe and North America and one was found in both Europe and Japan, indicating that at least many north temperate species have a wide distribution. Although DNA-based species identification and circumscription are associated

  2. Comparative Genomics of the Ectomycorrhizal Sister Species Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus (Basidiomycota: Boletales) Reveals a Divergence of the Mating Type B Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujic, Alija Bajro; Kuo, Alan; Tritt, Andrew; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; Sharma, Aditi; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    Divergence of breeding system plays an important role in fungal speciation. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, however, pose a challenge for the study of reproductive biology because most cannot be mated under laboratory conditions. To overcome this barrier, we sequenced the draft genomes of the ectomycorrhizal sister species Rhizopogon vinicolor Smith and Zeller and R. vesiculosus Smith and Zeller (Basidiomycota, Boletales)—the first genomes available for Basidiomycota truffles—and characterized gene content and organization surrounding their mating type loci. Both species possess a pair of homeodomain transcription factor homologs at the mating type A-locus as well as pheromone receptor and pheromone precursor homologs at the mating type B-locus. Comparison of Rhizopogon genomes with genomes from Boletales, Agaricales, and Polyporales revealed synteny of the A-locus region within Boletales, but several genomic rearrangements across orders. Our findings suggest correlation between gene content at the B-locus region and breeding system in Boletales with tetrapolar species possessing more diverse gene content than bipolar species. Rhizopogon vinicolor possesses a greater number of B-locus pheromone receptor and precursor genes than R. vesiculosus, as well as a pair of isoprenyl cysteine methyltransferase genes flanking the B-locus compared to a single copy in R. vesiculosus. Examination of dikaryotic single nucleotide polymorphisms within genomes revealed greater heterozygosity in R. vinicolor, consistent with increased rates of outcrossing. Both species possess the components of a heterothallic breeding system with R. vinicolor possessing a B-locus region structure consistent with tetrapolar Boletales and R. vesiculosus possessing a B-locus region structure intermediate between bipolar and tetrapolar Boletales. PMID:28450370

  3. Comparative Genomics of the Ectomycorrhizal Sister Species Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus (Basidiomycota: Boletales Reveals a Divergence of the Mating Type B Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alija Bajro Mujic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Divergence of breeding system plays an important role in fungal speciation. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, however, pose a challenge for the study of reproductive biology because most cannot be mated under laboratory conditions. To overcome this barrier, we sequenced the draft genomes of the ectomycorrhizal sister species Rhizopogon vinicolor Smith and Zeller and R. vesiculosus Smith and Zeller (Basidiomycota, Boletales—the first genomes available for Basidiomycota truffles—and characterized gene content and organization surrounding their mating type loci. Both species possess a pair of homeodomain transcription factor homologs at the mating type A-locus as well as pheromone receptor and pheromone precursor homologs at the mating type B-locus. Comparison of Rhizopogon genomes with genomes from Boletales, Agaricales, and Polyporales revealed synteny of the A-locus region within Boletales, but several genomic rearrangements across orders. Our findings suggest correlation between gene content at the B-locus region and breeding system in Boletales with tetrapolar species possessing more diverse gene content than bipolar species. Rhizopogon vinicolor possesses a greater number of B-locus pheromone receptor and precursor genes than R. vesiculosus, as well as a pair of isoprenyl cysteine methyltransferase genes flanking the B-locus compared to a single copy in R. vesiculosus. Examination of dikaryotic single nucleotide polymorphisms within genomes revealed greater heterozygosity in R. vinicolor, consistent with increased rates of outcrossing. Both species possess the components of a heterothallic breeding system with R. vinicolor possessing a B-locus region structure consistent with tetrapolar Boletales and R. vesiculosus possessing a B-locus region structure intermediate between bipolar and tetrapolar Boletales.

  4. Biogeography of Hysterangiales (Phallomycetidae, Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentaro Hosaka; Michael A. Castellano; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2008-01-01

    To understand the biogeography of truffle-like fungi, DNA sequences were analysed from representative taxa of Hysterangiales. Multigene phylogenies and the results of ancestral area reconstructions are consistent with the hypothesis of an Australian, or eastern Gondwanan, origin of Hysterangiales with subsequent range expansions to the Northern Hemisphere. However,...

  5. Phylogeny and diversity of Fomitiporella (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ji, X.H.; Vlasák, Josef; Zhou, L.-W.; Wu, F.; Dai, Y.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 2 (2017), s. 308-322 ISSN 0027-5514 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : phylloporia hymenochaetales * nov hymenochaetales * maximum-likelihood * tropical china Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 2.550, year: 2016

  6. Agrocybe putaminum (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, New for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Agrocybe putaminum (Maire Singer, a species hitherto unknown in Poland, is reported from two localities in the southwestern part of the country, with descriptions and illustrations of the morphological characters of the newly collected basidiomata. The delimitation of A. putaminum is briefly discussed, and information on the ecology of the fungus and its world distribution is provided.

  7. Anamorphs of the Bolbitiaceae (Basidiomycota, Agaricales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Grit; Weiss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We describe and illustrate thallic conidiogenesis in 14 species of the Bolbitiaceae sensu Singer studied in culture. Conidiogenesis of 12 species is shown for the first time. Bolbitius vitellinus and the investigated species of Conocybe (C. albipes, C. appendiculata, C. magnicapitata, C. semiglobata, C. subovalis, C. subpubescens, C. sulcatipes and C. teneroides) possessed a similar mode of conidiogenesis. Species of both genera formed mostly coiled conidiogenous hyphae arising sympodially from differentiated conidiophores. The anamorphs of the Agrocybe species were not uniform and predominantly differed from those of Conocybe and Bolbitius. The conidia of Agrocybe dura, A. firma and A. praecox developed by the simple fragmentation of normally branched hyphae. Sympodially proliferating conidiophores occurred in Agrocybe arvalis and A. aegerita. Secretory cells of different size and shape were found in Agrocybe and in Conocybe. Our results corroborate a close phylogenetic relationship between Bolbitius and Conocybe as well as the polyphyly of the Bolbitiaceae as currently treated, which is consistent with recent molecular phylogenetic studies. Consequently we emend the family concept based on anamorphic characters.

  8. Meottomyces dissimulans (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, new for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the first sites of Meottomyces dissimulans (Berk. & Broome Vizzini in Poland. About a dozen basidiomata in all stages of development were observed in poplar and alder-willow thickets. The macro- and micromorphological characters of the Polish specimens are described and illustrated, and the distribution of the species in Poland is given.

  9. Tricholoma ustaloides (Agaricales, Basidiomycota in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current distribution of Tricholoma ustaloides Romagn. in Poland is presented, based on literature data and the results of mycological investigations in oak-hornbeam forest associations in the Kotlina Raciborska basin. The paper reports the morphology of the discovered basidiomata, the habitat where they were found, and ITS sequence data for the specimens, and briefly discusses similar species and the ecology of the presented fungus. The location given in the paper is currently the only known station of T. ustaloides in Poland. The importance of secondary habitats for survival of this taxon is stressed.

  10. The first locality of Chalciporus rubinus (Boletales, Basidiomycota in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chalciporus rubinus (W.G. Sm. Singer, described in 1868 from England, was found in a city park in Wrocław. This is the first record of the species from Poland. Macro- and micromorphological characters of the Polish specimens are described and illustrated. The delimitation of Ch. rubinus, the knowledge of its distribution, ecology and conservation status is summarised.

  11. Hidden diversity in the Antrodia malicola group (Polyporales, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spirin, V.; Vlasák, Josef; Rivoire, B.; Kotiranta, H.; Miettinen, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2016), č. článku 51. ISSN 1617-416X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Antrodia malicola * Brown rot * Phylogeny * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.616, year: 2016

  12. Studies in the Antrodia serialis group (Polyporales, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spirin, V.; Vlasák, Josef; Miettinen, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 2 (2017), s. 217-230 ISSN 0027-5514 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : fungi * Brown-rot fungi * phylogeny * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 2.550, year: 2016

  13. Elaphroporia ailaoshanensis gen. et sp. nov. in Polyporales (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Qiang Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new poroid wood-inhabiting fungal genus, Elaphroporia, typified by E. ailaoshanensis sp. nov., is proposed based on a combination of morphological features and molecular evidence. The genus is characterised by an annual growth habit, resupinate basidiocarps, becoming rigid and light-weight up on drying, a monomitic hyphal system with thick-walled generative hyphae bearing both clamp connections and simple septa, slightly amyloid, CB+ and ellipsoid, hyaline, thin-walled, smooth and IKI–, CB– basidiospores. Sequences of ITS and LSU nrRNA gene regions of the studied samples were generated, and phylogenetic analyses were performed with maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and bayesian inference methods. The phylogenetic analysis based on molecular data of ITS+nLSU sequences showed that Elaphroporia belonged to the residual polyporoid clade and was closely related to Junghuhnia crustacea. Further investigation was obtained for more representative taxa in the Meruliaceae based on ITS+nLSU sequences, in which the result demonstrated that the genus Elaphroporia formed a monophyletic lineage with a strong support (100 % BS, 100 % BP, 1.00 BPP and then grouped with Flaviporus and Steccherinum.

  14. Trichaptum (Basidiomycota) in tropical America: a sequence study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2017), s. 1217-1227 ISSN 2077-7000 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hymenochaetales * taxonomy * Costa Rica Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 0.721, year: 2016

  15. Phellinus artemisiae sp. nov. (Basidiomycota, Hymenochaetaceae), from western USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 1 (2017), s. 93-96 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chaparral Fungi * Phellinus artemisiae sp. nov. * molecular taxonomy * Fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  16. Polypores and genus concepts in Phanerochaetaceae (Polyporales, Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Miettinen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored whether DNA-phylogeny-based and morphology-based genus concepts can be reconciled in the basidiomycete family Phanerochaetaceae. Our results show that macromorphology of fruiting bodies and hymenophore construction do not reflect monophyletic groups. However, by integrating micromorphology and re-defining genera, harmonization of DNA phylogeny and morphological genus concepts is possible in most cases. In the case of one genus (Phlebiopsis, our genetic markers could not resolve genus limits satisfactorily and a clear morphological definition could not be identified. We combine extended species sampling, microscopic studies of fruiting bodies and phylogenetic analyses of ITS, nLSU and rpb1 to revise genus concepts. Three new polypore genera are ascribed to the Phanerochaetaceae: Oxychaete gen. nov. (type Oxyporus cervinogilvus, Phanerina gen. nov. (type Ceriporia mellea, and Riopa (including Ceriporia metamorphosa and Riopa pudens sp. nov.. Phlebiopsis is extended to include Dentocorticium pilatii, further species of Hjortstamia and the monotypic polypore genus Castanoporus. The polypore Ceriporia inflata is combined into Phanerochaete. The identity of the type species of the genus Riopa, R. davidii, has been misinterpreted in the current literature. The species has been included in Ceriporia as a species of its own or placed in synonymy with Ceriporia camaresiana. The effort to properly define R. davidii forced us to study Ceriporia more widely. In the process we identified five closely related Ceriporia species that belong to the true Ceriporia clade (Irpicaceae. We describe those species here, and introduce the Ceriporia pierii group. We also select a lectotype and an epitype for Riopa metamorphosa and neotypes for Sporotrichum aurantiacum and S. aurantium, the type species of the anamorphic genus Sporotrichum, and recommend that teleomorphic Riopa is conserved against it.

  17. Porodaedalea chinensis (Hymenochaetaceae, Basidiomycota) a new polypore from China

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, S. J.; Vlasák, Josef; Tomšovský, M.; Wu, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2017), s. 986-993 ISSN 2077-7000 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : phellinus-pini group * Hymenochaetales * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 0.721, year: 2016

  18. Species diversity in the Antrodia crassa group (Polyporales, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spirin, V.; Runnel, K.; Vlasák, Josef; Miettinen, O.; Pöldmaa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 12 (2015), s. 1291-1310 ISSN 1878-6146 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Host specificity * Wood-inhabiting fungi * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.244, year: 2015

  19. A new species of Phlebopus (Botales, Basidiomycota) from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy J. Baroni; Joaquin Cifuentes; Beatriz Ortiz Santana; Silvia Cappello

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Phlebopus mexicanus, is described from southern tropical rainforests of Mexico based on morphological and molecular characters. Several features distinguish this species from others of Phlebopus including the medium to small basidiomata with olivaceous brown tomentose pileus that becomes finely areolate cracked with age, the dark...

  20. Panaeolus subfirmus (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, a species new for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Panaeolus subfirmus P. Karst. is reported for the first time from Poland, and described and illustrated based on Polish specimens. Its ecology, general distribution and taxonomy are also presented. A key for determination all Polish species of Panaeolus (Fr. Quél. is provided.

  1. Entoloma albotomentosum (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, a species new to Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Entoloma albotomentosum Noordel. & Hauskn., a member of the subgenus Claudopus and section Claudopus, is reported from Poland. A full description and illustration of the species based on Polish specimens are given and its taxonomy, ecology, and general distribution are also provided.

  2. Cortinarius sect. Brunnei (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) in North Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Tuula; Kytövuori, Ilkka; Liimatainen, Kare

    2009-02-01

    The section Brunnei was extensively studied based on material from North Europe. To stabilise the nomenclature we studied the relevant types of taxa included in this section. Phylogenetic relationships and species limits were investigated using rDNA ITS sequences and the results were compared with the morphological data. We recognised 11 species: Cortinarius brunneus, C. clarobrunneus comb. nov., C. coleoptera, C. ectypus, C. gentilis, C. glandicolor (neotypified), C. pseudorubricosus, and four species described as new C. caesiobrunneus, C. albogaudis, C. carabus, and C. cicindela. They are described here and their taxonomy, ecology, distribution, and relationships are discussed. In addition, a key to species of the section Brunnei is provided. A total of 77 new sequences of 11 species are published including nine type sequences. Also the taxonomic assignments of sequences in the public databases belonging to the section Brunnei are revised.

  3. Squamanita odorata (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, new mycoparasitic fungus for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rare and interesting fungus Squamanita odorata (Cool Imbach, a parasite on Hebeloma species, is reported for the first time from Poland, briefly described and illustrated based on Polish specimens. Its taxonomy, ecology and distribution are discussed.

  4. New localities of Protostropharia alcis (Basidiomycota, Agaricales in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides new records of Protostropharia alcis in Poland. So far this species was known in the country only from several latest localities in the Biebrza National Park (Biebrza Basin and the Kampinos National Park (Warsaw Basin. The new localities are situated in the Wigierski National Park (the East Sudetian Lake District and in the north-western slope of Mt Wierzejska (the Holy Cross Mountains, where P. alcis was collected on dung of herbivores (eurasian elk and red dear within several types of forest communities. All specimens of P. alcis were collected in recent years, from late September to early October, in the period 2012-2013. A full description and illustration of P. alcis based on gathered collections are given. Its delimitation, the knowledge of its ecology, general distribution, and threat is also briefly discussed. Based on the new and known distribution data for P. alcis in Poland, its red list category is proposed.

  5. The genus Dendrothele (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.K. Nakasone; H.H. Burdsall

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen species of Dendrothele sensu lato are confirmed from New Zealand. Nine new taxa are described: Dendrothele arachispora, D. aucklandica, D. australis, D. cymbiformis, D. leptostachys, D. magnenavicularis, D. navicularis, D. novae-zelandiae and D. subellipsoidea. Ten species were previously reported, but...

  6. Species of the genus Uromyces (Basidiomycota: Pucciniales) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... Uromyces penniseti S. Ahmad, Biologia, Lahore 6(2): 125 (1961). [1960] (Figure 3). Spermogonia and aecia not seen. Uredinia amphigenous, scattered, covered by ruptured epidermis, golden brown, naked,. 0.08 - 0.1 × 0.095 - 0.15 mm. Urediniospores globose to subglobose or ovoid, pale brown, 18 - 24 ...

  7. Noteworthy records of aphyllophoroid fungi in Finland (Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panu Kunttu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present new records of noteworthy aphyllophoroid fungi, mainly polypores and corticioids in Finland. The following 19 rare or infrequently collected species are presented with notes on their substrates: Amylocorticium subsulphureum, Antrodiella parasitica, Ceraceomyces sulphurinus, Clavaria atroumbrina, Clavaria rosea, Gloeophyllum carbonarium, Hyphodontia flavipora, Junghuhnia fimbriatella, Lindtneria chordulata, Odonticium septocystidia, Peniophorella guttulifera, Perenniporia tenuis, Postia immitis, Repetobasidium vile, Resinicium pinicola, Sidera vulgaris, Tomentella coerulea, Trechispora laevis and Xylodon pruni. We also list 41 aphyllophoroid fungi as new to some sections of the boreal vegetation zone in Finland.

  8. Callistosporium pinicola (Basidiomycota, a fungus species new to Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Basidiomata of Callistosporium pinicola were collected in years 2012–2013, on strongly decayed fallen trunks of Picea abies and Abies alba on two remote sites, localized in North-eastern and southern Poland. These localities represent the first records of this fungus in Poland. A full description and illustration of C. pinicola based on Polish specimens are provided and the distinguishing features and delimitation of the species are briefly discussed. The ecology of C. pinicola, its general distribution and threat are also presented. As all specimens of C. pinicola were collected only in recent years we suggest that this species is increasing its distribution in Poland. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that, because of its cryptic nature, C. pinicola has been much overlooked in the past.

  9. A revised family-level classification of the Polyporales (Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredo Justo; Otto Miettinen; Dimitrios Floudas; Beatriz Ortiz-Santana; Elisabet Sjökvist; Daniel Lindner; Karen Nakasone; Tuomo Niemelä; Karl-Henrik Larsson; Leif Ryvarden; David S. Hibbett

    2017-01-01

    Polyporales is strongly supported as a clade of Agaricomycetes, but the lack of a consensus higher-level classification within the group is a barrier to further taxonomic revision. We amplified nrLSU, nrITS, and rpb1 genes across the Polyporales, with a special focus on the latter. We...

  10. Species of the genus Uromyces (Basidiomycota: Pucciniales) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During a survey of rust fungi from Leepa Valley, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJ and K), Pakistan, four species of Uromyces were found parasitizing four plant species. These include Uromyces appendiculatus on Vigna mungo, Uromyces capitatus on Desmodium elegans, Uromyces penniseti on Pennisetum lanatum and ...

  11. Smut fungi (Ustilaginomycetes and Microbotryales, Basidiomycota in Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Piepenbring

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the first publication dedicated to the diversity of smut fungi in Panama bases on field work, the study of herbarium specimens, and referentes taken from literatura. It includes smuts parasitizing cultivated and wild plants. The latter are mostly found in rural vegetation. Among the 24 species cites here, 14 species are recorded for the first time for Panama. One of them, Sporisorium ovarium, is observes for the first time in Central America. Entyloma spilanthis is found on the host species Acmella papposa var. macrophylla (Asteraceae for the first time. Entyloma costaricense and Entyloma ecuadorense are considered synonyms of Entyloma compositarum and Entyloma spilanthis respectively. For the new conbination Sponsorium panamensis see note at the end of this publication. Descriptions of the species are complemented by some illustrations, a checklist, and a key.Esta es la primera publicación dedicada a la diversidad de carbones en Panamá. Tiene su base en trabajo de campo, estudio de especímenes herborizados y referencias de la literatura. Se incluyen carbones patógenos de plantas cultivadas y silvestres. Las últimas se encontraron sobre todo en zonas rurales. Entre las 24 especies citadas en este estudio, 14 especies son primeros registros para Panamá y una de éstas, Sporisorium ovarium, para América Central. Se encontró Entyloma spilanthis por primera vez en la planta hospedera Acmella papposa var.macrophylla (Asteraceac. Entyloma costaricense y Entyloma ecuadorense son sinónimos de Entyloma compositarum y Entyloma spilanthis respectivamente. "Sphacelotheca" panamensis es una especie dudosa. Se complementan las descripciones de las especies con algunas ilustraciones, una lista de especies y una clave.

  12. Two new species of Fulvifomes (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota) from America

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ji, X.H.; Wu, F.; Dai, Y.C.; Vlasák, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, May 02 (2017), s. 1-13 ISSN 1314-4057 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tree xylocarpus-granatum * thailand * phylogeny * china Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  13. Catálogo de hongos gasteroides (Basidiomycota de Catamarca, Argentina Catalogue of gasteroid fungi (Basidiomycota from Catamarca, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marta Dios

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un listado de los hongos gasteroides de la provincia de Catamarca (Argentina basado en la bibliografía hasta abril de 2010. En total aparecen citadas 43 especies distribuidas en 2 órdenes, 4 familias y 13 géneros. El número de especies catalogadas es relativamente baja pero este número probablemente se incremente cuando se estudien las zonas aún no muestreadas como son las regiones fitogeográfícas de la Puna y las Yungas.A compiled check list of gasteroid fungi of Catamarca Province (Argentina was made. It was based on literature records, available until April 2010. There were 43 species of fungi distributed in 2 orders, 4 families and 13 genera. The number of species recorded in this area was relatively poor but it is likely to increase with the study of unexplored areas not yet surveyed as the phytogeographical regions of the Puna and Yungas.

  14. Dos especies nuevas del género Phellinus (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota en México Two new species of the genus Phellinus ((Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota from México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Raymundo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen por primera vez para la ciencia, los caracteres morfológicos macroscópicos y microscópicos de 2 especies resupinadas del género Phellinus encontradas en vegetación tropical de México: Phellinus guzmanii y Phellinus herrerae. La primera se registra en la Reserva de la Biosfera de la Sierra Gorda en el estado de Querétaro y presenta esporas subglobosas a elipsoides, amarillentas y setas hifales en el margen del basidioma; la segunda se recolectó en la Reserva de la Biosfera de Calakmul en el estado de Campeche y se caracteriza por presentar esporas oblongo-elipsoides, amarillo-doradas a café amarillentas y grandes. Los ejemplares estudiados están depositados en los Herbarios ENCB con duplicados en FCME, MEXU y XAL.The macroscopic and microscopic morphological characters of 2 resupinate species of the genus Phellinus collected in tropical vegetation from Mexico are described for the first time, Phellinus guzmanii and Phellinus herrerae. The first species was collected from Sierra Gorda Biosphere Reserve in Querétaro State and has subglobose to ellipsoid and yellowish spores and hyphal setae on the margin of the basidiomata; the latter species was collected in the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve in Campeche State and is characterized by its large oblong-ellipsoid golden yellow to yellowish brown spores. The studied specimens were deposited in the ENCB herbarium with duplicates in FCME, MEXU, and XAL.

  15. Dos especies nuevas del género Phellinus (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota) en México Two new species of the genus Phellinus ((Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota) from México

    OpenAIRE

    Tania Raymundo; Ricardo Valenzuela; Joaquín Cifuentes

    2008-01-01

    Se describen por primera vez para la ciencia, los caracteres morfológicos macroscópicos y microscópicos de 2 especies resupinadas del género Phellinus encontradas en vegetación tropical de México: Phellinus guzmanii y Phellinus herrerae. La primera se registra en la Reserva de la Biosfera de la Sierra Gorda en el estado de Querétaro y presenta esporas subglobosas a elipsoides, amarillentas y setas hifales en el margen del basidioma; la segunda se recolectó en la Reserva de la Biosfera de Cala...

  16. Host-exclusivity and host-recurrence by wood decay fungi (Basidiomycota - Agaricomycetes in Brazilian mangroves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgea S. Nogueira-Melo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to investigate for the first time the ecological interactions between species of Agaricomycetes and their host plants in Brazilian mangroves. Thirty-two field trips were undertaken to four mangroves in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, from April 2009 to March 2010. One 250 x 40 m stand was delimited in each mangrove and six categories of substrates were artificially established: living Avicennia schaueriana (LA, dead A. schaueriana (DA, living Rhizophora mangle (LR, dead R. mangle (DR, living Laguncularia racemosa (LL and dead L. racemosa (DL. Thirty-three species of Agaricomycetes were collected, 13 of which had more than five reports and so were used in statistical analyses. Twelve species showed significant values for fungal-plant interaction: one of them was host-exclusive in DR, while five were host-recurrent on A. schauerianna; six occurred more in dead substrates, regardless the host species. Overall, the results were as expected for environments with low plant species richness, and where specificity, exclusivity and/or recurrence are more easily seen. However, to properly evaluate these relationships, mangrove ecosystems cannot be considered homogeneous since they can possess different plant communities, and thus different types of fungal-plant interactions.

  17. Inbreeding depression in urban environments of the bird's nest fungus Cyathus stercoreus (Nidulariaceae: Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloure, B D; James, T Y

    2013-04-01

    Many organisms display codispersal of offspring, but fewer display codispersal of compatible gametes. This mechanism enhances the ability of a species to colonize after long distance dispersal as a mechanism of reproductive assurance, but it also fosters inbreeding and potential reduction in fitness. Here we investigated both long distance dispersal and inbreeding in the bird's nest fungus Cyathus stercoreus, a dung and mulch-associated fungus with a splash cup fruiting body appearing like a miniature bird's nest of 'eggs' or peridioles that contain thousands of mating compatible meiotic spores. To investigate the genetic structure in the species, six North American urban populations were hierarchically sampled and genotyped using 10 microsatellite markers. We detected significant levels of inbreeding through heterozygote deficiencies at four loci, with global FIS=0.061. Dispersal limitation was suggested by both spatial autocorrelation and the detection of population structure between Louisiana and Michigan using clustering and F-statistics. Although inbreeding may facilitate colonization by the fungus, it has a negative effect on the fitness of populations as estimated from a 15% reduction in growth rates of inbred strains relative to outcrossed. Mating tests revealed that C. stercoreus has a higher estimated number of mating-type alleles (MAT-A= 39, MAT-B= 24) than other species of bird's nest fungi, which would increase its outcrossing efficiency. We speculate that the increased number of mating-type alleles is the result of a recent range and population size expansion into urban environments.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the medicinal fungus Ganoderma applanatum (Polyporales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Shao, Junjie; Liu, Chang

    2016-07-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the medicinal fungus Ganoderma applanatum (Pers.) Pat. using the next-generation sequencing technology. The circular molecule is 119,803 bp long with a GC content of 26.66%. Gene prediction revealed genes encoding 15 conserved proteins, 25 tRNAs, the large and small ribosomal RNAs, all genes are located on the same strand except trnW-CCA. Compared with previously sequenced genomes of G. lucidum, G. meredithiae and G. sinense, the order of the protein and rRNA genes is highly conserved; however, the types of tRNA genes are slightly different. The mitochondrial genome of G. applanatum will contribute to the understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of Ganoderma and Ganodermataceae, the group containing many species with high medicinal values.

  19. Mycena Juniperina (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, New for the Polish and Central European Mycobiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halama Marek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycena juniperina Aronsen was collected in March 2013 in the Origano-Brachypodietum association from trunks of living Juniperus communis in the Pieniny Mts (S Poland. The species is described and illustrated based on Polish specimens, its ecology and general distribution are outlined, and it is compared with similar species: M. meliigena (Berk. & Cooke Sacc., M. pseudocorticola Kühner, and others.

  20. Antrodia multiformis and A-tenerifensis spp. nov (Fomitopsidaceae, Basidiomycota): new brown rot polypores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kout, J.; Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2017), s. 737-742 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : diversity * usa * nuLSU Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 1.616, year: 2016

  1. A molecular analysis reveals hidden species diversity within the current concept of Russula maculata (Russulaceae, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamčík, S.; Caboň, M.; Eberhardt, U.; Saba, M.; Hampe, F.; Slovák, M.; Kleine, J.; Marxmüller, H.; Jančovičová, S.; Pfister, D.H.; Khalid, A. N.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Marhold, K.; Verbeken, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 270, č. 2 (2016), s. 71-88 ISSN 1179-3155 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : DNA barcode * ectomycorrhizal fungi * morphology Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  2. Possible Tyromyces fissilis (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) co-infection in a lung transplant recipient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrenková, V.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Hubáček, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2015), s. 33-35 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : fungal diseases * Tyromyces fissilis * cystic fibrosis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2015

  3. Patterns of vegetative growth and gene flow in Rhizopogon vinicolor and R. vesiculosus (Boletales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette M. Kretzer; Susie Dunham; Randy Molina; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2005-01-01

    We have collected sporocarps and tuberculate ectomycorrhizae of both Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus from three 50 x 100 m plots located at Mary's Peak in the Oregon Coast Range (USA); linear map distances between plots ranged from c. 1 km to c. 5.5 km. Six and...

  4. Molecular phylogenetics and delimitation of species in Cortinarius section Calochroi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Jeppesen, Thomas Stjernegaard; Laessøe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    types were identical to other taxa, and most of these can be readily treated as synonyms. This emphasizes the importance of critical analysis of collections before describing new taxa. The phylogenetic separation of species was, in general, unambiguous and there is considerable potential for using ITS......Cortinarius is the most species rich genus of mushroom forming fungi with an estimated 2000 spp. worldwide. However, species delimitation within the genus is often controversial. This is particularly true in the section Calochroi (incl. section Fulvi), where the number of accepted taxa in Europe...... ranges between c.60 and c.170 according to different taxonomic schools. Here, we evaluated species delimitation within this taxonomically difficult group of species and estimated their phylogenetic relationships. Species were delimited by phylogenetic inference and by comparison of ITS sequence data...

  5. Phellinidium asiaticum sp nova (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota), the Asian kin of P. fragrans and P pouzarii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, L.-W.; Spirin, V.; Vlasák, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2014), s. 167-172 ISSN 0003-3847 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Antrodiella-Americana * Maximum-likelihood * Mixed Models * Taxa Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.698, year: 2014

  6. Hispidaedalea gen. nov and Griseoporia taiwanense sp nov (Gloeophyllales, Basidiomycota) based on morphological and molecular characters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, S.H.; Vlasák, Josef; Dai, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2014), s. 833-839 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Brown rot * Hispidaedalea * Wood-decaying fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.913, year: 2014

  7. The identity of Postia lowei (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) and notes on related or similar species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vampola, P.; Ordynets, A.; Vlasák, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2014), s. 39-52 ISSN 1211-0981 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Postia * polypores * internal transcribed spacer * taxonomy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Pholiota chocenensis-a new European species of section Spumosae (Basidiomycota, Strophariaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Bizio, E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2014), s. 399-406 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungi * Agaricales * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.913, year: 2014

  9. The Phylogenetic Position of Osteina obducta (Polyporales, Basidiomycota) Based on Samples from Northern Hemisphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cui, B.-K.; Vlasák, Josef; Dai, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 4 (2014), s. 838-845 ISSN 0125-2526 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Perenniporia polyporales * taxonomy * genus * China Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.371, year: 2014

  10. Phylogenetic and morphological comparison of Pluteus variabilicolor and P. castri (Basidiomycota, Agaricales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzi, Tomaso; Vizzini, Alfredo; Ercole, Enrico; Migliozzi, Vincenzo; Justo, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    Based on several collections from Italy, a detailed description (including also macrophotographs, microphotographs, and drawings) of the morphological characters of the poorly known Pluteus variabilicolor, originally described from Hungary, is provided. The analysis of the ITS sequences placed this species within the P. leoninus clade of sect. Hispidoderma, in spite of the presence of clavate elements in the pileipellis. According to the molecular comparison of the type collections, Pluteus castri, a species recently described on the basis of material collected in Japan and Central Russia, is reduced to a synonym of P. variabilicolor.

  11. A new taxon in the Infundibulicybe gibba complex (Basidiomycota, Agaricales, Tricholomataceae) from Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, Alfredo; Contu, Marco; Musumeci, Enzo; Ercole, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A new species of Infundibulicybe (viz. I. mediterranea sp. nov.) is described from Sardinia based both on morphological and molecular ITS data. The species, a close ally of I. gibba, differs from the latter in the darker tinges of the basidiomata, the stipe, which is nearly concolorous with the pileus, and smaller basidiospores. Drawings of the main micro-morphological features as well as a color photograph of fresh basidiomata in situ are provided.

  12. New luminescent mycenoid fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Perry, Brian A; Stevani, Cassius V

    Four species of mycenoid fungi are reported as luminescent (or putatively luminescent) on the basis of specimens collected from São Paulo State, Brazil. Two of them represent new species (Mycena oculisnymphae, Resinomycena petarensis), and two represent new reports of luminescence in previously described species (M. deformis, M. globulispora). Comprehensive descriptions, illustrations, photographs, and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. Sequences of nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions were generated for barcoding purposes and for comparisons with similar species.

  13. Molecular phylogenetics and delimitation of species in Cortinarius section Calochroi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Jeppesen, Thomas Stjernegaard; Laessøe, Thomas; Kjøller, Rasmus

    2007-07-01

    Cortinarius is the most species rich genus of mushroom forming fungi with an estimated 2000 spp. worldwide. However, species delimitation within the genus is often controversial. This is particularly true in the section Calochroi (incl. section Fulvi), where the number of accepted taxa in Europe ranges between c.60 and c.170 according to different taxonomic schools. Here, we evaluated species delimitation within this taxonomically difficult group of species and estimated their phylogenetic relationships. Species were delimited by phylogenetic inference and by comparison of ITS sequence data in combination with morphological characters. A total of 421 ITS sequences were analyzed, including data from 53 type specimens. The phylogenetic relationships of the identified species were estimated by analyzing ITS data in combination with sequence data from the two largest subunits of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2). Seventy-nine species were identified, which are believed to constitute the bulk of the diversity of this group in Europe. The delimitation of species based on ITS sequences is more consistent with a conservative morphological species concept for most groups. ITS sequence data from 30 of the 53 types were identical to other taxa, and most of these can be readily treated as synonyms. This emphasizes the importance of critical analysis of collections before describing new taxa. The phylogenetic separation of species was, in general, unambiguous and there is considerable potential for using ITS sequence data as a barcode for the group. A high level of homoplasy and phenotypic plasticity was observed for morphological and ecological characters. Whereas most species and several minor lineages can be recognized by morphological and ecological character states, these same states are poor indicators at higher levels.

  14. New records of agaricoid fungi (Basidiomycota from Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altielys Casale Magnago

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a list of eighteen species of agaricoid fungi collected in the Atlantic Forest in the state of Paraíba. Hygrocybe subcaespitosa and Marasmius similis are new records for Brazil. Sixteen species are new records for Paraíba.

  15. Plunging hands into the mushroom jar: a phylogenetic framework for Lyophyllaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, J-M; Moreau, P-A; Corriol, G; Bidaud, A; Chalange, R; Dudova, Z; Richard, F

    2015-04-01

    During the last two decades, the unprecedented development of molecular phylogenetic tools has propelled an opportunity to revisit the fungal kingdom under an evolutionary perspective. Mycology has been profoundly changed but a sustained effort to elucidate large sections of the astonishing fungal diversity is still needed. Here we fill this gap in the case of Lyophyllaceae, a species-rich and ecologically diversified family of mushrooms. Assembly and genealogical concordance multigene phylogenetic analysis of a large dataset that includes original, vouchered material from expert field mycologists reveal the phylogenetic topology of the family, from higher (generic) to lower (species) levels. A comparative analysis of the most widely used phylogenetic markers in Fungi indicates that the nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, along with the 5.8S rDNA (ITS) and portions of the genes for RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) is the most performing combination to resolve the broadest range of taxa within Lyophyllaceae. Eleven distinct evolutionary lineages are identified, that display partial overlap with traditional genera as well as with the phylogenetic framework previously proposed for the family. Eighty phylogenetic species are delineated, which shed light on a large number of morphological concepts, including rare and poorly documented ones. Probing these novel phylogenetic species to the barcoding method of species limit delineation, indicates that the latter method fully resolves Lyophyllaceae species, except in one clade. This case study provides the first comprehensive phylogenetic overview of Lyophyllaceae, a necessary step towards a taxonomical, ecological and nomenclatural revision of this family of mushrooms. It also proposes a set of methodological guidelines that may be of relevance for future taxonomic works in other groups of Fungi.

  16. Tricholomopsis flammula (Basidiomycota, Agaricales)—molecular taxonomy, delimitation, variability and ecology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2011), s. 93-99 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Tricholomopsis * Europe * Nuclear rDNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.554, year: 2011

  17. Taxonomy and phylogeny of Pluteus glaucotinctus sensu lato (Agaricales, Basidiomycota), a multicontinental species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson Menolli; Alfredo Justo; Pedro Arrillaga; C.K. Pradeep; Andrew M. Minnis; Marina. Capelari

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand species delimitation in the Pluteus glaucotinctus species complex, we present a detailed study based on morphological and DNA sequence (nrITS + tef1) data. Pluteus glaucotinctus sensu stricto is known only from the type collection (Democratic Republic of the Congo), which is re-...

  18. A gilled mushroom, Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. (Basidiomycota: Agaricales), in Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, George

    2016-09-01

    A densely scaled small mushroom in Baltic amber is described as Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. and is characterized by a convex pileus 1.0 mm in diameter, distant to subdistant lamellae with smooth margins and a centrally inserted cylindrical, solid stipe. Its taxonomic placement is uncertain. This is the first mushroom described from Baltic amber. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Evaluation of Psilocybe cubensis (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) toxicity over Artemia franciscana (Crustacea, Anostraca)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Villasante, Fernando; Ruiz-González, Luis Eduardo; Guerrero-Galván, Saúl Rogelio; Guzmán-Dávalos, Laura

    2013-01-03

    Psilocybe cubensis is a species with psychodysleptic action that grows on cattle dung in pastures in the tropics and subtropics. This fungus has been widely used in Mexico since ancient times both for ceremonies and rituals, as well as for healing or medicinal purposes. Artemia franciscana is a crustacean frequently used as a model organism for toxicity testing. With the objective of determining the toxicity of P. cubensis, the results of a study with the extract of P. cubensis on nauplii and adults of the brine shrimp A. franciscana are presented. Specimens were collected at Bahía de Banderas, Jalisco, Mexico, and were dried and homogenized in artificial sea water. Bioassays were carried out on crystal vials filled with different concentrations of the extract of P. cubensis (EAP), and with potassium dichromate as reference toxic compound. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) in nauplii and adults and the inhibition of cysts hatching in A. franciscana were calculated. Nauplii showed a LC(50) = 135 μg/ml, while adults a LC(50) = 172 μg/ml. Cysts' hatching was inhibited by the EAP at all tested concentrations. Under the conditions of this study, the extract of P. cubensis was toxic for nauplii and adults of A. franciscana. Copyright © 2011 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. The enigmatic Squamanita odorata (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) is parasitic on Hebeloma mesophaeum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondiet, Nicolas; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Selosse, Marc-André

    2007-05-01

    Squamanita odorata is an agaric which is parasitic on unrecognizable, previously unidentifiable sporophores of a fungal host that is transformed into galls at the bases of the parasite's sporophore. Amplification and sequencing portions of the nuclear (ITS) and mt rDNA from three samplings originating from two sites (from France and from Switzerland) demonstrate that the galls produce sequences that are identical to that of co-occurring Hebeloma mesophaeum. This demonstrates that S. odorata is a biotrophic parasite on Hebeloma mesophaeum.

  1. In vitro wood decay of teak (Tectona grandis by Rigidoporus cf. microporus (Meripiliaceae, Polyporales, Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sarmiento S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of exotic species like teak for industry demands has increased over the last decades in Central America, however its vulnerability to decay by saprophytic fungi has not been well studied. Among these fungi, Rigidoporus spp. have been described as white rotters of dead hardwoods and conifers worldwide. In Costa Rica, R. microporus has been found growing on teak stumps. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of this white rot fungus on the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of teak wood from trees of different ages. Six and ten year old sapwood and heartwood samples were used in the assays. Severe anatomical damage and the highest weight and resistance losses were observed on 6 yr. old sapwood samples. There was an increase in the quantity of soluble materials in 1% NaOH (relative values and lignin content in all the samples analyzed, after 3 months exposure and up to the end of the experiment. Mass loss reduction and increased resistance of wood to compressive strength parallel to the grain were related to both the type of wood and the age of the tree. Knowledge of the potential damage that this fungus can cause to teak wood might help in a better selection of wood and developing more effective protection measures against decay in the field or in construction wood.

  2. Daedalea americana sp nov (Polyporales, Basidiomycota) evidenced by morphological characters and phylogenetic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Han, M.L.; Vlasák, Josef; Cui, B.-K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 204, č. 4 (2015), s. 277-286 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : brown-rot fungi * taxonomy * Fomitopsidaceae * Phylogeny Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2015

  3. Rubroboletus le-galiae (Boletales, Basidiomycota, a species new for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubroboletus le-galiae is reported for the first time from Poland. Macro- and micromorphological characters of the species are described and illustrated based on the study of material collected at three microlocalities in Łężczok reserve (SW Poland. The delimitation of R. le-galiae from related species of the genus Rubroboletus (R. satans, R. rubrosanguineus, R. rhodoxanthus is shortly discussed and the knowledge of its ecology and distribution is briefly summarized.

  4. Taxonomy and phylogeny of Lopharia s.s., Dendrodontia, Dentocorticium and Fuscocerrena (Basidiomycota, Polyporales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Liang Liu; Karen K. Nakasone; Sheng-Hua Wu; Shuang-Hui He; Yu-Cheng. Dai

    2018-01-01

    Eleven taxa of Lopharia s.s., Dendrodontia, Dentocorticium and Fuscocerrena in Polyporales are included in the phylogenetic analyses of nuc rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS), D1-D2 domains of nuc 28S rDNA (28S) and RNA polymerase II second-largest subunit (rpb2) sequences. New species Lopharia resupinata...

  5. Notes on two species of Diplomitoporus (Basidiomycota, Polyporaceae) of Central America

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kout, J.; Vlasák, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2010), s. 9-14 ISSN 1870-3453 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Polyporaceae * Poliporoid fungi * Belize * Guatemala Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2010

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the white-rot fungus Ganoderma meredithiae (Polyporales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Wu, Kai; Chen, Haimei; Shao, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Xiangdong; Lan, Jin; Liu, Chang

    2016-11-01

    Complete nucleotide sequence of the 78,447 bp mitochondrial genome of the white-rotting fungus Ganoderma meredithiae Adask. & Gilb. has been determined by next-generation sequencing technology. The circular molecule encodes a set of mitochondrial protein and RNA genes, including 15 conserved proteins, 29 tRNAs, large and small ribosomal RNAs, and 18 homing endonucleases, with a GC content of 26.14%. All structural genes are located on the same strand except trnW-CCA. Compared with previously sequenced mtDNAs of G. lucidum and G. sinense, the gene order of protein and rRNA genes among the three mitogenomes is highly conserved; however, the tRNA composition is slightly different. The mitochondrial genome of G. meredithiae will contribute to understanding the phylogeny and evolution of Ganoderma and Ganodermataceae, the group containing many species with high medicinal values.

  7. Wood decay fungus Flavodon ambrosius (Basidiomycota: Polyporales) is widely farmed by two genera of ambrosia beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    You Li; Craig Christopher Bateman; James Skelton; Michelle Alice Jusino; Zachary John Nolen; David Rabern Simmons; Jiri Hulcr

    2017-01-01

    The ambrosia fungus Flavodon ambrosius is the primary nutritional mutualist of ambrosia beetles Ambrosiodmus and Ambrosiophilus in North America. F. ambrosius is the only known ambrosial basidiomycete, unique in its efficient lignocellulose degradation. F. ambrosius is associated with...

  8. GENERALIDADES DE LOS UREDINALES(Fungi: Basidiomycota Y DE SUS RELACIONES FILOGENÉTICAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALINA MARÍA ZULUAGA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Los hongos-roya (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes representan uno de los grupos de microorganismos fitoparásitos más diversos y con mayor importancia económica mundial en la producción agrícola y forestal. Se caracterizan por ser patógenos obligados y por presentar una estrecha coevolución con sus hospedantes vegetales. Su taxonomía se ha basado fundamentalmente en el estudio de caracteres morfológicos, resultando en muchos casos en la formación de taxones polifiléticos. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se han tratado de incorporar herramientas moleculares que conduzcan a la generación de sistemas de clasificación basados en afinidades evolutivas. En esta revisión se ofrece una mirada general a las características de los uredinales, enfatizando en el surgimiento reciente de estudios filogenéticos que plantean la necesidad de establecer una profunda revisión de la taxonomía de este grupo. Finalmente se alerta sobre la necesidad de que en dichos estudios taxonómicos se incluya un alto número de especies de royas neotropicales, pues esta zona es reconocida no sólo por su alta diversidad de hongos-royas, sino también por las características únicas de sus ciclos de vida. Palabras clave: filogenia, hongos-roya, Puccinia, secuenciación, teliosporas. ABSTRACT Rust fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycetes are one of the most diverse and economically important plant pathogens of crops world-wide. They are obligated parasites and have a close evolutionary relationship with their plant hosts. Taxonomy of this group has been based on morphological treats, resulting in generation of polyphyletic taxa. Recently, different studies have incorporated molecular techniques addressed to establishing evolutionary affinities between these fungi. This review presents a general view of the biological characteristics of rust fungi, with a detailed discussion on the phylogenetic studies regarding the group. Finally, the review proposes the necessity to establish phylogenetic studies on rust fungi from the neotropics, where these fungi present a very high diversity and unique life cycles. Key words: phylogeny, Puccinia, rust fungi, sequencing, teliospores.

  9. Arrasia rostrata (Basidiomycota), a new corticioid genus and species from Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annarosa Bernicchia; Sergio P. Gorj& #243; n; Karen K. Nakasone

    2011-01-01

    An unusual corticioid species with distinctive large basidiospores that develop a distal refractive rostrum when fully mature is described as new. It grows on living bark of Juniperus phoenicea on the Italian island of Sardinia. Because it is morphologically distinct from any known genus of corticioid fungi, the new genus Arrasia...

  10. Studies in the Ceriporia purpurea group (Polyporales, Basidiomycota), with notes on similar Ceriporia species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spirin, V.; Vlasák, Josef; Rivoire, B.; Kout, J.; Kotiranta, H.; Miettinen, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2016), s. 421-435 ISSN 0181-1584 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Neotypifification * New species * Polypores * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.982, year: 2016

  11. Leucocoprinus Pat. (Agaricaceae, Basidiomycota no Parque Estadual de Itapuã, Viamão, RS,Brasil Leucocoprinus Pat. (Agaricaceae, Basidiomycota species in Itapuã State Park, Viamão, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Somenzi Rother

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho descreve as espécies do gênero Leucocoprinus que ocorrem no Parque Estadual de Itapuã, município de Viamão, estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Seis táxons foram encontrados: L. birnbaumii (Corda Singer, L. brebissonii (Godey Locq., L. cepistipes (Sowerby Pat., L. cretaceus (Bull. Locq., L. fragilissimus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Pat. e L. cf. medioflavus (Boud. Bon. São apresentados chave para identificação, descrições e ilustrações detalhadas dos caracteres macro e microscópicos, e comentários sobre a taxonomia e ecologia das espécies estudadas.This work describes the species of Leucocoprinus found in Itapuã State Park, Viamão municipality, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. Six species were found: L. birnbaumii (Corda Singer, L. brebissonii (Godey Locq., L. cepistipes (Sowerby Pat., L. cretaceus (Bull. Locq., L. fragilissimus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Pat. and L. cf. medioflavus (Boud. Bon. An identification key, detailed descriptions and illustrations of macro and microstructures, and comments on the taxonomy and ecology of the species are presented.

  12. Diversidade de Agaricales (Basidiomycota na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brasil Diversity of Agaricales (Basidiomycota in the Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenires Queiroz de Souza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo dos representantes da Ordem Agaricales Clements (Hymenomycetes, Basidiomycotina, ocorrentes na Reserva Biológica Walter Egler, situada na Estrada AM-010, Manaus-Itacoatiara, Km 64, Latitude 02° 43' S e Longitude 59° 47' W, Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas. A área abrange 709 ha de floresta de terra firme primária. As coletas foram realizadas no período de dezembro de 2000 a junho de 2001 e seguiu-se a metodologia usual para identificação de Agaricales. Foram estudadas um total de 39 espécies, distribuídas em 13 gêneros e seis famílias: Polyporaceae: Pleurotus sp.; Hygrophoraceae: Hygrocybe cf. megistospora, Hygrocybe aff. miniceps, Hygrocybe occidentalis var. scarletina, e mais oito espécies de Hygrocybe indeterminadas; Tricholomataceae: Clitocybe sp., Hydropus sp.1 e Hydropus sp.2, Macrocystidia sp., Marasmiellus sp., Marasmius bellus, Marasmius haedinus var. haedinus,Marasmius cf. leoninus, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. ruber,Marasmius cf. setulosifolius, Marasmius tageticolor, Marasmius cf. variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, Marasmius sp.1, Marasmius sp.2, Marasmius sp.3 e Marasmius sp.4, Tricholoma sp.; Agaricaceae: Agaricus sp.1 e Agaricus sp.2, Lepiota sp., Cystoderma sp.; Entolomataceae: Entoloma cf. azureoviride, Entoloma cf. cystidiophorum, Entoloma strigosissima, Entoloma sp.; Russulaceae: Lactarius panuoides. Destas, Entoloma azureoviride, Hygrocybe miniceps, Lactarius panuoides, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius e Marasmius variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, provavelmente, estão sendo aqui citadas pela primeira vez, para o Brasil. Com exceção de Marasmius tageticolor, as demais espécies são citadas pela primeira vez, para a Reserva Egler. São fornecidas tabelas com a ocorrência das espécies de acordo com o gradiente topográfico (baixio, vertente, platô e seus respectivos habitats.A study of the order Agaricales Clements (Hymenomycetes, Basidiomycotina, occurring in the Reserva Biológica Walter Egler was carried out from December 2000 to June 2001. The area of study is situated at Road AM-010, Manaus-Itacoatiara, km 64, Latitude 02° 43' S and Longitude 59° 47' W, Rio Preto da Eva, in the State of Amazonas, with a total area of 709 ha of terra firme rain forest. The fungi collected were identified based on traditional methodology for identification of Agaricales. A total of 39 species were studied, distributed in 13 genera and six families: Polyporaceae: Pleurotus sp.; Hygrophoraceae: Hygrocybe cf. megistospora, Hygrocybe aff. miniceps, Hygrocybe occidentalis var. scarletina and eight indeterminate species of Hygrocybe; Tricholomataceae: Clitocybe sp., Hydropus sp.1 and Hydropus sp.2, Macrocystidia sp., Marasmiellus sp., Marasmius bellus, Marasmius haedinus var. haedinus, Marasmius cf. leoninus, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. ruber, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius, Marasmius tageticolor, Marasmius cf. variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, Marasmius sp.1, Marasmius sp.2, Marasmius sp.3 and Marasmius sp.4, Tricholoma sp.; Agaricaceae: Agaricus sp.1 and Agaricus sp.2, Lepiota sp., Cystoderma sp.; Entolomataceae: Entoloma cf. azureoviride, Entoloma cf. cystidiophorum, Entoloma strigosissima, Entoloma sp.; Russulaceae: Lactarius panuoides. Entoloma azureoviride, Hygrocybe miniceps, Lactarius panuoides, Marasmius cf. mazatecus, Marasmius cf. setulosifolius and Marasmius variabiliceps var. variabiliceps, apparently are here cited for the first time from Brazil. With exception of Marasmius tageticolor, all species are cited here for the first time as occurring in Egler Forest. The tables with the species occurrence, in accordance with the topographical gradient (sand bank, incline, plateau and its respective habitat, are supplied.

  13. Agaricaceae Fr. (Agaricales, Basidiomycota from areas of Atlantic Forest in Pernambuco, Brazil Agaricaceae Fr. (Agaricales, Basidiomycota em áreas de Mata Atlântica do Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Wartchow

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The survey of Agaricaceae in areas of the Atlantic Forest in the metropolitan region of Recife, state of Pernambuco, Brazil, revealed the presence of nine species: Agaricus aff. parasilvaticus Heinem., A. purpurellus (F.H. Møller F.H. Møller, A. rufoaurantiacus Heinem., Leucoagaricus sulphurellus (Pegler B.P. Akers, Leucocoprinus cretaceus (Bull.: Fr. Locq., L. fragilissimus (Ravenel Pat., Lepiota elaiophylla Vellinga & Huijser, L. erythrosticta (Berk. & Broome Sacc. and Micropsalliota brunneosperma (Singer Pegler. A key for identification of these species, descriptions, drawings and remarks are provided. Micropsalliota brunneosperma is reported for the first time for Brazil.O levantamento de Agaricaceae em áreas de Mata Atlântica na região metropolitana de Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil, revelou a ocorrência de nove espécies: Agaricus aff. parasilvaticus Heinem., A. purpurellus (F.H. Møller F.H. Møller, A. rufoaurantiacus Heinem., Leucoagaricus sulphurellus (Pegler B.P. Akers, Leucocoprinus cretaceus (Bull.: Fr. Locq., L. fragilissimus (Ravenel Pat., Lepiota elaiophylla Vellinga & Huijser, L. erythrosticta (Berk. & Broome Sacc. e Micropsalliota brunneosperma (Singer Pegler. Chave para identificação dessas espécies, descrições, ilustrações e comentários são apresentadas. Micropsalliota brunneosperma constitui nova referência para o Brasil.

  14. Molecular evidence for long distance dispersal across the Southern Hemisphere in the Ganoderma applanatum-australe species complex (Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Buchanan, Peter K

    2008-04-01

    We examined phylogeographic relationships in the cosmopolitan polypore fungus Ganoderma applanatum and allies, and conservatively infer a possible age of origin for these fungi. Results indicate that it is very unlikely that members of this species complex diversified before the break-up of Gondwana from Laurasia ca 120M years ago, and also before the final separation of the Gondwanan landmasses from each other that was achieved about 66M years ago. An earliest possible age of origin of 30M years was estimated from nucleotide substitution rates in the 18S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic reconstruction of a worldwide sampling of ITS rDNA sequences reveals at least eight distinct clades that are strongly correlated with the geographic origin of the strains, and also correspond to mating groups. These include one Southern Hemisphere clade, one Southern Hemisphere-Eastern Asia clade, two temperate Northern Hemisphere clades, three Asian clades, and one neotropical clade. Geographically distant collections from the Southern Hemisphere shared identical ITS haplotypes, and an ITS recombinant was noted. Nested clade analysis of a parsimony network among isolates of the Southern Hemisphere clade indicated restricted gene flow with isolation-by-distance among the New Zealand, Australia-Tasmania, Chile-Argentine, and South Africa populations, suggesting episodic events of long-distance dispersal within the Southern Hemisphere. This study indicates that dispersal bias plays a more important role than generally admitted to explain the Southern Hemisphere distribution of many taxa, at least for saprobic fungi.

  15. Community structure and functional diversity of polypores (Basidiomycota in the Atlantic Forest of Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Borba-Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n1p1 Ecological studies have suggested that different groups of polypore species, acting as parasites and/or saprophytes, degrade different types of woody substrates. These functional groups have different decay capabilities and hence different roles in ecosystems. The aim of this study was to describe the community (species composition and their functionality inferred on the basis of substrate preference of wood-decaying polypores in the Atlantic Forest of Parque Nacional da Serra do Itajaí, in Santa Catarina State, Brazil. The polypore specimens and data on the substrates were sampled in two plots (100×50 m. Among 152 specimens collected, 58 species were identified. Three main dominant groups were identified. The first group comprised three dominant species, the second group five subordinate species and the third 50 rare species. The species were ordered using cluster correspondence analysis based on relative frequency of the species in the different types of substrates and the mean size of the substrate where basidiomes were found. Five functional groups were recognized: two of them were formed by Phylloporia species (P. spathulata on living roots in the ground and P. chrysita on living trunk; and three others consisted of different species of different genera, each of them characterized by the presence of one dominant, few subordinate and several rare species.

  16. Community structure and functional diversity of polypores (Basidiomycota in the Atlantic Forest of Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Borba-Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecological studies have suggested that different groups of polypore species, acting as parasites and/or saprophytes, degrade different types of woody substrates. These functional groups have different decay capabilities and hence different roles in ecosystems. The aim of this study was to describe the community (species composition and their functionality inferred on the basis of substrate preference of wood-decaying polypores in the Atlantic Forest of Parque Nacional da Serra do Itajaí, in Santa Catarina State, Brazil. The polypore specimens and data on the substrates were sampled in two plots (100×50 m. Among 152 specimens collected, 58 species were identified. Three main dominant groups were identified. The first group comprised three dominant species, the second group five subordinate species and the third 50 rare species. The species were ordered using cluster correspondence analysis based on relative frequency of the species in the different types of substrates and the mean size of the substrate where basidiomes were found. Five functional groups were recognized: two of them were formed by Phylloporia species (P. spathulata on living roots in the ground and P. chrysita on living trunk; and three others consisted of different species of different genera, each of them characterized by the presence of one dominant, few subordinate and several rare species.

  17. Chromosera cyanophylla (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) a rare fungus of Central European old-growth forests and its habitat preferences in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kříž, M.; Beran, M.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 100, 1-2 (2015), s. 189-204 ISSN 0029-5035 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Omphalina cyanophylla * Boubinskyr prales virgin forest * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.876, year: 2015

  18. Taxonomy and phylogeny of Phellinidium (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota): A redefinition and the segregation of Coniferiporia gen. nov for forest pathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, L.-W.; Vlasák, Josef; Dai, Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 8 (2016), s. 988-1001 ISSN 1878-6146 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Forest pathogen * Hymenochaetaceae * Internal transcribed spacer Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2016

  19. Searching for indicator species of old-growth spruce forests: studies in the genus Jahnoporus (Polyporales, Basidiomycota)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spirin, V.; Vlasák, Josef; Milakovsky, B.; Miettinen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2015), s. 409-417 ISSN 0181-1584 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Forest conservation * polypores * wood-rotting fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.509, year: 2015

  20. Global diversity and phylogeny of the Phellinus igniarius complex (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota) with the description of five new species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, L.-W.; Vlasák, Josef; Qin, W.-M.; Dai, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2016), s. 192-204 ISSN 0027-5514 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hymenochaetaceae * North America * Eastern Asia * Europe Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.550, year: 2016

  1. Three new species of Calocybe (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) from northeastern China are supported by morphological and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Jia; Wu, Shuang-Yan; Yu, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Shao-Bin; Cao, Dong-Xu

    2017-01-01

    Three new species, Calocybe aurantiaca, C. convexa, and C. decolorata, are described based on collections made in Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, China. The main characters of C. aurantiaca are its orange-yellow sporocarps and small and smooth basidiospores. Calocybe convexa is characterized by its orange-buff pileus, very small basidiospores, and tortuous stipe, whereas C. decolorata is mainly characterized by its gills that turn blue when bruised. The sequences of nuc rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS) and the 28S D1-D5 region of the Calocybe species were analyzed, and the results indicated that the three new species belonged to the genus Calocybe and differed from other species of Calocybe. The morphological similarities of the new species to other Calocybe species and the classification system within the genus Calocybe based on molecular data are also discussed. A key is provided for the Calocybe species as reported from China in order to facilitate future studies of the genus.

  2. Arthromyces and Blastosporella, two new genera of conidia-producing lyophylloid agarics (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) from the neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Timothy J; Franco-Molano, Ana Esperanza; Lodge, D Jean; Lindner, Daniel L; Horak, Egon; Hofstetter, Valerie

    2007-05-01

    Two new genera encompassing three new species of lyophylloid agarics that produce conidia on the basidiomata are described. Arthromyces is a genus comprised of two very different arthrospore-producing mushroom species found in the Greater Antilles and Central America. Blastosporella is a monotypic genus with spherical balls of blastospores covering the pileus surface with age and is known from Hispaniola and Colombia. A key to the species of Arthromyces is included.

  3. Comparative phylogenies and host specialization in the alder ectomycorrhizal fungi Alnicola, Alpova and Lactarius (Basidiomycota in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzi Sophie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizal fungi form intimate associations with their host plants that constitute their carbon resource and habitat. Alnus spp. (Betulaceae are known to host an exceptional species-poor and specialized ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungal community compared to other tree species, but the host-specificity pattern and its significance in terms of fungal diversification and speciation remain poorly documented. The degree of parallel speciation, host switching, and patterns of biogeography were explored in the historical associations between alders and three ECM taxa of Basidiomycetes: Alnicola (Agaricales, Alpova (Boletales, and Lactarius (Russulales. The aim was to develop an evolutionary framework on host specificity and diversification of Basidiomycetes in this highly specialized plant-fungus symbiosis. Results Sporocarps of Alnicola (220, Lactarius (61 and Alpova (29 were collected from stands of the four European alder species (A. alnobetula including the endemic subsp. suaveolens in Corsica, A. cordata, A. glutinosa, A. incana in Western Europe (mainly in France and Austria, from 1995 to 2009. Specimens were morphologically identified to the species level. From these, 402 sequences of four DNA regions (ITS, rpb2, gpd, and the V9 domain of the mit-SSU rDNA were successfully obtained and analyzed in addition with 89 sequences available in GenBank and UNITE databases. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on all sequence data sets (individual and combined using maximum likelihood reconstruction and Bayesian inference. Fungal phylogenies are compared and discussed in relation to the host, with a focus on species boundaries by associating taxonomic, systematic and molecular information. Conclusions Patterns of host specificity and phylogenies of Alnicola and Lactarius suggest coevolution as a basal factor of speciation in relation with the subgeneric diversification of Alnus, possibly due to the very selective pressure of the host. A second element of the historical associations between Alnus and its fungal symbionts is a host-dependent speciation (radiation without host change, here observed in Alnicola and Alpova in relation with Alnus subgen. Alnus. Finally host shifts from Alnus subgen. Alnus to A. alnobetula are found in most lineages of Alnicola (at least four times, Alpova (twice and Lactarius (once, but they do not represent such a common event as could be expected by geographic proximity of trees from the two subgenera. However, active or very recent host extensions clearly occurred in Corsica, where some fungi usually associated with Alnus glutinosa on mainland Europe locally extend there to A. alnobetula subsp. suaveolens without significant genetic or morphological deviation.

  4. Lower level relationships in the mushroom genus Cortinarius (Basidiomycota, Agaricales): a comparison of RPB1, RPB2, and ITS phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøslev, T G; Matheny, P B; Hibbett, D S

    2005-11-01

    We sampled and analyzed approximately 2900bp across the three loci from 54 taxa belonging to a taxonomically difficult group of Cortinarius subgenus Phlegmacium. The combined analyses of ITS and variable regions of RPB1 and RPB2 greatly increase the resolution and nodal support for phylogenies of these closely related species belonging to clades that until now have proven very difficult to resolve with the ribosomal markers, nLSU and ITS. We present the first study of the utility of variable regions of the genes encoding the two largest subunits of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2) for inferring the phylogeny of mushroom-forming fungi in combination with and compared to the widely used ribosomal marker ITS. The studied region of RPB1 contains an intron of the size and variability of ITS along with many variable positions in coding regions. Though almost entirely coding, the studied region of RPB2 is more variable than ITS. Both RNA polymerase II genes were alignable across all taxa. Our results indicate that several sections of Cortinarius need redefinition, and that several taxa treated at subspecific and varietal level should be treated at specific level. We suggest a new section for the two species, C. caesiocortinatus and C. prasinocyaneus, which constitute a well-supported separate lineage. We speculate that sequence information from RNA polymerase II genes have the potential for resolving phylogenetic problems at several levels of the diverse and taxonomically very challenging genus Cortinarius.

  5. Lignocellulose-converting enzyme activity profiles correlate with molecular systematics and phylogeny grouping in the incoherent genus Phlebia (Polyporales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuskeri, Jaana; Mäkelä, Miia R; Isotalo, Jarkko; Oksanen, Ilona; Lundell, Taina

    2015-10-19

    The fungal genus Phlebia consists of a number of species that are significant in wood decay. Biotechnological potential of a few species for enzyme production and degradation of lignin and pollutants has been previously studied, when most of the species of this genus are unknown. Therefore, we carried out a wider study on biochemistry and systematics of Phlebia species. Isolates belonging to the genus Phlebia were subjected to four-gene sequence analysis in order to clarify their phylogenetic placement at species level and evolutionary relationships of the genus among phlebioid Polyporales. rRNA-encoding (5.8S, partial LSU) and two protein-encoding gene (gapdh, rpb2) sequences were adopted for the evolutionary analysis, and ITS sequences (ITS1+5.8S+ITS2) were aligned for in-depth species-level phylogeny. The 49 fungal isolates were cultivated on semi-solid milled spruce wood medium for 21 days in order to follow their production of extracellular lignocellulose-converting oxidoreductases and carbohydrate active enzymes. Four-gene phylogenetic analysis confirmed the polyphyletic nature of the genus Phlebia. Ten species-level subgroups were formed, and their lignocellulose-converting enzyme activity profiles coincided with the phylogenetic grouping. The highest enzyme activities for lignin modification (manganese peroxidase activity) were obtained for Phlebia radiata group, which supports our previous studies on the enzymology and gene expression of this species on lignocellulosic substrates. Our study implies that there is a species-level connection of molecular systematics (genotype) to the efficiency in production of both lignocellulose-converting carbohydrate active enzymes and oxidoreductases (enzyme phenotype) on spruce wood. Thus, we may propose a similar phylogrouping approach for prediction of lignocellulose-converting enzyme phenotypes in new fungal species or genetically and biochemically less-studied isolates of the wood-decay Polyporales.

  6. Molecular phylogenetic biodiversity assessment of arctic and boreal ectomycorrhizal Lactarius Pers. (Russulales; Basidiomycota) in Alaska, based on soil and sporocarp DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozsef Geml; Gary A. Laursen; Ina Timling; Jack M. McFarland; Michael G. Booth; Niall Lennon; Chad Nusbaum; D. Lee. Taylor

    2009-01-01

    Despite the critical roles fungi play in the functioning of ecosystems, especially as symbionts of plants and recyclers of organic matter, their biodiversity is poorly known in high-latitude regions. In this paper, we discuss the molecular diversity of one of the most diverse and abundant groups of ectomycorrhizal fungi: the genus Lactarius Pers....

  7. Multi-gene phylogenetic analyses reveal species limits, phylogeographic patterns, and evolutionary histories of key morphological traits in Entoloma (Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, L N; Noordeloos, M E; Lamoureux, Y; Geml, J

    2013-12-01

    Species from Entoloma subg. Entoloma are commonly recorded from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres and, according to literature, most of them have at least Nearctic-Palearctic distributions. However, these records are based on morphological analysis, and studies relating morphology, molecular data and geographical distribution have not been reported. In this study, we used phylogenetic species recognition criteria through gene genealogical concordance (based on nuclear ITS, LSU, rpb2 and mitochondrial SSU) to answer specific questions considering species limits in Entoloma subg. Entoloma and their geographic distribution in Europe, North America and Australasia. The studied morphotaxa belong to sect. Entoloma, namely species like the notorious poisonous E. sinuatum (E. lividum auct.), E. prunuloides (type-species of sect. Entoloma), E. nitidum and the red-listed E. bloxamii. With a few exceptions, our results reveal strong phylogeographical partitions that were previously not known. For example, no collection from Australasia proved to be conspecific with the Northern Hemisphere specimens. Almost all North American collections represent distinct and sister taxa to the European ones. And even within Europe, new lineages were uncovered for the red-listed E. bloxamii, which were previously unknown due to a broad morphological species concept. Our results clearly demonstrate the power of the phylogenetic species concept to reveal evolutionary units, to redefine the morphological limits of the species addressed and to provide insights into the evolutionary history of key morphological characters for Entoloma systematics. New taxa are described, and new combinations are made, including E. fumosobrunneum, E. pseudoprunuloides, E. ochreoprunuloides and E. caesiolamellatum. Epitypes are selected for E. prunuloides and E. bloxamii. In addition, complete descriptions are given of some other taxa used in this study for which modern descriptions are lacking, viz. E. subsinuatum, E. whiteae, E. flavifolium, E. luridum, E. bloxamii, E. madidum, E. corneri, E. callidermum and E. coeruleoviride.

  8. Phylogenetic and ecological analyses of soil and sporocarp DNA sequences reveal high diversity and strong habitat partitioning in the boreal ectomycorrhizal genus Russula (Russulales; Basidiomycota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    József Geml; Gary A. Laursen; Ian C. Herriott; Jack M. McFarland; Michael G. Booth; Niall Lennon; H. Chad Nusbaum; D. Lee Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Although critical for the functioning of ecosystems, fungi are poorly known in high-latitude regions. Here, we provide the first genetic diversity assessment of one of the most diverse and abundant ectomycorrhizal genera in Alaska: Russula. We analyzed internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequences from sporocarps and soil samples using phylogenetic...

  9. HONGOS APHYLLOPHORALES (BASIDIOMYCOTA LIGNÍCOLAS DEL BOSQUE ALTO ANDINO “SANTA CLARA”. UNA GUÍA ILUSTRADA PARA EL ESTUDIO DE MACROHONGOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Pinzón Osorio

    2014-12-01

    Esta investigación surge de la necesidad de registrar los macrohongos Aphyllophorales de estos ecosistemas, conocidos por estar altamente impactados por la agricultura (Van der Hammen, 2003. Es fundamental el diseño de un material didáctico que ofrezca un panorama integral sobre la biología de los Aphyllophorales, teniendo en cuenta que las guías demacrohongos para el país, no se orientan directamente a su enseñanza

  10. Anatomical changes in Willow Wood Decayed by the brown rot fungus Coriolellus malicola (Basidiomycota Modificaciones anatómicas en madera de sauce por acción Coriolellus malicola (Aphyllophorales agente de pudrición castaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica A. Murace

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina, Salix wood is employed mainly in pulp and paper industry. In this country, the brown rotter C oriolellus malicola was found in association with willow plantations. The purpose of this work was to study the anatomical changes caused by C. malicola in willow wood in order to provide information on the effects of brown rot decay in the yield and quality of pulp. Two willow clones were employed: Salix nigra 4 and Salix babylonica x Salix alba cv I 131-25 . Two exposure times were used: 75 and 150 days. The percentages of weight loss produced by this fungus in both clones was ca. 30% at 75 days and ca. 60% at 150 days of decay. C. malicola degraded mainly fibre walls. Microscopically, the loss of cell shape, the presence of transwall fractures and the loss of birefringence were the main anatomical modifications observed. According to our observations decayed Salix wood by C. malicola seems to be inadequate for pulp industry.En la República Argentina la madera de Salix es empleada principalmente en la industria papelera. En este país el hongo de pudrición castaña C oriolellus malicola se encontró asociado a plantaciones comerciales de sauce. El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar las modificaciones anatómicas causada por C. malicola en la madera de sauce con el fin de aportar información sobre los efectos de la pudrición castaña en los rendimientos y calidad de la pulpa para papel. Se emplearon dos clones: Salix nigra 4 y Salix babylonica x Salix alba cv I. 131-25 . Se trabajó con dos tiempos de exposición: 75 y 150 días. Las pérdidas de peso producidas por esta cepa en ambos clones fueron de ca. del 30% a los 75 días y de ca. del 60% a los 150 días de incubación. C. malicola degradó principalmente las paredes de las fibras. Microscópicamente, las principales modificaciones anatómicas observadas fueron: deformación del tejido, presencia de fracturas transversales en las paredes celulares y pérdida de birrefringencia. De acuerdo con nuestras observaciones la madera de Salix degradada por C. malicola sería inadecuada para la industria del pulpado.

  11. Genus-Wide Comparative Genomics of Malassezia Delineates Its Phylogeny, Physiology, and Niche Adaptation on Human Skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Guangxi; Zhao, He; Li, Chenhao; Rajapakse, Menaka Priyadarsani; Wong, Wing Cheong; Xu, Jun; Saunders, Charles W; Reeder, Nancy L; Reilman, Raymond A; Scheynius, Annika; Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, Blake Robert; Li, Wenjun; Averette, Anna Floyd; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Heitman, Joseph; Theelen, Bart; Schröder, Markus S; De Sessions, Paola Florez; Butler, Geraldine; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Boekhout, Teun; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Dawson, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia is a unique lipophilic genus in class Malasseziomycetes in Ustilaginomycotina, (Basidiomycota, fungi) that otherwise consists almost exclusively of plant pathogens. Malassezia are typically isolated from warm-blooded animals, are dominant members of the human skin mycobiome and are

  12. .i.Psilocybe allenii ./i.– a new bluing species from the Pacific Coast, USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovička, Jan; Rockefeller, A.; Werner, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2012), s. 181-195 ISSN 1211-0981 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Agaricales * Strophariaceae * taxonomy * molecular phylogeny Subject RIV: EF - Botanics http://www.czechmycology.org/_cmo/CM64207.pdf

  13. Ossicaulis lachnopus (Agaricales, Lyophyllaceae), a species similar to O. linatilis, is verified by morphological and molecular methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    -, Oct 2012 (2012), s. 10.1007 ISSN 1861-8952 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungi * Basidiomycota * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11557-012-0866-2

  14. Polypore diversity in North America with an annotated checklist

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, L.-W.; Nakasone, K. K.; Burdsall, H.H.; Ginns, J.; Vlasák, Josef; Miettinen, O.; Spirin, V.; Niemela, T.; Yuan, H. S.; He, S.-H.; Cui, B.-K.; Xing, J,-H.; Dai, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2016), s. 771-790 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Phylogeny * Wood-decaying fungus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.616, year: 2016

  15. Geographic distribution of Sarcoporia polyspora and S-longitubulata sp nov

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.; Kinnunen, J.; Spirin, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 1 (2015), s. 279-287 ISSN 0093-4666 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Basidiomycota * brown rot fungi * molecular taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.610, year: 2015

  16. Two new polypore species from the southwestern USA: Fomitiporia fissurata and F. deserticola

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 1 (2016), s. 193-203 ISSN 0093-4666 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Hymenochaetales * Hymenochaetaceae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.538, year: 2016

  17. Screening the cultural characteristics of Hebeloma eburneum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    . In SEM examinations, the surface of spores was not flat, but has a rough structure. Key words: Hebeloma eburneum, Bolbitiaceae, Basidiomycota, radial growth speed. INTRODUCTION. Members of Hebeloma genus have ...

  18. Phylogenetic classification of yeasts and related taxa within Pucciniomycotina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q. -M.; Yurkov, A. M.; Goeker, M.; Lumbsch, H. T.; Leavitt, S. D.; Groenewald, M.; Theelen, B.; Liu, X. -Z.; Boekhout, T.; Bai, F. -Y.

    Most small genera containing yeast species in the Pucciniomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) are monophyletic, whereas larger genera including Bensingtonia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus and Sporobolomyces are polyphyletic. With the implementation of the “One Fungus = One Name”

  19. Neofomitella polyzonata gen. et sp. nov., and N. fumosipora and N. rhodophaea transferred from Fomitella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, H.J.; Li, X.C.; Vlasák, Josef; Dai, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 1 (2014), s. 7-20 ISSN 0093-4666 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Basidiomycota * phylogeny * polyporaceae * taxonomy Subject RIV: EB - Gen etics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.705, year: 2014

  20. Chapter 4: Hongos Hipogeos de Tamulipas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo Guevara-Guerrero; Efren Cazares-Gonzalez; Gregory Bonito; Rosanne A. Healy; Benjamin Stielow; Jesus Garcia; Fortunato Garza-Ocanas; Michael Castellano; James Trappe

    2014-01-01

    Twenty genera of hypogeous fungi or truffles are reported and illustrated from the State of Tamaulipas. The truffles belong to the following phyla: Glomeromycota (Glomus); Zygomycota (Endogone); hypogeous Ascomycota (Elaphomyces, Genabea, Genea, Hydnobolites, Pachyphloeus, Tuber); and Basidiomycota (...

  1. Evidence of natural hybridization among homothallic members of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Agaricales, Physalacriaceae) across much of its geographic range are heterothallic; homothallic populations are reported only from Africa (A. mellea ssp. africana), China [China Biological Species (CBS) G], and Japan (A. mellea ssp. nipponica). Monos...

  2. Sarcodon in the Neotropics I: new species from Guyana, Puerto Rico and Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Grupe; A. D. Baker; J. K. Uehling; M. E. Smith; T. J. Baroni; D. J. Lodge; T. W. Henkel

    2015-01-01

    Four species of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) genus Sarcodon (Bankeraceae, Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) are described as new to science. Sarcodon pakaraimensis sp. nov. is described from forests dominated by the ECM trees Pakaraimaea dipterocarpacea (Dipterocarpaceae) and Dicymbe jenmanii (...

  3. Neocampanella, a new corticioid fungal genus, and a note on Dendrothele bispora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen K. Nakasone; David S. Hibbett; Greta Goranova

    2009-01-01

    The new genus Neocampanella (Agaricales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) is established for Dentocorticium btastanos Boidin & Gilles, a crustose species, and the new combination, Neocampanella blastanos, is proposed. Morphological and molecular studies support the recognition of the new genus and its close...

  4. Pholiota highlandensis var. citrinosquamulosa (Fungi, Agaricales) is conspecific with Pholiota gallica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Borgarino, D.; Bidaud, A.; Moreau, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 103, 1-2 (2016), s. 251-263 ISSN 0029-5035 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Strophariaceae * phylogeny Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.941, year: 2016

  5. Pholiota gallica nom. nov., based on P. lubrica var. obscura

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 127, JAN-MAR 2014 (2014), s. 161-171 ISSN 0093-4666 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Agaricales * taxonomy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.705, year: 2014

  6. BIODIVERSITAS DAN POTENSI JAMUR BASIDOMYCOTA DI KAWASAN KASEPUHAN CISUNGSANG, KABUPATEN LEBAK, BANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ni’matullah Al Ulya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Biodiversitas jamur Basidiomycota di kawasan konservasi Taman Nasional Gunung Halimun Salak (TNGHS yang terletak di Kabupaten Lebak, Provinsi Banten, belum pernah diteliti sebelumnya. Kawasan konservasi tersebut dihuni oleh masyarakat adat dari Kasepuhan Cisungsang, yang selama ini memanfaatkan jamur dalam kehidupan sehari-hari. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini mengeks-plorasi keanekaragaman jamur Basidiomycota dan pemanfaatannya oleh masyarakat adat Kasepuhan Cisungsang. Penelitian dilaksanakan pada bulan Maret-Mei 2016. Sebanyak 34 spesies dari 21 marga, 16 keluarga, dan 5 bangsa dari jamur Basidiomycota berhasil ditemukan di daerah sawah, pekarangan, kebun, talun atau dudukan, dan hutan. Tujuh marga yang ditemukan diketahui dapat dimanfaatkan sebagai sumber makanan, yaitu supa ceuli (Auricularia sp.; supa amis (Marasmiellus sp.; supa beas (Coprinus sp.; supa tiram (Pleurotus sp.; supa jerami (Volvariella sp.; suung tunggal (Termitomyce sp.; dan supa kebo (Boletus sp.. Data ini menunjukkan tingginya biodiversitas jamur Basidiomycota di daerah masyarakat adat wilayah ini dan potensinya sebagai sumber makanan. Abstract Biodiversity of fungi Basidiomycota in the conservation area of Taman Nasional Gunung Halimun (TNNGHS Salak in Lebak, Province Banten, has never been studied. This area is resided by indigenous people from Kasepuhan Cisungsang, which uses the fungi in their life. Therefore, this study was aimed at exploring the biodiversity of mushrooms (Basidiomycota in Kasepuhan Cisungsang. The exploration was conducted from March to May 2016. A total number of 34 species which belong to 21 genera, 16 families, 5 orders were found in the rice field, yard, garden, and forest. About 7 genera are commonly consumed by the community. These include supa ceuli (Auricularia sp.; supa amis (Marasmiellus sp.; supa beas (Coprinus sp.; supa tiram (Pleurotus sp.; supa jerami (Volvariella sp.; suung tunggal (Termitomyce sp.; and supa kebo (Boletus sp

  7. Fungi inhabiting stumps of Pinus nigra depending on the period of their exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jankowiak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the species composition of communities of fungi inhabiting stumps of Pinus nigra depending on the period of their exposure. After 6 and 18 months of stump exposure two species of Basidiomycota distinctly dominaled: Stereum sanguinolentum and Phanerochaete gigantea. After 30 months of exposure the communities of fungi were the most diversified. A longer period of stump exposure resulted in the decrease of numbers of isolates of Ph. gigantea and S. sanguinolentum. However, other species belonging to Basidiomycota increased their numbers. As the wood decompositionn progressed, however, the fungi belonging to Deuteromycota were isolated more often.

  8. Global diversity and phylogeny of Onnia (Hymenochaetaceae) species on gymnosperms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ji, X.H.; He, S.H.; Chen, J.J.; Si, J.; Wu, F.; Zhou, L. W.; Vlasák, Josef; Tian, X. M.; Dai, Y. C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 1 (2017), s. 27-34 ISSN 0027-5514 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : maximum-likelihood * mixed models * basidiomycota * polyporaceae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 2.550, year: 2016

  9. Biochemical and functional characterization of recombinant fungal immunomodulatory proteins (rFIPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaan-Net, S.; Chanput, W.; Hertz, A.; Zwittink, R.D.; Mes, J.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study two novel FIPs have been identified and characterized. The first is FIP-nha, identified in the ascomycete Nectria haematococca, and as such, FIP-nha would be the first FIP to be identified outside the order of Basidiomycota. The second is LZ-9, an LZ-8 like protein identified in

  10. All-clear for gourmets: truffles not radioactive

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Büntgen, Ulf; Jäggi, M.; Stobbe, U.; Tegel, W.; Sproll, L.; Eikenberg, J.; Egli, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2016), s. 1145-1147 ISSN 1726-4170 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Tuber (truffle) * Tuber aestivum * Tuber uncinatum Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.851, year: 2016 http://www.biogeosciences.net/13/1145/2016/bg-13-1145-2016.pdf

  11. Adiciones al catálogo micológico de Madeira (Portugal). II. Registro de 23 especies nuevas.

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Calonge, Francisco de; Menezes de Sequeira, Miguel; Aguiar, G.; Rocha, E.

    2008-01-01

    [EN] 23 species of fungi are mentioned and commented, collected in Madeira island, which are new for the catalogue. These are the following: 5 Ascomycota: Chlorosplenium aeruginascens, Coccomyces delta, Gyromitra esculenta, Leotia atrovirens, Otidea anotica and 18 Basidiomycota: Agrocybe arvalis, Chroogomphus rutilis, Clitocybe phyllophila, Conocybe brunneola, Coprinus angulatus, Coprinus disseminatus, Coprinus lagopus, Coprinus radiatus, Coprinus romagnesianus, Entoloma nidorosum, Gamundia s...

  12. Arctic driftwood reveals unexpectedly rich fungal diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanchette, R.A.; Held, B.W.; Hellmann, L.; Millman, L.; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, OCT (2016), s. 58-65 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Ascomycota * Basidiomycota * Biodegradation * Community ecology * Greenland * Iceland * its * Russia * Soft rot * Taxonomy * Wood decay Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  13. Tropical Trametes lactinea is widely distributed in the eastern USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Kout, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2011), s. 271-279 ISSN 0093-4666 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Basidiomycota, USA new record, taxonomy * USA new record * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.709, year: 2011

  14. Septal Pore Caps in Basidiomycetes, Composition and Ultrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, K.G.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, including Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, form mycelia that consist of a network of apical growing hyphae. These hyphae are separated into cellular compartments by septa that have pores of about 70 to 500 nm in diameter. The cytoplasm within the mycelium is thus continuous

  15. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Riley; Asaf A. Salamov; Daren W. Brown; Laszlo G. Nagy; Dimitrios Floudas; Benjamin W. Held; Anthony Levasseur; Vincent Lombard; Emmanuelle Morin; Robert Otillar; Erika A. Lindquist; Hui Sun; Kurt M. LaButti; Jeremy Schmutz; Dina Jabbour; Hong Luo; Scott E. Baker; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Jonathan D. Walton; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Francis Martin; Daniel Cullen; David S. Hibbett; Igor V. Grigoriev

    2014-01-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic...

  16. Tracking the distribution of Puccinia psidii genotypes that cause rust disease on diverse myrtaceous trees and shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; Rodrigo N. Graca; Acelino C. Alfenas; Tobin L. Peever; Jack W. Hanna; Janice Y. Uchida; Rob D. Hauff; Chris Y. Kadooka; Mee-Sook Kim; Phil G. Cannon; Shigetou Namba; Nami Minato; Sofia Simeto; Carlos A. Perez; Min B. Rayamajhi; Mauricio Moran; D. Jean Lodge; Marcela Arguedas; Rosario Medel-Ortiz; M. Armando Lopez-Ramirez; Paula Tennant; Morag Glen; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2014-01-01

    Puccinia psidii Winter (Basidiomycota, Uredinales) is a biotrophic rust fungus that was first reported in Brazil from guava in 1884 (Psidium guajava; Winter 1884) and later from eucalypt in 1912 (Joffily 1944). Considered to be of neotropical origin, the rust has also been reported to infect diverse myrtaceous hosts elsewhere in South America, Central America, the...

  17. Draft genome sequence of a monokaryotic model brown-rot fungus Postia (Rhodonia) placenta SB12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill Gaskell; Phil Kersten; Luis F. Larrondo; Paulo Canessa; Diego Martinez; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Angel T. Martinez; Jagjit Yadav; Emma Master; Jon Karl Magnuson; Debbie Yaver; Randy Berka; Kathleen Lail; Cindy Chen; Kurt LaButti; Matt Nolan; Anna Lipzen; Andrea Aerts; Robert Riley; Kerrie Barry; Bernard Henrissat; Robert Blanchette; Igor V. Grigoriev; Dan Cullen

    2017-01-01

    We report the genome of Postia (Rhodonia) placenta MAD-SB12, a homokaryotic wood decay fungus (Basidiomycota, Polyporales). Intensively studied as a representative brown rot decayer, the gene complement is consistent with the rapid depolymerization of cellulose but not lignin.

  18. RECONSTRUCTING THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE FOREST FUNGAL PATHOGEN, ARMILLARIA MELLEA, IN A TEMPERATE WORLDWIDE POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The forest pathogen Armillaria mellea s.s. (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae) is among the most significant forest pathogens causing root rot in northern temperate forest trees worldwide. Phylogenetic reconstructions for A. mellea show distinct European, Asian and North American lineages. The North Am...

  19. Multigene phylogeny and taxonomic revision of yeasts and related fungi in the Ustilaginomycotina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q. -M.; Begerow, D.; Groenewald, M.; Liu, X. -Z.; Theelen, B.; Bai, F. -Y.; Boekhout, T.

    The subphylum Ustilaginomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) comprises mainly plant pathogenic fungi (smuts). Some of the lineages possess cultivable unicellular stages that are usually classified as yeast or yeast-like species in a largely artificial taxonomic system which is independent from and

  20. Notas sobre los Agaricales del páramo de Guasca, departamento de Cundinamarca, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Rivera Angel M.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Se han informado pocas especies de los Agaricales (Basidiomycota de los páramos colombianos. Guzmán y Yarda (1978, Pulido (1983, Saldarriaga et al. (1988 y Guzmán et al. (1994 entre otros, ofrecen valiosa informaci��n sobre la taxonomía y distribución de éstos.

  1. Fungal diversity notes 253-366: taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, G.J.; Hyde, K.D.; Zhao, R. L.; Hongsanan, S.; Abdel-Aziz, F.A.; Abdel-Wahab, M. A.; Alvarado, P.; Alves-Silva, G.; Ammirati, J.F.; Ariyawansa, H.A.; Baghela, A.; Bahkali, A. H.; Beug, M.; Bhat, D.J.; Bojantchev, D.; Boonpratuang, T.; Bulgakov, T.S.; Camporesi, E.; Boro, M.C.; Ceska, O.; Chakraborty, D.; Chen, J.J.; Chethana, K.W.T.; Chomnunti, P.; Consiglio, G.; Cui, B.K.; Dai, D. Q.; Dai, Y.C.; Daranagama, D. A.; Das, K.; Vlasák, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-237 ISSN 1560-2745 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : lichenized ascomycota ostropales * ribosomal dna-sequences * strictly anaerobic fungus * sp-nov russulaceae * molecular phylogeny * Basidiomycota Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 13.465, year: 2016

  2. Thai marine fungal diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Rattaket Choeyklin; Souwalak Phongpaichit; Ittichai Chatmala; Jariya Sakayaroj; Apiradee Pilantanapak; E.B. Gareth Jones

    2006-01-01

    The marine fungal diversity of Thailand was investigated and 116 Ascomycota, 3 Basidiomycota, 28 anamorphic fungi, 7 Stramenopiles recorded, with 30 tentatively identified. These species have primarily been collected from driftwood and attached decayed wood of mangrove trees. The holotype number of 15 taxa is from Thailand and 33 are new records from the country.

  3. Thai marine fungal diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattaket Choeyklin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine fungal diversity of Thailand was investigated and 116 Ascomycota, 3 Basidiomycota, 28 anamorphic fungi, 7 Stramenopiles recorded, with 30 tentatively identified. These species have primarily been collected from driftwood and attached decayed wood of mangrove trees. The holotype number of 15 taxa is from Thailand and 33 are new records from the country.

  4. Bioremediation Potentials of Heterobasidion annosum 13.12B and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The remediation potentials of diesel oil by two white rot fungi (Basidiomycota; Hymenomycetes) Heterobasidion annosum 13.12B and Resinicium bicolor were tested in two artificially contaminated experimental matrices: Norkran's liquid medium and Insch - Pitcaple soil collected from Aberdeen, United Kingdom.

  5. Hypholoma lateritium isolated from coarse woody debris, the forest floor, and mineral soil in a deciduous forest in New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese A. Thompson; R. Greg Thorn; Kevin T. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Fungi in the Agaricomycetes (Basidiomycota) are the primary decomposers in temperate forests of dead wood on and in the forest soil. Through the use of isolation techniques selective for saprotrophic Agaricomycetes, a variety of wood decay fungi were isolated from a northern hardwood stand in the Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. In particular,

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fungus Trametes hirsuta 072.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Moiseenko, Konstantin V; Vasina, Daria V; Mosunova, Olga V; Fedorova, Tatiana V; Maloshenok, Lilya G; Landesman, Elena O; Bruskin, Sergei A; Psurtseva, Nadezhda V; Slesarev, Alexei I; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Koroleva, Olga V

    2015-11-19

    A standard draft genome sequence of the white rot saprotrophic fungus Trametes hirsuta 072 (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) is presented. The genome sequence contains about 33.6 Mb assembled in 141 scaffolds with a G+C content of ~57.6%. The draft genome annotation predicts 14,598 putative protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs). Copyright © 2015 Pavlov et al.

  7. THE ORIGIN AND MAINTENANCE OF GENETIC DIVERSITY WITHIN POPULATIONS OF THE ROOT PATHOGEN ARMILLARIA MELLEA IN NORTH AMERICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae) sensu stricto is a common root pathogen of fruit crops, timber trees, and ornamentals worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear rDNA and protein-coding loci support differentiation of four geographic groups: Asia, western N. America, eastern N. Am...

  8. Macrofungal diversity of Bolu Abant Nature Park (Turkey) | Servi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was based on materials of macrofungi collected from Bolu Abant Nature Park between 2008 and 2009. As a result of field and laboratory studies, 103 taxa belonging to 34 families were identified. Five (5) taxa belong to Ascomycota and 98 to Basidiomycota.

  9. Taxonomical position of polypore Dichomitus albidofuscus: Donkioporia albidofusca comb. nov

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Kout, J.; Dvořák, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2010), s. 147-150 ISSN 1617-416X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Polyporaceae * Ribosomal DNA * Basidiomycota * Lignicolous fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.266, year: 2010

  10. Characterization and identification of Russula firmula and Russula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two ectomycorrhizal species of genus Russula: Russula postiana and Russula firmula (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) have been characterized and identified from Kashmir Himalaya using morpho-anatomical and molecular methods targeting its rDNA. The target internal transcribe spacer (ITS)-rDNA of both species was ...

  11. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up some 37% of the described fungi and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To b...

  12. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade ...

  13. Diversity of culturable fungi species in a tropical lagoon | Agwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 25 fungal species belonging to phyla Ascomycota (12), Zygomycota (6), Basidiomycota (1) and Fungi Imperfecti (6) were isolated and identified. Mucor species of the Zygomycota phylum, were the most frequent species encountered, being present in all the sampling stations. Nevertheless, the members of the ...

  14. Examining new phylogenetic markers to uncover the evolutionary history of early-diverging fungi: comparing MCM7, TSR1 and rRNA genes for single- and multi-gene analyses of the Kickxellomycotina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tretter, E.D.; Johnson, E.M.; Wang, Y.; Kandel, P.; White, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The recently recognised protein-coding genes MCM7 and TSR1 have shown significant promise for phylogenetic resolution within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, but have remained unexamined within other fungal groups (except for Mucorales). We designed and tested primers to amplify these genes across

  15. Molecular Systematics of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect parasitism has multiple and diverse origins within the Kingdom Fungi, with shifts to trophic specialization on insects having evolved one or more times in each of the four traditionally recognized phyla of fungi, the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. The rich legacy ...

  16. Estimation of fungal biomass in forest litter and soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Dobiášová, Petra; Petránková, Mirka; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Eichlerová, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-11 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0751; GA MŠk LD12050 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Basidiomycota * Ectomycorrhizal fungi * Ergosterol Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2013

  17. Microsatellite markers reveal the below ground distribution of genets in two species of Rhizopogon forming tuberculate ectomycorrhizas on Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette M. Kretzer; Susie Dunham; Randy Molina; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2003-01-01

    We have developed microsatellite markers for two sister species of Rhizopogon, R. vesiculosus and R. vinicolor (Boletales, Basidiomycota), and used selected markers to investigate genet size and distribution from ectomycorrhizal samples. Both species form ectomycorrhizas with tuberculate morphology on Douglas-fir (...

  18. Draft genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulosa 3A-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto Miettinen; Robert Riley; Kerrie Barry; Daniel Cullen; Ronald P. de Vries; Matthieu Hainaut; Annele Hatakka; Bernard Henrissat; Kristiina Hilden; Rita Kuo; Kurt LaButti; Anna Lipzen; Miia R. Makela; Laura Sandor; Joseph W. Spatafora; Igor V. Grigoriev; David S. Hibbett

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulsa (Polyporales, Basidiomycota), a polypore known for its lignin-decomposing ability. The genome is based on the homokaryon 3A-2 originating in Finland. The genome is typical in size and carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZy) content for wood-decomposing basidiomycetes.

  19. Turkish truffles I: 18 new records for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz TÜRKOĞLU; Michael Castellano; James Martin TRAPPE; Mehrican YARATANAKUL GÜNGÖR

    2015-01-01

    We report the first records of 18 truffle species in Turkey. Three belong to the Ascomycota: Elaphomyces leucocarpus, E. muricatus, and Genea sphaerica; and 15 to the Basidiomycota: Alpova corsicus, Gautieria otthii, G. retirugosa, G. trabutii, Hymenogaster citrinus, H. hessei, H. luteus, H. lycoperdineus,...

  20. C:\\Users\\AISA\\Desktop\\K. KAMOU.xps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Diversity and Molecular phylogeny of the genus Lactifluus (Basidiomycota,. Russulales) in West Africa including new taxa. XXth Congress of AETFAT,. Stellenbosch (South Africa), 13th to 17th. January 2014, Scripta Botanica Belgica vol. 52: 251. Maba D. L., Guelly A. K., Yorou N. S., Agerer R. 2014 c. Progress in molecular ...

  1. Comparative metagenomics approaches to characterize the soil fungal communities of western coastal region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Tarek A A; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S; Almaghrabi, Omar A; Abdelmoneim, Tamer S; Fuller, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    A total of 145007 reads were obtained from pyrosequencing for all the 4 samples. The total count ranged from 11,301,014 (Mecca old road) to 23,503,512 bp (Thuwal). A total of 460 fungal species belonging to 133 genera, 58 families, 33 orders, 13 classes and 4 phyla was identified across the four sites. The most abundant phylum at all four sites was Ascomycota followed by Basidiomycota. Four phyla (Ascomycota-99.31%, Basidiomycota-0.59%, Chytridiomycota-0.04%, Glomeromycota-0.03%) were detected in Khulais. Except for Glomeromycota, all phyla were detected at Mecca old road (Ascomycota-74.26%, Basidiomycota-25.71%, Chytridiomycota-0.01%) and Thuwal (Ascomycota-99.59%, Basidiomycota-0.40%, Chytridiomycota-0.002%); while only Ascomycota-90.98% and Basidiomycota-9.01% were detected in Asfan road. At the class level, Sordariomycetes was predominantly observed at Asfan road-59.88%, Khulais-68.26% and Thuwal-94.84%; while Pezizomycetes was dominant at Mecca old road-56.01%, was absent at Asfan road. Agaricomycetes was present only at Mecca old road-25.73%; while Tremellomycetes-5.77%, Malasseizomycetes-2.13% and Microbotryomycetes-1.10% were found only at Asfan road. The phylogenetic trees revealed that clear genus level differences are visible across all the four sites, with an overall predominance of Thielavia followed by Madurella, Aspergillus, and Gelasinospora. Chaetomium sp., Aspergillus caespitosus and Aspergillus sp. were found in moderate (Mecca old road and Thuwal) to abundant (Asfan road and Khulais) quantities. Thielavia sp., Thielavia hyalocarpa and Madurella sp. are found in moderate quantities at Khulais and Mecca old road, while in abundant levels at Asfan road and Thuwal. Fusarium equisati and F. oxysporum were detected at Thuwal and Khulais. Sordaria araneosa was present at Khulais, while Malasseiza globosa species was detected in moderate quantities across all sites except Khulais.

  2. Contrasting diversity and host association of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes versus root-associated ascomycetes in a dipterocarp rainforest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotoshi Sato

    Full Text Available Root-associated fungi, including ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi, are among the most diverse and important belowground plant symbionts in dipterocarp rainforests. Our study aimed to reveal the biodiversity, host association, and community structure of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and root-associated Ascomycota (including root-endophytic Ascomycota in a lowland dipterocarp rainforest in Southeast Asia. The host plant chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL region and fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 region were sequenced using tag-encoded, massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing to identify host plant and root-associated fungal taxa in root samples. In total, 1245 ascomycetous and 127 putative ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous taxa were detected from 442 root samples. The putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota were likely to be associated with closely related dipterocarp taxa to greater or lesser extents, whereas host association patterns of the root-associated Ascomycota were much less distinct. The community structure of the putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota was possibly more influenced by host genetic distances than was that of the root-associated Ascomycota. This study also indicated that in dipterocarp rainforests, root-associated Ascomycota were characterized by high biodiversity and indistinct host association patterns, whereas ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota showed less biodiversity and a strong host phylogenetic preference for dipterocarp trees. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that root-associated Ascomycota, which might be mainly represented by root-endophytic fungi, have biodiversity hotspots in the tropics, whereas biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota increases with host genetic diversity.

  3. Contribution to a macromycete survey of the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sobestiansky

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Collections of macromycetes made in seven municipalities in southern Brazil, viz. six in Rio Grande do Sul and one in Santa Catarina, are listed. They belonged to the Myxomycota (6 spp., Ascomycota (54 spp. and Basidiomycota (189 spp.. First records for Brazil could be Battarrea phalloides, Amanita rubescens, Boletus edulis and Mycena filopes, the last three found under exotic Pinus.São listadas as coletas executadas pelo autor em sete municípios no sul do Brasil, sendo seis no estado de Rio Grande do Sul e um no estado de Santa Catarina. Pertencem à Myxomycota (6 espécies, Ascomycota (54 espécies e Basidiomycota (189 espécies. Primeiros registros para o Brasil são aparentemente: Battarrea phalloides, Amanita rubescens, Boletus edulis e Mycena filopes, as últimas três encontradas sob espécies de Pinus.

  4. Assessment of fungal diversity in a water-damaged office building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brett J; Lemons, Angela R; Park, Yeonmi; Cox-Ganser, Jean M; Park, Ju-Hyeong

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have described fungal communities in indoor environments using gene sequencing-based approaches. In this study, dust-borne fungal communities were elucidated from a water-damaged office building located in the northeastern region of the United States using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA gene sequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from 5 mg of floor dust derived from 22 samples collected from either the lower floors (n = 8) or a top floor (n = 14) of the office building. ITS gene sequencing resolved a total of 933 ITS sequences and was clustered into 216 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Analysis of fungal OTUs at the 97% similarity threshold showed a difference between the lower and top floors that was marginally significant (p = 0.049). Species richness and diversity indices were reduced in the lower floor samples compared to the top floor samples and there was a high degree of compositional dissimilarity within and between the two different areas within the building. Fungal OTUs were placed in the phyla Ascomycota (55%), Basidiomycota (41%), Zygomycota (3%), Glomeromycota (0.4%), Chytridiomycota (0.3%), and unassigned fungi (0.5%). The Ascomycota classes with the highest relative abundances included the Dothideomycetes (30%) and Eurotiomycetes (16%). The Basidiomycota consisted of the classes Ustilaginomycetes (14%), Tremellomycetes (11%), and Agaricomycetes (8%). Sequence reads derived from the plant pathogen Ustilago syntherismae were the most abundant in the analysis as were obligate Basidiomycota yeast species that accounted for 12% and 11% of fungal ITS sequences, respectively. ITS gene sequencing provides additional insight into the diversity of fungal OTUs. These data further highlight the contribution of fungi placed in the phylum Basidiomycota, obligate yeasts, as well as xerophilic species that are typically not resolved using traditional culture methods.

  5. Caetea, a new genus of Pucciniales on Piptadenia (Fabaceae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Mauricio Salazar; de Carvalho Junior, Aníbal Alves

    2012-01-01

    A new genus of rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales), with species type Caetea itatiaiaensis, was collected on Piptadenia (Fabaceae) at the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia in the Serra da Mantiqueira, states of Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, Brazil. This genus is delimited as (i) three-celled teliospores borne on a single pedicel each with a corresponding apical cell and (ii) apical cells giving rise to distally capitate cysts that overhang the teliospore cells.

  6. PENGARUH MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DIPADU STUDENT FACILITATOR AND EXPLAINING TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS SISWA KELAS X SMAN 6 KEDIRI PADA POKOK BAHASAN FUNGI

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawan, M. Agung

    2017-01-01

         Kingdom Fungi material is material to learn about mushrooms. In the Kingdom Fungi consist of six phylum that zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Deuteromycota, Lumut crust, and Mycorrhiza. The material has many types of fungi kingdom, scientific name, and classification of fungi that constrain students to memorize and understand that students need learning model that can provide a good learning experience. This study aimed to determine the effect of learning model combined Student Pro...

  7. Molecular diversity of fungi from marine oxygen-deficient environments (ODEs)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Forster, D.; Kauff, F.; Stoeck, T.

    based on the ITS region may also have some disadvantages as in some instances members belonging to only to phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were amplified (Lai et al. 2007). These 12 discrepancies may arise because not all of the fungal... across the various taxonomic communities, as the different primer sets can complement the strengths and disadvantages of each other. The phylogenetic analyses of fungal sequences conducted in this study, which were based on publicly available SSU r...

  8. The genome of the xerotolerant mold Wallemia sebi reveals adaptations to osmotic stress and suggests cryptic sexual reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajabeen, Padamsee; Kumas, T. K. Arun; Riley, Robert; Binder, Manfred; Boyd, Alex; Calvo, Ann M.; Furukawa, Kentaro; Hesse, Cedar; Hohmann, Stefan; James, Tim Y.; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Miller, Kari; Shantappa, Sourabha; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.; McLaughlin, David J.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Aime, Mary C.

    2011-09-03

    Wallemia (Wallemiales, Wallemiomycetes) is a genus of xerophilic Fungi of uncertain phylogenetic position within Basidiomycota. Most commonly found as food contaminants, species of Wallemia have also been isolated from hypersaline environments. The ability to tolerate environments with reduced water activity is rare in Basidiomycota. We sequenced the genome of W. sebi in order to understand its adaptations for surviving in osmotically challenging environments, and we performed phylogenomic and ultrastructural analyses to address its systematic placement and reproductive biology. W. sebi has a compact genome (9.8 Mb), with few repeats and the largest fraction of genes with functional domains compared with other Basidiomycota. We applied several approaches to searching for osmotic stress-related proteins. In silico analyses identied 93 putative osmotic stress proteins; homology searches showed the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) pathway to be mostly conserved. Despite the seemingly reduced genome, several gene family expansions and a high number of transporters (549) were found that also provide clues to the ability of W. sebito colonize harsh environments. Phylogenetic analyses of a 71-protein dataset support the position of Wallemia as the earliest diverging lineage of Agaricomycotina, which is conrmed by septal pore ultrastructure that shows the septal pore apparatus as a variant of the Tremella-type. Mating type gene homologs were idented although we found no evidence of meiosis during conidiogenesis, suggesting there may be aspects of the life cycle of W. sebi that remain cryptic

  9. The genome of the xerotolerant mold Wallemia sebi reveals adaptations to osmotic stress and suggests cryptic sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Mahajabeen; Kumar, T K Arun; Riley, Robert; Binder, Manfred; Boyd, Alex; Calvo, Ana M; Furukawa, Kentaro; Hesse, Cedar; Hohmann, Stefan; James, Tim Y; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Miller, Kari; Shantappa, Sourabha; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S; McLaughlin, David J; Spatafora, Joseph W; Aime, M Catherine

    2012-03-01

    Wallemia (Wallemiales, Wallemiomycetes) is a genus of xerophilic Fungi of uncertain phylogenetic position within Basidiomycota. Most commonly found as food contaminants, species of Wallemia have also been isolated from hypersaline environments. The ability to tolerate environments with reduced water activity is rare in Basidiomycota. We sequenced the genome of W. sebi in order to understand its adaptations for surviving in osmotically challenging environments, and we performed phylogenomic and ultrastructural analyses to address its systematic placement and reproductive biology. W. sebi has a compact genome (9.8 Mb), with few repeats and the largest fraction of genes with functional domains compared with other Basidiomycota. We applied several approaches to searching for osmotic stress-related proteins. In silico analyses identified 93 putative osmotic stress proteins; homology searches showed the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) pathway to be mostly conserved. Despite the seemingly reduced genome, several gene family expansions and a high number of transporters (549) were found that also provide clues to the ability of W. sebi to colonize harsh environments. Phylogenetic analyses of a 71-protein dataset support the position of Wallemia as the earliest diverging lineage of Agaricomycotina, which is confirmed by septal pore ultrastructure that shows the septal pore apparatus as a variant of the Tremella-type. Mating type gene homologs were identified although we found no evidence of meiosis during conidiogenesis, suggesting there may be aspects of the life cycle of W. sebi that remain cryptic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Why Mycophoris is not an orchid seedling, and why Synaptomitus is not a fungal symbiont within this fossil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selosse, Marc-Andre; Brundrett, Mark; Dearnaley, John

    2017-01-01

    A recent publication in Botany introduced two new taxa: a fossil orchid seed (Mycophoris) and a fossilized basidiomycete fungus (Synaptomitus) in an alleged relationship with this orchid, encased in 15–20 million year old Dominican amber (Poinar, G. 2017. Two new genera, Mycophoris gen. nov......., (Orchidaceae) and Synaptomitus gen. nov. (Basidiomycota) based on a fossil seed with developing embryo and associated fungus in Dominican amber. Botany, 95: 1–8). From the working knowledge of extant orchid seeds, seedlings, and mycorrhiza shared among us, we cannot support these interpretations. Here we...

  11. Advances in the phylogenesis of Agaricales and its higher ranks and strategies for establishing phylogenetic hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui-Lin; Desjardin, Dennis E; Soytong, Kasem; Hyde, Kevin D

    2008-10-01

    We present an overview of previous research results on the molecular phylogenetic analyses in Agaricales and its higher ranks (Agaricomycetes/Agaricomycotina/Basidiomycota) along with the most recent treatments of taxonomic systems in these taxa. Establishing phylogenetic hypotheses using DNA sequences, from which an understanding of the natural evolutionary relationships amongst clades may be derived, requires a robust dataset. It has been recognized that single-gene phylogenies may not truly represent organismal phylogenies, but the concordant phylogenetic genealogies from multiple-gene datasets can resolve this problem. The genes commonly used in mushroom phylogenetic research are summarized.

  12. Advances in the phylogenesis of Agaricales and its higher ranks and strategies for establishing phylogenetic hypotheses§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui-lin; Desjardin, Dennis E.; Soytong, Kasem; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of previous research results on the molecular phylogenetic analyses in Agaricales and its higher ranks (Agaricomycetes/Agaricomycotina/Basidiomycota) along with the most recent treatments of taxonomic systems in these taxa. Establishing phylogenetic hypotheses using DNA sequences, from which an understanding of the natural evolutionary relationships amongst clades may be derived, requires a robust dataset. It has been recognized that single-gene phylogenies may not truly represent organismal phylogenies, but the concordant phylogenetic genealogies from multiple-gene datasets can resolve this problem. The genes commonly used in mushroom phylogenetic research are summarized. PMID:18837104

  13. The particularity of being a fungus – I. Cellular components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Leon Abrão

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and reproductive characteristics have been used to define the four phyla (Chytridiomycota, Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota that make up the Kingdom Fungi. However, fungal organelles and extracellular components have been studied in few species, and knowledge about them is restricted. In spite of the fact that fungi share some organelles with other eukaryotic organisms, they often show changes, but others are only found in Fungi. Compilation and divulgation of information about such fungal characteristics is the subject of this review.

  14. Loss of the flagellum happened only once in the fungal lineage: phylogenetic structure of Kingdom Fungi inferred from RNA polymerase II subunit genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodson Matthew C

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, there is not a widely accepted consensus view regarding the phylogenetic structure of kingdom Fungi although two major phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are clearly delineated. Regarding the lower fungi, Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota, a variety of proposals have been advanced. Microsporidia may or may not be fungi; the Glomales (vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi may or may not constitute a fifth fungal phylum, and the loss of the flagellum may have occurred either once or multiple times during fungal evolution. All of these issues are capable of being resolved by a molecular phylogenetic analysis which achieves strong statistical support for major branches. To date, no fungal phylogeny based upon molecular characters has satisfied this criterion. Results Using the translated amino acid sequences of the RPB1 and RPB2 genes, we have inferred a fungal phylogeny that consists largely of well-supported monophyletic phyla. Our major results, each with significant statistical support, are: (1 Microsporidia are sister to kingdom Fungi and are not members of Zygomycota; that is, Microsporidia and fungi originated from a common ancestor. (2 Chytridiomycota, the only fungal phylum having a developmental stage with a flagellum, is paraphyletic and is the basal lineage. (3 Zygomycota is monophyletic based upon sampling of Trichomycetes, Zygomycetes, and Glomales. (4 Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Ascomycota form a monophyletic group separate from Chytridiomycota. (5 Basidiomycota and Ascomycota are monophyletic sister groups. Conclusion In general, this paper highlights the evolutionary position and significance of the lower fungi (Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota. Our results suggest that loss of the flagellum happened only once during early stages of fungal evolution; consequently, the majority of fungi, unlike plants and animals, are nonflagellated. The phylogeny we infer from gene sequences is the first one that is

  15. Amino and Fatty Acids of Wild Edible Mushrooms of the Genus Boletus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri O. Levitsky

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on the free amino acids of 15 wild edible mushroom species belonging to the genus Boletus (phylum Basidiomycota was developed. The major amino acids in the fruit bodies were arginine , alanine, glutamine, and glutamic acid. The most abundant fatty acids were oleic ( 9- 18:1, linoleic acid (9,12-18:2 , and palmitic acid (16:0, but a great variation of the ester composition from one to another one was found. Chemical constituents were characterized by GC-MS, and other chemical methods.

  16. Loss of the flagellum happened only once in the fungal lineage: phylogenetic structure of kingdom Fungi inferred from RNA polymerase II subunit genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajuan J; Hodson, Matthew C; Hall, Benjamin D

    2006-09-29

    At present, there is not a widely accepted consensus view regarding the phylogenetic structure of kingdom Fungi although two major phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are clearly delineated. Regarding the lower fungi, Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota, a variety of proposals have been advanced. Microsporidia may or may not be fungi; the Glomales (vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) may or may not constitute a fifth fungal phylum, and the loss of the flagellum may have occurred either once or multiple times during fungal evolution. All of these issues are capable of being resolved by a molecular phylogenetic analysis which achieves strong statistical support for major branches. To date, no fungal phylogeny based upon molecular characters has satisfied this criterion. Using the translated amino acid sequences of the RPB1 and RPB2 genes, we have inferred a fungal phylogeny that consists largely of well-supported monophyletic phyla. Our major results, each with significant statistical support, are: (1) Microsporidia are sister to kingdom Fungi and are not members of Zygomycota; that is, Microsporidia and fungi originated from a common ancestor. (2) Chytridiomycota, the only fungal phylum having a developmental stage with a flagellum, is paraphyletic and is the basal lineage. (3) Zygomycota is monophyletic based upon sampling of Trichomycetes, Zygomycetes, and Glomales. (4) Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Ascomycota form a monophyletic group separate from Chytridiomycota. (5) Basidiomycota and Ascomycota are monophyletic sister groups. In general, this paper highlights the evolutionary position and significance of the lower fungi (Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota). Our results suggest that loss of the flagellum happened only once during early stages of fungal evolution; consequently, the majority of fungi, unlike plants and animals, are nonflagellated. The phylogeny we infer from gene sequences is the first one that is congruent with the widely accepted morphology

  17. From the comparative analysis of fungal mitochondrial genes to the development of taxonomic and phylogenetic tools

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Gérard; Ferandon, Cyril; Callac, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial cox1 gene, encoding the largest subunit of the cytochrome oxidase of the Basidiomycota Agaricus bisporus has been achieved. It has the longest cox1 gene (29,902 nt) with the largest number of group I introns (18 group I introns) reported to date in any eukaryote. The group I introns in the A. bisporus cox1 gene are similar to those reported in other Basidiomycetes includeing: 3 of the 4 introns in Agrocybe aegerita, 7 of the 9 introns in Pleu...

  18. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  19. Application of ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Compare the Cell Materials of Wood Decay Fungi with Wood Mould Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Shankar Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood fungi create vast damage among standing trees and all types of wood materials. The objectives of this study are to (a characterize the cell materials of two major wood decay fungi (Basidiomycota, namely, Trametes versicolor and Postia placenta, and (b compare the cell materials of decay fungi with four wood mould fungi (Ascomycota, namely, Aureobasidium pullulans, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Ulocladium atrum. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy is used to characterize the microbial cellular materials. The results showed that the IR bands for the fatty acid at ∼2900 cm−1 were different for the two-decay-fungi genre. Postia placenta shows more absorbance peaks at the fatty acid region. Band ratio indices for amide I and amide II from protein amino acids were higher for the mould fungi (Ascomycota than the decay fungi (Basidiomycota. Similarly, the band ratio index calculated for the protein end methyl group was found to be higher for the mould fungi than the decay fungi. Mould fungi along with the decay fungi demonstrated a positive correlation (R2=0.75 between amide I and amide II indices. The three-component multivariate, principal component analysis showed a strong correlation of amide and protein band indices.

  20. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power and Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power and plasma technologies are described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power are developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as germination control of plants such as Basidiomycota and arabidopsis inactivation of bacteria in soil and liquid medium of hydroponics; extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables; decontamination of air and liquid, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power and plasma are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei. This paper mainly describes the application of the pulsed power for the germination control of Basidiomycota i.e. mushroom, inactivation of fungi in the soil and the liquid medium in hydroponics, and extraction of polyphenol from skins of grape.

  1. Novel and highly diverse fungal endophytes in soybean revealed by the consortium of two different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Leite, Tiago; Cnossen-Fassoni, Andréia; Pereira, Olinto Liparini; Mizubuti, Eduardo Seiti Gomide; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2013-02-01

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from the leaves of soybean cultivars in Brazil using two different isolation techniques - fragment plating and the innovative dilution-to-extinction culturing - to increase the species richness, frequency of isolates and diversity. A total of 241 morphospecies were obtained corresponding to 62 taxa that were identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The Phylum Ascomycota predominated, representing 99% and 95.2% of isolates in the Monsoy and Conquista cultivars, respectively, whereas the Phylum Basidiomycota represented 1% and 4.8% of isolates, respectively. The genera Ampelomyces, Annulohypoxylon, Guignardia, Leptospora, Magnaporthe, Ophiognomonia, Paraconiothyrium, Phaeosphaeriopsis, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, and Xylaria for the first time were isolated from soybean; this suggests that soybean harbours novel and highly diverse fungi. The yeasts genera Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces (subphylum Pucciniomycotina) represent the Phylum Basidiomycota. The species richness was greater when both isolation techniques were used. The diversity of fungal endophytes was similar in both cultivars when the same isolation technique was used except for Hill's index, N1. The use of ITS region sequences allowed the isolates to be grouped according to Order, Class and Phylum. Ampelomyces, Chaetomium, and Phoma glomerata are endophytic species that may play potential roles in the biological control of soybean pathogens. This study is one of the first to apply extinction-culturing to isolate fungal endophytes in plant leaves, thus contributing to the development and improvement of this technique for future studies.

  2. Genome of Diaporthe sp. provides insights into the potential inter-phylum transfer of a fungal sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena Filho, Jose Guedes; Quin, Maureen B.; Spakowicz, Daniel J; Shaw, Jeffrey J.; Kucera, Kaury; Dunican, Brian; Strobel, Scott A.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Fungi have highly active secondary metabolic pathways which enable them to produce a wealth of sesquiterpenoids that are bioactive. One example is Δ6-protoilludene, the precursor to the cytotoxic illudins, which are pharmaceutically relevant as anticancer therapeutics. To date, this valuable sesquiterpene has only been identified in members of the fungal division Basidiomycota. To explore the untapped potential of fungi belonging to the division Ascomycota in producing Δ6-protoilludene, we isolated the a fungal endophyte Diaporthe sp. BR109 and show that it produces a diversity of terpenoids including Δ6-protoilludene. Using a genome sequencing and mining approach 17 putative novel sesquiterpene synthases were identified in Diaporthe sp. BR109. A phylogenetic approach was used to predict which gene encodes Δ6-protoilludene synthase, which was then confirmed experimentally. These analyses reveal that the sesquiterpene synthase and its putative sesquiterpene scaffold modifying cytochrome P450(s) may have been acquired by inter-phylum horizontal gene transfer from Basidiomycota to Ascomycota. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that inter-phylum transfer of these minimal sequiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways may have occurred in other fungi. This work provides insights into the evolution of fungal sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways in the production of pharmaceutically relevant bioactive natural products. PMID:27521636

  3. Mycorrhizal diversity in Apostasia (Orchidaceae) indicates the origin and evolution of orchid mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Tomohisa; Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Shefferson, Richard P; Yokoyama, Jun

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated that "orchid mycorrhiza," a specialized mycorrhizal type, appeared in the common ancestor of the largest plant family Orchidaceae and that the fungal partner shifted from Glomeromycota to a particular clade of Basidiomycota in association with this character evolution. Several unique mycorrhizal characteristics may have contributed to the diversification of the family. However, the origin of orchid mycorrhiza and the diversity of mycobionts across orchid lineages still remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the mycorrhizae of five Apostasia taxa, members of the earliest-diverging clade of Orchidaceae. The results of molecular identification using nrDNA ITS and LSU regions showed that Apostasia mycorrhizal fungi belong to families Botryobasidiaceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, which fall within the order Cantharellales of Basidiomycota. Most major clades in Orchidaceae also form mycorrhizae with members of Cantharellales, while the sister group and other closely related groups to Orchidaceae (i.e., Asparagales except for orchids and the "commelinid" families) ubiquitously form symbioses with Glomeromycota to form arbuscular mycorrhizae. This pattern of symbiosis indicates that a major shift in fungal partner occurred in the common ancestor of the Orchidaceae.

  4. Communities of fungi in decomposed wood of oak and pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśna Hanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and diversity of wood decomposing fungi were investigated by isolating and cultivating filamentous fungi from wood and by detection of fruit bodies of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous fungi. The objective was to study the impact of forest management on fungi in 100-year-old oak and 87-year-old Scots pine forests in Northern Poland. Fungi were found on coarse woody debris of decayed stumps and fallen logs, boughs and branches in each of the three (managed and unmanaged examined stands. In total, 226 species of Oomycota and fungi were recorded. Oak wood was colonized by one species of Oomycota and 141 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (103 species and Basidiomycota (19 species. Scots pine wood was also colonized by one species of Oomycota and 138 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (90 species and Basidiomycota (29 species. In the first, second and third stages of decomposition, the oak wood was colonized by 101, 89 and 56 species of fungi respectively and pine wood was colonized by 82, 103 and 47 species respectively. Eighty three of the observed species (37% occurred on both types of wood, while the other species displayed nutritional preferences. A decrease in the number of species with advancing decay indicates the necessity for a continuous supply of dead wood to the forest ecosystem.

  5. Links between Soil Fungal Diversity and Plant and Soil Properties on the Loess Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed inconsistent correlations between fungal diversity and plant/soil properties from local to global scales. Here, we investigated the internal relationships between soil fungal diversity and plant/soil properties on the Loess Plateau following vegetation restoration, using Illumina sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 region for fungal identification. We found significant effects of land use types (Af, Artificial forest; Ns, Natural shrub; Ag, Artificial grassland; Ng, Natural grassland; Sc, slope cropland on soil fungal communities composition, and the dominant phyla were Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota, which transitioned from Basidiomycota-dominant to Ascomycota-dominant community due to vegetation restoration. The Chao1 richness, Shannon’s diversity and ACE indices were significantly influenced by land use types with the order of Ns > Af > Ng > Ag > Sc, and the total number of OTUs varied widely. In contrast, Good’s coverage and Simpson’s diversity indicated no significant difference among land use types (p > 0.05. Correlation analysis showed that plant and soil properties were closely related to fungal diversity regardless of land use types. In addition, soil organic carbon (SOC and Hplant (plant richness, Shannon-Wiener index were strong driving factors that explained fungal diversity. As revealed by the structural equation model (SEM and generalized additive models (GAMs, fungal diversity was directly and indirectly affected by soil and plant properties, respectively, providing evidence for strong links between soil fungal diversity and plant and soil properties on the Loess Plateau.

  6. Fungi associated with chimney and sulfide samples from a South Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal site: Distribution, diversity and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems are known to support remarkably diverse microbial communities, ranging from chemoautotrophic prokaryotes to heterotrophic prokaryotes and microeukaryotes. While fungi have generally been identified as an important component of various microbial communities in the environment, little is known about the species richness and abundance of such microorganisms in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. In this study, a combined culture-dependent and culture-independent sequence-based approach was used to investigate fungal distribution and diversity at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent site located at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of the South Atlantic Ocean. Sequence analyses showed that the fungal community was dominated by members of the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. Several new phylotypes (28 of 65 total fungal OTUs and 2 of 19 culturable fungal phylotypes) were identified, contributing to the literally unknown diversity of fungi in this understudied habitat. The fungal community structures in the chimney samples were distinct from those in three sulfide samples. The qPCR results revealed that fungal LSU rRNA gene copy numbers ranged from 5.88×105 to 6.77×106 copies/gram rock (wet weight), and the Ascomycota was significantly more abundant 2-3 orders) than the Basidiomycota. Our findings provide new insights into the diversity and abundance of fungi in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems, which increases our knowledge and understanding of the fungal diversity in deep-sea environments.

  7. Comparative Metagenomics Reveal Phylum Level Temporal and Spatial Changes in Mycobiome of Belowground Parts of Crocus sativus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Ambardar

    Full Text Available Plant-fungal associations have been explored by routine cultivation based approaches and cultivation based approaches cannot catalogue more than 5% of fungal diversity associated with any niche. In the present study, an attempt has been made to catalogue fungal diversity associated with belowground parts i.e. rhizosphere and cormosphere, of Crocus sativus (an economically important herb during two growth stages, using cultivation independent ITS gene targeted approach, taking bulk soil as reference. The 454 pyrosequencing sequence data analysis suggests that the fungal diversity was niche and growth stage specific. Fungi diversity, in the present case, was not only different between the two organs (roots and corm but the dominance pattern varies between the cormosphere during two growth stages. Zygomycota was dominant fungal phylum in the rhizosphere whereas Basidiomycota was dominant in cormosphere during flowering stage. However in cormosphere though Basidiomycota was dominant phylum during flowering stage but Zygomycota was dominant during dormant stage. Interestingly, in cormosphere, the phyla which was dominant at dormant stage was rare at flowering stage and vice-versa (Basidiomycota: Flowering = 93.2% Dormant = 0.05% and Zygomycota: Flowering = 0.8% Dormant = 99.7%. At genus level, Rhizopus was dominant in dormant stage but was rare in flowering stage (Rhizopus: Dormant = 99.7% Flowering = 0.55%. This dynamics is not followed by the bulk soil fungi which was dominated by Ascomycota during both stages under study. The genus Fusarium, whose species F. oxysporum causes corm rot in C. sativus, was present during both stages with slightly higher abundance in roots. Interestingly, the abundance of Rhizopus varied a great deal in two stages in cormosphere but the abundance of Fusarium was comparable in two growth stages (Bulk soil Flowering = 0.05%, Rhizosphere Flowering = 1.4%, Cormosphere Flowering = 0.06%, Bulk soil Dormant = 2.47% and

  8. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  9. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  10. Anti-inflammatory properties of edible mushrooms: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Bożena; Grzywacz-Kisielewska, Agata; Kała, Katarzyna; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna

    2018-03-15

    Mushrooms have been used extensively, owing to their nutritional and medicinal value, for thousands of years. Modern research confirms the therapeutic effect of traditionally used species. Inflammation is a natural response of the immune system to damaging factors, e.g. physical, chemical and pathogenic. Deficiencies of antioxidants, vitamins, and microelements, as well as physiological processes, such as aging, can affect the body's ability to resolve inflammation. Mushrooms are rich in anti-inflammatory components, such as polysaccharides, phenolic and indolic compounds, mycosteroids, fatty acids, carotenoids, vitamins, and biometals. Metabolites from mushrooms of the Basidiomycota taxon possess antioxidant, anticancer, and most significantly, anti-inflammatory properties. Recent reports indicate that edible mushroom extracts exhibit favourable therapeutic and health-promoting benefits, particularly in relation to diseases associated with inflammation. In all certainty, edible mushrooms can be referred to as a "superfood" and are recommended as a valuable constituent of the daily diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The gut mycobiome of elderly danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bin Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan; Castro Mejia, Josue Leonardo; Kot, Witold

    mycobiome on health and disease in elderly remain sparsely investigated. Consequently, the aim of this study was to characterise the feacal mycobiota in relation to host health parameters.Feacal samples from 99 healthy individuals ranging from 65 to 81 years old were collected, and fungal composition...... categories associated with the clinical features among individuals.The elderly gut is home to three main phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Zygomycota, with genera Penicillium, Candida, and Aspergillus being particularly common. Based on HbA1c-levels, the individuals could be clustered into 3 groups, High...... glucose level.Collectively, these findings suggest that the presences of specific gut mycobiome member is associated with glycemic behaviours among the healthy individuals of the elderly Danes population....

  12. Endophytic Fungal Communities Associated with Vascular Plants in the High Arctic Zone Are Highly Diverse and Host-Plant Specific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available This study assessed the diversity and distribution of endophytic fungal communities associated with the leaves and stems of four vascular plant species in the High Arctic using 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the ITS region. Endophytic fungal communities showed high diversity. The 76,691 sequences obtained belonged to 250 operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Of these OTUs, 190 belonged to Ascomycota, 50 to Basidiomycota, 1 to Chytridiomycota, and 9 to unknown fungi. The dominant orders were Helotiales, Pleosporales, Capnodiales, and Tremellales, whereas the common known fungal genera were Cryptococcus, Rhizosphaera, Mycopappus, Melampsora, Tetracladium, Phaeosphaeria, Mrakia, Venturia, and Leptosphaeria. Both the climate and host-related factors might shape the fungal communities associated with the four Arctic plant species in this region. These results suggested the presence of an interesting endophytic fungal community and could improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Diversity of Endophytic Fungi Associated with Taraxacum coreanum and Their Antifungal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Kim, Won Ki; Woo, Sung Kyoon; Park, Myung Soo; Yu, Seung Hun

    2006-12-01

    Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaf and root samples of Taraxacum coreanum. Of the 72 isolates recovered, 39 were from leaves and 33 from roots with an isolation frequency of 54% and 46%, respectively. Based on ITS sequence analysis, 72 isolates were classified into 19 genera of which 17 were under the phylum Ascomycota and 2 were under Basidiomycota. Diverse genera were found and Alternaria, Cladosporium, Fusarium and Phoma were dominant. Out of 19 genera, Apodus, Ceriporia, Dothideales, Leptodontidium, Nemania, Neoplaconema, Phaeosphaeria, Plectosphaerella and Terfezia were new to Korea. Seventy two isolates were screened for antifungal activity, of which 10 isolates (14%) were found active at least against one of the tested fungi. Isolate 050603 had the widest antifungal spectra of activity, and isolates 050592 and 050611 were active against three plant pathogenic fungi.

  14. Lichensphere: a protected natural microhabitat of the non-lichenised fungal communities living in extreme environments of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Iara F; Soares, Marco Aurélio; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed the diversity, distribution and ecology of non-lichenised fungal communities associated with the Antarctic lichens Usnea antarctica and Usnea aurantiaco-atra across Antarctica. The phylogenetic study of the 438 fungi isolates identified 74 taxa from 21 genera of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Zygomycota. The most abundant taxa were Pseudogymnoascus sp., Thelebolus sp., Antarctomyces psychrotrophicus and Cryptococcus victoriae, which are considered endemic and/or highly adapted to Antarctica. Thirty-five fungi may represent new and/or endemic species. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, the similarity among the communities was variable. After discovering rich and diverse fungal communities composed of symbionts, decomposers, parasites and endemic and cold-adapted cosmopolitan taxa, we introduced the term "lichensphere". We hypothesised that the lichensphere may represent a protected natural microhabitat with favourable conditions able to help non-lichenised fungi and other Antarctic life forms survive and disperse in the extreme environments of Antarctica.

  15. The spectrum of allergic fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan; Caruthers, Carrie; Azmeh, Roua; Dykewicz, Mark S; Slavin, Raymond G; Knutsen, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    Fungi cause a wide spectrum of fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways. There are three main phyla involved in allergic fungal disease: (1) Ascomycota (2) Basidiomycota (3) Zygomycota. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) causes chronic rhinosinusitis symptoms and is caused predominantly by Aspergillus fumigatus in India and Bipolaris in the United States. The recommended treatment approach for AFRS is surgical intervention and systemic steroids. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (APBA) is most commonly diagnosed in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Long term systemic steroids are the mainstay treatment option for ABPA with the addition of an antifungal medication. Fungal sensitization or exposure increases a patient's risk of developing severe asthma and has been termed severe asthma associated with fungal sensitivity (SAFS). Investigating for triggers and causes of a patient's asthma should be sought to decrease worsening progression of the disease.

  16. Cultivation of Agaricus bisporus (button mushroom and its usages in the biosynthesis of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owaid Mustafa Nadhim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available White button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus, Higher Basidiomycota, is a very important nutritional and medicinal species which is used for recycling agrowastes including wheat straw, reed plant wastes, waste paper, oat straw, waste tea leaves, some water plants and others. A. bisporus has many usages in human dietary and pharmaceutical fields due to its composition of essential amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, low calories, crude fibers, trace elements and vitamins. Recently synthesized nanoparticles from A. bisporus were used to treat cancer, viral, bacterial and fungal diseases. The goal of this review is to highlight recent data about recycling wastes for Agaricus production and applications of A. bisporus as a reducing agent in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. Organically produced foods are currently highly desirable, but it can also be used for ecofriendly biosynthesis of nanoparticles.

  17. Culturable halotolerant fungal isolates from Southern California Gulf sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Martínez Sophia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine fungal biodiversity as a new precursor of biotechnology products is poorly studied compared to its terrestrial counterpart which has been used as a rich source of bioactive compounds. Because of the importance of marine fungi, we present here the first marine cultivable fungal isolates from sea sediments of 43 to 311 m depth from the Southern California Gulf, Mexico. Seventeen selected halotolerant fungi were isolated and identified by sequencing their ITS 1 and 2 genes. They belong to the phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota (16 and 1 isolates. Cladosporium spp were represented by 29%, Aspergillus spp by 24%, Talaromyces spp by 12% and other species by 35%. Two fungi showed antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus.

  18. Biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes: effects of cleaning on biofilm microbial communities, membrane performance, and adherence of extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ashhab, Ashraf; Sweity, Amer; Bayramoglu, Bihter; Herzberg, Moshe; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory-scale reverse osmosis (RO) flat-sheet systems were used with two parallel flow cells, one treated with cleaning agents and a control (ie undisturbed). The cleaning efforts increased the affinity of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to the RO membrane and altered the biofilm surface structure. Analysis of the membrane biofilm community composition revealed the dominance of Proteobacteria. However, within the phylum Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria dominated the cleaned membrane biofilm, while β-Proteobacteria dominated the control biofilm. The composition of the fungal phyla was also altered by cleaning, with enhancement of Ascomycota and suppression of Basidiomycota. The results suggest that repeated cleaning cycles select for microbial groups that strongly attach to the RO membrane surface by producing rigid and adhesive EPS that hampers membrane performance.

  19. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakes, Aimée; van der Wiel, Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W. J.; van Leeuwen, Johan L.; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill. Methods We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting. Results Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10−9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi), or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals), or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to −197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi). The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential) energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1) in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum) by compression of the spore and droplets and (2) in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5

  20. Who is out there? What are they doing? Application of metagenomics and metaproteomics to reveal soil functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Mello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to link microbial community composition to ecological processes happening in the brûlé, a metaproteomics analysis was applied to a brûlé previously characterized by metagenomics. The metagenomics data had showed a reduced fungal biodiversity, a dominance of Tuber melanosporum and a reduced presence both of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and of bacteria belonged to Pseudomonas and Flavobacteriaceae inside the brûlé. By metaproteomics analysis, the identified proteins revealed which biological processes were more represented or only present in the brûlé, and, among them, processes related to multiple stresses were identified in herbaceous plants. This study demonstrates that combining the data of metagenomics and metaproteomics gives the opportunity to potentially reveal the functioning of any environment.

  1. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée Sakes

    Full Text Available In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill.We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting.Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10-9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi, or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals, or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to -197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi. The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1 in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum by compression of the spore and droplets and (2 in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5,413,000g in

  2. Toward a stable classification of genera within the Entolomataceae: a phylogenetic re-evaluation of the Rhodocybe-Clitopilus clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluting, Kerri L; Baroni, Timothy J; Bergemann, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent molecular systematic analyses of the Entolomataceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota), a robust classification of genera supported by morphological and phylogenetic evidence remains unresolved for this cosmopolitan family of pink-spored fungi. Here, a phylogenetic analysis for one of the two major clades (Rhodocybe-Clitopilus) was conducted using three nuclear protein-coding gene regions, the mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 6 (atp6), the nuclear RNA polymerase subunit II (rpb2) and the nuclear translation elongation factor subunit 1-α (tef1). Five monophyletic groups are resolved with strong statistical support and a set of morphological features for delineation of genera is presented. In the revised classification proposed here, Clitopilus is retained, Rhodocybe is emended, two genera previously accepted as synonyms of Rhodocybe (Clitopilopsis and Rhodophana) are resurrected and Clitocella is described as new. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  3. Improving phylogenetic inference of mushrooms with RPB1 and RPB2 nucleotide sequences (Inocybe; Agaricales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, P Brandon

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 3000 bp across 84 taxa have been analyzed for variable regions of RPB1, RPB2, and nLSU-rDNA to infer phylogenetic relationships in the large ectomycorrhizal mushroom genus Inocybe (Agaricales; Basidiomycota). This study represents the first effort to combine variable regions of RPB1 and RPB2 with nLSU-rDNA for low-level phylogenetic studies in mushroom-forming fungi. Combination of the three loci increases non-parametric bootstrap support, Bayesian posterior probabilities, and resolution for numerous clades compared to separate gene analyses. These data suggest the evolution of at least five major lineages in Inocybe-the Inocybe clade, the Mallocybe clade, the Auritella clade, the Inosperma clade, and the Pseudosperma clade. Additionally, many clades nested within each major lineage are strongly supported. These results also suggest the family Crepiodataceae sensu stricto is sister to Inocybe. Recognition of Inocybe at the family level, the Inocybaceae, is recommended.

  4. Four New Species of Amanita in Inje County, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hae Jin; Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Jang, Yeongseon; Fong, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Amanita (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) is one of the most well-known genera composed of poisonous mushrooms. This genus of almost 500 species is distributed worldwide. Approximately 240 macrofungi were collected through an ongoing survey of indigenous fungi of Mt. Jeombong in Inje County, Korea in 2014. Among these specimens, 25 were identified as members of Amanita using macroscopic features. Specimens were identified to the species level by microscopic features and molecular sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA. We molecularly identified 13 Amanita species, with seven species matching previously recorded species, four species (A. caesareoides, A. griseoturcosa, A. imazekii, and A. sepiacea) new to Korea, and two unknown species. PMID:26839500

  5. Fungi on the skin: dermatophytes and Malassezia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Theodore C; Findley, Keisha; Dawson, Thomas L; Scheynius, Annika; Boekhout, Teun; Cuomo, Christina A; Xu, Jun; Saunders, Charles W

    2014-08-01

    Several human skin diseases and disorders are associated with two groups of fungi, the dermatophytes and Malassezia. Although these skin-related problems are not generally life threatening, they are among the most common diseases and disorders of mankind. These fungi are phylogenetically divergent, with the dermatophytes within the Ascomycota and Malassezia within Basidiomycota. Genome analysis indicates that the adaptations to the skin environment are different in these two groups of fungi. Malassezia are dependent on host lipids and secrete lipases and phospholipases that likely release host fatty acids. The dermatophytes encode multiple enzymes with potential roles in modulating host interactions: polyketide synthases, nonribosomal peptide synthetases, LysM, proteases, kinases, and pseudokinases. These two fungal groups have maximized their interactions with the host using two very different mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. The threatened plant intermediate wintergreen (Pyrola media) associates with a wide range of biotrophic fungi in native Scottish pine woods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Tenna; Iason, Glenn R.; Alexander, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    in a Scots pine forest was determined by morphotyping, polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing. Molecular identification found 49 taxa representing ecto- and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, dark septate endophytes, saprotrophs, and fungi of unknown trophic status. The majority of the taxa (67.4%) were...... that they associate with a restricted range of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. Here, we examined the hypothesis that specialisation by P. media for fungi usually associated with Scots pine is a factor in promoting its occurrence in this habitat. The fungal community associated with the roots of P. media growing...... Basidiomycota, with 24.4% known to be ECM fungi specific to Pinus sp. or conifers. However, a wide range of other mycorrhizal fungi with varying degrees of host specificity were also found, including taxa usually associated with deciduous hosts. In conclusion, the broad range of mycorrhizal fungi recovered from...

  7. Analysis of indole compounds in Armillaria mellea fruiting bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Bozena; Maślanka, Anna; Ekiert, Halina; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    A TLC method with densitometric detection for identification and quantitation of indole compounds in methanolic extracts of fruiting bodies of Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) P. Kumm. (Basidiomycota)--Honey mushroom has been developed. The TLC method with densitometric detection was validated for determination of tryptamine and serotonin contents. The use of this chromatographic-densitometric method for analysis of extracts allowed for a precise, easy and quick determination of the compounds under study. We identified three physiologically active indole compounds: tryptamine. L- tryptophan and serotonin. This analysis demonstrated the highest contents of L-tryptophan (4.467 mg/100 g d.w.). The contents of tryptamine were comparable with the contents of serotonin and amounted to: 2.740 and 2.207 mg/100 g d. w.

  8. Contribution to the knowledge of the fungal biodiversity of Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pancorbo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues the taxonomic revision of the species collected during the campaign of 2015 in the National Park of Ordesa and Monte Perdido. 409 taxa are added to the previous inventory, some of them from alpine-subalpine ecology, of which 76% correspond to phylum Basidiomycota and 22.2% to Ascomycota. They are presented in the form of a check-list, followed by 20 selected taxonomic descriptions of interesting, infrequent species, and those though to be new in the peninsular territory. Among the species determined, six species were included in the proposals for the inventory of protected species of the Iberian Peninsula and/or Aragon. This paper presents a first approximation, as a platform for later evaluations, of the beech conservation degree in some forests from the Park through the occurrence of indicator species.

  9. The MycoKey 3.1 DVD. Included in Knudsen, H. & Vesterholt, J. (eds.). Funga Nordica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    MycoKey enables the user to identify fungal genera (fruitbody forming Basidiomycota and discomycetes) by means of a digital, synoptical key. This key offers a very different way of choosing between genera than the traditional analytical key and the the two approaches complete each other nicely....... It is, of course, also possible to do a direct search on a name in MycoKey in order to find a genus or a particular species. MycoKey gives access to more than 4,000 illustrations of fungi and more than 17,000 links to references. From within the genera you can also open the Funga Nordica keys in a a pdf...

  10. Cultured and uncultured fungal diversity in deep-sea environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Takahiko; Nagano, Yuriko

    2012-01-01

    The importance of fungi found in deep-sea extreme environments is becoming increasingly recognized. In this chapter, current scientific findings on the fungal diversity in several deep-sea environments by conventional culture and culture-independent methods are reviewed and discussed, primarily focused on culture-independent approaches. Fungal species detected by conventional culture methods mostly belonged to Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla. Culture-independent approaches have revealed the presence of highly novel fungal phylotypes, including new taxonomic groups placed in deep branches within the phylum Chytridiomycota and unknown ancient fungal groups. Future attempts to culture these unknown fungal groups may provide key insights into the early evolution of fungi and their ecological and physiological significance in deep-sea environments.

  11. Assessment of macrofungal diversity in a Silver Fir plantation in Sardinia (Italy using a standardized sampling procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Ambrosio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of macrofungal diversity associated with Silver Fir forests in Italy is quite scarce. Only a little information is available about macrofungal communities from some Ligurian and Tuscan Silver Fir sites. This study aims to assess the macrofungal diversity of a Silver Fir plantation in Sardinia by the application of a standardized sampling procedure. A total of 606 sporomata were collected and 52 Basidiomycota were identified. The high value of the Shannon Index indicated a considerable level of macrofungal diversity in this plantation. The results were also compared with the diversity indices obtained by a previous 3-years long sampling methodology in the same site. The comparison of the macrofungal diversity values of the Sardinian site with those of the Ligurian Silver Fir forest revealed interesting similarities among natural versus planted coniferous forests.

  12. Diversity and biochemical features of culturable fungi from the coastal waters of Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fungi play a major role in various biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. However, fungi in marine environments remain to be one of the most under-studied microbial groups. This study investigates the diversity of planktonic fungi from the coastal habitat off Pearl River Delta (China) using culture-dependent approach. A total of 22 fungi and 9 yeast isolates were recovered from 30 seawater and 2 sediment samples. Microscopic and ITS rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that most of the fungi belonged to the phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota with a very small percentage (3%) of the subphylum Mucoromycotina of the Phylum Zygomycota. Most of these fungal isolates exhibited considerable production of extracellular enzymes, cellulase, lipase and laccase. Fungal isolates of two genera Mucor and Aspergillus sp. demonstrated pelletization capability over a wide range of pH, suggesting them as potential agents towards algae harvesting and wastewater treatment. PMID:25401065

  13. Fungal diversity in soils across a gradient of preserved Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Araujo, Ademir Sergio; Bezerra, Walderly Melgaço; Dos Santos, Vilma Maria; Nunes, Luis Alfredo Pinheiro Leal; de Lyra, Maria do Carmo Catanho Pereira; do Vale Barreto Figueiredo, Marcia; Melo, Vania Maria Maciel

    2017-04-01

    The preserved Cerrado from Northeastern Brazil presents different physicochemical properties and plant diversity, which can influence the fungal communities. Therefore, we evaluated the fungal diversity in preserved sites, at Sete Cidades National Park, across a gradient of vegetation that included Campo graminoide, Cerrado stricto sensu, Cerradao, and Floresta decidual. Of all of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained, the Floresta decidual presented the highest richness. Ascomycota were the most abundant phylum (45%), followed by Basidiomycota (32%). Basal fungi and other phyla accounted for 23% of the total dataset. Agaricomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Basidiobolus, Dothideomycetes, and Taphrinomycetes were the most abundant classes of fungi found across the gradient of Cerrado vegetation. In conclusion, our study suggests that the Brazilian Cerrado from Sete Cidades National Park presents a high fungal diversity and includes sources of new fungal species for biotechnological purposes.

  14. Anticancer effect of triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lijun; Li, Sumei; Zhuo, Yumin; Chen, Jianfan; Qin, Xiaoping; Guo, Guoqing

    2017-12-01

    Ganoderma lucidum , within the Polyporaceae family of Basidiomycota, is a popular traditional remedy medicine used in Asia to promote health and longevity. Compounds extracted from G. lucidum have revealed anticancer, antioxidant and liver protective effects. G. lucidum has been associated with prostate cancer cells. G. lucidum extracts contain numerous bioactive components; however, the exact functional monomer is unknown and the role of triterpenes from G. lucidum (GLT) in prostate cancer remain obscure. The present study investigated the effects of GLT on cell viability, migration, invasion and apoptosis in DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. The results demonstrated that a high dose (2 mg/ml) of GLT inhibits cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner by the regulation of matrix metalloproteases. Furthermore, GLT induced apoptosis of DU-145 cells. In general, GLT exerts its effect on cancer cells via numerous mechanisms and may have potential therapeutic use for the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  15. Co-evolution of enzyme function in the attine ant-fungus symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    Introduction: Fungus-growing ants cultivate specialized fungi in the tribe Leucocoprineae (Lepiotaceae: Basidiomycota) inside their nests. The conspicuous leaf-cutting ants in the genus Atta build huge nests displacing several cubic meters of soil, whereas lower attine genera such as Cyphomyrmex...... have small nests with a fungus garden the size of a table-tennis ball. Only the leaf-cutting ants are specialized on using fresh leaves as substrate for their fungus gardens, whereas the more basal attine genera use substrates such as dry plant material (leaf litter and small twigs) and also insect...... of substrate use in all extant fungus-growing ant genera to know the range of substrates used for any particular ant genus. (2.) Field assays of enzyme activity in fungus gardens of five candidate enzymes (Amylase, proteinase, pectinase, cellulose and xylanase) to indicate differences in enzyme activity...

  16. Free-living fungal symbionts (Lepiotaceae) of fungus-growing ants (Attini: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tanya L; Mueller, Ulrich G; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    Surveys of leucocoprinaceous fungi (Lepiotaceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota) in the rainforests of Panama and Brazil revealed several free-living counterparts of fungi cultivated by primitive attine ants (the lower Attini, Formicidae, Hymenoptera), adding to two such collections identified in a survey by Mueller et al (1998). The accumulated evidence supports the hypothesis that perhaps all fungi of lower attine ants have close free-living relatives. Free-living counterparts of ant-cultivated fungi are collected most readily during the early rainy season; in particular these are free-living mushrooms of fungal counterparts that are cultivated as yeasts in gardens of ants in the Cyphomyrmex rimosus group. Free-living and symbiotic fungi of these yeast-cultivating ant species might represent a promising study system to compare the biology of sympatric, conspecific fungi existing outside versus inside the attine symbiosis.

  17. The community distribution of bacteria and fungi on ancient wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yantian; Zhang, He; Du, Ye; Tian, Tian; Xiang, Ting; Liu, Xiande; Wu, Fasi; An, Lizhe; Wang, Wanfu; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-13

    In this study, we compared the microbial communities colonising ancient cave wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes exhibiting signs of biodeterioration. Ten samples were collected from five different caves built during different time periods and analysed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The clone library results revealed high microbial diversity, including the bacterial groups Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi and the fungal groups Euascomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Plectomycetes, Pezizomycetes, Zygomycota, and Basidiomycota. The bacterial community structures differed among the samples, with no consistent temporal or spatial trends. However, the fungal community diversity index correlated with the building time of the caves independent of environmental factors (e.g., temperature or relative humidity). The enrichment cultures revealed that many culturable strains were highly resistant to various stresses and thus may be responsible for the damage to cave paintings in the Mogao Grottoes.

  18. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakes, Aimée; van der Wiel, Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W J; van Leeuwen, Johan L; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill. We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting. Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10-9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi), or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals), or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to -197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi). The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential) energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1) in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum) by compression of the spore and droplets and (2) in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5,413,000g in cnidarians, the

  19. Proteomic analysis of germinating urediniospores of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, causal agent of Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Douglas G; McMahon, Michael B; Carter, Melissa L; Fortis, Laurie L; Nuñez, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is an obligate pathogen that causes Asian soybean rust. Asian soybean rust has an unusually broad host range and infects by direct penetration through the leaf cuticle. In order to understand the early events in the infection process, it is important to identify and characterize proteins in P. pachyrhizi. Germination of the urediniospore is the first stage in the infection process and represents a critical life stage applicable to studies with this obligate pathogen. We have applied a 2-DE and MS approach to identify 117 proteins from the National Center of Biotechnology Information nonredundant protein database and a custom database of Basidiomycota EST sequences. Proteins with roles in primary metabolism, energy transduction, stress, cellular regulation and signaling were identified in this study. This data set is accessible at http://world-2dpage.expasy.org/repository/database=0018.

  20. First detection of Endogone ectomycorrhizas in natural oak forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Endo, Naoki; Degawa, Yousuke; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Akiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The order Endogonales in Mucoromycotina, an early divergent lineage of fungi, includes ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. This order is therefore considered a key taxon for elucidation of the evolution of EM associations. Recent studies have revealed high diversity of EM lineages of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota; however, EM associations of Endogonales and its relatives remain largely unknown. In this study, EM root tips with a unique fungal sheath, with aseptate and highly branched hyphae of variable widths, were identified in Quercus acutissima and Quercus crispula forests in the temperate zone of Japan. The mycobionts were confirmed as Endogone sp., which were placed as a sister clade of Endogone pisiformis, based on phylogenetic analyses of the small and large subunits of the nuclear ribosomal RNA and elongation factor-1α genes. This is the first report of EM of Endogone in natural forests of the Northern Hemisphere and the first finding on Quercus.

  1. Characterisation of seven Inocybe ectomycorrhizal morphotypes from a semiarid woody steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, Diána; Dima, Bálint; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-04-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) of Inocybe species (Inocybaceae, Basidiomycota) formed by three host plant species (Populus alba, Salix rosmarinifolia and Pinus nigra) in a semiarid woody steppe of Hungary were studied. To identify the fungal partners, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences for the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear DNA (nrDNA ITS) together with sequences gained from public databases. Seven Inocybe ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were morpho-anatomically characterised. Five morphotypes were identified (I. phaeoleuca, I. psammophila, I. semifulva, I. splendens and I. subporospora), whereas two morphotypes represented unidentified Inocybe species. Differences were discernible among the morphotypes, and they showed general anatomical characteristics of Inocybe ECM, such as the slightly organised plectenchymatic mantle (types A, B and E and the gelatinous C). The ECM of I. subporospora and I. phaeoleuca were detected from the introduced Pinus nigra. These two fungi are probably native to the area but capable of forming a novel ectomycorrhizal association with the invasive host.

  2. Genus-Wide Comparative Genomics of Malassezia Delineates Its Phylogeny, Physiology, and Niche Adaptation on Human Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxi Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia is a unique lipophilic genus in class Malasseziomycetes in Ustilaginomycotina, (Basidiomycota, fungi that otherwise consists almost exclusively of plant pathogens. Malassezia are typically isolated from warm-blooded animals, are dominant members of the human skin mycobiome and are associated with common skin disorders. To characterize the genetic basis of the unique phenotypes of Malassezia spp., we sequenced the genomes of all 14 accepted species and used comparative genomics against a broad panel of fungal genomes to comprehensively identify distinct features that define the Malassezia gene repertoire: gene gain and loss; selection signatures; and lineage-specific gene family expansions. Our analysis revealed key gene gain events (64 with a single gene conserved across all Malassezia but absent in all other sequenced Basidiomycota. These likely horizontally transferred genes provide intriguing gain-of-function events and prime candidates to explain the emergence of Malassezia. A larger set of genes (741 were lost, with enrichment for glycosyl hydrolases and carbohydrate metabolism, concordant with adaptation to skin's carbohydrate-deficient environment. Gene family analysis revealed extensive turnover and underlined the importance of secretory lipases, phospholipases, aspartyl proteases, and other peptidases. Combining genomic analysis with a re-evaluation of culture characteristics, we establish the likely lipid-dependence of all Malassezia. Our phylogenetic analysis sheds new light on the relationship between Malassezia and other members of Ustilaginomycotina, as well as phylogenetic lineages within the genus. Overall, our study provides a unique genomic resource for understanding Malassezia niche-specificity and potential virulence, as well as their abundance and distribution in the environment and on human skin.

  3. Effects of stand age and soil properties on soil bacterial and fungal community composition in Chinese pine plantations on the Loess Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Dang

    Full Text Available The effects of Chinese pine (Pinus tabuliformis on soil variables after afforestation have been established, but microbial community changes still need to be explored. Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we analyzed bacterial and fungal community composition and diversity in soils from three stands of different-aged, designated 12-year-old (PF1, 29-year-old (PF2, and 53-year-old (PF3, on a Chinese pine plantation and from a natural secondary forest (NSF stand that was almost 80 years old. Abandoned farmland (BL was also analyzed. Shannon index values of both bacterial and fungal community in PF1 were greater than those in PF2, PF3 and NSF. Proteobacteria had the lowest abundance in BL, and the abundance increased with stand age. The abundance of Actinobacteria was greater in BL and PF1 soils than those in other sites. Among fungal communities, the dominant taxa were Ascomycota in BL and PF1 and Basidiomycota in PF2, PF3 and NSF, which reflected the successional patterns of fungal communities during the development of Chinese pine plantations. Therefore, the diversity and dominant taxa of soil microbial community in stands 12 and 29 years of age appear to have undergone significant changes; afterward, the soil microbial community achieved a relatively stable state. Furthermore, the abundances of the most dominant bacterial and fungal communities correlated significantly with organic C, total N, C:N, available N, and available P, indicating the dependence of these microbes on soil nutrients. Overall, our findings suggest that the large changes in the soil microbial community structure of Chinese pine plantation forests may be attributed to the phyla present (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota which were affected by soil carbon and nutrients in the Loess Plateau.

  4. Response of Soil Fungi Community Structure to Salt Vegetation Succession in the Yellow River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yun; Guo, Du-Fa

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology was used to reveal the composition and distribution of fungal community structure in the Yellow River Delta under bare land and four kinds of halophyte vegetation (saline seepweed, Angiospermae, Imperata and Apocynum venetum [A. venetum]). The results showed that the soil quality continuously improved with the succession of salt vegetation types. The soil fungi richness of mild-salt communities (Imperata and A. venetum) was relatively higher, with Shannon index values of 5.21 and 5.84, respectively. The soil fungi richness of severe-salt-tolerant communities (saline seepweed, Angiospermae) was relatively lower, with Shannon index values of 4.64 and 4.66, respectively. The UniFrac metric values ranged from 0.48 to 0.67 when the vegetation was in different succession stages. A total of 60,174 valid sequences were obtained for the five vegetation types, and they were classified into Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. Ascomycota had the greatest advantage among plant communities of Imperata and A. venetum, as indicated by relative abundances of 2.69 and 69.97 %, respectively. Basidiomycota had the greatest advantage among mild-salt communities of saline seepweed and Angiospermae, with relative abundances of 9.43 and 6.64 %, respectively. Soil physical and chemical properties were correlated with the distribution of the fungi, and Mucor was significantly correlated with soil moisture (r = 0.985; P Soil quality, salt vegetation and soil fungi were influenced by each other.

  5. Characterization of Bacterial and Fungal Community Dynamics by High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS) Metabarcoding during Flax Dew-Retting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemiel, Christophe; Grec, Sébastien; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Flax dew-retting is a key step in the industrial extraction of fibers from flax stems and is dependent upon the production of a battery of hydrolytic enzymes produced by micro-organisms during this process. To explore the diversity and dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities involved in this process we applied a high-throughput sequencing (HTS) DNA metabarcoding approach (16S rRNA/ITS region, Illumina Miseq) on plant and soil samples obtained over a period of 7 weeks in July and August 2014. Twenty-three bacterial and six fungal phyla were identified in soil samples and 11 bacterial and four fungal phyla in plant samples. Dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes (bacteria) and Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota (fungi) all of which have been previously associated with flax dew-retting except for Bacteroidetes and Basidiomycota that were identified for the first time. Rare phyla also identified for the first time in this process included Acidobacteria, CKC4, Chlorobi, Fibrobacteres, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae and TM6 (bacteria), and Chytridiomycota (fungi). No differences in microbial communities and colonization dynamics were observed between early and standard flax harvests. In contrast, the common agricultural practice of swath turning affects both bacterial and fungal community membership and structure in straw samples and may contribute to a more uniform retting. Prediction of community function using PICRUSt indicated the presence of a large collection of potential bacterial enzymes capable of hydrolyzing backbones and side-chains of cell wall polysaccharides. Assignment of functional guild (functional group) using FUNGuild software highlighted a change from parasitic to saprophytic trophic modes in fungi during retting. This work provides the first exhaustive description of the microbial communities involved in flax dew-retting and will provide a valuable benchmark in future studies aiming to evaluate

  6. Determining the Pathogenic Potential of Non-sporulating Molds Isolated from Cutaneous Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaprakasam, Nantha Kumar; Razak, Mohd Fuat Abdul; Ahmad, Noor Azimah Binti; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-06-01

    Although non-sporulating molds (NSM) are frequently isolated from patients and have been recognized as agents of pulmonary disease, their clinical significance in cutaneous specimens is relatively unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to identify NSM and to determine the keratinolytic activity of isolates from cutaneous sites. NSM isolates from clinical specimens such as skin, nail, and body fluids were identified based on their ribosomal DNA sequences. Of 17 NSM isolates (7 Ascomycota, 10 Basidiomycota), eleven were identified to species level while five were identified to the genus level. These include Schizophyllum commune, a known human pathogen, Phoma multirostrata, a plant pathogen, and Perenniporia tephropora, a saprophyte. To determine fungal pathogenicity, keratinolytic activity, a major virulence factor, was evaluated ex vivo using human nail samples by measuring dye release from keratin azure, for NSM along with pathogens (Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis and Fusarium spp.) and nonpathogenic (endophyte) fungi for comparison. This study showed that pathogenic fungi had the highest keratinolytic activity (7.13 ± 0.552 keratinase units) while the nonpathogenic endophytes had the lowest activity (2.37 ± 0.262 keratinase units). Keratinolytic activity of two Ascomycota NSM (Guignardia mangiferae and Hypoxylon sp.) and one Basidiomycota NSM (Fomitopsis cf. meliae) was equivalent to that of pathogenic fungi, while Xylaria feejeensis showed significantly higher activity (p < 0.05) than nonpathogenic endophytes. These results indicate that the pathogenic ability of NSM is species dependent; clinical isolates, especially more frequently isolated species, may be involved in disease etiology.

  7. Genus-Wide Comparative Genomics of Malassezia Delineates Its Phylogeny, Physiology, and Niche Adaptation on Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangxi; Zhao, He; Li, Chenhao; Rajapakse, Menaka Priyadarsani; Wong, Wing Cheong; Xu, Jun; Saunders, Charles W; Reeder, Nancy L; Reilman, Raymond A; Scheynius, Annika; Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, Blake Robert; Li, Wenjun; Averette, Anna Floyd; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Heitman, Joseph; Theelen, Bart; Schröder, Markus S; De Sessions, Paola Florez; Butler, Geraldine; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Boekhout, Teun; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Dawson, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    Malassezia is a unique lipophilic genus in class Malasseziomycetes in Ustilaginomycotina, (Basidiomycota, fungi) that otherwise consists almost exclusively of plant pathogens. Malassezia are typically isolated from warm-blooded animals, are dominant members of the human skin mycobiome and are associated with common skin disorders. To characterize the genetic basis of the unique phenotypes of Malassezia spp., we sequenced the genomes of all 14 accepted species and used comparative genomics against a broad panel of fungal genomes to comprehensively identify distinct features that define the Malassezia gene repertoire: gene gain and loss; selection signatures; and lineage-specific gene family expansions. Our analysis revealed key gene gain events (64) with a single gene conserved across all Malassezia but absent in all other sequenced Basidiomycota. These likely horizontally transferred genes provide intriguing gain-of-function events and prime candidates to explain the emergence of Malassezia. A larger set of genes (741) were lost, with enrichment for glycosyl hydrolases and carbohydrate metabolism, concordant with adaptation to skin's carbohydrate-deficient environment. Gene family analysis revealed extensive turnover and underlined the importance of secretory lipases, phospholipases, aspartyl proteases, and other peptidases. Combining genomic analysis with a re-evaluation of culture characteristics, we establish the likely lipid-dependence of all Malassezia. Our phylogenetic analysis sheds new light on the relationship between Malassezia and other members of Ustilaginomycotina, as well as phylogenetic lineages within the genus. Overall, our study provides a unique genomic resource for understanding Malassezia niche-specificity and potential virulence, as well as their abundance and distribution in the environment and on human skin.

  8. Endophytic fungi associated with Macrosolen tricolor and its host Camellia oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng-Liang, Zhou; Shu-Zhen, Yan; Zhen-Ying, Wu; Shuang-Lin, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Endophytic fungi play an important role in terrestrial ecosystem, while little is known about those in hemi-parasitic plants, a group of special plants which absorb nutrients from its hosts by haustoria. The relationship of the endophytes in the two parts of the bipartite systems (hemiparasites together with their hosts) is also poorly understood. Endophytic fungi of a hemi-parasitic plant Macrosolen tricolor, and its host plant Camellia oleifera were investigated and compared in this study. M. tricolor contained rich and diversified endophytic fungi (H' = 2.829), which consisted mainly of ascomycetes, distributed in more than ten orders of four classes (Sordariomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Leotiomycetes and Eurotiomycetes) besides Incertae sedis strains (23.2 % of total). In addition, 2.2 % of isolates were identified to be Basidiomycota, all of which belonged to Agaricomycetes. Obvious differences were observed between the endophytic fungal assembles in the leaves and those in the branches of M. tricolor. The endophytic fungi isolated from C. oleifera distributed in nearly same orders of the four classes of Ascomycota and one class (Agaricomycetes) of Basidiomycota as those from M. tricolor with similar proportion. For both M. tricolor and C. oleifera, Valsa sp. was the dominant endophyte species in the leaves, Torula sp. 1 and Fusarium sp. 1 were the dominant endophytic fungi in the branches. The similarity coefficient of the endophyte assembles in the two host was 64.4 %. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that the endophyte assembles of M. tricolor and C. oleifera were significantly different (p < 0.01).

  9. Fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments of a hydrothermal vent system in the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Gong, Lin-feng; Pang, Ka-Lai; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal sediment is known to support remarkably diverse microbial consortia. In deep sea environments, fungal communities remain less studied despite their known taxonomic and functional diversity. High-throughput sequencing methods have augmented our capacity to assess eukaryotic diversity and their functions in microbial ecology. Here we provide the first description of the fungal community diversity found in deep sea sediments collected at the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) using culture-dependent and high-throughput sequencing approaches. A total of 138 fungal isolates were cultured from seven different sediment samples using various nutrient media, and these isolates were identified to 14 fungal taxa, including 11 Ascomycota taxa (7 genera) and 3 Basidiomycota taxa (2 genera) based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of rDNA. Using illumina HiSeq sequencing, a total of 757,467 fungal ITS2 tags were recovered from the samples and clustered into 723 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to 79 taxa (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota contributed to 99% of all samples) based on 97% sequence similarity. Results from both approaches suggest that there is a high fungal diversity in the deep-sea sediments collected in the SWIR and fungal communities were shown to be slightly different by location, although all were collected from adjacent sites at the SWIR. This study provides baseline data of the fungal diversity and biogeography, and a glimpse to the microbial ecology associated with the deep-sea sediments of the hydrothermal vent system of the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  10. Spatiotemporal Distribution and Assemblages of Planktonic Fungi in the Coastal Waters of the Bohai Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqiong Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fungi play a critical role in the nutrient cycling and ecological function in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Yet, many ecological aspects of their counterparts in coastal ecosystems remain largely elusive. Using high-throughput sequencing, quantitative PCR, and environmental data analyses, we studied the spatiotemporal changes in the abundance and diversity of planktonic fungi and their abiotic and biotic interactions in the coastal waters of three transects along the Bohai Sea. A total of 4362 ITS OTUs were identified and more than 60% of which were unclassified Fungi. Of the classified OTUs three major fungal phyla, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Chytridiomycota were predominant with episodic low dominance phyla Cryptomycota and Mucoromycota (Mortierellales. The estimated average Fungi-specific 18S rRNA gene qPCR abundances varied within 4.28 × 106 and 1.13 × 107copies/L with significantly (P < 0.05 different abundances among the transects suggesting potential influence of the different riverine inputs. The spatiotemporal changes in the OTU abundance of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla coincided significantly (P < 0.05 with nutrients traced to riverine inputs and phytoplankton detritus. Among the eight major fungal orders, the abundance of Hypocreales varied significantly (P < 0.01 across months while Capnodiales, Pleosporales, Eurotiales, and Sporidiobolales varied significantly (P < 0.05 across transects. In addition, our results likely suggest a tripartite interaction model for the association within members of Cryptomycota (hyperparasites, Chytridiomycota (both parasites and saprotrophs, and phytoplankton in the coastal waters. The fungal network featured several hubs and keystone OTUs besides the display of cooperative and competitive relationship within OTUs. These results support the notion that planktonic fungi, hitherto mostly undescribed, play diverse ecological roles in marine habitats and further outline niche processes

  11. Assessment of epiphytic yeast diversity in rice (Oryza sativa) phyllosphere in Thailand by a culture-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Krataithong, Kultara; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-06-01

    The epiphytic yeast diversity in rice phyllosphere in Thailand was investigated by a culture-independent technique based on the RFLP pattern and the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene. Forty-four samples of rice leaf were collected randomly from six provinces. The DNA was extracted from leaf washing samples and the D1/D2 domain was amplified using PCR technique. The PCR products were cloned and then screened by colony PCR. Of total 1121 clones, 451 clones (40.2 %) revealed the D1/D2 domain sequences closely related to sequences of yeasts in GenBank, and they were clustered into 45 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 99 % homology. Of total yeast related clones, 329 clones (72.9 %) were identified as nine known yeast species, which consisted of 314 clones (8 OTUs) in the phylum Basidiomycota including Bullera japonica, Pseudozyma antarctica, Pseudozyma aphidis, Sporobolomyces blumeae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces oryzicola and 15 clones (6 OTUs) in the phylum Ascomycota including Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. The D1/D2 sequences (122 clones) that could not be identified as known yeast species were closest to 3 and 14 species in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, respectively, some of which may be new yeast species. The most predominant species detected was P. antarctica (42.6 %) followed by B. japonica (25.9 %) with 63.6 and 22.7 % frequency of occurrence, respectively. The results of OTU richness of each sampling location revealed that climate condition and sampling location could affect epiphytic yeast diversity in rice phyllosphere.

  12. Carbon:Nitrogen:Phosphorus Stoichiometry in Fungi: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus ratios are available now for major groups of biota and for various aquatic and terrestrial biomes. However, while fungi play an important role in nutrient cycling in ecosystems, relatively little is known about their C:N:P stoichiometry and how it varies across taxonomic groups, functional guilds, and environmental conditions. Here we present the first systematic compilation of C:N:P data for fungi including four phyla (Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Glomeromycota, and Zygomycota. The C, N, and P contents (percent of dry mass of fungal biomass varied from 38 to 57%, 0.23 to 15%, and 0.040 to 5.5%, respectively. Median C:N:P stoichiometry for fungi was 250:16:1 (molar, remarkably similar to the canonical Redfield values. However, we found extremely broad variation in fungal C:N:P ratios around the central tendencies in C:N:P ratios. Lower C:P and N:P ratios were found in Ascomycota fungi than in Basidiomycota fungi while significantly lower C:N ratios (p < 0.05 and higher N:P ratios (p < 0.01 were found in ectomycorrhizal fungi than in saprotrophs. Furthermore, several fungal stoichiometric ratios were strongly correlated with geographic and abiotic environmental factors, especially latitude, precipitation, and temperature. The results have implications for understanding the roles that fungi play in function in symbioses and in soil nutrient cycling. Further work is needed on the effects of actual in situ growth conditions of fungal growth on stoichiometry in the mycelium.

  13. Microbial Diversity of Browning Peninsula, Eastern Antarctica Revealed Using Molecular and Cultivation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Sarita; Wilson, John; Ji, Mukan; van Dorst, Josie; Snape, Ian; Palmer, Anne S; Burns, Brendan P; Ferrari, Belinda C

    2017-01-01

    Browning Peninsula is an ice-free polar desert situated in the Windmill Islands, Eastern Antarctica. The entire site is described as a barren landscape, comprised of frost boils with soils dominated by microbial life. In this study, we explored the microbial diversity and edaphic drivers of community structure across this site using traditional cultivation methods, a novel approach the soil substrate membrane system (SSMS), and culture-independent 454-tag pyrosequencing. The measured soil environmental and microphysical factors of chlorine, phosphate, aspect and elevation were found to be significant drivers of the bacterial community, while none of the soil parameters analyzed were significantly correlated to the fungal community. Overall, Browning Peninsula soil harbored a distinctive microbial community in comparison to other Antarctic soils comprised of a unique bacterial diversity and extremely limited fungal diversity. Tag pyrosequencing data revealed the bacterial community to be dominated by Actinobacteria (36%), followed by Chloroflexi (18%), Cyanobacteria (14%), and Proteobacteria (10%). For fungi, Ascomycota (97%) dominated the soil microbiome, followed by Basidiomycota. As expected the diversity recovered from culture-based techniques was lower than that detected using tag sequencing. However, in the SSMS enrichments, that mimic the natural conditions for cultivating oligophilic "k-selected" bacteria, a larger proportion of rare bacterial taxa (15%), such as Blastococcus, Devosia, Herbaspirillum, Propionibacterium and Methylocella and fungal (11%) taxa, such as Nigrospora, Exophiala, Hortaea , and Penidiella were recovered at the genus level. At phylum level, a comparison of OTU's showed that the SSMS shared 21% of Acidobacteria, 11% of Actinobacteria and 10% of Proteobacteria OTU's with soil. For fungi, the shared OTUs was 4% (Basidiomycota) and <0.5% (Ascomycota). This was the first known attempt to culture microfungi using the SSMS which resulted in

  14. Effects of stand age and soil properties on soil bacterial and fungal community composition in Chinese pine plantations on the Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Peng; Yu, Xuan; Le, Hien; Liu, Jinliang; Shen, Zhen; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The effects of Chinese pine (Pinus tabuliformis) on soil variables after afforestation have been established, but microbial community changes still need to be explored. Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we analyzed bacterial and fungal community composition and diversity in soils from three stands of different-aged, designated 12-year-old (PF1), 29-year-old (PF2), and 53-year-old (PF3), on a Chinese pine plantation and from a natural secondary forest (NSF) stand that was almost 80 years old. Abandoned farmland (BL) was also analyzed. Shannon index values of both bacterial and fungal community in PF1 were greater than those in PF2, PF3 and NSF. Proteobacteria had the lowest abundance in BL, and the abundance increased with stand age. The abundance of Actinobacteria was greater in BL and PF1 soils than those in other sites. Among fungal communities, the dominant taxa were Ascomycota in BL and PF1 and Basidiomycota in PF2, PF3 and NSF, which reflected the successional patterns of fungal communities during the development of Chinese pine plantations. Therefore, the diversity and dominant taxa of soil microbial community in stands 12 and 29 years of age appear to have undergone significant changes; afterward, the soil microbial community achieved a relatively stable state. Furthermore, the abundances of the most dominant bacterial and fungal communities correlated significantly with organic C, total N, C:N, available N, and available P, indicating the dependence of these microbes on soil nutrients. Overall, our findings suggest that the large changes in the soil microbial community structure of Chinese pine plantation forests may be attributed to the phyla present (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) which were affected by soil carbon and nutrients in the Loess Plateau.

  15. Fungal diversity in major oil-shale mines in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaoyan; Wang, Wenxing; Xue, Xiangxin; Cao, Chengyou; Zhang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    As an insufficiently utilized energy resource, oil shale is conducive to the formation of characteristic microbial communities due to its special geological origins. However, little is known about fungal diversity in oil shale. Polymerase chain reaction cloning was used to construct the fungal ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS) clone libraries of Huadian Mine in Jilin Province, Maoming Mine in Guangdong Province, and Fushun Mine in Liaoning Province. Pure culture and molecular identification were applied for the isolation of cultivable fungi in fresh oil shale of each mine. Results of clone libraries indicated that each mine had over 50% Ascomycota (58.4%-98.9%) and 1.1%-13.5% unidentified fungi. Fushun Mine and Huadian Mine had 5.9% and 28.1% Basidiomycota, respectively. Huadian Mine showed the highest fungal diversity, followed by Fushun Mine and Maoming Mine. Jaccard indexes showed that the similarities between any two of three fungal communities at the genus level were very low, indicating that fungi in each mine developed independently during the long geological adaptation and formed a community composition fitting the environment. In the fresh oil-shale samples of the three mines, cultivable fungal phyla were consistent with the results of clone libraries. Fifteen genera and several unidentified fungi were identified as Ascomycota and Basidiomycota using pure culture. Penicillium was the only genus found in all three mines. These findings contributed to gaining a clear understanding of current fungal resources in major oil-shale mines in China and provided useful information for relevant studies on isolation of indigenous fungi carrying functional genes from oil shale. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The soil carbon/nitrogen ratio and moisture affect microbial community structures in alkaline permafrost-affected soils with different vegetation types on the Tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinfang; Xu, Shijian; Li, Changming; Zhao, Lin; Feng, Huyuan; Yue, Guangyang; Ren, Zhengwei; Cheng, Guogdong

    2014-01-01

    In the Tibetan permafrost region, vegetation types and soil properties have been affected by permafrost degradation, but little is known about the corresponding patterns of their soil microbial communities. Thus, we analyzed the effects of vegetation types and their covariant soil properties on bacterial and fungal community structure and membership and bacterial community-level physiological patterns. Pyrosequencing and Biolog EcoPlates were used to analyze 19 permafrost-affected soil samples from four principal vegetation types: swamp meadow (SM), meadow (M), steppe (S) and desert steppe (DS). Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated bacterial communities and the main fungal phyla were Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Mucoromycotina. The ratios of Proteobacteria/Acidobacteria decreased in the order: SM>M>S>DS, whereas the Ascomycota/Basidiomycota ratios increased. The distributions of carbon and nitrogen cycling bacterial genera detected were related to soil properties. The bacterial communities in SM/M soils degraded amines/amino acids very rapidly, while polymers were degraded rapidly by S/DS communities. UniFrac analysis of bacterial communities detected differences among vegetation types. The fungal UniFrac community patterns of SM differed from the others. Redundancy analysis showed that the carbon/nitrogen ratio had the main effect on bacteria community structures and their diversity in alkaline soil, whereas soil moisture was mainly responsible for structuring fungal communities. Thus, microbial communities and their functioning are probably affected by soil environmental change in response to permafrost degradation. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Taxonomy and phylogeny of the xerophilic genus Wallemia (Wallemiomycetes and Wallemiales, cl. et ord. nov.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalar, Polona; Sybren de Hoog, G; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Frank, John Michael; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2005-05-01

    The genus Wallemia comprises xerophilic species. Based on parenthesome ultrastructure it has been linked to the Filobasidiales (basidiomycetes). Species show a unique type of conidiogenesis, including basauxic development of fertile hyphae, segregation of conidial units more or less basipetally, and disarticulation of conidial units into mostly four arthrospore-like conidia. Wallemia is known from air, soil, dried food (causing spoilage), and salt. It can be isolated from hypersaline water of man-made salterns on different continents. Based on analyses of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) Wallemia has been placed into a highly supported clade together with Ustilaginomycetes and Hymenomycetes (Basidiomycota). Within this clade, it possesses an isolated position distantly related to the Filobasidiales and was characterized by numerous nucleotide substitutions not shared by any other fungus. Tests on xerotolerance indicated that Wallemia presents one of the most xerophilic fungal taxa. Xerotolerance is otherwise rare in the Basidiomycota. To acknowledge its unique morphology, evolution, and xerotolerance, a new basidiomycetous class Wallemiomycetes covering an order Wallemiales, is proposed. Based on differences in conidial size, xerotolerance, and sequence data of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS rDNA), at least three Wallemia species are segregated, identified as Wallemia ichthyophaga, Wallemia sebi, and Torula epizoa var. muriae, for which the combination Wallemia muriae is proposed. The three species are neotypified. Wallemia ichthyophaga differs from W. sebi and W. muriae in numerous nucleotides of the SSU and ITS rDNA. This high variation within Wallemia indicates existence of at least two cryptic genera not distinguishable by morphological characters.

  18. Characterization of Bacterial and Fungal Community Dynamics by High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS Metabarcoding during Flax Dew-Retting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Djemiel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax dew-retting is a key step in the industrial extraction of fibers from flax stems and is dependent upon the production of a battery of hydrolytic enzymes produced by micro-organisms during this process. To explore the diversity and dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities involved in this process we applied a high-throughput sequencing (HTS DNA metabarcoding approach (16S rRNA/ITS region, Illumina Miseq on plant and soil samples obtained over a period of 7 weeks in July and August 2014. Twenty-three bacterial and six fungal phyla were identified in soil samples and 11 bacterial and four fungal phyla in plant samples. Dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes (bacteria and Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota (fungi all of which have been previously associated with flax dew-retting except for Bacteroidetes and Basidiomycota that were identified for the first time. Rare phyla also identified for the first time in this process included Acidobacteria, CKC4, Chlorobi, Fibrobacteres, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae and TM6 (bacteria, and Chytridiomycota (fungi. No differences in microbial communities and colonization dynamics were observed between early and standard flax harvests. In contrast, the common agricultural practice of swath turning affects both bacterial and fungal community membership and structure in straw samples and may contribute to a more uniform retting. Prediction of community function using PICRUSt indicated the presence of a large collection of potential bacterial enzymes capable of hydrolyzing backbones and side-chains of cell wall polysaccharides. Assignment of functional guild (functional group using FUNGuild software highlighted a change from parasitic to saprophytic trophic modes in fungi during retting. This work provides the first exhaustive description of the microbial communities involved in flax dew-retting and will provide a valuable benchmark in future studies aiming

  19. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Maria L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. Results Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans. Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20–188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene and concatenated (supergene. Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%: vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma, Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma, Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma, Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma, Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma, Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma, Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma, Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma, Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma, mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma, Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma, Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma, Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma, Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma, Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma, and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma. By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to ~10

  20. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Blair, Jaime E.; Venturi, Maria L.; Shoe, Jason L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i) animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii) red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii) choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv) diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v) diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans). Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20-188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene) and concatenated (supergene). Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%): vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma), Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma), Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma), Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma), Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma), Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma), Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma), Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma), Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma), mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma), Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma), Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma), Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma), Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma), Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma), and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma). By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to

  1. Contribución a la identificación de esporas del Reino Fungi en la atmósfera de La Plata, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Nitiu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir del análisis del registro aeromicológico de la ciudad de La Plata se propone la definición de Grupos Morfológicos de esporas del Reino Fungi. Este estudio constituye un aporte metodológico a la identificación y recuento de una fracción de la micobiota atmosférica. Para la definición de los grupos, se han tenido en cuenta los criterios de Saccardo (1886 y reformulado los agrupamientos de Díaz et al. (1998 y Aira et al. (2005. Se han creando 4 nuevos grupos y se han incorporando otros tipos esporales a las clasificaciones previas. Cada grupo, incluye entre 2 y 6 tipos de esporas pertenecientes a los Phylum Zygomycota, Basidiomycota y Ascomycota y sus anamorfos, que han sido asignados a nivel genérico. Los caracteres que definen dichas asociaciones son: Grupo Absidia, amerosporas hialinas; Grupo Cortinarius, amerosporas pigmentadas amigdaliformes; Grupo Didymella, didimosporas hialinas o levemente coloreadas; Grupo Didymosphaeria, didimosporas y didimoconidios pigmentados; Grupo Lepthosphaeria, fragmosporas septadas hialinas a pigmentadas y Grupo Helminthosporium, fragmosporas distoseptadas hialinas a pigmentadas. Esta investigación aspira a proporcionar una herramienta que facilite el procesamiento de datos y aporte nuevos elementos cualitativos a las clasificaciones previas, contribuyendo en la compleja problemática de identificación de las esporas fúngicas.Based on the aeromycological analysis of La Plata city, artificial Morphological Groups of fungal spores were defined. This study is a methodological contribution to the identification and counting of a fraction of the atmospheric micobiota. For the definition of groups, the criteria of Saccardo (1886 were taken into account and the groupings created by Díaz et al. (1998 and Aira et al. (2005 have been reformulated. Four new groups have been created and other sporal types have been incorporated to previous classifications. Each of them includes 2 to 6 spore types

  2. Las micorrizas: una relación planta-hongo que dura más de 400 millones de años

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honrubia, Mario

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of mycorrhiza is considered in a wide sense, as a not necessarily mutualistic symbiosis, covering the trophic relations of mycorrhizal fungi with “inferior” and achlorophyllics plants. A bibliographical review of the origin and diversification of mycorrhizae is made. The pioneering characteristics of the arbuscular mycorrhiza formed by Glomeromycota are discussed, emphasizing its importance during the terrestrialization processes. The chronological appearance of the other types of mycorrhizas is discussed. The independent and recurrent evolution of the ectomycorrhizas formed by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is discussed; their saprobiont or parasite origin points to the versatile nutritional strategy of these fungi, in adaptative response to environmental changes, as does the origin of the singular ericoid, arbutoid and helianthemoid mycorrhizas. The particular trophic relation between achlorophyllic plants, such as Monotropa and orchids, in their heterotrophic phases, with their “mycorrhizal” fungi is also described. Finally, the recent evolution of the non mycotrophic root systems is commented on.

    Se define el concepto de micorriza en un sentido amplio, como una simbiosis no necesariamente mutualística, para incluir las relaciones tróficas de hongos micorrícicos con plantas “inferiores” y plantas aclorofílicas. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica sobre el origen y diversificación de las micorrizas. Se evidencia el carácter pionero de la micorriza arbuscular formada por los Glomeromycota y se resalta su importancia en el proceso de ‘terrestrialización’. Se comenta la formación cronológica de los restantes tipos de micorrizas. Se denota la evolución independiente y recurrente de las ectomicorrizas, formadas por Basidiomycota y Ascomycota inicialmente saprófitos, que sugiere una versatilidad en las estrategias nutricionales de estos hongos, como respuesta

  3. Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Producing Yeasts in the Phyllosphere of the Carnivorous Plant Drosera indica L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25464336

  4. The microbial community characteristics of ancient painted sculptures in Maijishan Grottoes, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yulong; Wu, Fasi; Wang, Wanfu; He, Dongpeng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a culture-independent Illumina MiSeq sequencing strategy was applied to investigate the microbial communities colonizing the ancient painted sculptures of the Maijishan Grottoes, a famous World Cultural Heritage site listed by UNESCO in China. Four mixed samples were collected from Cave 4-4 of the Maijishan Grottoes, the so-called Upper Seven Buddha Pavilion, which was built during the Northern Zhou Dynasty (557-581AD). The 16/18S rRNA gene-based sequences revealed a rich bacterial diversity and a relatively low fungal abundance, including the bacterial groups Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and the fungal groups Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota. Among them, the bacteria genera of Pseudonocardia and Rubrobacter and unclassified fungi in the order of Capnodiales were dominant. The relative abundance of Pseudonocardia in the painted layer samples was higher than that in the dust sample, while Cyanobacteria dominated in the dust sample. Many of them have been discovered at other cultural heritage sites and associated with the biodeterioration of cultural relics. The presence and activity of these pioneering microorganisms may lead to an unexpected deterioration of the painted sculptures that are preserved in this heritage site. Thus, proper management strategies and potential risk monitoring should be used in the Maijishan Grottoes to improve the conservation of these precious painted sculptures.

  5. Fungal communities in ancient peatlands developed from different periods in the Sanjiang Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhou, Xue; Tian, Lei; Ma, Lina; Luo, Shasha; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Xiujun; Tian, Chunjie

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands in the Sanjiang Plain could be more vulnerable to global warming because they are located at the southernmost boundary of northern peatlands. Unlike bacteria, fungi are often overlooked, even though they play important roles in substance circulation in the peatland ecosystems. Accordingly, it is imperative that we deepen our understanding of fungal community structure and diversity in the peatlands. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing was used to study the fungal communities in three fens in the Sanjiang Plain, located at the southern edge of northern peatlands. Peat soil was collected from the three fens which developed during different periods. A total of 463,198 fungal ITS sequences were obtained, and these sequences were classified into at least six phyla, 21 classes, more than 60 orders and over 200 genera. The fungal community structures were distinct in the three sites and were dominated by Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. However, there were no significant differences between these three fens in any α-diversity index (p > 0.05). Soil age and the carbon (C) accumulation rate, as well as total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), C/N ratio, and bulk density were found to be closely related to the abundance of several dominant fungal taxa. We captured a rich fungal community and confirmed that the dominant taxa were those which were frequently detected in other northern peatlands. Soil age and the C accumulation rate were found to play important roles in shaping the fungal community structure.

  6. Fungal communities in ancient peatlands developed from different periods in the Sanjiang Plain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Peatlands in the Sanjiang Plain could be more vulnerable to global warming because they are located at the southernmost boundary of northern peatlands. Unlike bacteria, fungi are often overlooked, even though they play important roles in substance circulation in the peatland ecosystems. Accordingly, it is imperative that we deepen our understanding of fungal community structure and diversity in the peatlands. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing was used to study the fungal communities in three fens in the Sanjiang Plain, located at the southern edge of northern peatlands. Peat soil was collected from the three fens which developed during different periods. A total of 463,198 fungal ITS sequences were obtained, and these sequences were classified into at least six phyla, 21 classes, more than 60 orders and over 200 genera. The fungal community structures were distinct in the three sites and were dominated by Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. However, there were no significant differences between these three fens in any α-diversity index (p > 0.05. Soil age and the carbon (C accumulation rate, as well as total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, C/N ratio, and bulk density were found to be closely related to the abundance of several dominant fungal taxa. We captured a rich fungal community and confirmed that the dominant taxa were those which were frequently detected in other northern peatlands. Soil age and the C accumulation rate were found to play important roles in shaping the fungal community structure.

  7. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-04-22

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants.

  8. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants. PMID:20007181

  9. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Communities Along an Altitudinal Gradient in Alpine Forest Soils: What Are the Driving Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, José A; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    Shifts in soil microbial communities over altitudinal gradients and the driving factors are poorly studied. Their elucidation is indispensable to gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Here, we investigated soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities at four Alpine forest sites representing a climosequence, over an altitudinal gradient from 545 to 2000 m above sea level (asl), regarding abundance and diversity by using qPCR and Illumina sequencing, respectively. Archaeal community was dominated by Thaumarchaeota, and no significant shifts were detected in abundance or community composition with altitude. The relative bacterial abundance increased at higher altitudes, which was related to increasing levels of soil organic matter and nutrients with altitude. Shifts in bacterial richness and diversity as well as community structure (comprised basically of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) significantly correlated with several environmental and soil chemical factors, especially soil pH. The site at the lowest altitude harbored the highest bacterial richness and diversity, although richness/diversity community properties did not show a monotonic decrease along the gradient. The relative size of fungal community also increased with altitude and its composition comprised Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Changes in fungal richness/diversity and community structure were mainly governed by pH and C/N, respectively. The variation of the predominant bacterial and fungal classes over the altitudinal gradient was the result of the environmental and soil chemical factors prevailing at each site.

  10. Analysis of the community compositions of rhizosphere fungi in soybeans continuous cropping fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Cui, Jiaqi; Jie, Weiguang; Cai, Baiyan

    2015-11-01

    We used rhizosphere soil sampled from one field during zero year and two years of continuous cropping of high-protein soybean to analyze the taxonomic community compositions of fungi during periods of high-incidence of root rot. Our objectives were to identify the dominant pathogens in order to provide a theoretical basis for the study of pathogenesis as well as control tactics for soybean root rot induced by continuous cropping. A total of 17,801 modified internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were obtained from three different soybean rhizosphere soil samples after zero year and 1 or 2 years of continuous cropping using 454 high-throughput sequencing. The dominant eumycote fungal were identified to be Ascomycota and Basidiomycota in the three soil samples. Continuous cropping of soybean affected the diversity of fungi in rhizosphere soils and increased the abundance of Thelebolus and Mortierellales significantly. Thanatephorus, Fusarium, and Alternaria were identified to be the dominant pathogenic fungal genera in rhizosphere soil from continuously cropped soybean fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Ligninolytic Activity at 0 °C of Fungi on Oak Leaves Under Snow Cover in a Mixed Forest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toshizumi; Koda, Keiichi; Kawaguchi, Arata; Uraki, Yasumitsu

    2017-08-01

    Despite the importance of litter decomposition under snow cover in boreal forests and tundra, very little is known regarding the characteristics and functions of litter-decomposing fungi adapted to the cold climate. We investigated the decomposition of oak leaves in a heavy snowfall forest region of Japan. The rate of litter weight loss reached 26.5% during the snow cover period for 7 months and accounted for 64.6% of the annual loss (41.1%). Although no statistically significant lignin loss was detected, decolourization portions of oak leaf litter, which was attributable to the activities of ligninolytic fungi, were observed during snow cover period. This suggests that fungi involved in litter decomposition can produce extracellular enzymes to degrade lignin that remain active at 0 °C. Fungi were isolated from oak leaves collected from the forest floor under the snow layer. One hundred and sixty-six strains were isolated and classified into 33 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on culture characteristics and nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences. To test the ability to degrade lignin, the production of extracellular phenoloxidases by isolates was quantified at 0 °C. Ten OTUs (9 Ascomycota and 1 Basidiomycota) of fungi exhibited mycelial growth and ligninolytic activity. These results suggested that some litter-decomposing fungi that had the potential to degrade lignin at 0 °C significantly contribute to litter decomposition under snow cover.

  12. Seasonal Succession of Fungi Associated with Ips typographus Beetles and Their Phoretic Mites in an Outbreak Region of Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnakoski, Riikka; Mahilainen, Saila; Harrington, Alison; Vanhanen, Henri; Eriksson, Miikka; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Pappinen, Ari; Wingfield, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The ophiostomatoid fungi (Microascales and Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota) are common associates of Ips typographus, and include tree pathogens and species responsible for blue-stain of timber. Fungal assemblages associated with I. typographus have varied considerably between studies but few investigations have attempted to explain this variation. For this reason, we assessed the overall cultivable fungal diversity associated with I. typographus in a storm-felled spruce forest in south-eastern Finland. Fungi were isolated from the individually collected beetles as well as their phoretic mites in spring, summer and autumn, including different life stages of the beetle (hibernation, dispersal flight and first generation). The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene region was used to identify the fungi. A total of 32 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found and these resided in four fungal phyla/subphyla (24 Ascomycota, 2 Basidiomycota, 5 Mucoromycotina, 1 Mortierellomycotina) in association with adult bark beetles. Ophiostomatoid species were the most commonly detected fungal associates. A generalized linear model analysis showed a clear association between fungal communities and season, indicating seasonal succession among I. typographus-associated fungi. The season of sampling appears to be an important factor that has resulted in inconsistencies between results in previous studies. Many of these fungi were also found on phoretic mites and their presence or absence could have influenced variation in patterns of association.

  13. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  14. Rhizospheric fungi and their link with the nitrogen-fixing Frankia harbored in host plant Hippophae rhamnoides L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Jianfeng; Ma, Lina; Li, Xiujun; Tian, Chunjie

    2017-12-01

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) is a pioneer plant used for land reclamation and an appropriate material for studying the interactions of symbiotic microorganisms because of its nitrogen-fixing root nodules and mycorrhiza. We used high-throughput sequencing to reveal the diversities and community structures of rhizospheric fungi and their link with nitrogen-fixing Frankia harbored in sea buckthorn collected along an altitude gradient from the Qinghai Tibet Plateau to interior areas. We found that the fungal diversities and compositions varied between different sites. Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were the dominant phyla. The distribution of sea buckthorn rhizospheric fungi was driven by both environmental factors and the geographic distance. Among all examined soil characteristics, altitude, AP, and pH were found to have significant (p < 0.05) effect on the rhizospheric fungal community. The rhizospheric fungal communities became more distinct as the distance increased. Moreover, co-inertia analysis identified significant co-structures between Frankia and AMF communities in the rhizosphere of sea buckthorn. We conclude that at the large scale, there are certain linkages between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and the AMF expressed in the distributional pattern. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Endophytic fungi harbored in the root of Sophora tonkinensis Gapnep: Diversity and biocontrol potential against phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu Qun; Lan, Fang; Qiao, Yun Ming; Wei, Ji Guang; Huang, Rong Shao; Li, Liang Bo

    2017-06-01

    This work, for the first time, investigated the diversity of endophytic fungi harbored in the xylem and phloem of the root of Sophora tonkinensis Gapnep from three geographic localities with emphasis on the influence of the tissue type and geographic locality on endophytic fungal communities and their potential as biocontrol agents against phytopathogens of Panax notoginseng. A total of 655 fungal strains representing 47 taxa were isolated. Forty-two taxa (89.4%) were identified but not five taxa (10.6%) according to morphology and molecular phylogenetics. Out of identifiable taxa, the majority of endophyte taxa were Ascomycota (76.6%), followed by Basidiomycota (8.5%) and Zygomycota (4.3%). The alpha-diversity indices indicated that the species diversity of endophytic fungal community harbored in the root of S. tonkinensis was very high. The colonization and species diversity of endophytic fungal communities were significantly influenced by the geographic locality but not tissue type. The geographic locality and tissue type had great effects on the species composition of endophytic fungal communities. Forty-seven respective strains were challenged by three fungal phytopathogens of P. notoginseng and six strains exhibited significant inhibitory activity. It was noteworthy that endophytic Rhexocercosporidium sp. and F. solani strongly inhibited pathogenic F. solani and other fungal phytopathogens of P. notoginseng. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Diversity and biotransformative potential of endophytic fungi associated with the medicinal plant Kadsura angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; An, Hongmei; Song, Hongchuan; Mao, Hongqiang; Shen, Weiyun; Dong, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the diversity and host component-transforming activity of endophytic fungi in medicinal plant Kadsura angustifolia. A total of 426 isolates obtained were grouped into 42 taxa belonging to Fungi Imperfecti (65.96%), Ascomycota (27.00%), Zygomycota (1.64%), Basidiomycota (0.47%) and Mycelia Sterilia (4.93%). The abundance, richness, and species composition of endophytic assemblages were significantly dependent on the tissue and the sampling site. Many phytopathogenic species associated with healthy K. angustifolia were found prevalent. Among them, Verticillium dahliae was dominant with 16.43% abundance. From 134 morphospecies selected, 39 showed remarkable biocatalytic activity and were further identified as species belonging to the genera Colletotrichum, Eupenicillium, Fusarium, Hypoxylon, Penicillium, Phomopsis, Trametes, Trichoderma, Umbelopsis, Verticillium and Xylaria on the basis of the sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). The results obtained in this work show that K. angustifolia is an interesting reservoir of pathogenic fungal species, and could be a community model for further ecological and evolutionary studies. Additionally, the converting potency screening of some endophytic fungi from this specific medicinal plant may provide an interesting niche on the search for novel biocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  18. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E Kuramae

    Full Text Available We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA. The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most "active" fungi (as recovered via RNA. Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production. Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time.

  19. Resource partitioning between bacteria, fungi and protists in the detritusphere of an agricultural soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Kramer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of plant-derived carbon in soil is a key component of global carbon cycling. Conceptual models of trophic carbon fluxes in soil have assumed separate bacterial and fungal energy channels in the detritusphere, controlled by both substrate complexity and recalcitrance. However, detailed understanding of the key populations involved and niche-partitioning between them is limited. Here, a microcosm experiment was performed to trace the flow of detritusphere C from substrate analogues (glucose, cellulose and plant biomass amendments (maize leaves, roots in an agricultural soil. Carbon flow was traced by rRNA stable isotope probing and amplicon sequencing across three microbial kingdoms. Distinct lineages within the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Basidiomycota, Ascomycota as well as Peronosporomycetes were identified as important primary substrate consumers. A dynamic succession of primary consumers was observed especially in the cellulose treatments, but also in plant amendments over time. While intra-kingdom niche partitioning was clearly observed, distinct bacterial and fungal energy channels were not apparent. Furthermore, while the diversity of primary substrate consumers did not notably increase with substrate complexity, consumer succession and secondary trophic links to bacterivorous and fungivorous microbes resulted in increased food web complexity in the more recalcitrant substrates. This suggests that rather than substrate-defined energy channels, consumer succession as well as intra- and inter-kingdom cross-feeding should be considered as mechanisms supporting food web complexity in the detritusphere.

  20. Resource Partitioning between Bacteria, Fungi, and Protists in the Detritusphere of an Agricultural Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Susanne; Dibbern, Dörte; Moll, Julia; Huenninghaus, Maike; Koller, Robert; Krueger, Dirk; Marhan, Sven; Urich, Tim; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bonkowski, Michael; Buscot, François; Lueders, Tillmann; Kandeler, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The flow of plant-derived carbon in soil is a key component of global carbon cycling. Conceptual models of trophic carbon fluxes in soil have assumed separate bacterial and fungal energy channels in the detritusphere, controlled by both substrate complexity and recalcitrance. However, detailed understanding of the key populations involved and niche-partitioning between them is limited. Here, a microcosm experiment was performed to trace the flow of detritusphere C from substrate analogs (glucose, cellulose) and plant biomass amendments (maize leaves, roots) in an agricultural soil. Carbon flow was traced by rRNA stable isotope probing and amplicon sequencing across three microbial kingdoms. Distinct lineages within the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Basidiomycota, Ascomycota as well as Peronosporomycetes were identified as important primary substrate consumers. A dynamic succession of primary consumers was observed especially in the cellulose treatments, but also in plant amendments over time. While intra-kingdom niche partitioning was clearly observed, distinct bacterial and fungal energy channels were not apparent. Furthermore, while the diversity of primary substrate consumers did not notably increase with substrate complexity, consumer succession and secondary trophic links to bacterivorous and fungivorous microbes resulted in increased food web complexity in the more recalcitrant substrates. This suggests that rather than substrate-defined energy channels, consumer succession as well as intra- and inter-kingdom cross-feeding should be considered as mechanisms supporting food web complexity in the detritusphere.

  1. Halotolerant laccases from Chaetomium sp., Xylogone sphaerospora, and Coprinopsis sp. isolated from a Mediterranean coastal area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasemian, Leila; Billette, Christophe; Guiral, Daniel; Alazard, Emilie; Moinard, Magalie; Farnet, Anne-Marie

    2012-10-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) are phenoloxidases involved in the transformation of the recalcitrant fraction of organic matter in soil. These enzymes are also able to transform certain aromatic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and are known to be inhibited by chloride ions. This study aims to test the potential of some fungal strains newly isolated from natural environments subjected to high osmotic pressure such as coastal ecosystems, to produce chloride tolerant laccases. Three strains were identified as Chaetomium sp., Xylogone sphaerospora (two Ascomycota), and Coprinopsis sp. (a Basidiomycota) and the laccases produced by these fungi were weakly inhibited by chloride ions compared with previous data from literature. Moreover, we tested their reactivity towards various PAHs which are widespread anthropic pollutants. They were able to transform anthracene to 9,10-anthraquinone and we determine 7.5 eV as the threshold of ionization potential for PAH oxidation by these laccases. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of pectin-degrading fungal communities in temperate forests using glycosyl hydrolase family 28 pectinase primers targeting Ascomycete fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacura, Matthew D; Sprockett, Daniel D; Heidenreich, Bess; Blackwood, Christopher B

    2016-04-01

    Fungi have developed a wide assortment of enzymes to break down pectin, a prevalent polymer in plant cell walls that is important in plant defense and structure. One enzyme family used to degrade pectin is the glycosyl hydrolase family 28 (GH28). In this study we developed primers for the amplification of GH28 coding genes from a database of 293 GH28 sequences from 40 fungal genomes. The primers were used to successfully amplify GH28 pectinases from all Ascomycota cultures tested, but only three out of seven Basidiomycota cultures. In addition, we further tested the primers in PCRs on metagenomic DNA extracted from senesced tree leaves from different forest ecosystems, followed by cloning and sequencing. Taxonomic specificity for Ascomycota GH28 genes was tested by comparing GH28 composition in leaves to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) amplicon composition using pyrosequencing. All sequences obtained from GH28 primers were classified as Ascomycota; in contrast, ITS sequences indicated that fungal communities were up to 39% Basidiomycetes. Analysis of leaf samples indicated that both forest stand and ecosystem type were important in structuring fungal communities. However, site played the prominent role in explaining GH28 composition, whereas ecosystem type was more important for ITS composition, indicating possible genetic drift between populations of fungi. Overall, these primers will have utility in understanding relationships between fungal community composition and ecosystem processes, as well as detection of potentially pathogenic Ascomycetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heterologous production of the stain solving peptidase PPP1 from Pleurotus pulmonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Robin-Hagen; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G; Linke, Diana

    2016-05-01

    A novel stain solving subtilisin-like peptidase (PPP1) was identified from the culture supernatant of the agaricomycete Pleurotus pulmonarius. It was purified to homogeneity using a sequence of preparative isoelectric focusing, anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Peptides were identified by ab initio sequencing (nLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS), characterizing the enzyme as a member of the subtilase family (EC 3.4.21.X). An expression system was established featuring the pPIC9K vector, an alternative Kozak sequence, the codon optimized gene ppp1 gene without the native signal sequence with C-terminal hexa-histidine tag, and Pichia pastoris GS115 as expression host. Intracellular active enzyme was obtained from cultivations in shake flasks and in a five liter bioreactor. With reaction optima of 40 °C and a pH > 8.5, considerable bleaching of pre-stained fabrics (blood, milk and India ink), and the possibility of larger-scale production, the heterologous enzyme is well suitable for detergent applications, especially at lower temperatures as part of a more energy- and cost-efficient washing process. Showing little sequence similarity to other subtilases, this unique peptidase is the first subtilisin-like peptidase from Basidiomycota, which has been functionally produced in Pichia pastoris.

  4. Fungi diversity in PM2. 5 and PM1 at the summit of Mt. Tai: abundance, size distribution, and seasonal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Caihong; Wei, Min; Chen, Jianmin; Zhu, Chao; Li, Jiarong; Lv, Ganglin; Xu, Xianmang; Zheng, Lulu; Sui, Guodong; Li, Weijun; Chen, Bing; Wang, Wenxing; Zhang, Qingzhu; Ding, Aijun; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2017-09-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous throughout the near-surface atmosphere, where they represent an important component of primary biological aerosol particles. This study combined internal transcribed spacer region sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the ambient fungi in fine (PM2. 5, 50 % cutoff aerodynamic diameter Da50 = 2.5 µm, geometric standard deviation of collection efficiency σg = 1.2) and submicron (PM1, Da50 = 1 µm, σg = 1.2) particles at the summit of Mt. Tai located in the North China Plain, China. Fungal abundance values were 9.4 × 104 and 1.3 × 105 copies m-3 in PM2. 5 and PM1, respectively. Most of the fungal sequences were from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The fungal community showed a significant seasonal shift across different size fractions according to Metastats analysis and the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. The abundance of Glomerella and Zasmidium increased in larger particles in autumn, whereas Penicillium, Bullera, and Phaeosphaeria increased in smaller particles in winter. Environmental factors, namely Ca2+, humidity, and temperature, were found to be crucial for the seasonal variation in the fungal community. This study might serve as an important reference for fungal contribution to primary biological aerosol particles.

  5. Seasonal Succession of Fungi Associated with Ips typographus Beetles and Their Phoretic Mites in an Outbreak Region of Finland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Linnakoski

    Full Text Available The ophiostomatoid fungi (Microascales and Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota are common associates of Ips typographus, and include tree pathogens and species responsible for blue-stain of timber. Fungal assemblages associated with I. typographus have varied considerably between studies but few investigations have attempted to explain this variation. For this reason, we assessed the overall cultivable fungal diversity associated with I. typographus in a storm-felled spruce forest in south-eastern Finland. Fungi were isolated from the individually collected beetles as well as their phoretic mites in spring, summer and autumn, including different life stages of the beetle (hibernation, dispersal flight and first generation. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS gene region was used to identify the fungi. A total of 32 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were found and these resided in four fungal phyla/subphyla (24 Ascomycota, 2 Basidiomycota, 5 Mucoromycotina, 1 Mortierellomycotina in association with adult bark beetles. Ophiostomatoid species were the most commonly detected fungal associates. A generalized linear model analysis showed a clear association between fungal communities and season, indicating seasonal succession among I. typographus-associated fungi. The season of sampling appears to be an important factor that has resulted in inconsistencies between results in previous studies. Many of these fungi were also found on phoretic mites and their presence or absence could have influenced variation in patterns of association.

  6. On the Evolutionary History of Uleiella chilensis, a Smut Fungus Parasite of Araucaria araucana in South America: Uleiellales ord. nov. in Ustilaginomycetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Riess

    Full Text Available The evolutionary history, divergence times and phylogenetic relationships of Uleiella chilensis (Ustilaginomycotina, smut fungi associated with Araucaria araucana were analysed. DNA sequences from multiple gene regions and morphology were analysed and compared to other members of the Basidiomycota to determine the phylogenetic placement of smut fungi on gymnosperms. Divergence time estimates indicate that the majority of smut fungal orders diversified during the Triassic-Jurassic period. However, the origin and relationships of several orders remain uncertain. The most recent common ancestor between Uleiella chilensis and Violaceomyces palustris has been dated to the Lower Cretaceous. Comparisons of divergence time estimates between smut fungi and host plants lead to the hypothesis that the early Ustilaginomycotina had a saprobic lifestyle. As there are only two extant species of Araucaria in South America, each hosting a unique Uleiella species, we suggest that either coevolution or a host shift followed by allopatric speciation are the most likely explanations for the current geographic restriction of Uleiella and its low diversity. Phylogenetic and age estimation analyses, ecology, the unusual life-cycle and the peculiar combination of septal and haustorial characteristics support Uleiella chilensis as a distinct lineage among the Ustilaginomycotina. Here, we describe a new ustilaginomycetous order, the Uleiellales to accommodate Uleiella. Within the Ustilaginomycetes, Uleiellales are sister taxon to the Violaceomycetales.

  7. On the Evolutionary History of Uleiella chilensis, a Smut Fungus Parasite of Araucaria araucana in South America: Uleiellales ord. nov. in Ustilaginomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Kai; Schön, Max E; Lutz, Matthias; Butin, Heinz; Oberwinkler, Franz; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary history, divergence times and phylogenetic relationships of Uleiella chilensis (Ustilaginomycotina, smut fungi) associated with Araucaria araucana were analysed. DNA sequences from multiple gene regions and morphology were analysed and compared to other members of the Basidiomycota to determine the phylogenetic placement of smut fungi on gymnosperms. Divergence time estimates indicate that the majority of smut fungal orders diversified during the Triassic-Jurassic period. However, the origin and relationships of several orders remain uncertain. The most recent common ancestor between Uleiella chilensis and Violaceomyces palustris has been dated to the Lower Cretaceous. Comparisons of divergence time estimates between smut fungi and host plants lead to the hypothesis that the early Ustilaginomycotina had a saprobic lifestyle. As there are only two extant species of Araucaria in South America, each hosting a unique Uleiella species, we suggest that either coevolution or a host shift followed by allopatric speciation are the most likely explanations for the current geographic restriction of Uleiella and its low diversity. Phylogenetic and age estimation analyses, ecology, the unusual life-cycle and the peculiar combination of septal and haustorial characteristics support Uleiella chilensis as a distinct lineage among the Ustilaginomycotina. Here, we describe a new ustilaginomycetous order, the Uleiellales to accommodate Uleiella. Within the Ustilaginomycetes, Uleiellales are sister taxon to the Violaceomycetales.

  8. Comparative genomics of Coniophora olivacea reveals different patterns of genome expansion in Boletales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanera, Raúl; Pérez, Gúmer; López-Varas, Leticia; Amselem, Joëlle; LaButti, Kurt; Singan, Vasanth; Lipzen, Anna; Haridas, Sajeet; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Ramírez, Lucía

    2017-11-16

    Coniophora olivacea is a basidiomycete fungus belonging to the order Boletales that produces brown-rot decay on dead wood of conifers. The Boletales order comprises a diverse group of species including saprotrophs and ectomycorrhizal fungi that show important differences in genome size. In this study we report the 39.07-megabase (Mb) draft genome assembly and annotation of C. olivacea. A total of 14,928 genes were annotated, including 470 putatively secreted proteins enriched in functions involved in lignocellulose degradation. Using similarity clustering and protein structure prediction we identified a new family of 10 putative lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase genes. This family is conserved in basidiomycota and lacks of previous functional annotation. Further analyses showed that C. olivacea has a low repetitive genome, with 2.91% of repeats and a restrained content of transposable elements (TEs). The annotation of TEs in four related Boletales yielded important differences in repeat content, ranging from 3.94 to 41.17% of the genome size. The distribution of insertion ages of LTR-retrotransposons showed that differential expansions of these repetitive elements have shaped the genome architecture of Boletales over the last 60 million years. Coniophora olivacea has a small, compact genome that shows macrosynteny with Coniophora puteana. The functional annotation revealed the enzymatic signature of a canonical brown-rot. The annotation and comparative genomics of transposable elements uncovered their particular contraction in the Coniophora genera, highlighting their role in the differential genome expansions found in Boletales species.

  9. Assessment of the fungal diversity and succession of ligninolytic endophytes in Camellia japonica leaves using clone library analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Dai; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Osono, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Fungal assemblages in live, newly shed and partly decomposed leaves of Camellia japonica were investigated with a clone library analysis to assess the fungal diversity and succession in a subtropical forest in southern Japan. Partly decomposed leaves were divided into bleached and adjacent nonbleached portions to estimate the fungi functionally associated with lignin decomposition in the bleached portions, with an emphasis on Coccomyces sinensis (Rhytismataceae, Ascomycota). From 144 cloned 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, 48 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were defined based on a sequence similarity threshold of 98%. Forty-one (85%) of the 48 OTUs belonged to the Ascomycota and seven OTUs (15%) to the Basidiomycota. Twenty-six OTUs (54%) were detected only once (singletons). The number of OTUs and the diversity indices of the fungal assemblages in the different leaves were in this order: live leaves > newly shed leaves > bleached portions > nonbleached portions of partly decomposed leaves. The fungal assemblages were similar in newly shed leaves and the bleached portions of partly decomposed leaves. Ligninolytic fungi of the genera Coccomyces, Lophodermium and Xylaria were frequently detected in the bleached portions. OTU3, identified as Coccomyces sinensis, was detected in live and newly shed leaves and the bleached portions of partly decomposed leaves, suggesting that this fungus latently infects live leaves, persists after leaf fall and takes part in lignin decomposition.

  10. Statistical evaluation of the medium components for the production of high biomass, α-amylase and protease enzymes by Piriformospora indica using Plackett-Burman experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, S; Varma, Ajit; Padmavathi, T

    2014-08-01

    Piriformospora indica, a member of basidiomycota is an axenically cultivable endophytic fungus which exerts plant growth promoting effects on its host plant. P. indica is known to produce α-amylase and protease. Since the organism exhibits beneficial role in plant growth promotion, achieving high biomass is immensely essential. Hence to enable the commercial production, screening of medium components is a necessary step. The present paper investigates the screening of medium components using Plackett-Burman experimental design wherein the parameters such as α-amylase, protease and biomass have been examined. The parameters α-amylase, protease and biomass was found to vary from 0.25 to 0.45 mg -1  ml -1  min -1 , 0.1 to 0.15 mg -1  ml -1  h -1 and 0.8 to 22.6 g l -1 , respectively, in 16 runs which demonstrates the strong influence of the medium components.

  11. A dehydration-inducible gene in the truffle Tuber borchii identifies a novel group of dehydrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonfante Paola

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expressed sequence tag M6G10 was originally isolated from a screening for differentially expressed transcripts during the reproductive stage of the white truffle Tuber borchii. mRNA levels for M6G10 increased dramatically during fruiting body maturation compared to the vegetative mycelial stage. Results Bioinformatics tools, phylogenetic analysis and expression studies were used to support the hypothesis that this sequence, named TbDHN1, is the first dehydrin (DHN-like coding gene isolated in fungi. Homologs of this gene, all defined as "coding for hypothetical proteins" in public databases, were exclusively found in ascomycetous fungi and in plants. Although complete (or almost complete fungal genomes and EST collections of some Basidiomycota and Glomeromycota are already available, DHN-like proteins appear to be represented only in Ascomycota. A new and previously uncharacterized conserved signature pattern was identified and proposed to Uniprot database as the main distinguishing feature of this new group of DHNs. Expression studies provide experimental evidence of a transcript induction of TbDHN1 during cellular dehydration. Conclusion Expression pattern and sequence similarities to known plant DHNs indicate that TbDHN1 is the first characterized DHN-like protein in fungi. The high similarity of TbDHN1 with homolog coding sequences implies the existence of a novel fungal/plant group of LEA Class II proteins characterized by a previously undescribed signature pattern.

  12. Culturable mycobiota from Karst caves in China, with descriptions of 20 new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Liu, F; Zhou, X; Liu, X Z; Liu, S J; Cai, L

    2017-12-01

    Karst caves are distinctly characterised by darkness, low to moderate temperatures, high humidity, and scarcity of organic matter. During the years of 2014-2015, we explored the mycobiota in two unnamed Karst caves in Guizhou province, China, and obtained 563 fungal strains via the dilution plate method. Preliminary ITS analyses of these strains suggested that they belonged to 246 species in 116 genera, while 23.5 % were not identified to species level. Among these species, 85.8 % (211 species) belonged to Ascomycota ; 7.3 % (18 species) belonged to Basidiomycota ; 6.9 % (17 species) belonged to Mucoromycotina . The majority of these species have been previously known from other environments, mostly from plants or animals as pathogens, endophytes or via a mycorrhizal association. We also found that 59 % of these species were discovered for the first time from Karst caves, including 20 new species that are described in this paper. The phylogenetic tree based on LSU sequences revealed 20 new species were distributed in six different orders. In addition, ITS or multi-locus sequences were employed to infer the phylogenetic relationships of new taxa with closely related allies. We conclude that Karst caves encompass a high fungal diversity, including a number of previously unknown species. Novel species described include: Amphichorda guana , Auxarthronopsis guizhouensis , Biscogniauxia petrensis , Cladorrhinum globisporum , Collariella quadrum , Gymnoascus exasperatus , Humicola limonisporum , Metapochonia variabilis , Microascus anfractus , Microascus globulosus , Microdochium chrysanthemoides , Paracremonium variiforme , Pectinotrichum chinense , Phaeosphaeria fusispora , Ramophialophora globispora , Ramophialophora petraea , Scopulariopsis crassa , Simplicillium calcicola , Volutella aeria , and Wardomycopsis longicatenata .

  13. Nutrient input influences fungal community composition and size and can stimulate manganese (II) oxidation in caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Sarah K; Zorn, Bryan T; Santelli, Cara M; Roble, Leigh A; Carmichael, Mary J; Bräuer, Suzanna L

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the fungal role in biogeochemical cycling in oligotrophic ecosystems. This study compared fungal communities and assessed the role of exogenous carbon on microbial community structure and function in two southern Appalachian caves: an anthropogenically impacted cave and a near-pristine cave. Due to carbon input from shallow soils, the anthropogenically impacted cave had an order of magnitude greater fungal and bacterial quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) gene copy numbers, had significantly greater community diversity, and was dominated by ascomycotal phylotypes common in early phase, labile organic matter decomposition. Fungal assemblages in the near-pristine cave samples were dominated by Basidiomycota typically found in deeper soils (and/or in late phase, recalcitrant organic matter decomposition), suggesting more oligotrophic conditions. In situ carbon and manganese (II) [Mn(II)] addition over 10 weeks resulted in growth of fungal mycelia followed by increased Mn(II) oxidation. A before/after comparison of the fungal communities indicated that this enrichment increased the quantity of fungal and bacterial cells, yet decreased overall fungal diversity. Anthropogenic carbon sources can therefore dramatically influence the diversity and quantity of fungi, impact microbial community function, and stimulate Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in a cascade of changes that can strongly influence nutrient and trace element biogeochemical cycles in karst aquifers. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The link between morphotype transition and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqi Wang

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. This pathogen can undergo morphotype transition between the yeast and the filamentous form and such morphological transition has been implicated in virulence for decades. Morphotype transition is typically observed during mating, which is governed by pheromone signaling. Paradoxically, components specific to the pheromone signaling pathways play no or minimal direct roles in virulence. Thus, the link between morphotype transition and virulence and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that filamentation can occur independent of pheromone signaling and mating, and both mating-dependent and mating-independent morphotype transition require the transcription factor Znf2. High expression of Znf2 is necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain sex-independent filamentous growth under host-relevant conditions in vitro and during infection. Importantly, ZNF2 overexpression abolishes fungal virulence in murine models of cryptococcosis. Thus, Znf2 bridges the sex-independent morphotype transition and fungal pathogenicity. The impacts of Znf2 on morphological switch and pathogenicity are at least partly mediated through its effects on cell adhesion property. Cfl1, a Znf2 downstream factor, regulates morphogenesis, cell adhesion, biofilm formation, and virulence. Cfl1 is the first adhesin discovered in the phylum Basidiomycota of the Kingdom Fungi. Together with previous findings in other eukaryotic pathogens, our findings support a convergent evolution of plasticity in morphology and its impact on cell adhesion as a critical adaptive trait for pathogenesis.

  15. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  16. The Microbial Ecosystem Distinguishes Chronically Diseased Tissue from Adjacent Tissue in the Sigmoid Colon of Chronic, Recurrent Diverticulitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, Kathleen M; Sabey, Kate; Wright, Justin R; Toole, David R; Drucker, Rebecca; Tokarev, Vasily; Harris, Leonard R; Deiling, Sue; Eshelman, Melanie A; Hegarty, John P; Yochum, Gregory S; Koltun, Walter A; Lamendella, Regina; Stewart, David B

    2017-08-16

    Diverticular disease is commonly associated with the older population in the United States. As individual's age, diverticulae, or herniation of the mucosa through the colonic wall, develop. In 10-25% of individuals, the diverticulae become inflamed, resulting in diverticulitis. The gut ecosystem relies on the interaction of bacteria and fungi to maintain homeostasis. Although bacterial dysbiosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverticulitis, associations between the microbial ecosystem and diverticulitis remain largely unstudied. This study investigated how the cooperative network of bacteria and fungi differ between a diseased area of the sigmoid colon chronically affected by diverticulitis and adjacent non-affected tissue. To identify mucosa-associated microbes, bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal ITS sequencing were performed on chronically diseased sigmoid colon tissue (DT) and adjacent tissue (AT) from the same colonic segment. We found that Pseudomonas and Basidiomycota OTUs were associated with AT while Microbacteriaceae and Ascomycota were enriched in DT. Bipartite co-occurrence networks were constructed for each tissue type. The DT and AT networks were distinct for each tissue type, with no microbial relationships maintained after intersection merge of the groups. Our findings indicate that the microbial ecosystem distinguishes chronically diseased tissue from adjacent tissue.

  17. Eukaryotes in the gut microbiota in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra H. Mandarano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS often suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms and many are diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Previous studies, including from our laboratory, have demonstrated that the ME/CFS gut bacterial composition is altered and less diverse when compared to healthy individuals. Patients have increased biomarkers of inflammation and leaky gut syndrome. To further investigate dysbiosis in the ME/CFS gut microbiome, we sought to characterize the eukaryotes present in the gut of 49 individuals with ME/CFS and 39 healthy controls. Using 18S rRNA sequencing, we have identified eukaryotes in stool samples of 17 healthy individuals and 17 ME/CFS patients. Our analysis demonstrates a small, nonsignificant decrease in eukaryotic diversity in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy individuals. In addition, ME/CFS patients show a nonsignificant increase in the ratio of fungal phyla Basidiomycota to Ascomycota, which is consistent with ongoing inflammation in ME/CFS. We did not identify specific eukaryotic taxa that are associated with ME/CFS disease status.

  18. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  19. Assessment of microbial communities in PM1 and PM10 of Urumqi during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Huange; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Shanman; Tong, Yanbin; Xie, Chunbin; Zheng, Xiaowu

    2016-07-01

    Recently, inhalable particulate matter has been reported to carry microorganisms responsible for human allergy and respiratory disease. The unique geographical environment and adverse weather conditions of Urumqi cause double pollution of dust and smog, but research on the microbial content of the atmosphere has not been commenced. In this study, 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing were conducted to investigate the microbial composition of Urumqi's PM1 and PM10 pollutants in winter. Results showed that the bacterial community is mainly composed of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria accounted for the most proportion which was significant difference in some aforementioned studies. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota constitute the main part of the fungal microbial community. The difference of bacterial relative abundance in sample point is greater than in particle sizes. The sequences of several pathogenic bacteria and opportunistic pathogens were also detected, such as Acinetobacter, Delftia, Serratia, Chryseobacterium, which may impact on immunocompromised populations (elderly, children and postoperative convalescence patients), and some fungal genera may cause several plant diseases. Our findings may serve an important reference value in the global air microbial propagation and air microbial research in desert. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and antibacterial activity of culturable fungi derived from the zoanthid Palythoa haddoni in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Kai-Lin; Li, Jing; Wang, Chang-Yun; Shao, Chang-Lun

    2015-02-01

    Investigation on diversity of culturable fungi mainly focused on sponges and corals, yet little attention had been paid to the fungal communities associated with zoanthid corals. In this study, a total of 193 culturable fungal strains were isolated from the zoanthid Palythoa haddoni collected in the South China Sea, of which 49 independent isolates were identified using both morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analyses. Thirty-five strains were selected for phylogenetic analysis based on fungal ITS sequences. The results indicated that 18 genera within eight taxonomic orders of two phyla (seven orders of the phylum Ascomycota and one order of the phylum Basidiomycota) together with one unidentified fungal strain have been achieved, and Cladosporium sp. represented the dominant culturable genus. Particularly, 14 genera were isolated from a zoanthid for the first time. The antibacterial activities of organic extracts of mycelia and fermentation broth of 49 identified fungi were evaluated, and 29 (59.2 %) of the isolates displayed broad-spectrum or selective antibacterial activity. More interestingly, more than 60 % of the active fungal strains showed strong activity against two aquatic pathogenic bacteria Nocardia brasiliensis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, compared with other pathogenic bacteria, indicating that zoanthid-derived fungi may protect its host against pathogens. This is the first report of systematically phylogenetic diversity and extensively antibacterial activity of zoanthid-derived fungi.

  1. Diversity and distribution of lichen-associated fungi in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Xin-Li; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities associated with seven lichen species in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Lichen-associated fungal communities showed high diversity, with a total of 42,259 reads belonging to 370 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being found. Of these OTUs, 294 belonged to Ascomycota, 54 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Zygomycota, and 20 to unknown fungi. Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were the major classes, whereas the dominant orders were Helotiales, Capnodiales, and Chaetothyriales. Interestingly, most fungal OTUs were closely related to fungi from various habitats (e.g., soil, rock, plant tissues) in the Arctic, Antarctic and alpine regions, which suggests that living in association with lichen thalli may be a transient stage of life cycle for these fungi and that long-distance dispersal may be important to the fungi in the Arctic. In addition, host-related factors shaped the lichen-associated fungal communities in this region. Taken together, these results suggest that lichens thalli act as reservoirs of diverse fungi from various niches, which may improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic. PMID:26463847

  2. Diversity and distribution of lichen-associated fungi in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Xin-Li; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2015-10-14

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities associated with seven lichen species in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Lichen-associated fungal communities showed high diversity, with a total of 42,259 reads belonging to 370 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being found. Of these OTUs, 294 belonged to Ascomycota, 54 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Zygomycota, and 20 to unknown fungi. Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were the major classes, whereas the dominant orders were Helotiales, Capnodiales, and Chaetothyriales. Interestingly, most fungal OTUs were closely related to fungi from various habitats (e.g., soil, rock, plant tissues) in the Arctic, Antarctic and alpine regions, which suggests that living in association with lichen thalli may be a transient stage of life cycle for these fungi and that long-distance dispersal may be important to the fungi in the Arctic. In addition, host-related factors shaped the lichen-associated fungal communities in this region. Taken together, these results suggest that lichens thalli act as reservoirs of diverse fungi from various niches, which may improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic.

  3. Diversity of Marine-Derived Fungal Cultures Exposed by DNA Barcodes: The Algorithm Matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Andreakis

    Full Text Available Marine fungi are an understudied group of eukaryotic microorganisms characterized by unresolved genealogies and unstable classification. Whereas DNA barcoding via the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS provides a robust and rapid tool for fungal species delineation, accurate classification of fungi is often arduous given the large number of partial or unknown barcodes and misidentified isolates deposited in public databases. This situation is perpetuated by a paucity of cultivable fungal strains available for phylogenetic research linked to these data sets. We analyze ITS barcodes produced from a subsample (290 of 1781 cultured isolates of marine-derived fungi in the Bioresources Library located at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS. Our analysis revealed high levels of under-explored fungal diversity. The majority of isolates were ascomycetes including representatives of the subclasses Eurotiomycetidae, Hypocreomycetidae, Sordariomycetidae, Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetidae, Xylariomycetidae and Saccharomycetidae. The phylum Basidiomycota was represented by isolates affiliated with the genera Tritirachium and Tilletiopsis. BLAST searches revealed 26 unknown OTUs and 50 isolates corresponding to previously uncultured, unidentified fungal clones. This study makes a significant addition to the availability of barcoded, culturable marine-derived fungi for detailed future genomic and physiological studies. We also demonstrate the influence of commonly used alignment algorithms and genetic distance measures on the accuracy and comparability of estimating Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs by the automatic barcode gap finder (ABGD method. Large scale biodiversity screening programs that combine datasets using algorithmic OTU delineation pipelines need to ensure compatible algorithms have been used because the algorithm matters.

  4. Ectomycorrhizal diversity and community structure in stands of Quercus oleoides in the seasonally dry tropical forests of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nikhilesh S.; Wilson, Andrew W.; Powers, Jennifer S.; Mueller, Gregory M.; Egerton-Warburton, Louise M.

    2016-12-01

    Most conservation efforts in seasonally dry tropical forests have overlooked less obvious targets for conservation, such as mycorrhizal fungi, that are critical to plant growth and ecosystem structure. We documented the diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF) fungal communities in Quercus oleoides (Fagaceae) in Guanacaste province, Costa Rica. Soil cores and sporocarps were collected from regenerating Q. oleoides plots differing in stand age (early vs late regeneration) during the wet season. Sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region in EMF root tips and sporocarps identified 37 taxa in the Basidiomycota; EMF Ascomycota were uncommon. The EMF community was dominated by one species (Thelephora sp. 1; 70% of soil cores), more than half of all EMF species were found only once in an individual soil core, and there were few conspecific taxa. Most EMF taxa were also restricted to either Early or Late plots. Levels of EMF species richness and diversity, and AMF root colonization were similar between plots. Our results highlight the need for comprehensive spatiotemporal samplings of EMF communities in Q. oleoides to identify and prioritize rare EMF for conservation, and document their genetic and functional diversity.

  5. Molecular diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in the marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Michel R Z; Miqueletto, Paula B; de Oliveira, Valéria M; Sette, Lara D

    2015-02-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the diversity of bacteria and filamentous fungi of southern Atlantic Ocean marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum using cultivation-independent approaches. Fungal ITS rDNA and 18S gene analyses (DGGE and direct sequencing approaches) showed the presence of representatives of three order (Polyporales, Malasseziales, and Agaricales) from the phylum Basidiomycota and seven orders belonging to the phylum Ascomycota (Arthoniales, Capnodiales, Dothideales, Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Pleosporales, and Saccharomycetales). On the other hand, bacterial 16S rDNA gene analyses by direct sequencing approach revealed the presence of representatives of seven bacterial phyla (Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Lentisphaerae, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes). Results from statistical analyses (rarefaction curves) suggested that the sampled clones covered the fungal diversity in the sponge samples studied, while for the bacterial community additional sampling would be necessary for saturation. This is the first report related to the molecular analyses of fungal and bacterial communities by cultivation-independent approaches in the marine sponges D. reticulatum. Additionally, the present work broadening the knowledge of microbial diversity associated to marine sponges and reports innovative data on the presence of some fungal genera in marine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparisons of the fungal and protistan communities among different marine sponge holobionts by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Liu, Fang; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Ren, Yi; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-05-01

    To date, the knowledge of eukaryotic communities associated with sponges remains limited compared with prokaryotic communities. In a manner similar to prokaryotes, it could be hypothesized that sponge holobionts have phylogenetically diverse eukaryotic symbionts, and the eukaryotic community structures in different sponge holobionts were probably different. In order to test this hypothesis, the communities of eukaryota associated with 11 species of South China Sea sponges were compared with the V4 region of 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene using 454 pyrosequencing. Consequently, 135 and 721 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi and protists were obtained at 97 % sequence similarity, respectively. These sequences were assigned to 2 phyla of fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) and 9 phyla of protists including 5 algal phyla (Chlorophyta, Haptophyta, Streptophyta, Rhodophyta, and Stramenopiles) and 4 protozoal phyla (Alveolata, Cercozoa, Haplosporidia, and Radiolaria) including 47 orders (12 fungi, 35 protists). Entorrhizales of fungi and 18 orders of protists were detected in marine sponges for the first time. Particularly, Tilletiales of fungi and Chlorocystidales of protists were detected for the first time in marine habitats. Though Ascomycota, Alveolata, and Radiolaria were detected in all the 11 sponge species, sponge holobionts have different fungi and protistan communities according to OTU comparison and principal component analysis at the order level. This study provided the first insights into the fungal and protistan communities associated with different marine sponge holobionts using pyrosequencing, thus further extending the knowledge on sponge-associated eukaryotic diversity.

  7. Characterization of the Fungal Microbiome (Mycobiome in Fecal Samples from Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lauren Foster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and phylogenetic description of fungal organisms and their role as part of the intestinal ecosystem have not yet been studied extensively in dogs. This study evaluated the fungal microbiome of 19 dogs (12 healthy dogs and 7 dogs with acute diarrhea using fungal tag-encoded FLX-Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. Five distinct fungal phyla were identified, with Ascomycota (medians: 97.9% of obtained sequences in healthy dogs and 98.2% in diseased dogs and Basidiomycota (median 1.0% in healthy dogs and median 0.5% in diseased dogs being the most abundant fungal phyla. A total of 219 fungal genera were identified across all 19 dogs with a median (range of 28 (4–69 genera per sample. Candida was the most abundant genus found in both the diseased dogs (median: 1.9%, range: 0.2%–38.5% of sequences and healthy dogs (median: 5.2%, range: 0.0%–63.1% of sequences. Candida natalensis was the most frequently identified species. No significant differences were observed in the relative proportions of fungal communities between healthy and diseased dogs. In conclusion, fecal samples of healthy dogs and dogs with acute diarrhea harbor various fungal genera, and their role in gastrointestinal health and disease warrants further studies.

  8. PCR primers that amplify fungal rRNA genes from environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, J; Hartin, R J

    2000-10-01

    Two PCR primer pairs were designed to amplify rRNA genes (rDNA) from all four major phyla of fungi: Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridomycota, and Zygomycota. PCRs performed with these primers showed that both pairs amplify DNA from organisms representing the major taxonomic groups of fungi but not from nonfungal sources. To test the ability of the primers to amplify fungal rDNA from environment samples, clone libraries from two avocado grove soils were constructed and analyzed. These soils possess different abilities to inhibit avocado root rot caused by Phythophthora cinnamomi. Analysis of the two rDNA clone libraries revealed differences in the two fungal communities. It also revealed a markedly different depiction of the soil fungal community than that generated by a culture-based analysis, confirming the value of rDNA-based approaches for identifying organisms that may not readily grow on agar media. Additional evidence of the usefulness of the primers was obtained by identifying fungi associated with avocado leaves. In both the soil and leaf analyses, no nonfungal rDNA sequences were identified, illustrating the selectivity of these PCR primers. This work demonstrates the ability of two newly developed PCR primer sets to amplify fungal rDNA from soil and plant tissue, thereby providing unique tools to examine this vast and mostly undescribed community of organisms.

  9. DNA barcoding in Mexico: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Gutiérrez, M; León-Regagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    DNA barcoding has become an important current scientific trend to the understanding of the world biodiversity. In the case of mega-diverse hot spots like Mexico, this technique represents an important tool for taxonomists, allowing them to concentrate in highlighted species by the barcodes instead of analyzing entire sets of specimens. This tendency resulted in the creation of a national network named Mexican Barcode of Life (MEXBOL) which main goals are to train students, and to promote the interaction and collective work among researchers interested in this topic. As a result, the number of records in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) for some groups, such as the Mammalia, Actinopterygii, Polychaeta, Branchiopoda, Ostracoda, Maxillopoda, Nematoda, Pinophyta, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota place Mexico among the top ten countries in the generation of these data. This special number presents only few of the many interesting findings in this region of the world, after the use of this technique and its integration with other methodologies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Made for Each Other: Ascomycete Yeasts and Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Meredith

    2017-06-01

    Fungi and insects live together in the same habitats, and many species of both groups rely on each other for success. Insects, the most successful animals on Earth, cannot produce sterols, essential vitamins, and many enzymes; fungi, often yeast-like in growth form, make up for these deficits. Fungi, however, require constantly replenished substrates because they consume the previous ones, and insects, sometimes lured by volatile fungal compounds, carry fungi directly to a similar, but fresh, habitat. Yeasts associated with insects include Ascomycota (Saccharomycotina, Pezizomycotina) and a few Basidiomycota. Beetles, homopterans, and flies are important associates of fungi, and in turn the insects carry yeasts in pits, specialized external pouches, and modified gut pockets. Some yeasts undergo sexual reproduction within the insect gut, where the genetic diversity of the population is increased, while others, well suited to their stable environment, may never mate. The range of interactions extends from dispersal of yeasts on the surface of insects (e.g., cactus- Drosophila -yeast and ephemeral flower communities, ambrosia beetles, yeasts with holdfasts) to extremely specialized associations of organisms that can no longer exist independently, as in the case of yeast-like symbionts of planthoppers. In a few cases yeast-like fungus-insect associations threaten butterflies and other species with extinction. Technical advances improve discovery and identification of the fungi but also inform our understanding of the evolution of yeast-insect symbioses, although there is much more to learn.

  11. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from the zygomycete fungus Rhizopus oryzae: a highly specialized approach to carbohydrate degradation depicted at genome level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrissat Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhizopus oryzae is a zygomycete filamentous fungus, well-known as a saprobe ubiquitous in soil and as a pathogenic/spoilage fungus, causing Rhizopus rot and mucomycoses. Results Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZy annotation of the R. oryzae identified, in contrast to other filamentous fungi, a low number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs and a high number of glycosyl transferases (GTs and carbohydrate esterases (CEs. A detailed analysis of CAZy families, supported by growth data, demonstrates highly specialized plant and fungal cell wall degrading abilities distinct from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. The specific genomic and growth features for degradation of easily digestible plant cell wall mono- and polysaccharides (starch, galactomannan, unbranched pectin, hexose sugars, chitin, chitosan, β-1,3-glucan and fungal cell wall fractions suggest specific adaptations of R. oryzae to its environment. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genome of the zygomycete fungus R. oryzae and comparison to ascomycetes and basidiomycete species revealed how evolution has shaped its genetic content with respect to carbohydrate degradation, after divergence from the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota.

  12. Correlating bioaerosol load with PM2.5 and PM10cf concentrations: a comparison between natural desert and urban-fringe aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreson, Justin; Dillner, Ann M.; Peccia, Jordan

    2004-11-01

    Seasonal allergies and microbial mediated respiratory diseases, can coincide with elevated particulate matter concentrations, often when dry desert soils are disturbed. In addition to effects from the allergens, allergic and asthmatic responses may be enhanced when chemical and biological constituents of particulate matter (PM) are combined together. Because of these associations and also the recent regulatory and health-related interests of monitoring PM2.5, separately from total PM10, the biological loading between the fine (dpurban fringe site located in the expanding Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area during winter, spring, and summer seasons. Elemental carbon and inorganic ions were measured to determine the relative influence that anthropogenic sources, such as traffic, had on the aerosol composition. Total protein concentration was used as a surrogate measure of total biological concentration within the PM2.5 and PM10cf (coarse fraction) size ranges. In all seasons, coarse protein at the urban fringe was consistently higher than the natural desert. When high-anthropogenic PM events were separated from the data set, a positive significant correlation (purban fringe and natural desert. Both sites contained allergenic organisms. Some groups of eukaryotic species were exclusive to only one of the sites. The natural desert contained more species of Basidiomycota fungi and the urban fringe contained more species of green plants, suggesting that the biological loading at each site was different due to local influences.

  13. Importance of soil organic matter for the diversity of microorganisms involved in the degradation of organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Dominik; Heuer, Anke; Hemkemeyer, Michael; Martens, Rainer; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Many organic pollutants are readily degradable by microorganisms in soil, but the importance of soil organic matter for their transformation by specific microbial taxa is unknown. In this study, sorption and microbial degradation of phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) were characterized in three soil variants, generated by different long-term fertilization regimes. Compared with a non-fertilized control (NIL), a mineral-fertilized NPK variant showed 19% and a farmyard manure treated FYM variant 46% more soil organic carbon (SOC). Phenol sorption declined with overall increasing SOC because of altered affinities to the clay fraction (soil particles soil organic matter (present in the soil particle fractions of 63–2000 μm). Stable isotope probing identified Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter (both Actinobacteria) and Cryptococcus (Basidiomycota) as the main degraders of phenol. Rhodococcus and Cryptococcus were not affected by SOC, but the participation of Arthrobacter declined in NPK and even more in FYM. 14C-DCP was hardly metabolized in the NIL variant, more efficiently in FYM and most in NPK. In NPK, Burkholderia was the main degrader and in FYM Variovorax. This study demonstrates a strong effect of SOC on the partitioning of organic pollutants to soil particle size fractions and indicates the profound consequences that this process could have for the diversity of bacteria involved in their degradation. PMID:24430482

  14. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio T C C Rachid

    Full Text Available Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments: monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that.

  15. Phylogenetic classification of yeasts and related taxa within Pucciniomycotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q-M; Yurkov, A M; Göker, M; Lumbsch, H T; Leavitt, S D; Groenewald, M; Theelen, B; Liu, X-Z; Boekhout, T; Bai, F-Y

    2015-06-01

    Most small genera containing yeast species in the Pucciniomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) are monophyletic, whereas larger genera including Bensingtonia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus and Sporobolomyces are polyphyletic. With the implementation of the "One Fungus = One Name" nomenclatural principle these polyphyletic genera were revised. Nine genera, namely Bannoa, Cystobasidiopsis, Colacogloea, Kondoa, Erythrobasidium, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, Sakaguchia and Sterigmatomyces, were emended to include anamorphic and teleomorphic species based on the results obtained by a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis, phylogenetic network analyses, branch length-based methods, as well as morphological, physiological and biochemical comparisons. A new class Spiculogloeomycetes is proposed to accommodate the order Spiculogloeales. The new families Buckleyzymaceae with Buckleyzyma gen. nov., Chrysozymaceae with Chrysozyma gen. nov., Microsporomycetaceae with Microsporomyces gen. nov., Ruineniaceae with Ruinenia gen. nov., Symmetrosporaceae with Symmetrospora gen. nov., Colacogloeaceae and Sakaguchiaceae are proposed. The new genera Bannozyma, Buckleyzyma, Fellozyma, Hamamotoa, Hasegawazyma, Jianyunia, Rhodosporidiobolus, Oberwinklerozyma, Phenoliferia, Pseudobensingtonia, Pseudohyphozyma, Sampaiozyma, Slooffia, Spencerozyma, Trigonosporomyces, Udeniozyma, Vonarxula, Yamadamyces and Yunzhangia are proposed to accommodate species segregated from the genera Bensingtonia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus and Sporobolomyces. Ballistosporomyces is emended and reintroduced to include three Sporobolomyces species of the sasicola clade. A total of 111 new combinations are proposed in this study.

  16. Assembly, Annotation, and Analysis of Multiple Mycorrhizal Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Initiative Consortium, Mycorrhizal Genomics; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-03-08

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze dozens of mycorrhizal genomes of all Basidiomycota and Ascomycota orders and multiple ecological types (ericoid, orchid, and ectomycorrhizal). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput sequencing techniques, and Assembly, RNASeq, and Annotation Pipelines. In 2012 alone we sequenced, assembled, and annotated 12 draft or improved genomes of mycorrhizae, and predicted ~;;232831 genes and ~;;15011 multigene families, All of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm (http://jgi.doe.gov/fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. Preliminary comparisons of the current total of 14 public mycorrhizal genomes suggest that 1) short secreted proteins potentially involved in symbiosis are more enriched in some orders than in others amongst the mycorrhizal Agaricomycetes, 2) there are wide ranges of numbers of genes involved in certain functional categories, such as signal transduction and post-translational modification, and 3) novel gene families are specific to some ecological types.

  17. The taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and continental endemisms of Singerocybe: evidence from morphological and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiao; Feng, Bang; Yang, Zhu L; Li, Yan-Chun; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Takahashi, Haruki; Rexer, Karl-Heinz; Kost, Gerhard W; Karunarathna, Samantha C

    2014-01-01

    The genus Singerocybe (Tricholomataceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota) has been the subject of controversy since its proposal in 1988. Its taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and geographical distribution have not yet been examined with molecular sequence data. In this study phylogenetic analyses on this group of fungi were conducted based on collections from Europe, eastern Asia, southern Asia, North America and Australia, with four nuclear markers, ITS, nrLSU, tef1-α and rpb2. Molecular phylogenetic analyses, together with morphological observations, strongly support Singerocybe as a monophyletic group and identify the vesicles in the pileal and stipe cuticle as a synapomorphy of this genus. Seven species are recognized in the genus, including one new species and four new combinations. Clitocybe trogioides and Clitocybe trogioides var. odorifera are synonyms of Singerocybe humilis and Singerocybe alboinfundibuliformis respectively. Most of these species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore our study expands the distribution range of Singerocybe from the North Temperate Zone to Australia (Tasmania) and tropical southern Asia. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  18. Conservation of biotrophy in Hygrophoraceae inferred from combined stable isotope and phylogenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzman, Brian H; Ouimette, Andrew; Mixon, Rachel L; Hobbie, Erik A; Hibbett, David S

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional modes of genera in Hygrophoraceae (Basidiomycota: Agaricales), apart from the ectomycorrhizal Hygrophorus and lichen-forming taxa, are uncertain. New δ(15)N and δ(13)C values were obtained from 15 taxa under Hygrophoraceae collected in central Massachusetts and combined with isotopic datasets from five prior studies including a further 12 species using a data standardization method to allow cross-site comparison. Based on these data, we inferred the probable nutritional modes for species of Hygrophorus, Hygrocybe, Humidicutis, Cuphophyllus and Gliophorus. A phylogeny of Hygrophoraceae was constructed by maximum likelihood analysis of nuclear ribosomal 28S and 5.8S sequences and standardized δ(15)N and δ(13)C values were used for parsimony optimization on this phylogeny. Our results supported a mode of biotrophy in Hygrocybe, Humidicutis, Cuphophyllus and Gliophorus quantitatively unlike that in more than 450 other fungal taxa sampled in the present and prior studies. Parsimony optimization of stable isotope data suggests moderate conservation of nutritional strategies in Hygrophoraceae and a single switch to a predominantly ectomycorrhizal life strategy in the lineage leading to Hygrophorus. We conclude that Hygrophoraceae of previously unknown nutritional status are unlikely to be saprotrophs and are probably in symbiosis with bryophytes or other understory plants.

  19. Characterization of the fungal microbiota (mycobiome in healthy and dandruff-afflicted human scalps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kuk Park

    Full Text Available The human scalp harbors a vast community of microbial mutualists, the composition of which is difficult to elucidate as many of the microorganisms are not culturable using current culture techniques. Dandruff, a common scalp disorder, is known as a causative factor of a mild seborrheic dermatitis as well as pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. Lipophilic yeast Malassezia is widely accepted to play a role in dandruff, but relatively few comprehensive studies have been reported. In order to investigate fungal biota and genetic resources of dandruff, we amplified the 26S rRNA gene from samples of healthy scalps and dandruff-afflicted scalps. The sequences were analyzed by a high throughput method using a GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencer. Of the 74,811 total sequence reads, Basidiomycota (Filobasidium spp. was the most common phylum associated with dandruff. In contrast, Ascomycota (Acremonium spp. was common in the healthy scalps. Our results elucidate the distribution of fungal communities associated with dandruff and provide new avenues for the potential prevention and treatment of dandruff.

  20. Cultivable fungi present in Antarctic soils: taxonomy, phylogeny, diversity, and bioprospecting of antiparasitic and herbicidal metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eldon C Q; Godinho, Valéria M; Silva, Débora A S; de Paula, Maria T R; Vitoreli, Gislaine A; Zani, Carlos L; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Murta, Silvane M F; Barbosa, Emerson C; Oliveira, Jaquelline G; Oliveira, Fabio S; Carvalho, Camila R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2018-05-01

    Molecular biology techniques were used to identify 218 fungi from soil samples collected from four islands of Antarctica. These consisted of 22 taxa of 15 different genera belonging to the Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Mortierella, Antarctomyces, Pseudogymnoascus, and Penicillium were the most frequently isolated genera and Penicillium tardochrysogenum, Penicillium verrucosus, Goffeauzyma gilvescens, and Mortierella sp. 2 the most abundant taxa. All fungal isolates were cultivated using solid-state fermentation to obtain their crude extracts. Pseudogymnoascus destructans, Mortierella parvispora, and Penicillium chrysogenum displayed antiparasitic activities, whilst extracts of P. destructans, Mortierella amoeboidea, Mortierella sp. 3, and P. tardochrysogenum showed herbicidal activities. Reported as pathogenic for bats, different isolates of P. destructans exhibited trypanocidal activities and herbicidal activity, and may be a source of bioactive molecules to be considered for chemotherapy against neglected tropical diseases. The abundant presence of P. destructans in soils of the four islands gives evidence supporting that soils in the Antarctic Peninsula constitute a natural source of strains of this genus, including some P. destructans strains that are phylogenetically close to those that infect bats in North America and Europe/Palearctic Asia.

  1. Microbial diversity associated with algae, ascidians and sponges from the north coast of São Paulo state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Cláudia B A; Bonugli-Santos, Rafaella C; Miqueletto, Paula B; Passarini, Michel R Z; Silva, Carlos H D; Justo, Mariana R; Leal, Rebeca R; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Oliveira, Valéria M; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Sette, Lara D

    2010-08-20

    Little is known about the microbial diversity associated with marine macroorganisms, despite the vital role microorganisms may play in marine ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria and fungi isolated from eight marine invertebrate and one algae samples. Data derived from ARDRA and sequencing analyses allowed the identification of marine-derived microorganisms isolated from those samples. Microbial strains identified up to the genus level revealed 144 distinct ribotypes out of 256 fungal strains and 158 distinct ribotypes out of 181 bacterial strains. Filamentous fungi were distributed among 24 different genera belonging to Ascomycota, Zygomycota and Basidiomycota, some of which had never been reported in the literature as marine invertebrate-inhabiting fungi (Pestalotiopsis, Xylaria, Botrysphaeria and Cunnninghamella). Bacterial isolates were affiliated to 41 different genera, being Bacillus, Ruegeria, Micrococcus, Pseudovibrio and Staphylococcus the most abundant ones. Results revealed an unexpected high microbial diversity associated to the macroorganisms which have been collected and suggested the selection of certain microbial taxonomic groups according to the host. The combined data gathered from this investigation contribute to broaden the knowledge of microbial diversity associated to marine macroorganisms, including as a promising source for the discovery of new natural products. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M; Lee, Junghoon; Edwards, David P; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads) observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.

  3. Sebacina vermifera: a unique root symbiont with vast agronomic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Prasun; Craven, Kelly D

    2016-01-01

    The Sebacinales belong to a taxonomically, ecologically, and physiologically diverse group of fungi in the Basidiomycota. While historically recognized as orchid mycorrhizae, recent DNA studies have brought to light both their pandemic distribution and the broad spectrum of mycorrhizal types they form. Indeed, ecological studies using molecular-based methods of detection have found Sebacinales fungi in field specimens of bryophytes (moss), pteridophytes (fern) and all families of herbaceous angiosperms (flowering plants) from temperate, subtropical and tropical regions. These natural host plants include, among others, liverworts, wheat, maize and Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant traditionally viewed as non-mycorrhizal. The orchid mycorrhizal fungus Sebacina vermifera (MAFF 305830) was first isolated from the Australian orchid Cyrtostylis reniformis. Research performed with this strain clearly indicates its plant growth promoting abilities in a variety of plants, while demonstrating a lack of specificity that rivals or even surpasses that of arbuscular mycorrhizae. Indeed, these traits thus far appear to characterize a majority of strains belonging to the so-called "clade B" within the Sebacinales (recently re-classified as the Serendipitaceae), raising numerous basic research questions regarding plant-microbe signaling and the evolution of mycorrhizal symbioses. Further, given their proven beneficial impact on plant growth and their apparent but cryptic ubiquity, sebacinoid fungi should be considered as a previously hidden, but amenable and effective microbial tool for enhancing plant productivity and stress tolerance.

  4. Diversity and distribution of fungal communities in the marine sediments of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (High Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Fei Wang, Neng; Qin Zhang, Yu; Yu Liu, Hong; Yan Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities in eight marine sediments of Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, High Arctic) using 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Sedimentary fungal communities showed high diversity with 42,219 reads belonging to 113 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Of these OTUs, 62 belonged to the Ascomycota, 26 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Chytridiomycota, 1 to Zygomycota, 1 to Glomeromycota, and 21 to unknown fungi. The major known orders included Hypocreales and Saccharomycetales. The common fungal genera were Pichia, Fusarium, Alternaria, and Malassezia. Interestingly, most fungi occurring in these Arctic sediments may originate from the terrestrial habitats and different basins in Kongsfjorden (i.e., inner basin, central basin, and outer basin) harbor different sedimentary fungal communities. These results suggest the existence of diverse fungal communities in the Arctic marine sediments, which may serve as a useful community model for further ecological and evolutionary study of fungi in the Arctic.

  5. Large variability of bathypelagic microbial eukaryotic communities across the world’s oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Pernice, Massimo C.

    2015-10-09

    In this work, we study the diversity of bathypelagic microbial eukaryotes (0.8–20 μm) in the global ocean. Seawater samples from 3000 to 4000 m depth from 27 stations in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans were analyzed by pyrosequencing the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal DNA. The relative abundance of the most abundant operational taxonomic units agreed with the results of a parallel metagenomic analysis, suggesting limited PCR biases in the tag approach. Although rarefaction curves for single stations were seldom saturated, the global analysis of all sequences together suggested an adequate recovery of bathypelagic diversity. Community composition presented a large variability among samples, which was poorly explained by linear geographic distance. In fact, the similarity between communities was better explained by water mass composition (26% of the variability) and the ratio in cell abundance between prokaryotes and microbial eukaryotes (21%). Deep diversity appeared dominated by four taxonomic groups (Collodaria, Chrysophytes, Basidiomycota and MALV-II) appearing in different proportions in each sample. Novel diversity amounted to 1% of the pyrotags and was lower than expected. Our study represents an essential step in the investigation of bathypelagic microbial eukaryotes, indicating dominating taxonomic groups and suggesting idiosyncratic assemblages in distinct oceanic regions.

    The ISME Journal advance online publication, 9 October 2015; doi:10.1038/ismej.2015.170

  6. Diversity and saline resistance of endophytic fungi associated with Pinus thunbergii in coastal shelterbelts of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Young Ju; Park, Myung Soo; Fong, Jonathan J; Quan, Ying; Jung, Sungcheol; Lim, Young Woon

    2014-03-28

    The Black Pine, Pinus thunbergii, is widely distributed along the eastern coast of Korea and its importance as a shelterbelt was highlighted after tsunamis in Indonesia and Japan. The root endophytic diversity of P. thunbergii was investigated in three coastal regions; Goseong, Uljin, and Busan. Fungi were isolated from the root tips, and growth rates of pure cultures were measured and compared between PDA with and without 3% NaCl to determine their saline resistance. A total of 259 isolates were divided into 136 morphotypes, of which internal transcribed spacer region sequences identified 58 species. Representatives of each major fungi phylum were present: 44 Ascomycota, 8 Zygomycota, and 6 Basidiomycota. Eighteen species exhibited saline resistance, many of which were Penicillium and Trichoderma species. Shoreline habitats harbored higher saline-tolerant endophytic diversity compared with inland sites. This investigation indicates that endophytes of P. thunbergii living closer to the coast may have higher resistance to salinity and potentially have specific relationships with P. thunbergii.

  7. Diversity and dynamics of fungal endophytes in leaves, stems and roots of Stellera chamaejasme L. in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Quan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jixiang; Qin, Bo

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to explore fungal endophyte communities inhabiting a toxic weed (Stellera chamaejasme L.) from meadows of northwestern China. The effects of plant tissue and growth stage on endophyte assemblages were characterized. Endophytes were recovered from 50 % of the samples, with a total of 714 isolates. 41 operational taxonomical units (OTUs) were identified, consisting of 40 OTUs belonging primarily to Ascomycota and 1 OTU belonging to Basidiomycota. Pleosporales and Hypocreales were the orders contributing the most species to the endophytic assemblages. The total colonization frequency and species richness of endophytic fungi were higher in roots than in leaves and stems. In addition, for the plant tissues, the structure of fungal communities differed significantly by growth stages of leaf emergence and dormancy; for the plant growth stages, the structure of fungal communities differed significantly by plant tissues. This study demonstrates that S. chamaejasme serves as a reservoir for a wide variety of fungal endophytes that can be isolated from various plant tissues.

  8. Endophytic Fungi as Novel Resources of natural Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari Rajamanikyam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fungal endophytes constitute a major part of the unexplored fungal diversity. Endophytic fungi (EF are an important source for novel, potential and active metabolites. Plant-endophyte interaction and endophyte -endophyte interactions study provide insights into mutualism and metabolite production by fungi. Bioactive compounds produced by endophytes main function are helping the host plants to resist external biotic and abiotic stress, which benefit the host survival in return. These organisms mainly consist of members of the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Oomycota. Recently, the genome sequencing technology has emerged as one of the most efficient tools that can provide whole information of a genome in a small period of time. Endophytes are fertile ground for drug discovery. EFare considered as the hidden members of the microbial world and represent an underutilized resource for new therapeutics and compounds. Endophytes are rich source of natural products displaying broad spectrum of biological activities like anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-arthritis and anti-inflammatory.

  9. The diversity and antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with medicinal plant Baccharis trimera (Asteraceae) from the Brazilian savannah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mariana L A; Johann, Susana; Hughes, Frederic M; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2014-12-01

    The fungal endophyte community associated with Baccharis trimera, a Brazilian medicinal plant, was characterized and screened for its ability to present antimicrobial activity. By using molecular methods, we identified and classified the endophytic fungi obtained into 25 different taxa from the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The most abundant species were closely related to Diaporthe phaseolorum, Pestalotiopsis sp. 1, and Preussia pseudominima. The differences observed in endophytic assemblages from different B. trimera specimens might be associated with their crude extract activities. Plants that had higher α-biodiversity were also those that contributed more to the regional (γ) diversity. All fungal isolates were cultured and their crude extracts screened to examine the antimicrobial activities. Twenty-three extracts (12.8%) displayed antimicrobial activities against at least one target microorganism. Among these extracts, those obtained from Epicoccum sp., Pestalotiopsis sp. 1, Cochliobolus lunatus, and Nigrospora sp. presented the best minimum inhibitory concentration values. Our results show that the endophytic fungal community associated with the medicinal plant B. trimera included few dominant bioactive taxa, which may represent sources of compounds with antifungal activity. Additionally, the discovery of these bioactive fungi in association with B. trimera suggests that Brazilian plants used as folk medicine may shelter a rich fungal diversity as well as taxa able to produce bioactive metabolites with antimicrobial activities.

  10. Phylogenic diversity and tissue specificity of fungal endophytes associated with the pharmaceutical plant, Stellera chamaejasme L. revealed by a cultivation-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Dengxue; Li, Chunjie; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Xiuzhuang; Zeng, Liming; Qin, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The fungal endophytes associated with medicinal plants have been demonstrated as a reservoir with novel natural products useful in medicine and agriculture. It is desirable to explore the species composition, diversity and tissue specificity of endophytic fungi that inhabit in different tissues of medicinal plants. In this study, a culture-independent survey of fungal diversity in the rhizosphere, leaves, stems and roots of a toxic medicinal plant, Stellera chamaejasme L., was conducted by sequence analysis of clone libraries of the partial internal transcribed spacer region. Altogether, 145 fungal OTUs (operational taxonomic units), represented by 464 sequences, were found in four samples, of these 109 OTUs (75.2 %) belonging to Ascomycota, 20 (13.8 %) to Basidiomycota, 14 (9.7 %) to Zygomycota, 1 (0.7 %) to Chytridiomycota, and 1 (0.7 %) to Glomeromycota. The richness and diversity of fungal communities were strongly influenced by plant tissue environments, and the roots are associated with a surprisingly rich endophyte community. The endophyte assemblages associated with S. chamaejasme were strongly shaped by plant tissue environments, and exhibited a certain degree of tissue specificity. Our results suggested that a wide variety of fungal assemblages inhabit in S. chamaejasme, and plant tissue environments conspicuously influence endophyte community structure.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of the dimorphic transition of Ustilago maydis induced in vitro by a change in pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Soto, Domingo; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-01-01

    Dimorphism is the property of fungi to grow as budding yeasts or mycelium, depending on the environmental conditions. This phenomenon is important as a model of differentiation in eukaryotic organisms, and since a large number of fungal diseases are caused by dimorphic fungi, its study is important for practical reasons. In this work, we examined the transcriptome during the dimorphic transition of the basidiomycota phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis using microarrays, utilizing yeast and mycelium monomorphic mutants as controls. This way, we thereby identified 154 genes of the fungus that are specifically involved in the dimorphic transition induced by a pH change. Of these, 82 genes were up-regulated, and 72 were down-regulated. Differential categorization of these genes revealed that they mostly belonged to the classes of metabolism, cell cycle and DNA processing, transcription and protein fate, transport and cellular communication, stress, cell differentiation and biogenesis of cellular components, while a significant number of them corresponded to unclassified proteins. The data reported in this work are important for our understanding of the molecular bases of dimorphism in U. maydis, and possibly of other fungi. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Ibuprofen removal in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: treatment performance and fungal community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Luo, Jinxue; Lee, Zarraz May Ping; Gersberg, Richard M; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-01-01

    The treatment performance of ibuprofen (IBP)-enriched wastewater by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands planted with cattail (Typha angustifolia) and unplanted control mesocosms was investigated. Removal efficiencies of IBP were significantly (p fungal community in these wetland systems. The overall diversity of the fungal community was reduced under the IBP exposure. Taxonomic analysis revealed that 62.2% of the fungal sequences were affiliated with Basidiomycota, followed by Ascomycota (37.4%) at the phylum level. Uncultured fungus (48.2%), Chaetomium sp. (14.2%), Aspergillus sp. (12.4%), Trichoderma sp. (5.7%), Cladosporium sp. (5.4%), and Emericellopsis sp. (5.2%) were identified as dominant genera. At the genus level, a distinct profile of the fungal community in the IBP-enriched mesocosms was observed as compared to the control beds, and as well specific fungal genera were enhanced in the planted beds, regardless of IBP enrichment. However, despite these differences, the composition of the fungal community (as measured by Bray-Curtis similarity) was mostly unaffected by the significant IBP enrichment. On the other hand, a consistent similarity pattern of fungal community structure in the planted mesocosms suggests that the presence of higher macrophytes in the wetland systems may well help shape the fungal community structure.

  13. Olive mill wastewater biodegradation potential of white-rot fungi--Mode of action of fungal culture extracts and effects of ligninolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Baldrian, Petr; Ehaliotis, Constantinos; Nerud, Frantisek; Merhautová, Věra; Zervakis, Georgios I

    2015-01-01

    Forty-nine white-rot strains belonging to 38 species of Basidiomycota were evaluated for olive-mill wastewater (OMW) degradation. Almost all fungi caused high total phenolics (>60%) and color (⩽ 70%) reduction, while COD and phytotoxicity decreased to a lesser extent. Culture extracts from selected Agrocybe cylindracea, Inonotus andersonii, Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor strains showed non-altered physicochemical and enzymatic activity profiles when applied to raw OMW in the presence or absence of commercial catalase, indicating no interaction of the latter with fungal enzymes and no competition for H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide's addition resulted in drastic OMW's decolorization, with no effect on phenolic content, suggesting that oxidation affects colored components, but not necessarily phenolics. When fungal extracts were heat-treated, no phenolics decrease was observed demonstrating thus their enzymatic rather than physicochemical oxidation. Laccases added to OMW were reversibly inhibited by the effluent's high phenolic load, while peroxidases were stable and active during the entire process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ignored fungal community in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants: diversity and altitudinal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lihua; Li, Yi; Xu, Lingling; Wang, Peifang; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Cai, Wei; Wang, Linqiong

    2017-02-01

    Fungi are important contributors to the various functions of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs); however, the diversity and geographic characteristics of fungal populations have remained vastly unexplored. Here, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were combined to investigate the abundance and diversity of the activated sludge fungal communities from 18 full-scale municipal WWTPs in China. Phylogenetic taxonomy revealed that the members of the fungal communities were assigned to 7 phyla and 195 genera. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the most abundant phyla, dominated by Pluteus, Wickerhamiella, and Penicillium. Twenty-three fungal genera, accounting for 50.1 % of the total reads, were shared by 18 WWTPs and constituted a core fungal community. The fungal communities presented similar community diversity but different community structures across the WWTPs. Significant distance decay relationships were observed for the dissimilarity in fungal community structure and altitudinal distance between WWTPs. Additionally, the community evenness increased from 0.25 to 0.7 as the altitude increased. Dissolved oxygen and the C/N ratio were determined to be the most dominant contributors to the variation in fungal community structure via redundancy analysis. The observed data demonstrated the diverse occurrence of fungal species and gave a marked view of fungal community characteristics based on the previously unexplored fungal communities in activated sludge WWTPs.

  15. Exploring the potential of fungi isolated from PAH-polluted soil as a source of xenobiotics-degrading fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Patricia; Reina, Rocío; Calderón, Andrea; Wittich, Regina-Michaela; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to find polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading fungi adapted to polluted environments for further application in bioremediation processes. In this study, a total of 23 fungal species were isolated from a historically pyrogenic PAH-polluted soil in Spain and taxonomically identified. The dominant groups in these samples were the ones associated with fungi belonging to the Ascomycota phylum and two isolates belonging to the Mucoromycotina subphylum and Basiodiomycota phylum. We tested their ability to convert the three-ring PAH anthracene in a 42-day time course and analysed their ability to secrete extracellular oxidoreductase enzymes. Among the 23 fungal species screened, 12 were able to oxidize anthracene, leading to the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone as the main metabolite, a less toxic one than the parent compound. The complete removal of anthracene was achieved by three fungal species. In the case of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, extracellular enzyme independent degradation of the initial 100 μM anthracene occurred, whilst in the case of the ligninolytic fungus Fomes (Basidiomycota), the same result was obtained with extracellular enzyme-dependent transformation. The yield of accumulated 9,10-anthraquinone was 80 and 91 %, respectively, and Fomes sp. could slowly deplete it from the growth medium when offered alone. These results are indicative for the effectiveness of these fungi for pollutant removal. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  16. Diversity of endolithic fungal communities in dolomite and limestone rocks from Nanjiang Canyon in Guizhou karst area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuan; Lian, Bin

    2012-06-01

    The endolithic environment, the tiny pores and cracks in rocks, buffer microbial communities from a number of physical stresses, such as desiccation, rapid temperature variations, and UV radiation. Considerable knowledge has been acquired about the diversity of microorganisms in these ecosystems, but few culture-independent studies have been carried out on the diversity of fungi to date. Scanning electron microscopy of carbonate rock fragments has revealed that the rock samples contain certain kinds of filamentous fungi. We evaluated endolithic fungal communities from bare dolomite and limestone rocks collected from Nanjiang Canyon (a typical karst canyon in China) using culture-independent methods. Results showed that Ascomycota was absolutely dominant both in the dolomite and limestone fungal clone libraries. Basidiomycota and other eukaryotic groups (Bryophyta and Chlorophyta) were only detected occasionally or at low frequencies. The most common genus in the investigated carbonate rocks was Verrucaria. Some other lichen-forming fungi (e.g., Caloplaca, Exophiala, and Botryolepraria), Aspergillus, and Penicillium were also identified from the rock samples. The results provide a cross-section of the endolithic fungal communities in carbonate rocks and help us understand more about the role of microbes (fungi and other rock-inhabiting microorganisms) in rock weathering and pedogenesis.

  17. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative bioluminescence dynamics among multiple Armillaria gallica, A. mellea, and A. tabescens genets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2013-03-01

    Bioluminescence is well known among white-spored species of Basidiomycota including several species of the white-rot wood decay genus Armillaria. Previous work demonstrated consistent differences among A. gallica, A. mellea, and A. tabescens in luminescence magnitude and in luminescence expression relative to environmental stimuli. In the present studies, temporal fluctuations in mycelial luminescence were quantitatively characterized using genets matched for geographical location. All genets derived from rhizomorphs or basdiomata were constitutively luminescent while six of 13 genets originating from mycelial fans were inconsistently luminescent. Using time series of 1000 consecutive measurements over 800 ms intervals, fluctuation patterns had significantly quantifiable structure and were not simply 'white noise'. Fluctuation patterns were qualitatively similar with alternating periods of rapid fluctuation and relative stability, regardless of luminescence magnitude. Anomalous spikes or shifts in luminescence were recorded for several genets suggesting further work to identify the transient stimuli which elicited these altered luminescence patterns. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Young

    Full Text Available Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes. Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  20. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of coastal bioaerosols using culture dependent and independent techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, R.; Palenik, B.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-02-01

    Bioaerosols are emerging as important yet poorly understood players in atmospheric processes. Microorganisms can impact atmospheric chemistry through metabolic reactions and can potentially influence physical processes by participating in ice nucleation and cloud droplet formation. Microbial roles in atmospheric processes are thought to be species-specific and potentially dependent on cell viability. Using a coastal pier monitoring site as a sampling platform, culture-dependent (i.e. agar plates) and culture-independent (i.e. DNA clone libraries from filters) approaches were combined with 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene targeting to obtain insight into the local atmospheric microbial composition. From 13 microbial isolates and 42 DNA library clones, a total of 55 sequences were obtained representing four independent sampling events. Sequence analysis revealed that in these coastal samples two fungal phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, predominate among eukaryotes while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominate among bacteria. Furthermore, our culture-dependent study verifies the viability of microbes from all four phyla detected through our culture-independent study. Contrary to our expectations and despite oceanic air mass sources, common marine planktonic bacteria and phytoplankton were not typically found. The abundance of terrestrial and marine sediment-associated microorganisms suggests a potential importance for bioaerosols derived from beaches and/or coastal erosion processes.

  1. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  2. Investigations of biodeterioration by fungi in historic wooden churches of Chiloé, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Rodrigo; Párraga, Mario; Navarrete, José; Carrasco, Ivo; de la Vega, Eduardo; Ortiz, Manuel; Herrera, Paula; Jurgens, Joel A; Held, Benjamin W; Blanchette, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    The use of wood in construction has had a long history and Chile has a rich cultural heritage of using native woods for building churches and other important structures. In 2000, UNESCO designated a number of the historic churches of Chiloé, built entirely of native woods, as World Heritage Sites. These unique churches were built in the late 1700 s and throughout the 1800 s, and because of their age and exposure to the environment, they have been found to have serious deterioration problems. Efforts are underway to better understand these decay processes and to carryout conservation efforts for the long-term preservation of these important structures. This study characterized the types of degradation taking place and identified the wood decay fungi obtained from eight historic churches in Chiloé, seven of them designated as UNESCO World Heritage sites. Micromorphological observations identified white, brown and soft rot in the structural woods and isolations provided pure cultures of fungi that were identified by sequencing of the internal transcribed region of rDNA. Twenty-nine Basidiomycota and 18 Ascomycota were found. These diverse groups of fungi represent several genera and species not previously reported from Chile and demonstrates a varied microflora is causing decay in these historic buildings.

  3. What is Antrodia sensu stricto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirin, Viacheslav; Vlasák, Josef; Niemelä, Tuomo; Miettinen, Otto

    2013-01-01

    The polypore genus Antrodia (Polyporales, Basidiomycota) in the strict sense consists of a small number of species grouped around the type species A. serpens in phylogenetic analyses. This distinct clade (Antrodia sensu stricto in our view) contains species of the Antrodia heteromorpha complex, A. macra coll. and Antrodia mappa (formerly Postia mappa). Nuclear rDNA ITS and tef1 data show that the Antrodia heteromorpha species complex includes four species: A. heteromorpha sensu stricto (mostly on gymnosperms, large pores and spores), A. serpens (on angiosperms in Europe, resupinate, smaller pores but large spores), A. favescens (smaller pores and spores, pileate species in North America, formerly known as Trametes sepium), and A. tanakai (a close kin of A. favescens in Eurasia). Antrodia albida is a synonym of A. heteromorpha sensu stricto. We combine A. mappa, A. favescens and A. tanakai in Antrodia and designate neotypes for A. albida and A. heteromorpha, and an epitype for A. serpens. We also compare the morphologically similar but distantly related A. albidoides and A. mellita, and conclude that A. macrospora and A. subalbidoides are synonyms of A. albidoides.

  4. Fungal communities in ancient peatlands developed from different periods in the Sanjiang Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Ma, Lina; Luo, Shasha; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Xiujun

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands in the Sanjiang Plain could be more vulnerable to global warming because they are located at the southernmost boundary of northern peatlands. Unlike bacteria, fungi are often overlooked, even though they play important roles in substance circulation in the peatland ecosystems. Accordingly, it is imperative that we deepen our understanding of fungal community structure and diversity in the peatlands. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing was used to study the fungal communities in three fens in the Sanjiang Plain, located at the southern edge of northern peatlands. Peat soil was collected from the three fens which developed during different periods. A total of 463,198 fungal ITS sequences were obtained, and these sequences were classified into at least six phyla, 21 classes, more than 60 orders and over 200 genera. The fungal community structures were distinct in the three sites and were dominated by Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. However, there were no significant differences between these three fens in any α-diversity index (p > 0.05). Soil age and the carbon (C) accumulation rate, as well as total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), C/N ratio, and bulk density were found to be closely related to the abundance of several dominant fungal taxa. We captured a rich fungal community and confirmed that the dominant taxa were those which were frequently detected in other northern peatlands. Soil age and the C accumulation rate were found to play important roles in shaping the fungal community structure. PMID:29236715

  5. Yeast tolerance to the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Shi, Shuang; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Simmons, Christopher W

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the target feedstock for production of second-generation biofuels. Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment can enhance deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. Although biomass is typically washed following IL pretreatment, small quantities of residual IL can inhibit fermentative microorganisms downstream, such as the widely used ethanologenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The aim of this study was to identify yeasts tolerant to the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, one of the top performing ILs known for biomass pretreatment. One hundred and sixty eight strains spanning the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla were selected for screening, with emphasis on yeasts within or closely related to the Saccharomyces genus and those tolerant to saline environments. Based on growth in media containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, tolerance to IL levels ranging 1-5% was observed for 80 strains. The effect of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate concentration on maximum cell density and growth rate was quantified to rank tolerance. The most tolerant yeasts included strains from the genera Clavispora, Debaryomyces, Galactomyces, Hyphopichia, Kazachstania, Meyerozyma, Naumovozyma, Wickerhamomyces, Yarrowia, and Zygoascus. These yeasts included species known to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides and those capable of ethanol fermentation. These yeasts warrant further investigation for use in saccharification and fermentation of IL-pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol or other products. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microsporomyces hainanensis sp. nov., Isolated from Hybrid Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feirong; Liu, Yang; Li, Ni; Yao, Su; Li, Nannan; Wang, Weiping; Cheng, Chi

    2016-10-01

    A total of five strains were isolated from two different hybrid rice seeds samples (Oryza sativa L. Shenliangyou 5814 and Yliangyou 900) in Sanya city, Hainan province, China. Sequence analysis and physiological characteristics indicated that these strains were identical and represented a novel species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer regions revealed that this new species is located in the Microsporomyces clade, with four closely related species, namely, M. magnisporus, M. orientalis, M. bloemfonteinensis, and M. pini. The novel species differed from these four described species in ability to assimilate sorbose, cellobiose, lactose, D-arabinose, and maltose. Based on these results, the following novel yeast species is proposed: Microsporomyces hainanensis sp. nov. with the type strain of Z8(T) (CICC 33066(T) = CBS 14092(T)) belongs to phylum Basidiomycota, subphylum Pucciniomycotina, class Cystobasidiomycetes, family Microsporomycetaceae. The new species were registered in MycoBank under MB 815471.

  7. Destructuring plant biomass: focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-05-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocallimastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Yeast diversity and novel yeast D1/D2 sequences from corn phylloplane obtained by a culture-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Jaibangyang, Sopin; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2016-12-01

    Culture-independent techniques have recently been used for evaluation of microbial diversity in the environment since it addresses the problem of unculturable microorganisms. In this study, the diversity of epiphytic yeasts from corn (Zea mays Linn.) phylloplanes in Thailand was investigated using this technique and sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit ribosomal DNA sequences. Thirty-seven samples of corn leaf were collected randomly from 10 provinces. The DNA was extracted from leaf washing samples and the D1/D2 domains were amplified. The PCR products were cloned and then screened by colony PCR. A total of 1049 clones were obtained from 37 clone libraries. From this total, 329 clones (213 sequences) were closely related to yeast strains in the GenBank database, and they were clustered into 77 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a similarity threshold of 99 %. The majority of sequences (98.5 %) were classified into the phylum Basidiomycota. Sixteen known yeast species were identified. Interestingly, more than 65 % of the D1/D2 sequences obtained by this technique were suggested to be sequences from new yeast taxa. The predominant yeast sequences detected belonged to the order Ustilaginales with relative frequency of 68.0 %. The most common known yeast species detected on the leaf samples were Pseudozyma hubeiensis pro tem. and Moesziomyces antarcticus with frequency of occurrence of 24.3 and 21.6 %, respectively.

  9. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  10. Morphological-anatomical characterization and identification of Tomentella ectomycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Eros-Honti, Zsolt

    2008-09-01

    Over the last two decades, much information has been gathered on the ectomycorrhizal fungus community composition of plant associations of boreal, temperate, and tropical regions. Worldwide, Tomentella ectomycorrhizas (ECM) are often common and dominant in the mycorrhizosphere of coniferous and deciduous forests. They are present under different environmental conditions and associate with diverse plant hosts. Tomentella sporocarps, however, are rarely found aboveground, so Tomentella species are often missing from fungus community studies based on fruit-body presence. Tomentella is a resupinate genus of Thelephoraceae (Basidiomycota) forming black-brown, brown, yellow, or ochre ECM on the roots of gymnosperm and angiosperm trees, distinguished by typical morphological-anatomical characteristics (clamped hyphae, angular mantle, surface network, special rhizomorphs and cystidia). In this paper, we review the taxonomic position and morphological-anatomical characteristics of Tomentella ECM. A short summary of the microscopic features used for distinguishing tomentelloids during morphotyping and identification is presented in order to support molecular and ecological studies of ectomycorrhizal fungus communities.

  11. Contrasting root associated fungi of three common oak-woodland plant species based on molecular identification: host specificity or non-specific amplification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhan, Greg W; Petersen, Carolyn; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Rizzo, David M

    2005-07-01

    An increasingly popular approach used to identify arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in planta is to amplify a portion of AM fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) from whole root DNA extractions using the primer pair AM1-NS31, followed by cloning and sequencing. We used this approach to study the AM fungal community composition of three common oak-woodland plant species: a grass (Cynosurus echinatus), blue oak (Quercus douglasii), and a forb (Torilis arvensis). Significant diversity of AM fungi were found in the roots of C. echinatus, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating a high degree of AM fungal diversity from the roots of various hosts. In contrast, clones from Q. douglasii and T. arvensis were primarily from non-AM fungi of diverse origins within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This work demonstrates that caution must be taken when using this molecular approach to determine in planta AM fungal diversity if non-sequence based methods such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis are used.

  12. CULTURE DESCRIPTION OF SOME SPONTANEOUS LIGNICOLOUS MACROMYCETES SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALAEŞ TIBERIUS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 24 species of lignicolous macromycetes from 4 taxonomic families and 2 orders, Class Agaricomycetes, Phyllum Basidiomycota, have been analyzed. The cultural characters of these isolates had been observed, some of them being little studied till now. The dikaryotic mycelium from the trama of the sporoms was used for the isolation purpose. The fungal isolates were cultivated onto malt extract-agar media (malt extract 20g l-1 and incubated at 25 °C, in the dark, for 6 weeks. The cultures were observed directly and using a Nikon stereomicroscope in order to measure the growth rhythm and to observe the changes of the colonies: edge, surface, reverse, shape, colour, smell, presence or absence of the exudates. After 6 weeks from the inoculation, microscopic slides were made in order to investigate the types of hyphae, the colour and the structure of the mycelium and to note the presence of particular elements: cuticle, chlamydospors, arthrospores, conidia, and basidia. We noticed that the analyzed species present similar characters but also significant differences between them.

  13. Estudio micológico de El Canal y Los Tiles (La Palma, Islas Canarias. V. Datos adicionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal, Julio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An annotated catalogue of 66 taxa, collected in the early MAB Reserve El Canal y Los Tiles is presented. Among these taxa, 11 species are new for La Palma island and 5 are recorded for the first time in the Canary Islands. Taxonomic comments on some critical species and information about the distribution in the Macaronesian bioregion of all the studied taxa are given. Based on our previous publications, global data on biodiversity, substrates and distribution of the mycobiota in the different plant communities present in the sampled area are analyzed.

    Se presenta un estudio sobre 66 especies, pertenecientes a las divisiones Myxomycota (21, Ascomycota (29 y Basidiomycota (16, encontradas en la antigua Reserva de la Biosfera El Canal y Los Tiles. De ellas 11 se citan por primera vez para la isla de La Palma, siendo 5 de éstas nuevas para Canarias. Se hacen comentarios taxonómicos sobre algunos táxones conflictivos, además de amplia información sobre su distribución en la Región Macaronésica. En base a publicaciones propias anteriores, se aportan datos globales sobre biodiversidad, sustratos y distribución de la micobiota en las diferentes unidades ambientales presentes en el área de estudio.

  14. Bacterial selection by mycospheres of Atlantic Rainforest mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Joshua Andrew; de Cássia Pereira E Silva, Michele; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on the selection exerted on bacterial communities in the mycospheres of mushrooms collected in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. A total of 24 paired samples (bulk soil vs. mycosphere) were assessed to investigate potential interactions between fungi and bacteria present in fungal mycospheres. Prevalent fungal families were identified as Marasmiaceae and Lepiotaceae (both Basidiomycota) based on ITS partial sequencing. We used culture-independent techniques to analyze bacterial DNA from soil and mycosphere samples. Bacterial communities in the samples were distinguished based on overall bacterial, alphaproteobacterial, and betaproteobacterial PCR-DGGE patterns, which were different in fungi belonging to different taxa. These results were confirmed by pyrosequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene (based on five bulk soil vs. mycosphere pairs), which revealed the most responsive bacterial families in the different conditions generated beneath the mushrooms, identified as Bradyrhizobiaceae, Burkholderiaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae. The bacterial families Acetobacteraceae, Chrhoniobacteraceae, Planctomycetaceae, Conexibacteraceae, and Burkholderiaceae were found in all mycosphere samples, composing the core mycosphere microbiome. Similarly, some bacterial groups identified as Koribacteriaceae, Acidobacteria (Solibacteriaceae) and an unclassified group of Acidobacteria were preferentially present in the bulk soil samples (found in all of them). In this study we depict the mycosphere effect exerted by mushrooms inhabiting the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest, and identify the bacteria with highest response to such a specific niche, possibly indicating the role bacteria play in mushroom development and dissemination within this yet-unexplored environment.

  15. Phylogenomic relationships between amylolytic enzymes from 85 strains of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanping Chen

    Full Text Available Fungal amylolytic enzymes, including α-amylase, gluocoamylase and α-glucosidase, have been extensively exploited in diverse industrial applications such as high fructose syrup production, paper making, food processing and ethanol production. In this paper, amylolytic genes of 85 strains of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota were annotated on the genomic scale according to the classification of glycoside hydrolase (GH from the Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy Database. Comparisons of gene abundance in the fungi suggested that the repertoire of amylolytic genes adapted to their respective lifestyles. Amylolytic enzymes in family GH13 were divided into four distinct clades identified as heterologous α-amylases, eukaryotic α-amylases, bacterial and fungal α-amylases and GH13 α-glucosidases. Family GH15 had two branches, one for gluocoamylases, and the other with currently unknown function. GH31 α-glucosidases showed diverse branches consisting of neutral α-glucosidases, lysosomal acid α-glucosidases and a new clade phylogenetically related to the bacterial counterparts. Distribution of starch-binding domains in above fungal amylolytic enzymes was related to the enzyme source and phylogeny. Finally, likely scenarios for the evolution of amylolytic enzymes in fungi based on phylogenetic analyses were proposed. Our results provide new insights into evolutionary relationships among subgroups of fungal amylolytic enzymes and fungal evolutionary adaptation to ecological conditions.

  16. Impact of Amazon land use on the community of soil fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle G. M. Fracetto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considered as one of the most biodiverse biomes, the Amazon has a featured role in the discovery of new species of plants, animals and microorganisms, which may be important for the functionality of different ecosystems. However, studies on the impacts resulted from changes in the Amazon land use on microbial communities and their functions are still limited. In this context, the soil fungal diversity can act as an important indicator of environmental stress caused by land use of the Amazon. This study describes changes in soil fungal communities caused by different systems of land use (primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. Communities were observed in each of the areas using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 18S rRNA gene combined with the non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS. Unique bands indicated the dominance of particular fungal groups in each of the specific treatments, mainly in areas converted to pasture, which differed greatly from samples of other systems of land use (SLU. The analysis of partial sequence of the 18S rRNA gene of fungi in soils under primary forest, agriculture and pasture showed differences (p = 0.001, evidencing the fungal community response to such changes. Most abundant phyla were the Zygomycota in the soil under primary forest and agricultural land, and Basidiomycota in the soil under pasture. The results show that the Amazon soil is an ecosystem susceptible to environmental changes in regarding the fungi community inhabiting this niche.

  17. Fungi Sailing the Arctic Ocean: Speciose Communities in North Atlantic Driftwood as Revealed by High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämä, Teppo; Davey, Marie L; Nordén, Jenni; Halvorsen, Rune; Blaalid, Rakel; Mathiassen, Geir H; Alsos, Inger G; Kauserud, Håvard

    2016-08-01

    High amounts of driftwood sail across the oceans and provide habitat for organisms tolerating the rough and saline environment. Fungi have adapted to the extremely cold and saline conditions which driftwood faces in the high north. For the first time, we applied high-throughput sequencing to fungi residing in driftwood to reveal their taxonomic richness, community composition, and ecology in the North Atlantic. Using pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons obtained from 49 marine logs, we found 807 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on clustering at 97 % sequence similarity cut-off level. The phylum Ascomycota comprised 74 % of the OTUs and 20 % belonged to Basidiomycota. The richness of basidiomycetes decreased with prolonged submersion in the sea, supporting the general view of ascomycetes being more extremotolerant. However, more than one fourth of the fungal OTUs remained unassigned to any fungal class, emphasising the need for better DNA reference data from the marine habitat. Different fungal communities were detected in coniferous and deciduous logs. Our results highlight that driftwood hosts a considerably higher fungal diversity than currently known. The driftwood fungal community is not a terrestrial relic but a speciose assemblage of fungi adapted to the stressful marine environment and different kinds of wooden substrates found in it.

  18. Hybrid histidine kinases in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Sharma, Anupam; Mondal, Alok K; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Calderone, Richard; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Histidine kinases (HK) sense and transduce via phosphorylation events many intra- and extracellular signals in bacteria, archaea, slime moulds and plants. HK are also widespread in the fungal kingdom, but their precise roles in the regulation of physiological processes remain largely obscure. Expanding genomic resources have recently given the opportunity to identify uncharacterised HK family members in yeasts and moulds and now allow proposing a complex classification of Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and lower fungi HK. A growing number of genetic approaches have progressively provided new insight into the role of several groups of HK in prominent fungal pathogens. In particular, a series of studies have revealed that members of group III HK, which occur in the highest number of fungal species and contain a unique N-terminus region consisting of multiple HAMP domain repeats, regulate morphogenesis and virulence in various human, plant and insect pathogenic fungi. This research field is further supported by recent shape-function studies providing clear correlation between structural properties and signalling states in group III HK. Since HK are absent in mammals, these represent interesting fungal target for the discovery of new antifungal drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Species richness and adaptation of marine fungi from deep-subseafloor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rédou, Vanessa; Navarri, Marion; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan

    2015-05-15

    The fungal kingdom is replete with unique adaptive capacities that allow fungi to colonize a wide variety of habitats, ranging from marine habitats to freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The diversity, importance, and ecological roles of marine fungi have recently been highlighted in deep-subsurface sediments using molecular methods. Fungi in the deep-marine subsurface may be specifically adapted to life in the deep biosphere, but this can be demonstrated only using culture-based analyses. In this study, we investigated culturable fungal communities from a record-depth sediment core sampled from the Canterbury Basin (New Zealand) with the aim to reveal endemic or ubiquist adapted isolates playing a significant ecological role(s). About 200 filamentous fungi (68%) and yeasts (32%) were isolated. Fungal isolates were affiliated with the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, including 21 genera. Screening for genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis also revealed their bioactive compound synthesis potential. Our results provide evidence that deep-subsurface fungal communities are able to survive, adapt, grow, and interact with other microbial communities and highlight that the deep-sediment habitat is another ecological niche for fungi. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aquatic gilled mushrooms: Psathyrella fruiting in the Rogue River in southern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jonathan L; Coffan, Robert A; Southworth, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    A species of Psathyrella (Basidiomycota) with true gills has been observed fruiting underwater in the clear, cold, flowing waters of the upper Rogue River in Oregon. Fruiting bodies develop and mature in the main channel, where they are constantly submerged, and were observed fruiting over 11 wk. These mushrooms develop underwater, not on wood recently washed into the river. Substrates include water-logged wood, gravel and the silty riverbed. DNA sequences of the ITS region and a portion of the ribosomal large subunit gene place this fungus in Psathyrella sensu stricto near P. atomata, P. fontinalis and P. superiorensis. Morphological characters distinguish the underwater mushroom from previously described species. Fruiting bodies have long fibrillose stipes with small diameter caps. Immature stages have a thin veil that is soon lost. Gills lack reddish edges. Cystidia are ventricose with subacute apices. Spores were observed as wedge-shape rafts released into gas pockets below the caps. Underwater gills and ballistospores indicate a recent adaptation to the stream environment. This particular river habitat combines the characteristics of spring-fed flows and cold, aerated water with woody debris in shallow depths on a fine volcanic substrate. Based on molecular and morphological evidence we conclude that the underwater mushrooms are a new species, Psathyrella aquatica. This report adds to the biodiversity of stream fungi that degrade woody substrates. The underwater environment is a new habitat for gilled mushrooms.

  2. The Role of Microbial Community Composition in Controlling Soil Respiration Responses to Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Marc D; Karhu, Kristiina; Khachane, Amit; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Fraser, Fiona; Hopkins, David W; Wookey, Philip A; Singh, Brajesh K; Freitag, Thomas E; Hartley, Iain P; Prosser, James I

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperatures may increase the rates of soil organic matter decomposition by heterotrophic microorganisms, potentially accelerating climate change further by releasing additional carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, the possibility that microbial community responses to prolonged warming may modify the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration creates large uncertainty in the strength of this positive feedback. Both compensatory responses (decreasing temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in the long-term) and enhancing responses (increasing temperature sensitivity) have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying these responses are poorly understood. In this study, microbial biomass, community structure and the activities of dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase enzymes were determined for 18 soils that had previously demonstrated either no response or varying magnitude of enhancing or compensatory responses of temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic microbial respiration to prolonged cooling. The soil cooling approach, in contrast to warming experiments, discriminates between microbial community responses and the consequences of substrate depletion, by minimising changes in substrate availability. The initial microbial community composition, determined by molecular analysis of soils showing contrasting respiration responses to cooling, provided evidence that the magnitude of enhancing responses was partly related to microbial community composition. There was also evidence that higher relative abundance of saprophytic Basidiomycota may explain the compensatory response observed in one soil, but neither microbial biomass nor enzymatic capacity were significantly affected by cooling. Our findings emphasise the key importance of soil microbial community responses for feedbacks to global change, but also highlight important areas where our understanding remains limited.

  3. Biodegradation and detoxification of olive mill wastewater by selected strains of the mushroom genera Ganoderma and Pleurotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Baldrian, Petr; Ehaliotis, Constantinos; Nerud, Frantisek; Antoniou, Theodoros; Merhautová, Věra; Zervakis, Georgios I

    2012-07-01

    Thirty-nine white-rot fungi belonging to nine species of Agaricomycotina (Basidiomycota) were initially screened for their ability to decrease olive-mill wastewater (OMW) phenolics. Four strains of Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Pleurotus eryngii and Pleurotus ostreatus, were selected and further examined for key-aspects of the OMW biodegradation process. Fungal growth in OMW-containing batch cultures resulted in significant decolorization (by 40-46% and 60-65% for Ganoderma and Pleurotus spp. respectively) and reduction of phenolics (by 64-67% and 74-81% for Ganoderma and Pleurotus spp. respectively). COD decrease was less pronounced (12-29%). Cress-seeds germination increased by 30-40% when OMW was treated by Pleurotus strains. Toxicity expressed as inhibition of Aliivibrio fischeri luminescence was reduced in fungal-treated OMW samples by approximately 5-15 times compared to the control. As regards the pertinent enzyme activities, laccase and Mn-independent peroxidase were detected for Ganoderma spp. during the entire incubation period. In contrast, Pleurotus spp. did not exhibit any enzyme activities at early growth stages; instead, high laccase (five times greater than those of Ganoderma spp.) and Mn peroxidases activities were determined at the end of treatment. OMW decolorization by Ganoderma strains was strongly correlated to the reduction of phenolics, whereas P. eryngii laccase activity was correlated with the effluent's decolorization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pezizomycotina dominates the fungal communities of South China Sea sponges Theonella swinhoei and Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liling; Liu, Fang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the knowledge of sponge-associated bacterial diversity and ecological roles, the fungal diversity and ecological roles of sponges remain largely unknown. In this study, the fungal diversity and protein synthesis potential in two South China Sea sponges Theonella swinhoei and Xestospongia testudinaria were investigated by rRNA vs. rRNA gene analysis. EF4/fung5 was chosen after a series of PCR tests to target fungal 18S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene. Altogether, 283 high-quality sequences were obtained, which resulted in 26 Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were assigned to Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Blastocladiomycota. At subphylum level, 77.3% of sponge-derived sequences were affiliated with Pezizomycotina. The fungal compositions of T. swinhoei and X. testudinaria were different from that of ambient seawater. The predominant OTU shared between two sponges was rare in seawater, whereas the most abundant OTUs in seawater were not found in sponges. Additionally, the major OTUs of sponge cDNA datasets were shared in two sponges. The fungal diversity illustrated by sponge cDNA datasets correlated well with that derived from sponge DNA datasets, indicating that the major members of sponge-associated fungi had protein synthesis potential. This study highlighted the diversity of Pezizomycotina in marine sponge-fungi symbioses and the necessity of investigating ecological roles of sponge-associated fungi. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from the zygomycete fungus Rhizopus oryzae: a highly specialized approach to carbohydrate degradation depicted at genome level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhizopus oryzae is a zygomycete filamentous fungus, well-known as a saprobe ubiquitous in soil and as a pathogenic/spoilage fungus, causing Rhizopus rot and mucomycoses. Results Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZy) annotation of the R. oryzae identified, in contrast to other filamentous fungi, a low number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and a high number of glycosyl transferases (GTs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs). A detailed analysis of CAZy families, supported by growth data, demonstrates highly specialized plant and fungal cell wall degrading abilities distinct from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. The specific genomic and growth features for degradation of easily digestible plant cell wall mono- and polysaccharides (starch, galactomannan, unbranched pectin, hexose sugars), chitin, chitosan, β-1,3-glucan and fungal cell wall fractions suggest specific adaptations of R. oryzae to its environment. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genome of the zygomycete fungus R. oryzae and comparison to ascomycetes and basidiomycete species revealed how evolution has shaped its genetic content with respect to carbohydrate degradation, after divergence from the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. PMID:21241472

  6. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabarcoding-based fungal diversity on coarse and fine particulate organic matter in a first-order stream in Nova Scotia, Canada [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wurzbacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most streams receive substantial inputs of allochthonous organic material in the form of leaves and twigs (CPOM, coarse particulate organic matter. Mechanical and biological processing converts this into fine particulate organic matter (FPOM. Other sources of particles include flocculated dissolved matter and soil particles. Fungi are known to play a role in the CPOM conversion process, but the taxonomic affiliations of these fungi remain poorly studied. The present study seeks to shed light on the composition of fungal communities on FPOM and CPOM as assessed in a natural stream in Nova Scotia, Canada. Maple leaves were exposed in a stream for four weeks and their fungal community evaluated through pyrosequencing. Over the same period, four FPOM size fractions were collected by filtration and assessed. Particles had much lower ergosterol contents than leaves, suggesting major differences in the extent of fungal colonization. Pyrosequencing documented a total of 821 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTU, of which 726 were exclusive to particles and 47 to leaf samples. Most fungal phyla were represented, including yeast lineages (e.g., Taphrinaceae and Saccharomycotina, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Cryptomycota, but several classes of Pezizomycontina (Ascomycota dominated. Cluster dendrograms clearly separated fungal communities from leaves and from particles. Characterizing fungal communities may shed some light on the processing pathways of fine particles in streams and broadens our view of the phylogenetic composition of fungi in freshwater ecosystems.

  8. Early diverging lineages within Cryptomycota and Chytridiomycota dominate the fungal communities in ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Jimenez, Keilor; Wurzbacher, Christian; Bourne, Elizabeth Charlotte; Chiuchiolo, Amy; Priscu, John C; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2017-11-10

    Antarctic ice-covered lakes are exceptional sites for studying the ecology of aquatic fungi under conditions of minimal human disturbance. In this study, we explored the diversity and community composition of fungi in five permanently covered lake basins located in the Taylor and Miers Valleys of Antarctica. Based on analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences, we showed that fungal taxa represented between 0.93% and 60.32% of the eukaryotic sequences. Cryptomycota and Chytridiomycota dominated the fungal communities in all lakes; however, members of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota, and Blastocladiomycota were also present. Of the 1313 fungal OTUs identified, the two most abundant, belonging to LKM11 and Chytridiaceae, comprised 74% of the sequences. Significant differences in the community structure were determined among lakes, water depths, habitat features (i.e., brackish vs. freshwaters), and nucleic acids (DNA vs. RNA), suggesting niche differentiation. Network analysis suggested the existence of strong relationships among specific fungal phylotypes as well as between fungi and other eukaryotes. This study sheds light on the biology and ecology of basal fungi in aquatic systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the predominance of early diverging lineages of fungi in pristine limnetic ecosystems, particularly of the enigmatic phylum Cryptomycota.

  9. Distinct difference in the polyamine compositions of bryophyta and pteridophyta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamana, K; Matsuzaki, S

    1985-06-01

    Polyamine contents of various species of plants and fungi including Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Gymnospermae, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Lichenobionta were determined by the combination of six chromatographic techniques. Polyamines examined included putrescine, spermidine, spermine, 1,3-diaminopropane (diaminopropane), sym-norspermidine (norspermidine), sym-norspermine (norspermine), thermospermine, caldopentamine, homocaldopentamine, cadaverine, aminopropylcadaverine, sym-homospermidine (homospermidine), agmatine, and canavalmine. In addition to the widely occurring polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine), the "unusual" polyamines norspermidine and norspermine were found to be widely distributed in Bryophyta and Lichenobionta. These two polyamines were not detected in any species of Pteridophyta, Gymnospermae, and fungi even though their possible precursor, diaminopropane, was found in some species. Homospermidine was one of the major polyamines in Bryophyta and Lichenobionta, and was detected in most species of Pteridophyta and sporadically in higher plants. Agmatine was detected in most species of Bryophyta and in certain species of Gymnospermae. These data suggest that norspermidine, norspermine, and homospermidine can serve as chemical phylogenic and taxonomic markers in Plantae and Fungi.

  10. U12 type introns were lost at multiple occasions during evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartschat Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two categories of introns are known, a common U2 type and a rare U12 type. These two types of introns are removed by distinct spliceosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs that are characteristic of the U12 spliceosome, i.e. the U11, U12, U4atac and U6atac RNAs, suggest that U12 spliceosomes were lost in many phylogenetic groups. We have now examined the distribution of U2 and U12 introns in many of these groups. Results U2 and U12 introns were predicted by making use of available EST and genomic sequences. The results show that in species or branches where U12 spliceosomal components are missing, also U12 type of introns are lacking. Examples are the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, Entamoeba histolytica, green algae, diatoms, and the fungal lineage Basidiomycota. Furthermore, whereas U12 splicing does not occur in Caenorhabditis elegans, U12 introns as well as U12 snRNAs are present in Trichinella spiralis, which is deeply branching in the nematode tree. A comparison of homologous genes in T. spiralis and C. elegans revealed different mechanisms whereby U12 introns were lost. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of U12 introns and spliceosomal RNAs give further support to an early origin of U12 dependent splicing. In addition, this distribution identifies a large number of instances during eukaryotic evolution where such splicing was lost.

  11. Bioconcentration factors and trace elements bioaccumulation in sporocarps of fungi collected from quartzite acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juan Antonio; Tejera, Noel Amaurys

    2011-10-01

    The content of 19 metals (Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Cs, Ba, Ce, Pb, Th, U and Nd) was investigated in 15 edible species of phylum Basidiomycota collected in an area with quartzite acidic soils in a province of the central Spain. The study explores the differences in metal accumulation in relation to fungal species, and the results were related to metal content in soil through the determination of bioconcentration factors. Regarding the highest concentrations, Zn, Al, Cu and Rb were the metals more accumulated in the sporocarps. Notable concentrations were also found in Sr, Zr, Ba, Cs and Ce. The major bioconcentration factors were found for Cu and Zn in sporocarps of Agaricus silvicola and Lepista nuda. Regarding the different species, Tricholoma equestre and Cantharellus cibarius were those with the greatest capacity to absorb trace elements, and in contrast, Amanita caesarea and Agaricus campestris showed the lowest values. The cluster analysis shows that there are some species with the same nutritive physiology that share similarities in the absorptive behaviour. Lactarius sanguifluus and Lactarius deliciosus, both ectomycorrhizas of the genus Pinus, are closely related, and Clitocybe gibba, L. nuda and Marasmius oreades, all of them saprobes on soil organic matter, are very close too.

  12. Fungal succession in an in-vessel composting system characterized using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langarica-Fuentes, Adrian; Zafar, Urooj; Heyworth, Alan; Brown, Thomas; Fox, Graeme; Robson, Geoffrey D

    2014-05-01

    Fungi are known to have an important role in the composting process as degraders of recalcitrant materials such as cellulose and lignin. Previous attempts to study the diversity and succession of fungi in compost systems have relied on the use of culture-dependent analyses and low-resolution DNA-fingerprinting techniques, lacking the necessary depth to analyse such a rich ecosystem. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the fungal community composition at the different stages of an in-vessel composting process. A complex succession of fungi was revealed, with 251 fungal OTUs identified throughout the monitoring period. The Ascomycota were the dominant phylum (82.5% of all sequences recovered), followed by the Basidiomycota (10.4%) and the subphylum Mucoromycotina (4.9%). In the starting materials and early stages of the process, yeast species from the Saccharomycetales were abundant, while in latter stages and in the high temperature regions of the pile, fungi from the orders Eurotiales, Sordariales, Mucorales, Agaricales and Microascales were the most prominent. This study provides an improved understanding of the fungal diversity occurring during the composting of municipal solid waste, and this knowledge can lead to the development of more efficient composting practices and a better evaluation of the end-product quality. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid peat accumulation favours the occurrence of both fen and bog microbial communities within a Mediterranean, free-floating peat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheri, Giuseppe; Stevanato, Piergiorgio; Zaccone, Claudio; Shotyk, William; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro; Piffanelli, Pietro; Rizzi, Valeria; Ferrandi, Chiara; Squartini, Andrea

    2017-08-17

    The unique environment of a 4m-thick, free-floating peat island within the Posta Fibreno lake (Central Italy) was analyzed using DNA-based techniques to assess bacterial and fungal community members identity and abundance. Two depths were sampled at 41 and 279 cm from the surface, the former corresponding to an emerged portion of Sphagnum residues accumulated less than 30 yrs ago, and the latter mainly consisting of silty peat belonging to the deeply submerged part of the island, dating back to 1520-1660 AD. The corresponding communities were very diverse, each of them dominated by a different member of the Delta-proteobacteria class for prokaryotes. Among Eukaryotes, Ascomycota prevailed in the shallow layer while Basidiomycota were abundant in the deep sample. The identity of taxa partitioning between acidic surface layer and neutral core is very reminiscent of the differences reported between bogs and fens respectively, supporting the view of Posta Fibreno as a relic transitional floating mire. Moreover, some microbial taxa show an unusual concurrent species convergence between this sub-Mediterranean site and far Nordic or circumpolar environments. This study represents the first report describing the biotic assemblages of such a peculiar environment, and provides some insights into the possible mechanisms of its evolution.

  14. Comparison of complex networks and tree-based methods of phylogenetic analysis and proposal of a bootstrap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Diniz, Marcelo V C; Carvalho, Daniel S; Bomfim, Gilberto C; Duarte, Angelo A; Brzozowski, Jerzy A; Petit Lobão, Thierry C; Pinho, Suani T R; El-Hani, Charbel N; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2018-01-01

    Complex networks have been successfully applied to the characterization and modeling of complex systems in several distinct areas of Biological Sciences. Nevertheless, their utilization in phylogenetic analysis still needs to be widely tested, using different molecular data sets and taxonomic groups, and, also, by comparing complex networks approach to current methods in phylogenetic analysis. In this work, we compare all the four main methods of phylogenetic analysis (distance, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian) with a complex networks method that has been used to provide a phylogenetic classification based on a large number of protein sequences as those related to the chitin metabolic pathway and ATP-synthase subunits. In order to perform a close comparison to these methods, we selected Basidiomycota fungi as the taxonomic group and used a high-quality, manually curated and characterized database of chitin synthase sequences. This enzymatic protein plays a key role in the synthesis of one of the exclusive features of the fungal cell wall: the presence of chitin. The communities (modules) detected by the complex network method corresponded exactly to the groups retrieved by the phylogenetic inference methods. Additionally, we propose a bootstrap method for the complex network approach. The statistical results we have obtained with this method were also close to those obtained using traditional bootstrap methods.

  15. Molecular diversity of fungal phylotypes co-amplified alongside nematodes from coastal and deep-sea marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punyasloke Bhadury

    Full Text Available Nematodes and fungi are both ubiquitous in marine environments, yet few studies have investigated relationships between these two groups. Microbial species share many well-documented interactions with both free-living and parasitic nematode species, and limited data from previous studies have suggested ecological associations between fungi and nematodes in benthic marine habitats. This study aimed to further document the taxonomy and distribution of fungal taxa often co-amplified from nematode specimens. A total of 15 fungal 18S rRNA phylotypes were isolated from nematode specimens representing both deep-sea and shallow water habitats; all fungal isolates displayed high pairwise sequence identities with published data in Genbank (99-100% and unpublished high-throughput 454 environmental datasets (>95%. BLAST matches indicate marine fungal sequences amplified in this study broadly represent taxa within the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, and several phylotypes showed robust groupings with known taxa in phylogenetic topologies. In addition, some fungal phylotypes appeared to be present in disparate geographic habitats, suggesting cosmopolitan distributions or closely related species complexes in at least some marine fungi. The present study was only able to isolate fungal DNA from a restricted set of nematode taxa; further work is needed to fully investigate the taxonomic scope and function of nematode-fungal interactions.

  16. Community structure of endophytic fungi of four mangrove species in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Long Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forests play an important role in subtropical and tropical coastal ecosystems. Endophytic fungi are widely distributed in various ecosystems and have great contribution to global biodiversity. In order to better understand the effects of mangrove species and tissue types on endophytic fungal community, we investigated cultivable endophytic fungi in leaves and twigs of four mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum, Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, and Kandelia candel in Guangxi, China. The four tree species had similar overall colonisation rates of endophytic fungi (24–33%. The colonisation rates of endophytic fungi were higher in twigs (30–58% than in leaves (6–25% in the four plant species. A total of 36 endophytic fungal taxa were identified based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, including 35 Ascomycota and 1 Basidiomycota, dominated by Phomopsis, Phyllosticta, Xylaria, Leptosphaerulina, and Pestalotiopsis. The diversity of endophytic fungi was higher in twigs than in leaves in the four plant species. Some endophytic fungi showed host and tissue preference. The endophytic fungal community composition was different among four mangrove species and between leaf and twig tissues.

  17. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Feng Sun

    Full Text Available Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  18. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pei-Feng; Fang, Wei-Ta; Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  19. Proteomics Shows New Faces for the Old Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barreiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi comprise a vast group of microorganisms including the Ascomycota (majority of all described fungi, the Basidiomycota (mushrooms or higher fungi, and the Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota (basal or lower fungi that produce industrially interesting secondary metabolites, such as β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs world-wide. Since Fleming's initial discovery of Penicillium notatum 80 years ago, the role of Penicillium as an antimicrobial source became patent. After the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum NRRL 1951 six decades ago, classical mutagenesis and screening programs led to the development of industrial strains with increased productivity (at least three orders of magnitude. The new “omics” era has provided the key to understand the underlying mechanisms of the industrial strain improvement process. The review of different proteomics methods applied to P. chrysogenum has revealed that industrial modification of this microorganism was a consequence of a careful rebalancing of several metabolic pathways. In addition, the secretome analysis of P. chrysogenum has opened the door to new industrial applications for this versatile filamentous fungus.

  20. Xerophilic fungal genus Wallemia: Bioactive inhabitants of marine solar salterns and salty food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajc Janja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wallemia is a genus of cosmopolitan xerophilic fungi, frequently involved in food spoilage of particularly sweet, salty, and dried food. Until recently, only a single species, Wallemia sebi, was recognized in the genus. When a large group of strains globally collected in salterns and other different ecological niches was analyzed on the level of physiological, morphological and molecular characteristics, a new basidiomycetous class, Wallemiomycetes, covering an order of Wallemiales was proposed and three Wallemia species were recognized: W. ichthyophaga, W. sebi and W. muriae. Wallemia ichthyophaga was recognized as the most halophilic eukaryote known, thus representing an appropriate eukaryotic model for in depth studies of adaptation to hypersaline conditions. Our preliminary studies indicated that all three Wallemia species synthesized a yet undescribed haemolytic compound under, surprisingly, low water activity conditions. Due to the taxonomic status w hich was unrevealed only recently, there were so far no reports on the production of any bioactive compounds by the three newly described species. The article aims to present the taxonomy, ecology, physiology and so far described molecular mechanisms of adaptations to life at low water activity, as well as bioactive potential of the genus Wallemia, a phylogenetically ancient taxon and a taxonomic maverick within Basidiomycota.

  1. Diversity of ectomycorrhizal Thelephoraceae in Tuber melanosporum-cultivated orchards of Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel, Ana María; Águeda, Beatriz; Sáez, Raimundo; Sánchez, Sergio; Parladé, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Truffles are edible hypogeous ascomycetes highly appreciated worldwide, especially the black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.). In recent decades, the cultivation of the black truffle has expanded across the Mediterranean climate regions in and outside its native range. Members of the Thelephoraceae (Thelephorales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) are commonly found in truffle plantations, but their co-occurrence with Tuber species and other members of the fungal community has been scarcely reported. Thelephoraceae is one of the most represented families of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community in boreal and Mediterranean forests. To reveal the diversity of these fungi in T. melanosporum-cultivated plantations, ten orchards located in the Navarra region (Northern Spain) were surveyed for 2 years. Morphological and molecular approaches were used to detect and identify the Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas present in those plantations. Ten different mycorrhizal types were detected and described. Four of them were morphologically identified as Tomentella galzinii, Quercirhiza cumulosa, Q. squamosa, and T39 Thelephoraceae type. Molecular analyses revealed 4-6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), depending on the nucleotide database used, but similarities remained under 95 % and no clear species assignments could be done. The results confirm the diversity and abundance of this fungal family in the ectomycorrhizal community of black truffle plantations, generally established in Mediterranean areas. The occurrence and relative abundance of Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas is discussed in relation to their possible influence on truffle production.

  2. Root-associated fungi of Vaccinium carlesii in subtropical forests of China: intra- and inter-annual variability and impacts of human disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Ni, Jian; Tang, Fangping; Pei, Kequan; Luo, Yiqi; Jiang, Lifen; Sun, Lifu; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Ericoid mycorrhiza (ERM) are expected to facilitate establishment of ericaceous plants in harsh habitats. However, diversity and driving factors of the root-associated fungi of ericaceous plants are poorly understood. In this study, hair-root samples of Vaccinium carlesii were taken from four forest types: old growth forests (OGF), secondary forests with once or twice cutting (SEC I and SEC II), and Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation (PLF). Fungal communities were determined using high-throughput sequencing, and impacts of human disturbances and the intra- and inter-annual variability of root-associated fungal community were evaluated. Diverse fungal taxa were observed and our results showed that (1) Intra- and inter-annual changes in root-associated fungal community were found, and the Basidiomycota to Ascomycota ratio was related to mean temperature of the sampling month; (2) Human disturbances significantly affected structure of root-associated fungal community of V. carlesii, and two secondary forest types were similar in root-associated fungal community and were closer to that of the old growth forest; (3) Plant community composition, edaphic parameters, and geographic factors significantly affected root-associated fungal communities of V. carlesii. These results may be helpful in better understanding the maintenance mechanisms of fungal diversity associated with hair roots of ERM plants under human disturbances. PMID:26928608

  3. The good, the bad and the tasty: The many roles of mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.J. de Mattos-Shipley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are often inconspicuous in nature and this means it is all too easy to overlook their importance. Often referred to as the “Forgotten Kingdom”, fungi are key components of life on this planet. The phylum Basidiomycota, considered to contain the most complex and evolutionarily advanced members of this Kingdom, includes some of the most iconic fungal species such as the gilled mushrooms, puffballs and bracket fungi. Basidiomycetes inhabit a wide range of ecological niches, carrying out vital ecosystem roles, particularly in carbon cycling and as symbiotic partners with a range of other organisms. Specifically in the context of human use, the basidiomycetes are a highly valuable food source and are increasingly medicinally important. In this review, seven main categories, or ‘roles’, for basidiomycetes have been suggested by the authors: as model species, edible species, toxic species, medicinal basidiomycetes, symbionts, decomposers and pathogens, and two species have been chosen as representatives of each category. Although this is in no way an exhaustive discussion of the importance of basidiomycetes, this review aims to give a broad overview of the importance of these organisms, exploring the various ways they can be exploited to the benefit of human society.

  4. Horizontal transfer of a nitrate assimilation gene cluster and ecological transitions in fungi: a phylogenetic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Slot

    Full Text Available High affinity nitrate assimilation genes in fungi occur in a cluster (fHANT-AC that can be coordinately regulated. The clustered genes include nrt2, which codes for a high affinity nitrate transporter; euknr, which codes for nitrate reductase; and NAD(PH-nir, which codes for nitrite reductase. Homologs of genes in the fHANT-AC occur in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but they have only been found clustered in the oomycete Phytophthora (heterokonts. We performed independent and concatenated phylogenetic analyses of homologs of all three genes in the fHANT-AC. Phylogenetic analyses limited to fungal sequences suggest that the fHANT-AC has been transferred horizontally from a basidiomycete (mushrooms and smuts to an ancestor of the ascomycetous mold Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from diverse eukaryotes and eubacteria, and cluster structure, are consistent with a hypothesis that the fHANT-AC was assembled in a lineage leading to the oomycetes and was subsequently transferred to the Dikarya (Ascomycota+Basidiomycota, which is a derived fungal clade that includes the vast majority of terrestrial fungi. We propose that the acquisition of high affinity nitrate assimilation contributed to the success of Dikarya on land by allowing exploitation of nitrate in aerobic soils, and the subsequent transfer of a complete assimilation cluster improved the fitness of T. reesei in a new niche. Horizontal transmission of this cluster of functionally integrated genes supports the "selfish operon" hypothesis for maintenance of gene clusters.

  5. Microbial ecology of Thailand tsunami and non-tsunami affected terrestrials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naraporn Somboonna

    Full Text Available The effects of tsunamis on microbial ecologies have been ill-defined, especially in Phang Nga province, Thailand. This ecosystem was catastrophically impacted by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami as well as the 600 year-old tsunami in Phra Thong island, Phang Nga province. No study has been conducted to elucidate their effects on microbial ecology. This study represents the first to elucidate their effects on microbial ecology. We utilized metagenomics with 16S and 18S rDNA-barcoded pyrosequencing to obtain prokaryotic and eukaryotic profiles for this terrestrial site, tsunami affected (S1, as well as a parallel unaffected terrestrial site, non-tsunami affected (S2. S1 demonstrated unique microbial community patterns than S2. The dendrogram constructed using the prokaryotic profiles supported the unique S1 microbial communities. S1 contained more proportions of archaea and bacteria domains, specifically species belonging to Bacteroidetes became more frequent, in replacing of the other typical floras like Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Basidiomycota. Pathogenic microbes, including Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Flavobacterium spp. and Photobacterium spp., were also found frequently in S1. Furthermore, different metabolic potentials highlighted this microbial community change could impact the functional ecology of the site. Moreover, the habitat prediction based on percent of species indicators for marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial niches pointed the S1 to largely comprise marine habitat indicating-species.

  6. Analysis of the influence of living environment and age on vaginal fungal microbiome in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Danyu; Li, Caiwu; Feng, Lan; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Heming; Cheng, Guangyang; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Guiquan; Wang, Hongning; Chen, Yanxi; Feng, Mingfu; Wang, Chengdong; Wu, Honglin; Deng, Linhua; Ming, He; Yang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    A recent study has described the normal vaginal bacterial community in giant pandas, but there is a lack of knowledge of the fungal community residing in the vagina of giant pandas. In order to comprehensively understand the vaginal fungal microbial diversity and abundance in giant pandas, high throughput sequencing was used to analyse the ITS1 region, based on thirteen samples taken from the pandas' vaginas, which were grouped by sampling points and age. The results showed that the most abundant phyla were Basidiomycota (73.37%), followed by Ascomycota (20.04%), Zygomycota (5.23%), Glomeromycota (0.014%) and Chytridiomycota (0.006%). At the genus level, Guehomyces (37.92%) was the most abundant, followed by Cladosporium (9.072%), Trichosporon (6.2%) and Mucor (4.97%). Furthermore, Candida only accounted for a low percentage of the vaginal fungal community. With the saturation of rarefaction curves and fungal diversity indices, the samples from Dujiangyan and Chungking Safari Park (DC group) showed a higher fungal species richness and diversity than other living environments. Shannon diversity indices showed significant difference between group WL (Wolong nature reserve) and DC (P giant pandas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Variaciones en la estacionalidad de polen y esporas fúngicas en la atmósfera de la ciudad de La Plata (Argentina Seasonal variation of pollen and fungal spores in the atmosphere of Plata city (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S Nitiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los primeros datos sobre variaciones estacionales de polen y esporas fúngicas en su conjunto en la atmósfera de la ciudad de La Plata durante julio 2000 / junio 2001. El total de bioaerosoles fue de 201889.15 de los cuales el 15% correspondió a 54 tipos polínicos y el 85% a 79 tipos esporales. El Índice Polínico estuvo dado en un 74% por Polen Arbóreo (PA y en un 26% por Polen Herbáceo (PNA. La máxima concentración de PA tuvo lugar en septiembre con granos provenientes de Platanus y Fraxinus. El PNA presentó dos picos, el primero en diciembre procedente de Poaceae y el segundo en marzo debido a Ambrosia. Con respecto al componente fúngico, se identificaron esporas de Oomycota, Zygomycota, Myxomycota, Ascomycota y Basidiomycota. Estos bioaerosoles estuvieron presentes durante todo el año y en altas concentraciones siendo más abundantes en verano - otoño Las mitosporas de Hongos Imperfectos dominan la nube superando el 44% del total del Índice Esporal. El máximo aporte se registró en febrero dado por las esporas de Cladosporium. Se identificaron dos períodos estacionales en los cuales se hallan simultáneamente altas concentraciones de polen y esporas fúngicas. El primero se desarrolla en primavera y está integrado por Platanus, Fraxinus y Aspergillus / Penicillium y el segundo es estival e involucra a Ambrosia, Alternaria y Cladosporium.We present the first data on representativeness and seasonal variation of pollen and fungal spores as a whole in the atmosphere of the city of La Plata during july 2000 / june 2001. Total was 201889.15 bioaerosols, 15% of which was contributed by 54 pollen types and 85% by 79 spore types. The Pollinic Index came from arboreal pollen (PA in 74% and herbaceous pollen (PNA in 26%. The PA maximum concentration took place in september due to Platanus and Fraxinus. The PNA presented two peaks, one in december due to Poaceae, and the other one in march from Ambrosia. In regard to the

  8. Macromicetos del Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, municipio de Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, México Macrofungi from Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica, Municipality of Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Chanona-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio tuvo como objetivos contribuir al conocimiento de los macromicetos que crecen en el Parque Educativo Laguna Bélgica (PELB, en Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, Chiapas y determinar el índice de diversidad de Simpson y similitud de Sorensen de la micobiota existente en los diferentes tipos de vegetación. Se realizaron 24 exploraciones micológicas durante un año, encontrándose 144 especies (24 Ascomycota y 120 Basidiomycota. El índice de diversidad, mostró que la vegetación con la micobiota más diversa fue la del bosque de Quercus elliptica (D= 0.9678 la cual presentó mayor similitud con el bosque de Liquidambar stracyflua (Is= 83 %. El sustrato más frecuente fue la madera en descomposición (57.63 %. Se determinaron las especies de macromicetos potencialmente utilizables para el consumo humano (22 especies, lo que determinó el valor micológico del área de estudio en 15.27 %. Del total de especies determinadas 22 son nuevos registros para el estado de Chiapas; 4 Ascomicetos Scutellinia scutellata, Xylaria amphitele, X. persicaria, Chlorociboria aeruginosa, y 18 Basidiomicetos Amanita pantherina, Geastrum striatum, Hydnum repandum, Hygrocybe miniata, Scleroderma verrucosum, Cotylidia diaphana, Lactarius indigo, Phlogiotis helvelloides, Hydnochaete olivaceae, Phellinus ferruginosus, P. contiguus, P.rufitinctus, Thelephora terrestris, T. cervicornis, Perenniporia ohiensis, Diplomitoporus lenis, Schizopora paradoxa y Tremella fuciformis.The objectives of this study were to contribute to the knowledge of macro fungi growing in the "Parque Educativo Laguna Belgica" (PELB, in Chiapas, Mexico and to determine the diversity and similarity indexes for its mycobiota in each type of vegetation. Twenty four mycological explorations were made during a year, resulting in the identification of 144 species (24 Ascomycota and 120 Basidiomycota. The diversity of fungal species was determined through the index of Simpson and the similarity

  9. Microorganismos asociados a la rizosfera de jitomate en un agroecosistema del valle de Guasave, Sinaloa, México Rhizosphere microorganisms associated to tomato in an agroecosystem from Guasave Valley, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Damián Cordero-Ramírez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La diversidad de los microorganismos asociados a la rizosfera de diferentes especies vegetales en los suelos, en México se ha estudiado poco y se ha abordado de manera convencional, con técnicas microbiológicas limitadas debido al elevado porcentaje de microorganismos no-cultivables (95-99%. En el presente trabajo se empleó el análisis por secuenciación del ADN ribosomal (ADNr para evitar esa limitante y explorar mejor la diversidad de los microorganismos cultivables y no-cultivables asociados al jitomate (Solanum lycopersicum L. en un agroecosistema en Sinaloa. Se empleó ADN genómico extraído del suelo rizosférico para amplificar una región hipervariable en el ADNr empleando oligonucleótidos universales para ADNr procariota y eucariota. El an��lisis de 194 y 384 secuencias de ADNr de origen procariota y eucariota, respectivamente, mostró que los phyla eucariotes más abundantes fueron Ascomycota (59%, Chlorophyta (21% y Basidiomycota (12%, y los más abundantes de origen procariote fueron Firmicutes (45%, Proteobacteria (14.7% y Gemmatimonadetes (13.1%. El presente trabajo representa a la fecha la caracterización más completa de la diversidad de microorganismos de la rizosfera del jitomate. Se discute el papel que especies identificadas en este trabajo, pertenecientes a géneros procariotas (Bacillus y Paenibacillus y eucariotas (Alternaría, pudieran desempeñar en la rizosfera del jitomate y en el control biológico de fitopatogénos en esta especie.Rhizosphere microorganism diversity associated to different plant species in Mexican soils has been understudied. Most of those studies have been done using conventional microbiological techniques, which present an important limitation due to their incapacity to detect unculturable microorganisms, which represent 95-99% of the total microorganisms in soils. The present work employs ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequencing to overcome this limitation and to improve exploration of the

  10. Filamentous fungi isolated from the rhizosphere of melon plants (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine cultivated in soil with organic amendments Fungos filamentosos isolados da rizosfera de meloeiros (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine cultivados em solo com compostos orgânicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Paiva Coutinho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere soil samples were collected in a semiarid area, in the region of the São Francisco River valley, Petrolina, Pernambuco state, Brazil, to study the diversity of filamentous fungi in a soil cultivated with melon (Cucumis melo L. cv. Gold Mine and receiving different organic amendments: Treatment 1 (control, without organic compost; T2 (77% coconut fiber, 20% goat manure and 3% K2SO4; T3 (10% Ricinus communis leaves and stems, 50% Pennisetum purpureum leaves and 40% goat manure; T4 (77% coconut fiber, 20% goat manure and 3% termophosphate; T5 (47% Pennisetum purpureum leaves, 50% goat manure and 3% K2SO4; and T6 (57% Pennisetum purpureum leaves, 40% goat manure and 3% termophosphate. Fungal isolation was carried out by the serial dilution technique to 1:1000. The Sorensen index of similarity, frequency and distribution of the fungi were evaluated. Seventy-eight species of filamentous fungi were isolated and identified, plus several Basidiomycota (04 and Mycelia sterilia (02. The predominant genera were Aspergillus and Penicillium, with 15 and 13 species, respectively. A greater number of species was found in the sowing period (49, and in relation to the organic fertilization, treatment 6 provided the greatest species diversity (43 species. Most of the species are saprobes and only a few are considered to be potential pathogens on melon plants, such as Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani and Myrothecium roridum.Foram coletadas amostras de solo rizosférico em uma área semiárida, na região do Vale do São Francisco, Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brasil, com o objetivo de conhecer a diversidade dos fungos filamentosos presentes em solo cultivado com melão (Cucumis melo cv. Gold Mine e adubado com diferentes compostos orgânicos: Tratamento 1 (controle, sem adição de compostos orgânicos; T2 (77% de bagaço de côco, 20% de esterco de caprino e 3% de K2SO4; T3 (10% de torta de mamona, 50% de capim elefante e 40% de esterco de caprino; T4 (77% de

  11. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/ brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitris; Held, Benjamin; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-03-14

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32percent of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white rot/brown rot classification paradigm we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically-informed Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs, but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  12. Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Communities during the Outbreak and Decline of an Algal Bloom in a Drinking Water Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihan; Jia, Jingyu; Chen, Shengnan; Huang, Tinglin; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Ji; Hao, Huiyan; Li, Sulin; Ma, Xinxin

    2018-02-18

    The microbial communities associated with algal blooms play a pivotal role in organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in freshwater ecosystems. However, there have been few studies focused on unveiling the dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities during the outbreak and decline of algal blooms in drinking water reservoirs. To address this issue, the compositions of bacterial and fungal communities were assessed in the Zhoucun drinking water reservoir using 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene Illumina MiSeq sequencing techniques. The results showed the algal bloom was dominated by Synechococcus, Microcystis, and Prochlorothrix. The bloom was characterized by a steady decrease of total phosphorus (TP) from the outbreak to the decline period (p water bacterial and fungal community structure. During the bloom, the dominant bacterial genus were Acinetobacter sp., Limnobacter sp., Synechococcus sp., and Roseomonas sp. The relative size of the fungal community also changed with algal bloom and its composition mainly contained Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota. Heat map profiling indicated that algal bloom had a more consistent effect upon fungal communities at genus level. Redundancy analysis (RDA) also demonstrated that the structure of water bacterial communities was significantly correlated to conductivity and ammonia nitrogen. Meanwhile, water temperature, Fe and ammonia nitrogen drive the dynamics of water fungal communities. The results from this work suggested that water bacterial and fungal communities changed significantly during the outbreak and decline of algal bloom in Zhoucun drinking water reservoir. Our study highlights the potential role of microbial diversity as a driving force for the algal bloom and biogeochemical cycling of reservoir ecology.

  13. Plant and fungal diversity in gut microbiota as revealed by molecular and culture investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gouba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies describing eukaryotic communities in the human gut microbiota have been published. The objective of this study was to investigate comprehensively the repertoire of plant and fungal species in the gut microbiota of an obese patient. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A stool specimen was collected from a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a body mass index of 48.9 who was living in Marseille, France. Plant and fungal species were identified using a PCR-based method incorporating 25 primer pairs specific for each eukaryotic phylum and universal eukaryotic primers targeting 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS and a chloroplast gene. The PCR products amplified using these primers were cloned and sequenced. Three different culture media were used to isolate fungi, and these cultured fungi were further identified by ITS sequencing. A total of 37 eukaryotic species were identified, including a Diatoms (Blastocystis sp. species, 18 plant species from the Streptophyta phylum and 18 fungal species from the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiocomycota phyla. Cultures yielded 16 fungal species, while PCR-sequencing identified 7 fungal species. Of these 7 species of fungi, 5 were also identified by culture. Twenty-one eukaryotic species were discovered for the first time in human gut microbiota, including 8 fungi (Aspergillus flavipes, Beauveria bassiana, Isaria farinosa, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium dipodomyicola, Penicillium camemberti, Climacocystis sp. and Malassezia restricta. Many fungal species apparently originated from food, as did 11 plant species. However, four plant species (Atractylodes japonica, Fibraurea tinctoria, Angelica anomala, Mitella nuda are used as medicinal plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Investigating the eukaryotic components of gut microbiota may help us to understand their role in human health.

  14. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Droby, Samir; Schena, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea) was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December) using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6%) and Basidiomycota (2.8%). A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii) was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions.

  15. Fungal diversity from deep marine subsurface sediments (IODP 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redou, V.; Arzur, D.; Burgaud, G.; Barbier, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest regarding micro-eukaryotic communities in extreme environments as a third microbial domain after Bacteria and Archaea. However, knowledge is still scarce and the diversity of micro-eukaryotes in such environments remains hidden and their ecological role unknown. Our research program is based on the deep sedimentary layers of the Canterbury Basin in New Zealand (IODP 317) from the subsurface to the record depth of 1884 meters below seafloor. The objectives of our study are (i) to assess the genetic diversity of fungi in deep-sea sediments and (ii) identify the functional part in order to better understand the origin and the ecological role of fungal communities in this extreme ecosystem. Fingerprinting-based methods using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography were used as a first step to raise our objectives. Molecular fungal diversity was assessed using amplification of ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacer 1) as a biomarker on 11 samples sediments from 3.76 to 1884 meters below seafloor. Fungal molecular signatures were detected throughout the sediment core. The phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were revealed with DNA as well as cDNA. Most of the phylotypes are affiliated to environmental sequences and some to common fungal cultured species. The discovery of a present and metabolically active fungal component in this unique ecosystem allows some interesting first hypotheses that will be further combined to culture-based methods and deeper molecular methods (454 pyrosequencing) to highlight essential informations regarding physiology and ecological role of fungal communities in deep marine sediments.

  16. Apple endophytic microbiota of different rootstock/scion combinations suggests a genotype-specific influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Norelli, John; Burchard, Erik; Schena, Leonardo; Droby, Samir; Wisniewski, Michael

    2018-01-27

    High-throughput amplicon sequencing spanning conserved portions of microbial genomes (16s rRNA and ITS) was used in the present study to describe the endophytic microbiota associated with three apple varieties, "Royal Gala," "Golden Delicious," and "Honey Crisp," and two rootstocks, M.9 and M.M.111. The objectives were to (1) determine if the microbiota differs in different rootstocks and apple varieties and (2) determine if specific rootstock-scion combinations influence the microbiota composition of either component. Results indicated that Ascomycota (47.8%), Zygomycota (31.1%), and Basidiomycota (11.6%) were the dominant fungal phyla across all samples. The majority of bacterial sequences were assigned to Proteobacteria (58.4%), Firmicutes (23.8%), Actinobacteria (7.7%), Bacteroidetes (2%), and Fusobacteria (0.4%). Rootstocks appeared to influence the microbiota of associated grafted scion, but the effect was not statistically significant. Pedigree also had an impact on the composition of the endophytic microbiota, where closely-related cultivars had a microbial community that was more similar to each other than it was to a scion cultivar that was more distantly-related by pedigree. The more vigorous rootstock (M.M.111) was observed to possess a greater number of growth-promoting bacterial taxa, relative to the dwarfing rootstock (M.9). The mechanism by which an apple genotype, either rootstock or scion, has a determinant effect on the composition of a microbial community is not known. The similarity of the microbiota in samples with a similar pedigree suggests the possibility of some level of co-evolution or selection as proposed by the "holobiont" concept in which metaorganisms have co-evolved. Clearly, however, the present information is only suggestive, and a more comprehensive analysis is needed.

  17. Colonization history, host distribution, anthropogenic influence and landscape features shape populations of white pine blister rust, an invasive alien tree pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Simren; Tsui, Clement K M; Dhillon, Braham; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Joly, David L; Zambino, P J; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Hamelin, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales). This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola. We characterized 1,292 samples of C. ribicola from 66 geographic locations in North America using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluated the effect of landscape features, host distribution, and colonization history on the structure of these pathogen populations. We identified eastern and western genetic populations in North America that are strongly differentiated. Genetic diversity is two to five times higher in eastern populations than in western ones, which can be explained by the repeated accidental introductions of the pathogen into northeastern North America compared with a single documented introduction into western North America. These distinct genetic populations are maintained by a barrier to gene flow that corresponds to a region where host connectivity is interrupted. Furthermore, additional cryptic spatial differentiation was identified in western populations. This differentiation corresponds to landscape features, such as mountain ranges, and also to host connectivity. We also detected genetic differentiation between the pathogen populations in natural stands and plantations, an indication that anthropogenic movement of this pathogen still takes place. These results highlight the importance of monitoring this invasive alien tree pathogen to prevent admixture of eastern and western populations where different pathogen races occur.

  18. Colonization history, host distribution, anthropogenic influence and landscape features shape populations of white pine blister rust, an invasive alien tree pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simren Brar

    Full Text Available White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales. This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola. We characterized 1,292 samples of C. ribicola from 66 geographic locations in North America using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and evaluated the effect of landscape features, host distribution, and colonization history on the structure of these pathogen populations. We identified eastern and western genetic populations in North America that are strongly differentiated. Genetic diversity is two to five times higher in eastern populations than in western ones, which can be explained by the repeated accidental introductions of the pathogen into northeastern North America compared with a single documented introduction into western North America. These distinct genetic populations are maintained by a barrier to gene flow that corresponds to a region where host connectivity is interrupted. Furthermore, additional cryptic spatial differentiation was identified in western populations. This differentiation corresponds to landscape features, such as mountain ranges, and also to host connectivity. We also detected genetic differentiation between the pathogen populations in natural stands and plantations, an indication that anthropogenic movement of this pathogen still takes place. These results highlight the importance of monitoring this invasive alien tree pathogen to prevent admixture of eastern and western populations where different pathogen races occur.

  19. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable fungi from fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Ke; Shen, Xiao-Ye; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2017-06-01

    An important and useful bamboo species, fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada Oliver), is broadly distributed in Southeast China and has multiple purposes, including uses in cuisine, weaving, Chinese medicine and ecological protection. However, no previous studies have focused on the endophytes of this plant. In our article, a total of 127 fungal strains were first isolated from the healthy branches and leaves of common P. heteroclada. These endophytic fungi could be directly categorized into 50 morphotypes according to their culture characteristics, and their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed for molecular identification. Using the BLAST search tool of the NCBI database and phylogenetic tree analysis, these isolates were divided into two phyla, Ascomycota (95.28%) and Basidiomycota (4.72%), including at least six orders (Xylariales, Capnodiales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Chaetothyriales and Polyporales) and fourteen genera (Arthrinium, Pestalotiopsis, Epicoccum, Cladosporium, Nigrospora, Setophoma, Didymella, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Nemania, Creosphaeria, Ophiobolus, Phialophora and Perenniporia). It is fascinating that four genera, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Creosphaeria and Phialophora were isolated from bamboos for the first time. The inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens were also preliminarily screened, and four isolates FB43 (Calcarisporium arbuscula), FB06 (Preussia minima), FB16 (Setophoma sp.) and FB21 (Perenniporia medulla-pains) among the candidate strains displayed broad-spectrum activities according to the agar diffusion method and the disk diffusion assay. Strain FB16 (Setophoma sp.) especially indicated high bioactivity against both clinical bacteria and yeast. This study is the first report on the diversity and antimicrobial activity of the endophytic fungi associated with P. heteroclada, which could be regarded as a potential source of drug precursors and could be used in biocontrol development.

  20. Diversity and antioxidant activity of culturable endophytic fungi from alpine plants of Rhodiola crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Long; Guo, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Na-Sha; Wang, Meng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola spp. are rare and endangered alpine plants widely used as medicines and food additives by many civilizations since ancient times. Their main effective ingredients (such as salidroside and p-tyrosol) are praised to exhibit pharmacologic effects on high-altitude sickness and possess anti-aging and other adaptogenic capacities based on their antioxidant properties. In this study, 347 endophytic fungi were isolated from R. crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis, and the molecular diversity and antioxidant activities of these fungi were investigated for the first time. These fungi were categorized into 180 morphotypes based on cultural characteristics, and their rRNA gene ITS sequences were analyzed by BLAST search in the GenBank database. Except for 12 unidentified fungi (6.67%), all others were affiliated to at least 57 genera in 20 orders of four phyla, namely, Ascomycota (88.89%), Basidiomycota (2.78%), Zygomycota (1.11%), and Glomeromycota (0.56%), which exhibited high abundance and diversity. Antioxidant assay showed that the DPPH radical-scavenging rates of 114 isolates (63.33%) were >50%, and those of five isolates (Rct45, Rct63, Rct64, Rac76, and Rsc57) were >90%. The EC50 values of five antioxidant assays suggested significant potential of these fungi on scavenging DPPH•, O2-•, and OH• radicals, as well as scavenging nitrite and chelating Fe2+, which showed preference and selection between endophytic fungi and their hosts. Further research also provided the first evidence that Rac12 could produce salidrosides and p-tyrosol. Results suggested that versatile endophytic fungi associated with Rhodiola known as antioxidants could be exploited as potential sources of novel antioxidant products.

  1. Antimycobacterial and antimalarial activities of endophytic fungi associated with the ancient and narrowly endemic neotropical plant Vellozia gigantea from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mariana C; Cantrell, Charles L; Wedge, David E; Gonçalves, Vívian N; Jacob, Melissa R; Khan, Shabana; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2017-10-01

    Endophytic fungi, present mainly in the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla, are associated with different plants and represent important producers of bioactive natural products. Brazil has a rich biodiversity of plant species, including those reported as being endemic. Among the endemic Brazilian plant species, Vellozia gigantea (Velloziaceae) is threatened by extinction and is a promising target to recover endophytic fungi. The present study focused on bioprospecting of bioactive compounds of the endophytic fungi associated with V. gigantea, an endemic, ancient, and endangered plant species that occurs only in the rupestrian grasslands of Brazil. The capability of 285 fungal isolates to produce antimicrobial and antimalarial activities was examined. Fungi were grown at solid-state fermentation to recover their crude extracts in dichloromethane. Bioactive extracts were analysed by chromatographic fractionation and NMR and displayed compounds with antimicrobial, antimycobacterial, and antimalarial activities. Five fungi produced antimicrobial and antimalarial compounds. Extracts of Diaporthe miriciae showed antifungal, antibacterial, and antimalarial activities; Trichoderma effusum displayed selective antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium intracellulare; and three Penicillium species showed antibacterial activity. D. miriciae extract contained highly functionalised secondary metabolites, yielding the compound epoxycytochalasin H with high antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum, with an IC50 approximately 3.5-fold lower than that with chloroquine. Our results indicate that V. gigantea may represent a microhabitat repository hotspot of potential fungi producers of bioactive compounds and suggest that endophytic fungal communities might be an important biological component contributing to the fitness of the plants living in the rupestrian grassland.

  2. Isolation, diversity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi harboured in Huperzia serrata from Jinggang Mountain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Lai, Zheng; Li, Xi-Xi; Yan, Ri-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhu, Du

    2016-02-01

    Huperzia serrata has many important medicinal properties with proven pharmacological potential. Some of these properties may be mediated by its endophytic fungi. To test this hypothesis, in the present study, we provided a first insights into evaluating the species composition and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi of H. serrata from the regional at Jinggang Mountain in southeastern China. A total number of 885 fungal isolates distributed across 44 genera and 118 putative species were obtained from 1422 fragments of fine H. serrata roots, stems and leaves base on ITS-rDNA sequences BLAST analysis. The endophytic fungi were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich, with high rate of colonization and isolation. The assemble of endophytic fungi consisted mainly of Ascomycota (97.15%), followed by Basidiomycota (1.92%) and unknown fungal species (0.90%). Colletotrichum (64.29%), Phyllosticta (3.39%), Hypoxylon (2.81%), Xylaria (2.25%) and Nigrospora (2.04%) were the most abundant genera, whereas the remaining genera were infrequent groups. Although, roots yielded low abundance strains, the diverse and species-rich were both higher than that of stems and leaves. In addition, out of the 247 endophytic fungi strains determinated, 221 fungal extracts showed AChE inhibition activities in vitro. Among them, 22 endophytic fungi strains achieved high inhibitory activity (≥50%) on AChE which belongs to 13 genera and five incertae sedis strains. Four endophytic fungi designated as JS4 (Colletotrichum spp.), FL14 (Ascomycota spp.), FL9 (Sarcosomataceae spp.) and FL7 (Dothideomycetes spp.) were displayed highly active (≥80%) against AChE, which the inhibition effects were even more intense than the positive control. Our findings highlight that H. serrata grown in Jinggang Mountain harbors a rich and fascinating endophytic fungus community with potential AChE inhibitory activity, which could further broaden the natural

  3. Yet more "weeds" in the garden: fungal novelties from nests of leaf-cutting ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana O Augustin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Symbiotic relationships modulate the evolution of living organisms in all levels of biological organization. A notable example of symbiosis is that of attine ants (Attini; Formicidae: Hymenoptera and their fungal cultivars (Lepiotaceae and Pterulaceae; Agaricales: Basidiomycota. In recent years, this mutualism has emerged as a model system for studying coevolution, speciation, and multitrophic interactions. Ubiquitous in this ant-fungal symbiosis is the "weedy" fungus Escovopsis (Hypocreales: Ascomycota, known only as a mycoparasite of attine fungal gardens. Despite interest in its biology, ecology and molecular phylogeny--noting, especially, the high genetic diversity encountered--which has led to a steady flow of publications over the past decade, only two species of Escovopsis have formally been described. METHODS AND RESULTS: We sampled from fungal gardens and garden waste (middens of nests of the leaf-cutting ant genus Acromyrmex in a remnant of subtropical Atlantic rainforest in Minas Gerais, Brazil. In culture, distinct morphotypes of Escovopsis sensu lato were recognized. Using both morphological and molecular analyses, three new species of Escovopsis were identified. These are described and illustrated herein--E. lentecrescens, E. microspora, and E. moelleri--together with a re-description of the genus and the type species, E. weberi. The new genus Escovopsioides is erected for a fourth morphotype. We identify, for the first time, a mechanism for horizontal transmission via middens. CONCLUSIONS: The present study makes a start at assigning names and formal descriptions to these specific fungal parasites of attine nests. Based on the results of this exploratory and geographically-restricted survey, we expect there to be many more species of the genus Escovopsis and its relatives associated with nests of both the lower and higher Attini throughout their neotropical range, as suggested in previous studies.

  4. Phylogenetic Diversity of Culturable Fungi in Heshang Cave, Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiying eMan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Caves are nutrient-limited and dark subterranean ecosystems. To date, attention has been focused on geological research of caves in China, whilst indigenous microbial diversity has been insufficiently characterized. Here, we report the fungal diversity in the pristine, oligotrophic, karst Heshang Cave, central China, using a culture-dependent method coupled with the analysis of the fungal rRNA-ITS gene sequences. A total of 194 isolates were obtained with six different media from 14 sampling sites of sediments, weathered rocks and bat guanos. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the 194 sequenced isolates into 33 genera within 15 orders of 3 phyla, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Zygomycota, indicating a high degree of fungal diversity in the Heshang cave. Notably, 16 out of the 36 fungal genera were also frequently observed in solution caves around the world and 23 genera were previously found in carbonate cave, indicating potential similarities among fungal communities in cave ecosystems. However, 10 genera in this study were not reported previously in any solution caves, thus expanding our knowledge about fungal diversity in cave ecosystems. Moreover, culturable fungal diversity varied from one habitat to another within the cave, being the highest in sediments, followed by weathered rocks and bat guanos as indicated by alpha-diversity indexes. At the genus level, Penicillium accounted for 40 %, 54 % and 52 % in three habitats of sediments, weathered rocks and bat guanos respectively. Trichoderma, Paecilomyces and Aspergillus accounted for 9 %, 22 % and 37 % in the above habitats, correspondingly. Despite of the dominance of Penicillium in all samples beta-diversity index indicated significant differences between each two fungal communities in the three habitats in view of both the composition and abundance. Our study is the first report on fungal communities in a natural pristine solution cave system in central China and sheds light on fungal

  5. Microbial diversity of a Mediterranean soil and its changes after biotransformed dry olive residue amendment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Siles

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot, about whose soil microbial diversity little is known. Intensive land use and aggressive management practices are degrading the soil, with a consequent loss of fertility. The use of organic amendments such as dry olive residue (DOR, a waste produced by a two-phase olive-oil extraction system, has been proposed as an effective way to improve soil properties. However, before its application to soil, DOR needs a pre-treatment, such as by a ligninolytic fungal transformation, e.g. Coriolopsis floccosa. The present study aimed to describe the bacterial and fungal diversity in a Mediterranean soil and to assess the impact of raw DOR (DOR and C. floccosa-transformed DOR (CORDOR on function and phylogeny of soil microbial communities after 0, 30 and 60 days. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that bacterial diversity was dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, while 28S-rRNA gene data revealed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota accounted for the majority of phyla in the fungal community. A Biolog EcoPlate experiment showed that DOR and CORDOR amendments decreased functional diversity and altered microbial functional structures. These changes in soil functionality occurred in parallel with those in phylogenetic bacterial and fungal community structures. Some bacterial and fungal groups increased while others decreased depending on the relative abundance of beneficial and toxic substances incorporated with each amendment. In general, DOR was observed to be more disruptive than CORDOR.

  6. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Fungal contributions to Stable Soil Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton-Warburton, L. M.; Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal organic carbon (OC) can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2-month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Members of the Zygomycota and Ascomycota were among the dominant fungal groups involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycota. At the end of the 2-month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibited varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16, C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue while others maintained steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (C18) or increased in concentration throughout the degradation sequence (C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to rapidly and significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker

  7. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-04-23

    Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed a complex

  8. Fungi diversity in PM2. 5 and PM1 at the summit of Mt. Tai: abundance, size distribution, and seasonal variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are ubiquitous throughout the near-surface atmosphere, where they represent an important component of primary biological aerosol particles. This study combined internal transcribed spacer region sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to investigate the ambient fungi in fine (PM2. 5, 50 % cutoff aerodynamic diameter Da50 =  2.5 µm, geometric standard deviation of collection efficiency σg =  1.2 and submicron (PM1, Da50 =  1 µm, σg =  1.2 particles at the summit of Mt. Tai located in the North China Plain, China. Fungal abundance values were 9.4  ×  104 and 1.3  ×  105 copies m−3 in PM2. 5 and PM1, respectively. Most of the fungal sequences were from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The fungal community showed a significant seasonal shift across different size fractions according to Metastats analysis and the Kruskal–Wallis rank sum test. The abundance of Glomerella and Zasmidium increased in larger particles in autumn, whereas Penicillium, Bullera, and Phaeosphaeria increased in smaller particles in winter. Environmental factors, namely Ca2+, humidity, and temperature, were found to be crucial for the seasonal variation in the fungal community. This study might serve as an important reference for fungal contribution to primary biological aerosol particles.

  9. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  10. DIRS and Ngaro Retrotransposons in Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Muszewska

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons with a tyrosine recombinase (YR have been discovered recently and lack thorough annotation in fungi. YR retrotransposons are divided into 3 groups: DIRS, Ngaro and VIPER (known only from kinetoplastida. We used comparative genomics to investigate the evolutionary patterns of retrotransposons in the fungal kingdom. The identification of both functional and remnant elements provides a unique view on both recent and past transposition activity. Our searches covering a wide range of fungal genomes allowed us to identify 2241 YR retrotransposons. Based on CLANS clustering of concatenated sequences of the reverse transcriptase (RT, RNase H (RH, DNA N-6-adenine-methyltransferase (MT and YR protein domains we propose a revised classification of YR elements expanded by two new categories of Ngaro elements. A phylogenetic analysis of 477 representatives supports this observation and additionally demonstrates that DIRS and Ngaro abundance changed independently in Basidiomycota and Blastocladiomycota/Mucoromycotina/Kixellomycotina. Interestingly, a single remnant Ngaro element could be identified in an Ascomycota genome. Our analysis revealed also that 3 Pucciniomycotina taxa, known for their overall mobile element abundance and big genome size, encode an elevated number of Ngaro retrotransposons. Considering the presence of DIRS elements in all analyzed Mucoromycotina, Kickxellomycotina and Blastocladiomycota genomes one might assume a common origin of fungal DIRS retrotransposons with a loss in Dicarya. Ngaro elements described to date from Opisthokonta, seem to have invaded the common ancestor of Agaricomycotina and Pucciniomycotina after Ustilagomycotina divergence. Yet, most of analyzed genomes are devoid of YR elements and most identified retrotransposons are incomplete.

  11. Fungal Dysbiosis in Mucosa-associated Microbiota of Crohn’s Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Giuseppina; Lamas, Bruno; Richard, Mathias L.; Brandi, Giovanni; da Costa, Gregory; Hoffmann, Thomas W.; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Calabrese, Carlo; Poggioli, Gilberto; Langella, Philippe; Campieri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gut microbiota is involved in many physiological functions and its imbalance is associated with several diseases, particularly with inflammatory bowel diseases. Mucosa-associated microbiota could have a key role in induction of host immunity and in inflammatory process. Although the role of fungi has been suggested in inflammatory disease pathogenesis, the fungal microbiota has not yet been deeply explored. Here we analysed the bacterial and fungal composition of the mucosa-associated microbiota of Crohn’s disease patients and healthy subjects. Methods: Our prospective, observational study evaluated bacterial and fungal composition of mucosa-associated microbiota of 23 Crohn’s disease patients [16 in flare, 7 in remission] and 10 healthy subjects, using 16S [MiSeq] and ITS2 [pyrosequencing] sequencing, respectively. Global fungal load was assessed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Bacterial microbiota in Crohn’s disease patients was characterised by a restriction in biodiversity. with an increase of Proteobacteria and Fusobacteria. Global fungus load was significantly increased in Crohn’s disease flare compared with healthy subjects [p microbiota was dominated by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota phyla. Cystofilobasidiaceae family and Candida glabrata species were overrepresented in Crohn’s disease. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Filobasidium uniguttulatum species were associated with non-inflamed mucosa, whereas Xylariales order was associated with inflamed mucosa. Conclusions: Our study confirms the alteration of the bacterial microbiota and is the first demonstration of the existence of an altered fungal microbiota in Crohn’s disease patients, suggesting that fungi may play a role in pathogenesis. PMID:26574491

  12. Effects of Bromelia pinguin (Bromeliaceae) on soil ecosystem function and fungal diversity in the lowland forests of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Caitlin I; Eaton, William D

    2014-05-05

    Bromelia pinguin (Bromeliaceae) is a terrestrial bromeliad commonly found under forest stands throughout the Neotropics that has been shown to have antifungal activity in vitro. We have hypothesized that this bromeliad would also have an effect on the fungal populations in nearby soil by decreasing fungaldiversity and negatively impacting C and N cycle-related activities. A previous study in the lowland forest of Costa Rica showed the soil beneath these bromeliads had decreased fungal ITS DNA and differences in C and N levels compared to adjacent primary forest soils. In this follow-up study, we found that the bromeliad soils had lower rates of C and N biomass development and lower phenol oxidase activity (suggesting less decreased fungal decomposition activity). The results of T-RFLP and cloning-based taxonomic analyses showed the community level diversity and abundance of fungal ITS DNA was less in bromeliad soils. Sequence analysis of fungal ITS DNA clones showed marked differences in fungal community structure between habitats of Basidiomycota (Tremellales, Agricales, Thelephorales), Ascomycota (Helotiales), and Zycomycota populations. The data show there to be differences in the soil nutrient dynamics and fungal community structure and activity associated with these bromeliads, as compared to the adjacent primary forest. This suggests the possibility that the anti-fungal activity of the bromeliad extends into the soil. The bromeliad-dense regions of these primary forest habitats provide a unique natural micro-habitat within the forests and the opportunity to better identify the role of fungal communities in the C and N cycles in tropical soils.

  13. FIRST FINDING OF MUTINUS RAVENELII (BERK. & M. A. CURT IS E. FISCH. (PHALLACEAE IN THE REPUBLIC OF MORDOVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr V. Ivoylov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An unusual fungus for Mordovia Mutinus ravenelii (Berk & M. A. Curtis E. Fisch, 1888 related to the Basidiomycota mushrooms was found in 2016 during the research of microbiota of the Republic of Mordovia. The fungus is the subject of the interest for mycologists-florists and systematics as a rare adventive species with a significant but intermittent (disjunctive area. The purpose of the study is to describe the basidia, to locate the findings and to make their morphometry. Materials and Methods: The author used reference books, atlases and databases Index Fungorum and MycoBank for ascertaining the origin of the fungus. Results: This article contains information about the first finding in the Republic of Mordovia the stinkhorn mushroom (Mutinus ravenelii (Berk. & M. A. Curtis E. Fisch. Then the author describes the form species definition history, its systematic identity, name etymology, fruiting bodies, general spread on the earth, especially its ecology, and the appearance of the American species in Europe. M. ravenelii has been often found in European countries, including Russia in recent years. This is coused by climate warming and globalization processes (cargo of seeds, plants, animals, gardening substrates, traveling the increase of the greenhouse area and field crops with using the fertile substrates, mulching crops and planting of vegetable crops bark, sawdust, straw. The article indicates macromycetes location, gives their coordinates and finding dates. Discussion and Conclusions: Dimensions of the founded fruiting bodies were typical for the species. M. ravenelii is considered to be an invasive species with unpredictable behavior strategies, so it is should be included into the list of the fungi monitored in Russia.

  14. Genome-Enhanced Detection and Identification (GEDI of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Feau

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant diseases caused by fungi and Oomycetes represent worldwide threats to crops and forest ecosystems. Effective prevention and appropriate management of emerging diseases rely on rapid detection and identification of the causal pathogens. The increase in genomic resources makes it possible to generate novel genome-enhanced DNA detection assays that can exploit whole genomes to discover candidate genes for pathogen detection. A pipeline was developed to identify genome regions that discriminate taxa or groups of taxa and can be converted into PCR assays. The modular pipeline is comprised of four components: (1 selection and genome sequencing of phylogenetically related taxa, (2 identification of clusters of orthologous genes, (3 elimination of false positives by filtering, and (4 assay design. This pipeline was applied to some of the most important plant pathogens across three broad taxonomic groups: Phytophthoras (Stramenopiles, Oomycota, Dothideomycetes (Fungi, Ascomycota and Pucciniales (Fungi, Basidiomycota. Comparison of 73 fungal and Oomycete genomes led the discovery of 5,939 gene clusters that were unique to the targeted taxa and an additional 535 that were common at higher taxonomic levels. Approximately 28% of the 299 tested were converted into qPCR assays that met our set of specificity criteria. This work demonstrates that a genome-wide approach can efficiently identify multiple taxon-specific genome regions that can be converted into highly specific PCR assays. The possibility to easily obtain multiple alternative regions to design highly specific qPCR assays should be of great help in tackling challenging cases for which higher taxon-resolution is needed.

  15. Massive lateral transfer of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes to the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma from its plant-associated hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Chenthamara, Komal; Zhang, Jian; Atanasova, Lea; Yang, Dongqing; Miao, Youzhi; Rahimi, Mohammad J; Grujic, Marica; Cai, Feng; Pourmehdi, Shadi; Salim, Kamariah Abu; Pretzer, Carina; Kopchinskiy, Alexey G; Henrissat, Bernard; Kuo, Alan; Hundley, Hope; Wang, Mei; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Lipzen, Anna; LaButti, Kurt; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V; Shen, Qirong; Kubicek, Christian P

    2018-04-09

    Unlike most other fungi, molds of the genus Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) are aggressive parasites of other fungi and efficient decomposers of plant biomass. Although nutritional shifts are common among hypocrealean fungi, there are no examples of such broad substrate versatility as that observed in Trichoderma. A phylogenomic analysis of 23 hypocrealean fungi (including nine Trichoderma spp. and the related Escovopsis weberi) revealed that the genus Trichoderma has evolved from an ancestor with limited cellulolytic capability that fed on either fungi or arthropods. The evolutionary analysis of Trichoderma genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading carbohydrate-active enzymes and auxiliary proteins (pcwdCAZome, 122 gene families) based on a gene tree / species tree reconciliation demonstrated that the formation of the genus was accompanied by an unprecedented extent of lateral gene transfer (LGT). Nearly one-half of the genes in Trichoderma pcwdCAZome (47%) were obtained via LGT from plant-associated filamentous fungi belonging to different classes of Ascomycota, while no LGT was observed from other potential donors. In addition to the ability to feed on unrelated fungi (such as Basidiomycota), we also showed that Trichoderma is capable of endoparasitism on a broad range of Ascomycota, including extant LGT donors. This phenomenon was not observed in E. weberi and rarely in other mycoparasitic hypocrealean fungi. Thus, our study suggests that LGT is linked to the ability of Trichoderma to parasitize taxonomically related fungi (up to adelphoparasitism in strict sense). This may have allowed primarily mycotrophic Trichoderma fungi to evolve into decomposers of plant biomass.

  16. Community structure, population dynamics and diversity of fungi in a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) for urban wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza-Márquez, P; Vilchez-Vargas, R; Kerckhof, F M; Aranda, E; González-López, J; Rodelas, B

    2016-11-15

    Community structure, population dynamics and diversity of fungi were monitored in a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) operated throughout four experimental phases (Summer 2009, Autumn 2009, Summer 2010 and Winter, 2012) under different conditions, using the 18S-rRNA gene and the intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS2-region) as molecular markers, and a combination of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing. Both total and metabolically-active fungal populations were fingerprinted, by amplification of molecular markers from community DNA and retrotranscribed RNA, respectively. Fingerprinting and 454-pyrosequencing evidenced that the MBR sheltered a dynamic fungal community composed of a low number of species, in accordance with the knowledge of fungal diversity in freshwater environments, and displaying a medium-high level of functional organization with few numerically dominant phylotypes. Population shifts were experienced in strong correlation with the changes of environmental variables and operation parameters, with pH contributing the highest level of explanation. Phylotypes assigned to nine different fungal Phyla were detected, although the community was mainly composed of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota/Blastocladiomycota. Prevailing fungal phylotypes were affiliated to Saccharomycetes and Chytridiomycetes/Blastocladiomycetes, which displayed antagonistic trends in their relative abundance throughout the experimental period. Fungi identified in the activated sludge were closely related to genera of relevance for the degradation of organic matter and trace-organic contaminants, as well as genera of dimorphic fungi potentially able to produce plant operational issues such as foaming or biofouling. Phylotypes closely related to genera of human and plant pathogenic fungi were also detected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the functional roles of fungal endophytes of Phragmites australis from high saline and low saline habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcos Antonio; Li, Hai-Yan; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Bergen, Marshall; Torres, Monica S.; White, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native Phragmites australis decreases biodiversity and produces dense stands in North America. We surveyed the endophyte communities in the stems, leaves and roots of collections of P. australis obtained from two sites with a low and high salt concentration to determine differences in endophyte composition and assess differences in functional roles of microbes in plants from both sites. We found differences in the abundance, richness and diversity of endophytes between the low saline collections (18 species distributed in phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Stramenopiles (Oomycota); from orders Dothideales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Eurotiales, Cantharellales and Pythiales; Shannon H = 2.639; Fisher alpha = 7.335) and high saline collections (15 species from phylum Ascomycota; belonging to orders Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Diaporthales, Xylariales and Dothideales; Shannon H = 2.289; Fisher alpha = 4.181). Peyronellaea glomerata, Phoma macrostoma and Alternaria tenuissima were species obtained from both sites. The high salt endophyte community showed higher resistance to zinc, mercury and salt stress compared to fungal species from the low salt site. These endophytes also showed a greater propensity for growth promotion of rice seedlings (a model species) under salt stress. The results of this study are consistent with the ‘habitat-adapted symbiosis hypothesis’ that holds that endophytic microbes may help plants adapt to extreme habitats. The capacity of P. australis to establish symbiotic relationships with diverse endophytic microbes that enhance its tolerance to abiotic stresses could be a factor that contributes to its invasiveness in saline environments. Targeting the symbiotic associates of P. australis could lead to more sustainable control of non-native P. australis.

  18. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  19. Development of a Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB Specific Gene Model Enables Comparative Genome Analyses between Phytopathogenic R. solani AG1-IA, AG1-IB, AG3 and AG8 Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wibberg

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani, a soil-born plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus, affects various economically important agricultural and horticultural crops. The draft genome sequence for the R. solani AG1-IB isolate 7/3/14 as well as a corresponding transcriptome dataset (Expressed Sequence Tags--ESTs were established previously. Development of a specific R. solani AG1-IB gene model based on GMAP transcript mapping within the eukaryotic gene prediction platform AUGUSTUS allowed detection of new genes and provided insights into the gene structure of this fungus. In total, 12,616 genes were recognized in the genome of the AG1-IB isolate. Analysis of predicted genes by means of different bioinformatics tools revealed new genes whose products potentially are involved in degradation of plant cell wall components, melanin formation and synthesis of secondary metabolites. Comparative genome analyses between members of different R. solani anastomosis groups, namely AG1-IA, AG3 and AG8 and the newly annotated R. solani AG1-IB genome were performed within the comparative genomics platform EDGAR. It appeared that only 21 to 28% of all genes encoded in the draft genomes of the different strains were identified as core genes. Based on Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI and Average Amino-acid Identity (AAI analyses, considerable sequence differences between isolates representing different anastomosis groups were identified. However, R. solani isolates form a distinct cluster in relation to other fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota. The isolate representing AG1-IB encodes significant more genes featuring predictable functions in secondary metabolite production compared to other completely sequenced R. solani strains. The newly established R. solani AG1-IB 7/3/14 gene layout now provides a reliable basis for post-genomics studies.

  20. Bacterial and Fungal Communities in a Degraded Ombrotrophic Peatland Undergoing Natural and Managed Re-Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David R.; Caporn, Simon J. M.; Nwaishi, Felix; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Sen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The UK hosts 15–19% of global upland ombrotrophic (rain fed) peatlands that are estimated to store 3.2 billion tonnes of carbon and represent a critical upland habitat with regard to biodiversity and ecosystem services provision. Net production is dependent on an imbalance between growth of peat-forming Sphagnum mosses and microbial decomposition by microorganisms that are limited by cold, acidic, and anaerobic conditions. In the Southern Pennines, land-use change, drainage, and over 200 years of anthropogenic N and heavy metal deposition have contributed to severe peatland degradation manifested as a loss of vegetation leaving bare peat susceptible to erosion and deep gullying. A restoration programme designed to regain peat hydrology, stability and functionality has involved re-vegetation through nurse grass, dwarf shrub and Sphagnum re-introduction. Our aim was to characterise bacterial and fungal communities, via high-throughput rRNA gene sequencing, in the surface acrotelm/mesotelm of degraded bare peat, long-term stable vegetated peat, and natural and managed restorations. Compared to long-term vegetated areas the bare peat microbiome had significantly higher levels of oligotrophic marker phyla (Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, TM6) and lower Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, together with much higher ligninolytic Basidiomycota. Fewer distinct microbial sequences and significantly fewer cultivable microbes were detected in bare peat compared to other areas. Microbial community structure was linked to restoration activity and correlated with soil edaphic variables (e.g. moisture and heavy metals). Although rapid community changes were evident following restoration activity, restored bare peat did not approach a similar microbial community structure to non-eroded areas even after 25 years, which may be related to the stabilisation of historic deposited heavy metals pollution in long-term stable areas. These primary findings are discussed in relation to bare

  1. Bacterial and fungal communities in a degraded ombrotrophic peatland undergoing natural and managed re-vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Elliott

    Full Text Available The UK hosts 15-19% of global upland ombrotrophic (rain fed peatlands that are estimated to store 3.2 billion tonnes of carbon and represent a critical upland habitat with regard to biodiversity and ecosystem services provision. Net production is dependent on an imbalance between growth of peat-forming Sphagnum mosses and microbial decomposition by microorganisms that are limited by cold, acidic, and anaerobic conditions. In the Southern Pennines, land-use change, drainage, and over 200 years of anthropogenic N and heavy metal deposition have contributed to severe peatland degradation manifested as a loss of vegetation leaving bare peat susceptible to erosion and deep gullying. A restoration programme designed to regain peat hydrology, stability and functionality has involved re-vegetation through nurse grass, dwarf shrub and Sphagnum re-introduction. Our aim was to characterise bacterial and fungal communities, via high-throughput rRNA gene sequencing, in the surface acrotelm/mesotelm of degraded bare peat, long-term stable vegetated peat, and natural and managed restorations. Compared to long-term vegetated areas the bare peat microbiome had significantly higher levels of oligotrophic marker phyla (Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, TM6 and lower Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, together with much higher ligninolytic Basidiomycota. Fewer distinct microbial sequences and significantly fewer cultivable microbes were detected in bare peat compared to other areas. Microbial community structure was linked to restoration activity and correlated with soil edaphic variables (e.g. moisture and heavy metals. Although rapid community changes were evident following restoration activity, restored bare peat did not approach a similar microbial community structure to non-eroded areas even after 25 years, which may be related to the stabilisation of historic deposited heavy metals pollution in long-term stable areas. These primary findings are discussed in

  2. Identification and functional analysis of the erh1(+ gene encoding enhancer of rudimentary homolog from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek K Krzyzanowski

    Full Text Available The ERH gene encodes a highly conserved small nuclear protein with a unique amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure but unknown function. The gene is present in animals, plants, and protists but to date has only been found in few fungi. Here we report that ERH homologs are also present in all four species from the genus Schizosaccharomyces, S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus, which, however, are an exception in this respect among Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The ERH protein sequence is moderately conserved within the genus (58% identity between S. pombe and S.japonicus, but the intron-rich genes have almost identical intron-exon organizations in all four species. In S. pombe, erh1(+ is expressed at a roughly constant level during vegetative growth and adaptation to unfavorable conditions such as nutrient limitation and hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Erh1p localizes preferentially to the nucleus with the exception of the nucleolus, but is also present in the cytoplasm. Cells lacking erh1(+ have an aberrant cell morphology and a comma-like shape when cultured to the stationary phase, and exhibit a delayed recovery from this phase followed by slower growth. Loss of erh1(+ in an auxotrophic background results in enhanced arrest in the G1 phase following nutritional stress, and also leads to hypersensitivity to agents inducing hyperosmotic stress (sorbitol, inhibiting DNA replication (hydroxyurea, and destabilizing the plasma membrane (SDS; this hypersensitivity can be abolished by expression of S. pombe erh1(+ and, to a lesser extent, S. japonicus erh1(+ or human ERH. Erh1p fails to interact with the human Ciz1 and PDIP46/SKAR proteins, known molecular partners of human ERH. Our data suggest that in Schizosaccharomyces sp. erh1(+ is non-essential for normal growth and Erh1p could play a role in response to adverse environmental conditions and in cell cycle regulation.

  3. Soil pH is a key determinant of soil fungal community composition in the Ny-Ålesund Region, Svalbard (High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the fungal community composition and its relationships with properties of surface soils in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic. A total of thirteen soil samples were collected and soil fungal community was analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing with fungi-specific primers targeting the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS region. The following eight soil properties were analyzed: pH, organic carbon (C, organic nitrogen (N, ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N, silicate silicon (SiO42--Si, nitrite nitrogen (NO2--N, phosphate phosphorus (PO43--P and nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N. A total of 57,952 reads belonging to 541 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were found. Of these OTUs, 343 belonged to Ascomycota, 100 to Basidiomycota, 31 to Chytridiomycota, 22 to Glomeromycota, 11 to Zygomycota, 10 to Rozellomycota, whereas 24 belonged to unknown fungi. The dominant orders were Helotiales, Verrucariales, Agaricales, Lecanorales, Chaetothyriales, Lecideales, and Capnodiales. The common genera (>8 soil samples were Tetracladium, Mortierella, Fusarium, Cortinarius, and Atla. Distance-based redundancy analysis (db-rda and analysis of similarities (ANOSIM revealed that soil pH (p=0.001 was the most significant factor in determining the soil fungal community composition. Members of Verrucariales were found to predominate in soils of pH 8-9, whereas Sordariales predominated in soils of pH 7-8 and Coniochaetales predominated in soil samples of pH 6-7. The results suggest the presence and distribution of diverse soil fungal communities in the High Arctic, which can provide reliable data for studying the ecological responses of soil fungal communities to climate changes in the Arctic.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides against traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Emre Cemal; Kahveci, Ramazan; Atanur, Osman Malik; Gürer, Bora; Aksoy, Nurkan; Gokce, Aysun; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Cemil, Berker; Erdogan, Bulent; Kahveci, Ozan

    2015-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) is a mushroom belonging to the polyporaceae family of Basidiomycota and has widely been used as a traditional medicine for thousands of years. G. lucidum has never been studied in traumatic spinal cord injury. The aim of this study is to investigate whether G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLPS) can protect the spinal cord after experimental spinal cord injury. Rats were randomized into five groups of eight animals each: control, sham, trauma, GLPS, and methylprednisolone. In the control group, no surgical intervention was performed. In the sham group, only a laminectomy was performed. In all the other groups, the spinal cord trauma model was created by the occlusion of the spinal cord with an aneurysm clip. In the spinal cord tissue, caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, nitric oxide levels, and superoxide dismutase levels were analysed. Histopathological and ultrastructural evaluations were also performed. Neurological evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined-plane test. After traumatic spinal cord injury, increases in caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels were detected. After the administration of GLPS, decreases were observed in tissue caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels. Furthermore, GLPS treatment showed improved results in histopathological scores, ultrastructural scores, and functional tests. Biochemical, histopathological, and ultrastructural analyses and functional tests reveal that GLPS exhibits meaningful neuroprotective effects against spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorsaf Kerfahi

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.

  6. Diversity, molecular phylogeny, and bioactive potential of fungal endophytes associated with the Himalayan blue pine (Pinus wallichiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Masroor; Rajput, Roopali; Abdin, Malik Z; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Riyaz-Ul-Hassan, Syed

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the diversity of fungal endophytes associated with Pinus wallichiana from the Western Himalayas, with emphasis on comparison of endophytic communities harbored by the stem and needle tissues of the host and their antimicrobial potential. A total number of 130 isolates, comprising of 38 different genera, were recovered from 210 fragments of the plant. Among the isolated fungi, only a single isolate, Tritirachium oryzae, belonged to the Phylum Basidiomycota whereas the rest belonged to Ascomycota. Dothideomycetes was the dominant class with the highest isolation frequency of 49.2 %. The most frequent colonizers of the host were Alternaria spp., Pestalotiopsis spp., Preussia spp., and Sclerostagonospora spp. The diversity and species richness were higher in needle tissues than in the stems. Antimicrobial activities were displayed by extracts from a total number of 22 endophytes against one or more pathogens. Endophytes designated as P1N13 (Coniothyrium carteri), P2N8 (Thielavia subthermophila), P4S6b (Truncatella betulae), P7N10 (Cochliobolus australiensis), and P8S4 (Tritirachium oryzae) were highly active against Candida albicans. Broad spectrum antimicrobial activities were obtained with the extracts of P8-S4 (Tritirachium oryzae) and P5-N26 (Coniochaeta gigantospora) that were potentially active against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. The most prominent antagonistic activity against fungal pathogens was shown by P8-S4 (Tritirachium oryzae), P5-N31a (Truncatella spadicea), and P5-N20 (Fusarium larvarum). Our findings indicate that Pinus wallichiana harbors a rich endophytic fungal community with potential antimicrobial activities. Further studies are needed to understand the ecology and evolutionary context of the associations between the Himalayan pine and its endophytes.

  7. Unexpected diversity of basidiomycetous endophytes in sapwood and leaves of Hevea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachael; Gazis, Romina; Skaltsas, Demetra; Chaverri, Priscila; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    Research on fungal endophytes has expanded dramatically in recent years, but little is known about the diversity and ecological roles of endophytic basidiomycetes. Here we report the analysis of 310 basidiomycetous endophytes isolated from wild and planted populations of the rubber tree genus, Hevea. Species accumulation curves were nonasymptotic, as in the majority of endophyte surveys, indicating that more sampling is needed to recover the true diversity of the community. One hundred eighteen OTUs were delimited, representing nine orders of Basidiomycota (Agaricales, Atheliales, Auriculariales, Cantharellales, Hymenochaetales, Polyporales, Russulales, Septobasidiales, Tremellales). The diversity of basidiomycetous endophytes found inhabiting wild populations of Hevea was comparable to that present in plantations. However, when samples were segregated by tissue type, sapwood of wild populations was found to contain a higher number of species than sapwood of planted trees. Seventy-five percent of isolates were members of the Polyporales, the majority in the phlebioid clade. Most of the species belong to clades known to cause a white-rot type of wood decay. Two species in the insect-associated genus Septobasidium were isolated. The most frequently isolated genera included Bjerkandera, Ceriporia, Phanerochaete, Phlebia, Rigidoporus, Tinctoporellus, Trametes (Polyporales), Peniophora, Stereum (Russulales) and Coprinellus (Agaricales), all of which have been reported as endophytes from a variety of hosts, across wide geographic locations. Literature records on the geographic distribution and host association of these genera revealed that their distribution and substrate affinity could be extended if the endophytic niche was investigated as part of fungal biodiversity surveys. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  8. The Deep-Sea Microbial Community from the Amazonian Basin Associated with Oil Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeão, Mariana E; Reis, Luciana; Leomil, Luciana; de Oliveira, Louisi; Otsuki, Koko; Gardinali, Piero; Pelz, Oliver; Valle, Rogerio; Thompson, Fabiano L; Thompson, Cristiane C

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of oil production is the possibility of unplanned accidental oil spills; therefore, it is important to evaluate the potential of indigenous microorganisms (both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) from different oceanic basins to degrade oil. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial response during the biodegradation process of Brazilian crude oil, both with and without the addition of the dispersant Corexit 9500, using deep-sea water samples from the Amazon equatorial margin basins, Foz do Amazonas and Barreirinhas, in the dark and at low temperatures (4°C). We collected deep-sea samples in the field (about 2570 m below the sea surface), transported the samples back to the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions (5°C in the dark) and subsequently performed two laboratory biodegradation experiments that used metagenomics supported by classical microbiological methods and chemical analysis to elucidate both taxonomic and functional microbial diversity. We also analyzed several physical-chemical and biological parameters related to oil biodegradation. The concomitant depletion of dissolved oxygen levels, oil droplet density characteristic to oil biodegradation, and BTEX concentration with an increase in microbial counts revealed that oil can be degraded by the autochthonous deep-sea microbial communities. Indigenous bacteria (e.g., Alteromonadaceae, Colwelliaceae , and Alcanivoracaceae ), archaea (e.g., Halobacteriaceae, Desulfurococcaceae , and Methanobacteriaceae ), and eukaryotic microbes (e.g., Microsporidia, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota) from the Amazonian margin deep-sea water were involved in biodegradation of Brazilian crude oil within less than 48-days in both treatments, with and without dispersant, possibly transforming oil into microbial biomass that may fuel the marine food web.

  9. Secrets of the subterranean pathosystem of Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Coetzee, Martin P A; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    Armillaria root disease affects fruit and nut crops, timber trees and ornamentals in boreal, temperate and tropical regions of the world. The causal pathogens are members of the genus Armillaria (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae). This review summarizes the state of knowledge and highlights recent advances in Armillaria research. Armillaria includes more than 40 morphological species. However, the identification and delineation of species on the basis of morphological characters are problematic, resulting in many species being undetected. Implementation of the biological species' concept and DNA sequence comparisons in the contemporary taxonomy of Armillaria have led to the discovery of a number of new species that are not linked to described morphological species. Armillaria exhibits a range of symbioses with both plants and fungi. As plant pathogens, Armillaria species have broad host ranges, infecting mostly woody species. Armillaria can also colonize orchids Galeola and Gastrodia but, in this case, the fungus is the host and the plant is the parasite. Similar to its contrasting relationships with plants, Armillaria acts as either host or parasite in its interactions with other fungi. Disease control: Recent research on post-infection controls has revealed promising alternatives to the former pre-plant eradication attempts with soil fumigants, which are now being regulated more heavily or banned outright because of their negative effects on the environment. New study tools for genetic manipulation of the pathogen and characterization of the molecular basis of the host response will greatly advance the development of resistant rootstocks in a new stage of research. The depth of the research, regardless of whether traditional or genomic approaches are used, will depend on a clear understanding of where the different propagules of Armillaria attack a root system, which of the pathogen's diverse biolymer-degrading enzymes and secondary metabolites facilitate infection

  10. Evidence of natural hybridization among homothallic members of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Baker, Bethany R; Korhonen, Kari; Zhao, Jun; Hughes, Karen W; Bruhn, Johann; Bowman, Tiffany S; Bergemann, Sarah E

    2012-06-01

    Populations of Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) across much of its range are heterothallic; homothallic populations occur only in Africa (A. mellea ssp. africana), China (China Biological Species CBS G), and Japan (A. mellea ssp. nipponica). Monosporous isolates of heterothallic A. mellea are haploid and their mating behaviour is consistent with the requirement of two different alleles at two mating-type loci (tetrapolar mating system) to create a diploid individual. In contrast, monosporous isolates of homothallic A. mellea are putatively diploid; they bypass the haploid phase by undergoing karyogamy in the basidium (a unique type of secondary homothallism/pseudohomothallism). In order to determine the genetic origin of this homothallism, we analyzed genetic variation of 47 heterothallic isolates from China, Europe, and North America, and 14 homothallic isolates from Africa, China, and Japan. Gene trees and mutational networks were constructed for partial mitochondrial gene ATP synthase subunit 6 (ATP6) and for the following nuclear genes: actin (ACTIN), elongation factor subunit 1-alpha (EFA), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), and the RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2). Homothallic isolates from Africa and Japan shared a common mitochondrial ATP6 haplotype with homothallic isolates from China, and are likely introductions. Homothallic isolates from China that shared a common mitochondrial haplotype with all European isolates did not share European nuclear haplotypes, as revealed by median-joining networks, but instead clustered with haplotypes from China or were intermediate between those of China and Europe. Such mitochondrial-nuclear discordance in homothallic isolates from China is indicative of hybridization between lineages originating from China and Europe. Copyright © 2012 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiological Peculiarities of Lignin-Modifying Enzyme Production by the White-Rot Basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica Strain BCC 142

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Elisashvili

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen white-rot Basidiomycota isolates were screened for production of lignin-modifying enzymes (LME in glycerol- and mandarin peel-containing media. In the synthetic medium, Cerrena unicolor strains were the only high laccase (Lac (3.2–9.4 U/mL and manganese peroxidase (MnP (0.56–1.64 U/mL producers while one isolate Coriolopsis gallica was the only lignin peroxidase (LiP (0.07 U/mL producer. Addition of mandarin peels to the synthetic medium promoted Lac production either due to an increase in fungal biomass (Funalia trogii, Trametes hirsuta, and T. versicolor or enhancement of enzyme production (C. unicolor, Merulius tremellosus, Phlebia radiata, Trametes ochracea. Mandarin peels favored enhanced MnP and LiP secretion by the majority of the tested fungi. The ability of LiP activity production by C. gallica, C. unicolor, F. trogii, T. ochracea, and T. zonatus in the medium containing mandarin-peels was reported for the first time. Several factors, such as supplementation of the nutrient medium with a variety of lignocellulosic materials, nitrogen source or surfactant (Tween 80, Triton X-100 significantly influenced production of LME by a novel strain of C. gallica. Moreover, C. gallica was found to be a promising LME producer with a potential for an easy scale up cultivation in a bioreactor and high enzyme yields (Lac-9.4 U/mL, MnP-0.31 U/mL, LiP-0.45 U/mL.

  12. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Filipa Simões

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%, while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%, yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  13. Changes in bacterial and fungal communities across compost recipes, preparation methods, and composting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Deborah A; Weicht, Thomas R; Bates, Scott T; Leff, Jonathan W; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Compost production is a critical component of organic waste handling, and compost applications to soil are increasingly important to crop production. However, we know surprisingly little about the microbial communities involved in the composting process and the factors shaping compost microbial dynamics. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing approaches to assess the diversity and composition of both bacterial and fungal communities in compost produced at a commercial-scale. Bacterial and fungal communities responded to both compost recipe and composting method. Specifically, bacterial communities in manure and hay recipes contained greater relative abundances of Firmicutes than hardwood recipes with hay recipes containing relatively more Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes. In contrast, hardwood recipes contained a large relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi. Fungal communities of compost from a mixture of dairy manure and silage-based bedding were distinguished by a greater relative abundance of Pezizomycetes and Microascales. Hay recipes uniquely contained abundant Epicoccum, Thermomyces, Eurotium, Arthrobotrys, and Myriococcum. Hardwood recipes contained relatively abundant Sordariomycetes. Holding recipe constant, there were significantly different bacterial and fungal communities when the composting process was managed by windrow, aerated static pile, or vermicompost. Temporal dynamics of the composting process followed known patterns of degradative succession in herbivore manure. The initial community was dominated by Phycomycetes, followed by Ascomycota and finally Basidiomycota. Zygomycota were associated more with manure-silage and hay than hardwood composts. Most commercial composters focus on the thermophilic phase as an economic means to insure sanitation of compost from pathogens. However, the community succeeding the thermophilic phase begs further investigation to determine how the microbial dynamics observed here can be best managed

  14. Diversity and Antioxidant Activity of Culturable Endophytic Fungi from Alpine Plants of Rhodiola crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Long; Guo, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Na-Sha; Wang, Meng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola spp. are rare and endangered alpine plants widely used as medicines and food additives by many civilizations since ancient times. Their main effective ingredients (such as salidroside and p-tyrosol) are praised to exhibit pharmacologic effects on high-altitude sickness and possess anti-aging and other adaptogenic capacities based on their antioxidant properties. In this study, 347 endophytic fungi were isolated from R. crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis, and the molecular diversity and antioxidant activities of these fungi were investigated for the first time. These fungi were categorized into 180 morphotypes based on cultural characteristics, and their rRNA gene ITS sequences were analyzed by BLAST search in the GenBank database. Except for 12 unidentified fungi (6.67%), all others were affiliated to at least 57 genera in 20 orders of four phyla, namely, Ascomycota (88.89%), Basidiomycota (2.78%), Zygomycota (1.11%), and Glomeromycota (0.56%), which exhibited high abundance and diversity. Antioxidant assay showed that the DPPH radical-scavenging rates of 114 isolates (63.33%) were >50%, and those of five isolates (Rct45, Rct63, Rct64, Rac76, and Rsc57) were >90%. The EC50 values of five antioxidant assays suggested significant potential of these fungi on scavenging DPPH•, O2−•, and OH• radicals, as well as scavenging nitrite and chelating Fe2+, which showed preference and selection between endophytic fungi and their hosts. Further research also provided the first evidence that Rac12 could produce salidrosides and p-tyrosol. Results suggested that versatile endophytic fungi associated with Rhodiola known as antioxidants could be exploited as potential sources of novel antioxidant products. PMID:25768014

  15. Chemical and microbiological characterization of an aged PCB-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, T; Covino, S; Burianová, E; Filipová, A; Křesinová, Z; Voříšková, J; Větrovský, T; Baldrian, P; Cajthaml, T

    2015-11-15

    This study was aimed at complex characterization of three soil samples (bulk soil, topsoil and rhizosphere soil) from a site historically contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). The bulk soil was the most highly contaminated, with a PCB concentration of 705.95 mg kg(-1), while the rhizosphere soil was the least contaminated (169.36 mg kg(-1)). PCB degradation intermediates, namely chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs), were detected in all the soil samples, suggesting the occurrence of microbial transformation processes over time. The higher content of organic carbon in the topsoil and rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil could be linked to the reduced bioaccessibility (bioavailability) of these chlorinated pollutants. However, different proportions of the PCB congener contents and different bioaccessibility of the PCB homologues indicate microbial biotransformation of the compounds. The higher content of organic carbon probably also promoted the growth of microorganisms, as revealed by phospholipid fatty acid (PFLA) quantification. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing analysis showed that the bacterial community structure was significantly similar among the three soils and was predominated by Proteobacteria (44-48%) in all cases. Moreover, analysis at lower taxonomic levels pointed to the presence of genera (Sphingomonas, Bulkholderia, Arthrobacter, Bacillus) including members with reported PCB removal abilities. The fungal community was mostly represented by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota, which accounted for >80% of all the sequences detected in the three soils. Fungal taxa with biodegradation potential (Paxillus, Cryptococcus, Phoma, Mortierella) were also found. These results highlight the potential of the indigenous consortia present at the site as a starting point for PCB bioremediation processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of primary biological aerosols to characterize their diversity in particulate matter over the Indian tropical region: assessment for climatic and health impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada R, H.; Muthalagu, A.; R, R.; Verma, R. S.; Philip, L.; Desprès, V.; Poeschl, U.; Gunthe, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs) are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and can influence the biosphere, climate, and public health (Després et al., 2012).To study the importance of the PBAPs, it is important to have an understanding about their origin, seasonal abundance and diversity. The study of PBAPs over the Indian tropical region becomes important as it hosts ~ 18% of the world population and has a distinct climate with a systematic and cyclic monsoon season which is different from the continental climates in Europe and America. In this study, the PBAPs were characterized by the application of molecular genetic techniques involving DNA extraction, PCR amplifications, cloning and DNA sequencing. In addition, characterization of the fungal source emissions was performed to better understand the diversity, abundance, and relative contribution of the fungal aerosols. For the present study, DNA analysis was performed on a one-year air filter set of PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 mm) covering three distinct meteorological seasons, i.e. summer, monsoon, and winter. The results from DNA analysis revealed the presence of bacteria and fungi in the filter samples. The fungal source characterization performed by the DNA analysis revealed the ratio of Basidiomycota to Ascomycota to be 96:4, which is consistent with previously reported studies from airborne fungal communities in the European continental boundary layer air (Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2009). In the study region, the highest species richness was found to be present in the family Agaricaceae (25.3%) followed by Polyporaceae (15.3%) and Marasmiaceae (10.81%). Agaricaceae, Polyporaceae and Psathyrellaceae were dominant families in the study region and the families like Clavariaceae, Nectriaceae, Phanerochaetachae, Pleurotaceae and Strophariaceae were found to be rare. The results will next be compared with the diversity and types of the fungi found in ambient PM10. More details will be presented.

  17. Fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Harry; Leducq, Valentin; Aschard, Hugues; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Jegou, Sarah; Landman, Cecilia; Cohen, David; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bourrier, Anne; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Cosnes, Jacques; Seksik, Philippe; Langella, Philippe; Skurnik, David; Richard, Mathias L; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Objective The bacterial intestinal microbiota plays major roles in human physiology and IBDs. Although some data suggest a role of the fungal microbiota in IBD pathogenesis, the available data are scarce. The aim of our study was to characterise the faecal fungal microbiota in patients with IBD. Design Bacterial and fungal composition of the faecal microbiota of 235 patients with IBD and 38 healthy subjects (HS) was determined using 16S and ITS2 sequencing, respectively. The obtained sequences were analysed using the Qiime pipeline to assess composition and diversity. Bacterial and fungal taxa associated with clinical parameters were identified using multivariate association with linear models. Correlation between bacterial and fungal microbiota was investigated using Spearman's test and distance correlation. Results We observed that fungal microbiota is skewed in IBD, with an increased Basidiomycota/Ascomycota ratio, a decreased proportion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an increased proportion of Candida albicans compared with HS. We also identified disease-specific alterations in diversity, indicating that a Crohn's disease-specific gut environment may favour fungi at the expense of bacteria. The concomitant analysis of bacterial and fungal microbiota showed a dense and homogenous correlation network in HS but a dramatically unbalanced network in IBD, suggesting the existence of disease-specific inter-kingdom alterations. Conclusions Besides bacterial dysbiosis, our study identifies a distinct fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD characterised by alterations in biodiversity and composition. Moreover, we unravel here disease-specific inter-kingdom network alterations in IBD, suggesting that, beyond bacteria, fungi might also play a role in IBD pathogenesis. PMID:26843508

  18. Multigene phylogeny and taxonomic revision of yeasts and related fungi in the Ustilaginomycotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q-M; Begerow, D; Groenewald, M; Liu, X-Z; Theelen, B; Bai, F-Y; Boekhout, T

    2015-06-01

    The subphylum Ustilaginomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) comprises mainly plant pathogenic fungi (smuts). Some of the lineages possess cultivable unicellular stages that are usually classified as yeast or yeast-like species in a largely artificial taxonomic system which is independent from and largely incompatible with that of the smut fungi. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses based on seven genes including three nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and four protein coding genes to address the molecular phylogeny of the ustilaginomycetous yeast species and their filamentous counterparts. Taxonomic revisions were proposed to reflect this phylogeny and to implement the 'One Fungus = One Name' principle. The results confirmed that the yeast-containing classes Malasseziomycetes, Moniliellomycetes and Ustilaginomycetes are monophyletic, whereas Exobasidiomycetes in the current sense remains paraphyletic. Four new genera, namely Dirkmeia gen. nov., Kalmanozyma gen. nov., Golubevia gen. nov. and Robbauera gen. nov. are proposed to accommodate Pseudozyma and Tilletiopsis species that are distinct from the other smut taxa and belong to clades that are separate from those containing type species of the hitherto described genera. Accordingly, new orders Golubeviales ord. nov. with Golubeviaceae fam. nov. and Robbauerales ord. nov. with Robbaueraceae fam. nov. are proposed to accommodate the sisterhood of Golubevia gen. nov. and Robbauera gen. nov. with other orders of Exobasidiomycetes. The majority of the remaining anamorphic yeast species are transferred to corresponding teleomorphic genera based on strongly supported phylogenetic affinities, resulting in the proposal of 28 new combinations. The taxonomic status of a few Pseudozyma species remains to be determined because of their uncertain phylogenetic positions. We propose to use the term pro tempore or pro tem. in abbreviation to indicate the single-species lineages that are temporarily maintained.

  19. A High-Level Fungal Diversity in the Intertidal Sediment of Chinese Seas Presents the Spatial Variation of Community Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Bian, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jiajia; Cai, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The intertidal region is one of the most dynamic environments in the biosphere, which potentially supports vast biodiversity. Fungi have been found to play important roles in marine ecosystems, e.g., as parasites or symbionts of plants and animals, and as decomposers of organic materials. The fungal diversity in intertidal region, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, sediment samples from various intertidal habitats of Chinese seas were collected and investigated for determination of fungal community and spatial distribution. Through ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS2) metabarcoding, a high-level fungal diversity was revealed, as represented by 6,013 OTUs that spanned six phyla, 23 classes, 84 orders and 526 genera. The presence of typical decomposers (e.g., Corollospora in Ascomycota and Lepiota in Basidiomycota) and pathogens (e.g., Olpidium in Chytriomycota, Actinomucor in Zygomycota and unidentified Rozellomycota spp.), and even mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., Glomus in Glomeromycota) indicated a complicated origin of intertidal fungi. Interestingly, a small proportion of sequences were classified to obligate marine fungi (e.g., Corollospora, Lignincola, Remispora, Sigmoidea ). Our data also showed that the East China Sea significantly differed from other regions in terms of species richness and community composition, indicating a profound effect of the huge discharge of the Yangtze River. No significant difference in fungal communities was detected, however, among habitat types (i.e., aquaculture, dock, plant, river mouth and tourism). These observations raise further questions on adaptation of these members to environments and the ecological functions they probably perform.

  20. Accessing the Hidden Microbial Diversity of Aphids: an Illustration of How Culture-Dependent Methods Can Be Used to Decipher the Insect Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Alina S; Renoz, François; Sabri, Ahmed; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe

    2017-11-09

    Microorganism communities that live inside insects can play critical roles in host development, nutrition, immunity, physiology, and behavior. Over the past decade, high-throughput sequencing reveals the extraordinary microbial diversity associated with various insect species and provides information independent of our ability to culture these microbes. However, their cultivation in the laboratory remains crucial for a deep understanding of their physiology and the roles they play in host insects. Aphids are insects that received specific attention because of their ability to form symbiotic associations with a wide range of endosymbionts that are considered as the core microbiome of these sap-feeding insects. But, if the functional diversity of obligate and facultative endosymbionts has been extensively studied in aphids, the diversity of gut symbionts and other associated microorganisms received limited consideration. Herein, we present a culture-dependent method that allowed us to successfully isolate microorganisms from several aphid species. The isolated microorganisms were assigned to 24 bacterial genera from the Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria phyla and three fungal genera from the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla. In our study, we succeeded in isolating already described bacteria found associated to aphids (e.g., the facultative symbiont Serratia symbiotica), as well as microorganisms that have never been described in aphids before. By unraveling a microbial community that so far has been ignored, our study expands our current knowledge on the microbial diversity associated with aphids and illustrates how fast and simple culture-dependent approaches can be applied to insects in order to capture their diverse microbiota members.

  1. Microbial communities and their potential for degradation of dissolved organic carbon in cryoconite hole environments of Himalaya and Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Aritri; Antony, Runa; Samui, Gautami; Thamban, Meloth

    2018-03-01

    Cryoconite holes (cylindrical melt-holes on the glacier surface) are important hydrological and biological systems within glacial environments that support diverse microbial communities and biogeochemical processes. This study describes retrievable heterotrophic microbes in cryoconite hole water from three geographically distinct sites in Antarctica, and a Himalayan glacier, along with their potential to degrade organic compounds found in these environments. Microcosm experiments (22 days) show that 13-60% of the dissolved organic carbon in the water within cryoconite holes is bio-available to resident microbes. Biodegradation tests of organic compounds such as lactate, acetate, formate, propionate and oxalate that are present in cryoconite hole water show that microbes have good potential to metabolize the compounds tested. Substrate utilization tests on Biolog Ecoplate show that microbial communities in the Himalayan samples are able to oxidize a diverse array of organic substrates including carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, amines/amides and polymers, while Antarctic communities generally utilized complex polymers. In addition, as determined by the extracellular enzyme activities, majority of the microbes (82%, total of 355) isolated in this study (Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Basidiomycota) had ability to degrade a variety of compounds such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, cellulose and lignin that are documented to be present within cryoconite holes. Thus, microbial communities have good potential to metabolize organic compounds found in the cryoconite hole environment, thereby influencing the water chemistry in these holes. Moreover, microbes exported downstream during melting and flushing of cryoconite holes may participate in carbon cycling processes in recipient ecosystems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression and phylogenetic analyses of the Gel/Gas proteins of Tuber melanosporum provide insights into the function and evolution of glucan remodeling enzymes in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillo, Fabiano; Gissi, Carmela; Chignoli, Daniele; Ragni, Enrico; Popolo, Laura; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2013-04-01

    The β(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases of the GH72 family are redundant enzymes that are essential for the formation and dynamic remodeling of the fungal wall during different stages of the life cycle. Four putative genes encoding glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored β(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases, designated TmelGEL1, TmelGEL2, TmelGEL4 and TmelGAS4, have been annotated in the genome of Tuber melanosporum, an ectomycorrhizal fungus that also produces a hypogeous fruiting body (FB) of great commercial value (black truffle). This work focuses on the characterization and expression of this multigene family by taking advantage of a laser microdissection (LMD) technology that has been used to separate two distinct compartments in the FB, the hyphae and the asci containing the ascospores. Of the four genes, TmelGEL1 was the most up-regulated in the FB compared to the free-living mycelium. Inside the FB, the expression of TmelGEL1 was restricted to the hyphal compartment. A phylogenetic analysis of the Gel/Gas protein family of T. melanosporum was also carried out. A total of 237 GH72 proteins from 51 Ascomycotina and 3 Basidiomycota (outgroup) species were analyzed. The resulting tree provides insight into the evolution of the T. melanosporum proteins and identifies new GH72 paralogs/subfamilies. Moreover, it represents a starting point to formulate new hypotheses on the significance of the striking GH72 gene redundancy in fungal biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Candida albicans scavenges host zinc via Pra1 during endothelial invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Citiulo

    Full Text Available The ability of pathogenic microorganisms to assimilate essential nutrients from their hosts is critical for pathogenesis. Here we report endothelial zinc sequestration by the major human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. We hypothesised that, analogous to siderophore-mediated iron acquisition, C. albicans utilises an extracellular zinc scavenger for acquiring this essential metal. We postulated that such a "zincophore" system would consist of a secreted factor with zinc-binding properties, which can specifically reassociate with the fungal cell surface. In silico analysis of the C. albicans secretome for proteins with zinc binding motifs identified the pH-regulated antigen 1 (Pra1. Three-dimensional modelling of Pra1 indicated the presence of at least two zinc coordination sites. Indeed, recombinantly expressed Pra1 exhibited zinc binding properties in vitro. Deletion of PRA1 in C. albicans prevented fungal sequestration and utilisation of host zinc, and specifically blocked host cell damage in the absence of exogenous zinc. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PRA1 arose in an ancient fungal lineage and developed synteny with ZRT1 (encoding a zinc transporter before divergence of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Structural modelling indicated physical interaction between Pra1 and Zrt1 and we confirmed this experimentally by demonstrating that Zrt1 was essential for binding of soluble Pra1 to the cell surface of C. albicans. Therefore, we have identified a novel metal acquisition system consisting of a secreted zinc scavenger ("zincophore", which reassociates with the fungal cell. Furthermore, functional similarities with phylogenetically unrelated prokaryotic systems indicate that syntenic zinc acquisition loci have been independently selected during evolution.

  4. Metaproteome analysis of the microbial community during leaf litter decomposition - the impact of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Leitner, S.; Hämmerle, I.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the breakdown of dead plant material, a terrestrial ecosystem process of paramount importance. Nutrients released during decomposition play a key role for microbial growth and plant productivity. These processes are controlled by abiotic factors, such as climate, and by biotic factors, such as litter nutrient concentration and stoichiometry (carbon:nutrient ratio) and activity of soil organisms. Future climate change scenarios predict temperature perturbations, therefore following changes of microbial community composition and possible feedbacks on ecosystem processes are of key interest; especially as our knowledge about the microbial regulation of these processes is still scarce. Our aim was to elucidate how temperature perturbations and leaf litter stoichiometry affect the composition of the microbial decomposer community. To this end a terrestrial microcosm experiment using beech (Fagus sylvatica) litter with different stoichiometry was conducted. In a semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) we used the intrinsic metabolic function of proteins to relate specific microbial activities to their phylogenetic origin in multispecies communities. Decomposer communities varied on litter with different stoichiometry so that microbial decomposers (fungi and bacteria) were favoured in litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios. The fungal community was dominated by Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes) and Basidiomycota (Agaricomycetes) and the bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The extracellular enzymes we detected belonged mainly to classes of xylanases, pectinases, cellulases and proteases and were almost exclusively of fungal origin (particularly Ascomycota). Temperature stress (heat and frost) evoked strong changes in community composition, enzyme activities, dissolved organic

  5. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  6. Comparative analysis of P450 signature motifs EXXR and CXG in the large and diverse kingdom of fungi: identification of evolutionarily conserved amino acid patterns characteristic of P450 family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khajamohiddin Syed

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s are heme-thiolate proteins distributed across the biological kingdoms. P450s are catalytically versatile and play key roles in organisms primary and secondary metabolism. Identification of P450s across the biological kingdoms depends largely on the identification of two P450 signature motifs, EXXR and CXG, in the protein sequence. Once a putative protein has been identified as P450, it will be assigned to a family and subfamily based on the criteria that P450s within a family share more than 40% homology and members of subfamilies share more than 55% homology. However, to date, no evidence has been presented that can distinguish members of a P450 family. Here, for the first time we report the identification of EXXR- and CXG-motifs-based amino acid patterns that are characteristic of the P450 family. Analysis of P450 signature motifs in the under-explored fungal P450s from four different phyla, ascomycota, basidiomycota, zygomycota and chytridiomycota, indicated that the EXXR motif is highly variable and the CXG motif is somewhat variable. The amino acids threonine and leucine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the EXXR motif and proline and glycine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the CXG motif in fungal P450s. Analysis of 67 P450 families from biological kingdoms such as plants, animals, bacteria and fungi showed conservation of a set of amino acid patterns characteristic of a particular P450 family in EXXR and CXG motifs. This suggests that during the divergence of P450 families from a common ancestor these amino acids patterns evolve and are retained in each P450 family as a signature of that family. The role of amino acid patterns characteristic of a P450 family in the structural and/or functional aspects of members of the P450 family is a topic for future research.

  7. Diversity and biocide susceptibility of fungal assemblages dwelling in the Art Gallery of Magura Cave, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena M. Mitova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magura Cave, north-western Bulgaria, possesses valuable rock-art paintings made with bat guano and dated from the period between the Eneolithic and Bronze Ages. Since 2008, the Art Gallery is closed to the general public in order to protect the paintings from vandalism, microclimatic changes caused by visitors and artificial illumination, and the consequent growth of fungi and phototrophs. Nevertheless, some tourist visits are allowed under the supervision of cave managers. This study provides the first scientific report on cultivable fungal assemblages dwelling different substrata in the Art Gallery. A total of 78 strains, belonging to 37 OTUs (Ascomycota 81%, Zygomycota 13%, Basidiomycota 5%, were isolated in the study. This fungal diversity was clearly dominated by Penicillium (50% of strains and Aspergillus (13%. The most relevant visible fungal colonies were detected in sediments rich in bat guano, where, besides Penicillium, other guanophilic fungi such as Mucor, Mortierella, Trichosporon and Trichoderma were dominant. Conversely, scarce fungi were detected on rock surface of painted walls. Based on the biocide susceptibility assay, octylisothiazolinone (OIT and benzalkonium chloride (BAC were effective inhibiting the in vitro growth of dominant fungal species in Magura Cave, when applied at concentrations ranged from 100 to 1,000 mg/L. These data provide a valuable knowledge about Magura fungi, and exemplify a type of preliminary test that may be conducted before planning any biocide treatment. However, considering the irreversible effects of biocides on the ecological balance in caves, and the low fungal contamination in painted walls of Magura Cave, there is no reason to use conventional biocides in this cave. Further studies, monitoring microbial communities and microclimatic parameters, should be conducted to improve the knowledge on microbial ecology in Magura Cave and possible human impacts, as well as to allow the early detection

  8. Diversity and antioxidant activity of culturable endophytic fungi from alpine plants of Rhodiola crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Cui

    Full Text Available Rhodiola spp. are rare and endangered alpine plants widely used as medicines and food additives by many civilizations since ancient times. Their main effective ingredients (such as salidroside and p-tyrosol are praised to exhibit pharmacologic effects on high-altitude sickness and possess anti-aging and other adaptogenic capacities based on their antioxidant properties. In this study, 347 endophytic fungi were isolated from R. crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis, and the molecular diversity and antioxidant activities of these fungi were investigated for the first time. These fungi were categorized into 180 morphotypes based on cultural characteristics, and their rRNA gene ITS sequences were analyzed by BLAST search in the GenBank database. Except for 12 unidentified fungi (6.67%, all others were affiliated to at least 57 genera in 20 orders of four phyla, namely, Ascomycota (88.89%, Basidiomycota (2.78%, Zygomycota (1.11%, and Glomeromycota (0.56%, which exhibited high abundance and diversity. Antioxidant assay showed that the DPPH radical-scavenging rates of 114 isolates (63.33% were >50%, and those of five isolates (Rct45, Rct63, Rct64, Rac76, and Rsc57 were >90%. The EC50 values of five antioxidant assays suggested significant potential of these fungi on scavenging DPPH•, O2-•, and OH• radicals, as well as scavenging nitrite and chelating Fe2+, which showed preference and selection between endophytic fungi and their hosts. Further research also provided the first evidence that Rac12 could produce salidrosides and p-tyrosol. Results suggested that versatile endophytic fungi associated with Rhodiola known as antioxidants could be exploited as potential sources of novel antioxidant products.

  9. Changes in bacterial and fungal communities across compost recipes, preparation methods, and composting times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Neher

    Full Text Available Compost production is a critical component of organic waste handling, and compost applications to soil are increasingly important to crop production. However, we know surprisingly little about the microbial communities involved in the composting process and the factors shaping compost microbial dynamics. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing approaches to assess the diversity and composition of both bacterial and fungal communities in compost produced at a commercial-scale. Bacterial and fungal communities responded to both compost recipe and composting method. Specifically, bacterial communities in manure and hay recipes contained greater relative abundances of Firmicutes than hardwood recipes with hay recipes containing relatively more Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes. In contrast, hardwood recipes contained a large relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi. Fungal communities of compost from a mixture of dairy manure and silage-based bedding were distinguished by a greater relative abundance of Pezizomycetes and Microascales. Hay recipes uniquely contained abundant Epicoccum, Thermomyces, Eurotium, Arthrobotrys, and Myriococcum. Hardwood recipes contained relatively abundant Sordariomycetes. Holding recipe constant, there were significantly different bacterial and fungal communities when the composting process was managed by windrow, aerated static pile, or vermicompost. Temporal dynamics of the composting process followed known patterns of degradative succession in herbivore manure. The initial community was dominated by Phycomycetes, followed by Ascomycota and finally Basidiomycota. Zygomycota were associated more with manure-silage and hay than hardwood composts. Most commercial composters focus on the thermophilic phase as an economic means to insure sanitation of compost from pathogens. However, the community succeeding the thermophilic phase begs further investigation to determine how the microbial dynamics observed here

  10. Diversity and composition of airborne fungal community associated with particulate matters in Beijing during haze and non-haze days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong eYan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: To assess the diversity and composition of airborne fungi associated with particulate matter in Beijing, China, a total of 81 PM samples were collected, which derived from PM2.5, PM10 fractions and total suspended particles during haze and non-haze days. The airborne fungal community in these samples was analyzed using the Illumina Miseq platform with fungi-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of the large subunit rRNA gene. A total of 797,040 reads belonging to 1,633 operational taxonomic units were observed. Of these, 1,102 belonged to Ascomycota, 502 to Basidiomycota, 24 to Zygomycota, and 5 to Chytridiomycota. The dominant orders were Capnodiales (27.95%, Pleosporales (26.8%, Eurotiales (10.64%, and Hypocreales (9.09%. The dominant genera were Cladosporium, Alternaria, Fusarium, Penicillium, Sporisorium, and Aspergilus. Analysis of similarities revealed that both particulate matter sizes (R=0.175, p=0.001 and air quality levels (R=0.076, p=0.006 significantly affected the airborne fungal community composition. The relative abundance of many fungal genera was found to significantly differ among various PM types and air quality levels. Alternaria and Epicoccum were more abundant in total suspended particles samples, Aspergillus in heavy-haze days and PM2.5 samples, and Malassezia in PM2.5 samples and heavy-haze days. Canonical correspondence analysis and permutation tests showed that temperature (p<0.01, NO2 (p<0.01, PM10 (p<0.01, SO2 (p<0.01, CO (p<0.01, and relative humidity (p<0.05 were significant factors that determine airborne fungal community composition. The results suggest diverse airborne fungal communities are associated with particulate matters, and may provide reliable data for studying the responses of human body to the increasing level of air pollution in Beijing.

  11. Molecular and morphological diversity of fungi and the associated functions in three European nearby lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobard, Marlène; Rasconi, Serena; Solinhac, Laurent; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2012-09-01

    This study presents an original rDNA PCR and microscopic survey of pelagic freshwater fungal communities, and was designed to unveil the diversity of true Fungi (i.e. the kingdom Eumycota) in three contrasting lake ecosystems (Lakes Pavin, Aydat and Vassivière) located in the French Massif Central. Three clone libraries were constructed from samples collected in the euphotic layers of the lakes during spring 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined data from the three lakes clustered our sequences into thee divisions: Chytridiomycota (50% of total sequences), Ascomycota (40%) and Basidiomycota (10% in Pavin and Aydat only). Several sequences were assigned to a novel Chytridiomycota clade first recovered in Lake Pavin in 2005. Most of the sequences retrieved in the investigated lakes were affiliated with known fungal species, most of which were apparently well adapted to thrive in the pelagic realm. Their main functions (i.e. parasitism and saprophytism), putatively inferred from the closest relatives of the retrieved molecular sequences, were confirmed by microscopic approaches and by enrichment experiments with pollen grains. The occurrence of three fungal forms (zoosporic, yeast and mycelial) was associated with different trophic modes, establishing fungi as strong potential competitors for various niches in pelagic ecosystems, primarily in relation to the processing of particulate organic matter and the production of propagule food sources for grazers. For the first time, this study provides insight into the diversity and the associated functions of all members of the Kingdom Eumycota investigated in the whole plankton fraction of aquatic ecosystems. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Comparative analysis of P450 signature motifs EXXR and CXG in the large and diverse kingdom of fungi: identification of evolutionarily conserved amino acid patterns characteristic of P450 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Mashele, Samson Sitheni

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins distributed across the biological kingdoms. P450s are catalytically versatile and play key roles in organisms primary and secondary metabolism. Identification of P450s across the biological kingdoms depends largely on the identification of two P450 signature motifs, EXXR and CXG, in the protein sequence. Once a putative protein has been identified as P450, it will be assigned to a family and subfamily based on the criteria that P450s within a family share more than 40% homology and members of subfamilies share more than 55% homology. However, to date, no evidence has been presented that can distinguish members of a P450 family. Here, for the first time we report the identification of EXXR- and CXG-motifs-based amino acid patterns that are characteristic of the P450 family. Analysis of P450 signature motifs in the under-explored fungal P450s from four different phyla, ascomycota, basidiomycota, zygomycota and chytridiomycota, indicated that the EXXR motif is highly variable and the CXG motif is somewhat variable. The amino acids threonine and leucine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the EXXR motif and proline and glycine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the CXG motif in fungal P450s. Analysis of 67 P450 families from biological kingdoms such as plants, animals, bacteria and fungi showed conservation of a set of amino acid patterns characteristic of a particular P450 family in EXXR and CXG motifs. This suggests that during the divergence of P450 families from a common ancestor these amino acids patterns evolve and are retained in each P450 family as a signature of that family. The role of amino acid patterns characteristic of a P450 family in the structural and/or functional aspects of members of the P450 family is a topic for future research.

  13. Identification of a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematically identified possible TKs across the fungal kingdom by using the profile hidden Markov Models searches and phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed that fungi lack the orthologs of animal TKs. We identified a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases (FslK) that appears to be a sister group closely related to TKs. Sequence analysis revealed that members of the FslK clade contain all the conserved protein kinase sub-domains and thus are likely enzymatically active. However, they lack key amino acid residues that determine TK-specific activities, indicating that they are not true TKs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the last common ancestor of fungi may have possessed numerous members of FslK. The ancestral FslK genes were lost in Ascomycota and Ustilaginomycotina and Pucciniomycotina of Basidiomycota during evolution. Most of these ancestral genes, however, were retained and expanded in Agaricomycetes. The discovery of the fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to TKs helps shed light on the origin and evolution of TKs and also has potential implications for the importance of these kinases in mushroom fungi.

  14. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A.; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  15. Fungal monitoring of the indoor air of the Museo de La Plata Herbarium, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallo, Andrea C; Elíades, Lorena A; Nitiu, Daniela S; Saparrat, Mario C N

    Biological agents, such as fungal spores in the air in places where scientific collections are stored, can attack and deteriorate them. The aim of this study was to gather information on the indoor air quality of the Herbarium of Vascular Plants of the Museo de Ciencias Naturales de La Plata, Argentina, in relation to fungal propagules and inert particles. This study was made using a volumetric system and two complementary sampling methods: (1) a non-viable method for direct evaluation, and (2) a viable method by culture for viable fungal propagules. The non-viable method led to ten spore morphotypes being found from related fungal sources. A total of 4401.88spores/m 3 and 32135.18 inert suspended particles/m 3 were recorded. The viable method led to the finding of nine fungal taxa as viable spores that mostly belonged to anamorphic forms of Ascomycota, although the pigmented yeast Rhodotorula F.C. Harrison (Basidiomycota) was also found. A total count of 40,500fungal CFU/m 3 air was estimated for all the sites sampled. Both the non-viable and viable sampling methods were necessary to monitor the bio-aerosol load in the La Plata Herbarium. The indoor air of this institution seems to be reasonably adequate for the conservation of vascular plants due to the low indoor/outdoor index, low concentrations of air spores, and/or lack of indicators of moisture problems. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Chitin mixed in potting soil alters lettuce growth, the survival of zoonotic bacteria on the leaves and associated rhizosphere microbiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eDebode

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is a promising soil amendment for improving soil quality, plant growth and plant resilience. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, to study the effect of chitin mixed in potting soil on lettuce growth and on the survival of two zoonotic bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on the lettuce leaves. Second, to assess the related changes in the microbial lettuce rhizosphere, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis and amplicon sequencing of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment and the fungal ITS2. As a result of chitin addition, lettuce fresh yield weight was significantly increased. S. enterica survival in the lettuce phyllosphere was significantly reduced. The E. coli O157:H7 survival was also lowered, but not significantly. Moreover, significant changes were observed in the bacterial and fungal community of the lettuce rhizosphere. PLFA analysis showed a significant increase in fungal and bacterial biomass. Amplicon sequencing showed no increase in fungal and bacterial biodiversity, but relative abundances of the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria and the fungal phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were significantly changed. More specifically, a more than tenfold increase was observed for operational taxonomic units (OTUs belonging to the bacterial genera Cellvibrio, Pedobacter, Dyadobacter, and Streptomyces and to the fungal genera Lecanicillium and Mortierella. These genera include several species previously reported to be involved in biocontrol, plant growth promotion, the nitrogen cycle and chitin degradation. These results enhance the understanding of the response of the rhizosphere microbiome to chitin amendment. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the use of soil amendments to control the survival of S. enterica on plant leaves.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships and morphological evolution in Lentinus, Polyporellus and Neofavolus, emphasizing southeastern Asian taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelan, Jaya Seelan Sathiya; Justo, Alfredo; Nagy, Laszlo G; Grand, Edward A; Redhead, Scott A; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lentinus (Polyporaceae, Basidiomycota) is widely documented from tropical and temperate forests and is taxonomically controversial. Here we studied the relationships between Lentinus subg. Lentinus sensu Pegler (i.e. sections Lentinus, Tigrini, Dicholamellatae, Rigidi, Lentodiellum and Pleuroti and polypores that share similar morphological characters). We generated sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and partial 28S regions of nuc rDNA and genes encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB1), focusing on Lentinus subg. Lentinus sensu Pegler and the Neofavolus group, combined these data with sequences from GenBank (including RPB2 gene sequences) and performed phylogenetic analyses with maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. We also evaluated the transition in hymenophore morphology between Lentinus, Neofavolus and related polypores with ancestral state reconstruction. Single-gene phylogenies and phylogenies combining ITS and 28S with RPB1 and RPB2 genes all support existence of a Lentinus/Polyporellus clade and a separate Neofavolus clade. Polyporellus (represented by P. arcularius, P. ciliatus, P. brumalis) forms a clade with species representing Lentinus subg. Lentinus sensu Pegler (1983), excluding L. suavissimus. Lentinus tigrinus appears as the sister group of Polyporellus in the four-gene phylogeny, but this placement was weakly supported. All three multigene analyses and the single-gene analysis using ITS strongly supported Polyporus tricholoma as the sister group of the Lentinus/Polyporellus clade; only the 28S rRNA phylogeny failed to support this placement. Under parsimony the ancestral hymenophoral configuration for the Lentinus/Polyporellus clade is estimated to be circular pores, with independent transitions to angular pores and lamellae. The ancestral state for the Neofavolus clade is estimated to be angular pores, with a single transition to lamellae in L. suavissimus. We propose that Lentinus suavissimus (section

  18. Spatial variations of soil respiration and temperature sensitivity along a steep slope of the semiarid Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiqi; Wang, Rui; Hu, Yaxian; Yao, Lunguang; Guo, Shengli

    2018-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity pose a great challenge to accurately estimate the carbon flux in global carbon cycling, which has primarily been researched in flatlands versus hillslope ecosystems. On an eroded slope (35°) of the semiarid Loess Plateau, soil respiration, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured in situ at upper and lower slope positions in triplicate from 2014 until 2016, and the soil biochemical and microbial properties were determined. The results showed that soil respiration was significantly greater (by 44.2%) at the lower slope position (2.6 μmol m-2 s-1) than at the upper slope position, as were soil moisture, carbon, nitrogen fractions and root biomass. However, the temperature sensitivity was 13.2% greater at the upper slope position than at the lower slope position (P < 0.05). The soil fungal community changed from being Basidiomycota-dominant at the upper slope position to being Zygomycota-dominant at the lower slope position, corresponding with increased β-D-glucosidase activity at the upper slope position than at the lower slope position. We concluded that soil respiration was enhanced by the greater soil moisture, root biomass, carbon and nitrogen contents at the lower slope position than at the upper slope position. Moreover, the increased soil respiration and decreased temperature sensitivity at the lower slope position were partially due to copiotrophs replacing oligotrophs. Such spatial variations along slopes must be properly accounted for when estimating the carbon budget and feedback of future climate change on hillslope ecosystems.

  19. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Grey Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea - A Metagenomic Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Simoes, Marta

    2015-11-05

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea grey mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from grey mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the grey mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  20. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Hanne N; Dixon, Kingsley W; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-09-01

    Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult. An experimental approach using several

  1. Introducing a novel mushroom from mycophagy community with emphasis on biomedical potency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somanjana Khatua

    Full Text Available Mushrooms have been prized by humankind as medicine and culinary wonder since antiquity. Though several species are ethnically valued; many prospective species are still being discovered. One such wild macrofungus has recently been discovered during subsequent field surveys in West Bengal, India which in turn exposed as a traditionally consumed popular myco-food. The collected taxon was found to be unique with regard to its morphological as well as genetical features. After detailed characterizations, the fungus was identified as a novel taxon belonging to the genus Russula (Russulaceae, Basidiomycota. Besides, the investigation was further extended in search of new functional ingredients and in this context, a water soluble crude polysaccharide rich extract (Rusalan was isolated from dried basidiocarps. Accumulating evidences from GC-MS, HPTLC, FT-IR along with several spectrophotometric methods postulated that the fraction consisted mainly of carbohydrate in triple helical conformation, where glucose was the major monosaccharide mostly with β-type glycosidic linkage. Conversely, Rusalan showed pronounced antioxidant activity in six in vitro assay systems with EC50 value ranging from 190-1328 μg/ml concentration. The crude polysaccharide was also evaluated against six bacterial strains using microdilution method and the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were found to be inhibited effectively. In addition, immune-stimulatory assays demonstrated that Rusalan could evidently promote proliferation, induce phagocytosis, release NO, produce intracellular ROS and upregulate mRNA expression of iNOS, TNF-α, COX-2, as well as IL-6 genes in in mouse macrophage cells. Therefore, aim of the present study was not only to describe a new taxon to the world mycoflora but also to introduce a potent therapeutic agent that could be explored for food and pharmaceutical purposes. However, isolation of active component and in vivo studies need

  2. Rhizospheric soil and root endogenous fungal diversity and composition in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong; Cui, Yinshan; Li, Haoyu; Kuang, Anxiu; Li, Xiaoran; Wei, Yunlin; Ji, Xiuling

    2017-01-01

    Rhizosphere and endophytic fungal communities are considered critically important for plant health and soil fertility. In response to continuous cropping, Panax notoginseng becomes vulnerable to attack by fungal pathogens. In the present study, culture-independent Illumina MiSeq was used to investigate the rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. The results demonstrated that fungal diversity is increased inside the roots and in rhizospheric. Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were the dominant phyla detected during the continuous cropping of Panax notoginseng. The fungal diversity in the rhizospheric soil and roots of root-rot P. notoginseng plants are less than that of healthy plants in the same cultivating year, thus showing that root-rot disease also affects the community structure and diversity of rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi. Similarities in the major fungal components show that endophytic fungal communities are similar to rhizospheric soil fungal community based on a specialized subset of organisms. Canonical correspondence analysis on the fungal communities in root-rot rhizospheric from both healthy plants and rotation soils reveals that the soil pH and organic matter have the greatest impact upon the microbial community composition during continuous cropping, whereas soil nutrition status does not significantly affect the fungal community composition in response to continuous cropping practices. In addition, the results suggest that the unclassified genera Leotiomycetes, Cylindrocarpon, Fusarium and Mycocentrospora are shown as the potential pathogens which are responsible for the obstacles in continuous cropping of P. notoginseng. Further exploration of these potential pathogens might be useful for the biological control of continuous cropping of P. notoginseng. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity of culturable fungi in the Heshang Cave, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Baiying; Wang, Hongmei; Xiang, Xing; Wang, Ruicheng; Yun, Yuan; Gong, Linfeng

    2015-01-01

    Caves are nutrient-limited and dark subterranean ecosystems. To date, attention has been focused on geological research of caves in China, whilst indigenous microbial diversity has been insufficiently characterized. Here, we report the fungal diversity in the pristine, oligotrophic, karst Heshang Cave, central China, using a culture-dependent method coupled with the analysis of the fungal rRNA-ITS gene sequences. A total of 194 isolates were obtained with six different media from 14 sampling sites of sediments, weathered rocks, and bat guanos. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the 194 sequenced isolates into 33 genera within 15 orders of three phyla, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota, indicating a high degree of fungal diversity in the Heshang Cave. Notably, 16 out of the 36 fungal genera were also frequently observed in solution caves around the world and 23 genera were previously found in carbonate cave, indicating potential similarities among fungal communities in cave ecosystems. However, 10 genera in this study were not reported previously in any solution caves, thus expanding our knowledge about fungal diversity in cave ecosystems. Moreover, culturable fungal diversity varied from one habitat to another within the cave, being the highest in sediments, followed by weathered rocks and bat guanos as indicated by α-diversity indexes. At the genus level, Penicillium accounted for 40, 54, and 52% in three habitats of sediments, weathered rocks, and bat guanos, respectively. Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, and Aspergillus accounted for 9, 22, and 37% in the above habitats, correspondingly. Despite of the dominance of Penicillium in all samples, β-diversity index indicated significant differences between each two fungal communities in the three habitats in view of both the composition and abundance. Our study is the first report on fungal communities in a natural pristine solution cave system in central China and sheds light on fungal diversity and functions in

  4. Moniliophthora roreri, causal agent of cacao frosty pod rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bryan A; Evans, Harry C; Phillips-Mora, Wilbert; Ali, Shahin S; Meinhardt, Lyndel W

    2017-12-01

    Taxonomy: Moniliophthora roreri (Cif.) H.C. Evans et al. ; Phylum Basidiomycota; Class Agaricomycetes; Order Agaricales; Family Marasmiaceae; Genus Moniliophthora. Biology: Moniliophthora roreri attacks Theobroma and Herrania species causing frosty pod rot. Theobroma cacao (cacao) is the host of major economic concern. Moniliophthora roreri is a hemibiotroph with a long biotrophic phase (45-90 days). Spore masses, of apparent asexual origin, are produced on the pod surface after initiation of the necrotrophic phase. Spores are spread by wind, rain and human activity. Symptoms of the biotrophic phase can include necrotic flecks and, in some cases, pod malformation, but pods otherwise remain asymptomatic. Relationship to Moniliophthora perniciosa: Moniliophthora roreri and Moniliophthora perniciosa, causal agent of witches' broom disease of cacao, are closely related. Their genomes are similar, including many of the genes they carry which are considered to be important in the disease process. Moniliophthora perniciosa, also a hemibiotroph, has a typical basidiomycete lifestyle and morphology, forming clamp connections and producing mushrooms. Basidiospores infect meristematic tissues including flower cushions, stem tips and pods. Moniliophthora roreri does not form clamp connections or mushrooms and infects pods only. Both pathogens are limited to the Western Hemisphere and are a threat to cacao production around the world. Agronomic importance: Disease losses caused by frosty pod rot can reach 90% and result in field abandonment. Moniliophthora roreri remains in the invasive phase in the Western Hemisphere, not having reached Brazil, some islands within the Caribbean and a few specific regions within otherwise invaded countries. The disease can be managed by a combination of cultural (for example, maintenance of tree height and removal of infected pods) and chemical methods. These methods benefit from regional application, but can be cost prohibitive. Breeding for

  5. The effects of high-tannin leaf litter from transgenic poplars on microbial communities in microcosm soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S. Winder

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of leaf litter from genetically-modified hybrid poplar accumulating high levels of condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins were examined in soil microcosms consisting of moss growing on sieved soil. Moss preferentially proliferated in microcosms with lower tannin content; DGGE detected increased fungal diversity in microcosms with low-tannin litter. The proportion of cloned rDNA sequences from Actinobacteria decreased with litter addition while Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, and α-Proteobacteria significantly increased. β–Proteobacteria were proportionally more numerous at high tannin levels. Tannins had no significant impact on overall diversity of bacterial communities analyzed with various estimators. There was an increased proportion of N-fixing bacteria corresponding to the addition of litter with low tannin levels. The addition of litter increased the proportion of Ascomycota/Basidiomycota. Dothideomycetes, Pucciniomycetes, and Tremellomycetes also increased and Agaricomycetes decreased. Agaricomycetes and Sordariomycetes were significantly more abundant in controls, whereas Pucciniomycetes increased in soil with litter from transformed trees (P = 0.051. Richness estimators and diversity indices revealed no significant difference in the composition of fungal communities; PCoA partitioned the fungal communities into three groups: (i those with higher amounts of added tannin from both transformed and untransformed treatments, (ii those corresponding to soils without litter, and (iii those corresponding to microcosms with litter added from trees transformed only with a β-glucuronidase (GUS control vector. While the litter from transformed poplars had significant effects on soil microbe communities, the observed impacts reflected known impacts on soil processes associated with tannins, and were similar to changes that would be expected from natural variation in tannin levels.

  6. Composted versus Raw Olive Mill Waste as Substrates for the Production of Medicinal Mushrooms: An Assessment of Selected Cultivation and Quality Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervakis, Georgios I.; Koutrotsios, Georgios; Katsaris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW, “alperujo”) is a highly biotoxic sludge-like effluent of the olive-oil milling process with a huge seasonal production. One of the treatment approaches that has so far received little attention is the use of TPOMW as substrate for the cultivation of edible mushrooms. Fifteen fungal strains belonging to five species (Basidiomycota), that is, Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. pulmonarius, were evaluated for their efficacy to colonize media composed of TPOMW, which was used either raw or composted in mixtures with wheat straw in various ratios. Qualified strains exhibited high values of biological efficiency (e.g., 120–135% for Pleurotus spp. and 125% for A. cylindracea) and productivity in subsequent cultivation experiments on substrates supplemented with 20–40% composted TPOMW or 20% raw TPOMW. Only when supplementation exceeded 60% for raw TPOMW, a negative impact was noted on mushroom yields which could be attributed to the effluent's toxicity (otherwise alleviated in the respective composted TPOMW medium). Earliness and mushroom size as well as quality parameters such as total phenolic content and antioxidant activity did not demonstrate significant differences versus the control wheat-straw substrate. The substrates hemicellulose content was negatively correlated with mycelium growth rates and yields and positively with earliness; in addition, cellulose: lignin ratio presented a positive correlation with mycelium growth and mushroom weight for A. cylindracea and with earliness for all species examined. TPOMW-based media revealed a great potential for the substitution of traditional cultivation substrates by valorizing environmentally hazardous agricultural waste. PMID:24027758

  7. Antimycobacterial and antimalarial activities of endophytic fungi associated with the ancient and narrowly endemic neotropical plant Vellozia gigantea from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana C Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Endophytic fungi, present mainly in the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla, are associated with different plants and represent important producers of bioactive natural products. Brazil has a rich biodiversity of plant species, including those reported as being endemic. Among the endemic Brazilian plant species, Vellozia gigantea (Velloziaceae is threatened by extinction and is a promising target to recover endophytic fungi. OBJECTIVE The present study focused on bioprospecting of bioactive compounds of the endophytic fungi associated with V. gigantea, an endemic, ancient, and endangered plant species that occurs only in the rupestrian grasslands of Brazil. METHODS The capability of 285 fungal isolates to produce antimicrobial and antimalarial activities was examined. Fungi were grown at solid-state fermentation to recover their crude extracts in dichloromethane. Bioactive extracts were analysed by chromatographic fractionation and NMR and displayed compounds with antimicrobial, antimycobacterial, and antimalarial activities. FINDINGS Five fungi produced antimicrobial and antimalarial compounds. Extracts of Diaporthe miriciae showed antifungal, antibacterial, and antimalarial activities; Trichoderma effusum displayed selective antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium intracellulare; and three Penicillium species showed antibacterial activity. D. miriciae extract contained highly functionalised secondary metabolites, yielding the compound epoxycytochalasin H with high antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum, with an IC50 approximately 3.5-fold lower than that with chloroquine. MAIN CONCLUSION Our results indicate that V. gigantea may represent a microhabitat repository hotspot of potential fungi producers of bioactive compounds and suggest that endophytic fungal communities might be an important biological component contributing to the

  8. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ye Shen

    Full Text Available Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0% and Basidiomycota (2.0%, including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp., B34 (Curvularia sp., B35 (undefined genus 1, B38 (Penicillium sp. and zzz816 (Shiraia sp. displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816 could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which

  9. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Ye; Cheng, Yan-Lin; Cai, Chun-Ju; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0%) and Basidiomycota (2.0%), including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp.), B34 (Curvularia sp.), B35 (undefined genus 1), B38 (Penicillium sp.) and zzz816 (Shiraia sp.) displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816) could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which is

  10. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelfattah

    Full Text Available The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6% and Basidiomycota (2.8%. A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions.

  11. Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goellner, Katharina; Loehrer, Marco; Langenbach, Caspar; Conrath, Uwe; Koch, Eckhard; Schaffrath, Ulrich

    2010-03-01

    The plant pathogenic basidiomycete fungi Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Phakopsora meibomiae cause rust disease in soybean plants. Phakopsora pachyrhizi originated in Asia-Australia, whereas the less aggressive P. meibomiae originated in Latin America. In the New World, P. pachyrhizi was first reported in the 1990s to have spread to Hawaii and, since 2001, it has been found in South America. In 2004, the pathogen entered continental USA. This review provides detailed information on the taxonomy and molecular biology of the pathogen, and summarizes strategies to combat the threat of this devastating disease. Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & P. Syd; uredial anamorph: Malupa sojae (syn. Uredo sojae); Domain Eukaryota; Kingdom Fungi; Phylum Basidiomycota; Order Uredinales; Class Urediniomycetes; Family Phakopsoraceae; Genus Phakopsora (http://www.indexfungorum.org). The nomenclature of rust spores and spore-producing structures used within this review follows Agrios GN (2005) Plant Pathology, 5th edn. London: Elsevier/Academic Press. In the field, P. pachyrhizi infects leaf tissue from a broad range (at least 31 species in 17 genera) of leguminous plants. Infection of an additional 60 species in other genera has been achieved under laboratory conditions. At the beginning of the disease, small, tan-coloured lesions, restricted by leaf veins, can be observed on infected soybean leaves. Lesions enlarge and, 5-8 days after initial infection, rust pustules (uredia, syn. uredinia) become visible. Uredia develop more frequently in lesions on the lower surface of the leaf than on the upper surface. The uredia open with a round ostiole through which uredospores are released.

  12. Gene expression and proteomic analysis of the formation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi appressoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christine L; McMahon, Michael B; Fortis, Laurie L; Nuñez, Alberto; Smythers, Gary W; Luster, Douglas G; Frederick, Reid D

    2012-06-22

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is an obligate fungal pathogen causing Asian soybean rust (ASR). A dual approach was taken to examine the molecular and biochemical processes occurring during the development of appressoria, specialized infection structures by which P. pachyrhizi invades a host plant. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was utilized to generate a cDNA library enriched for transcripts expressed during appressoria formation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy analysis were used to generate a partial proteome of proteins present during appressoria formation. Sequence analysis of 1133 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) revealed 238 non-redundant ESTs, of which 53% had putative identities assigned. Twenty-nine of the non-redundant ESTs were found to be specific to the appressoria-enriched cDNA library, and did not occur in a previously constructed germinated urediniospore cDNA library. Analysis of proteins against a custom database of the appressoria-enriched ESTs plus Basidiomycota EST sequences available from NCBI revealed 256 proteins. Fifty-nine of these proteins were not previously identified in a partial proteome of P. pachyrhizi germinated urediniospores. Genes and proteins identified fell into functional categories of metabolism, cell cycle and DNA processing, protein fate, cellular transport, cellular communication and signal transduction, and cell rescue. However, 38% of ESTs and 24% of proteins matched only to hypothetical proteins of unknown function, or showed no similarity to sequences in the current NCBI database. Three novel Phakopsora genes were identified from the cDNA library along with six potentially rust-specific genes. Protein analysis revealed eight proteins of unknown function, which possessed classic secretion signals. Two of the extracellular proteins are reported as potential effector proteins. Several genes and proteins were identified that are expressed in P. pachyrhizi during appressoria formation

  13. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Droby, Samir; Schena, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea) was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December) using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6%) and Basidiomycota (2.8%). A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii) was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions. PMID:26132745

  14. Does warming by open-top chambers induce change in the root-associated fungal community of the arctic dwarf shrub Cassiope tetragona (Ericaceae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorberau, Kelsey Erin; Botnen, Synnøve Smebye; Mundra, Sunil; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Rozema, Jelte; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken; Kauserud, Håvard

    2017-07-01

    Climate change may alter mycorrhizal communities, which impact ecosystem characteristics such as carbon sequestration processes. These impacts occur at a greater magnitude in Arctic ecosystems, where the climate is warming faster than in lower latitudes. Cassiope tetragona (L.) D. Don is an Arctic plant species in the Ericaceae family with a circumpolar range. C. tetragona has been reported to form ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) as well as ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses. In this study, the fungal taxa present within roots of C. tetragona plants collected from Svalbard were investigated using DNA metabarcoding. In light of ongoing climate change in the Arctic, the effects of artificial warming by open-top chambers (OTCs) on the fungal root community of C. tetragona were evaluated. We detected only a weak effect of warming by OTCs on the root-associated fungal communities that was masked by the spatial variation between sampling sites. The root fungal community of C. tetragona was dominated by fungal groups in the Basidiomycota traditionally classified as either saprotrophic or ECM symbionts, including the orders Sebacinales and Agaricales and the genera Clavaria, Cortinarius, and Mycena. Only a minor proportion of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be annotated as ErM-forming fungi. This indicates that C. tetragona may be forming mycorrhizal symbioses with typically ECM-forming fungi, although no characteristic ECM root tips were observed. Previous studies have indicated that some saprophytic fungi may also be involved in biotrophic associations, but whether the saprotrophic fungi in the roots of C. tetragona are involved in biotrophic associations remains unclear. The need for more experimental and microscopy-based studies to reveal the nature of the fungal associations in C. tetragona roots is emphasized.

  15. Fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments associated with asphalt seeps at the Sao Paulo Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yuriko; Miura, Toshiko; Nishi, Shinro; Lima, Andre O.; Nakayama, Cristina; Pellizari, Vivian H.; Fujikura, Katsunori

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the fungal diversity in a total of 20 deep-sea sediment samples (of which 14 samples were associated with natural asphalt seeps and 6 samples were not associated) collected from two different sites at the Sao Paulo Plateau off Brazil by Ion Torrent PGM targeting ITS region of ribosomal RNA. Our results suggest that diverse fungi (113 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on clustering at 97% sequence similarity assigned into 9 classes and 31 genus) are present in deep-sea sediment samples collected at the Sao Paulo Plateau, dominated by Ascomycota (74.3%), followed by Basidiomycota (11.5%), unidentified fungi (7.1%), and sequences with no affiliation to any organisms in the public database (7.1%). However, it was revealed that only three species, namely Penicillium sp., Cadophora malorum and Rhodosporidium diobovatum, were dominant, with the majority of OTUs remaining a minor community. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in major fungal community structure between the asphalt seep and non-asphalt seep sites, despite the presence of mass hydrocarbon deposits and the high amount of macro organisms surrounding the asphalt seeps. However, there were some differences in the minor fungal communities, with possible asphalt degrading fungi present specifically in the asphalt seep sites. In contrast, some differences were found between the two different sampling sites. Classification of OTUs revealed that only 47 (41.6%) fungal OTUs exhibited >97% sequence similarity, in comparison with pre-existing ITS sequences in public databases, indicating that a majority of deep-sea inhabiting fungal taxa still remain undescribed. Although our knowledge on fungi and their role in deep-sea environments is still limited and scarce, this study increases our understanding of fungal diversity and community structure in deep-sea environments.

  16. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial Taxa Distribution Is Associated with Ecological Trophic Cascades along an Elevation Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Wang, Zhirui; Wang, Xue; Ye, Ji; Wang, Xugao; DeBruyn, Jennifer M.; Feng, Xue; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The elevational pattern of soil microbial diversity along mountain slopes has received considerable interest over the last decade. An increasing amount of taxonomic data on soil microbial community composition along elevation gradients have been collected, however the trophic patterns and environmental drivers of elevational changes remain largely unclear. Here, we examined the distribution patterns of major soil bacterial and fungal taxa along the northern slope of Changbai Mountain, Northeast China, at five typical vegetation types located between 740 and 2,691 m above sea level. Elevational patterns of the relative abundance of specific microbial taxa could be partially explained by the oligotrophic-copiotrophic theory. Specifically, two dark-coniferous forests, located at mid-elevation sites, were considered to be oligotrophic habitats, with relatively higher soil C/N ratio and NH4+-N concentrations. As expected, oligotrophic microbial taxa, belonging to the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes, and fungal phylum Basidiomycota, were predominant in the two dark-coniferous forests, exhibiting a mid-elevation maximum pattern. In contrast, the broad leaf-Korean pine mixed forest located at the foot of the mountain, Betula ermanii-dominated forest located below the tree line, and alpine tundra at the highest elevation were considered more copiotrophic habitats, characterized by higher substrate-induced-respiration rates and NO3--N concentrations. Microbial taxa considered to be so called copiotrophic members, such as bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and fungal phylum Ascomycota, were relatively abundant in these locations, resulting in a mid-elevation minimum pattern. At finer taxonomic levels, the two most abundant proteobacterial classes, alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria, along with Acidobacteria Gp1, 2, 3, 15, and the Basidiomycotal class of Tremellomycetes were classified with the copiotrophic group. Gamma- and delta

  18. Microbial Taxa Distribution Is Associated with Ecological Trophic Cascades along an Elevation Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The elevational pattern of soil microbial diversity along mountain slopes has received considerable interest over the last decade. An increasing amount of taxonomic data on soil microbial community composition along elevation gradients have been collected, however the trophic patterns and environmental drivers of elevational changes remain largely unclear. Here, we examined the distribution patterns of major soil bacterial and fungal taxa along the northern slope of Changbai Mountain, Northeast China, at five typical vegetation types located between 740 and 2,691 m above sea level. Elevational patterns of the relative abundance of specific microbial taxa could be partially explained by the oligotrophic-copiotrophic theory. Specifically, two dark-coniferous forests, located at mid-elevation sites, were considered to be oligotrophic habitats, with relatively higher soil C/N ratio and NH4+-N concentrations. As expected, oligotrophic microbial taxa, belonging to the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes, and fungal phylum Basidiomycota, were predominant in the two dark-coniferous forests, exhibiting a mid-elevation maximum pattern. In contrast, the broad leaf-Korean pine mixed forest located at the foot of the mountain, Betula ermanii-dominated forest located below the tree line, and alpine tundra at the highest elevation were considered more copiotrophic habitats, characterized by higher substrate-induced-respiration rates and NO3--N concentrations. Microbial taxa considered to be so called copiotrophic members, such as bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and fungal phylum Ascomycota, were relatively abundant in these locations, resulting in a mid-elevation minimum pattern. At finer taxonomic levels, the two most abundant proteobacterial classes, alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria, along with Acidobacteria Gp1, 2, 3, 15, and the Basidiomycotal class of Tremellomycetes were classified with the copiotrophic group. Gamma- and

  19. Diversity, taxonomic composition, and functional aspects of fungal communities in living, senesced, and fallen leaves at five sites across North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U'Ren, Jana M; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    . Within Dothideomycetes, activity differed significantly between fungi from living vs. non-living leaves, but such differences were not observed in Sordariomycetes. Although some fungi with endophytic life stages clearly persist for periods of time in leaves after senescence and incorporation into leaf litter, our sampling across diverse biomes and host lineages detected consistent differences between fungal assemblages in living vs. non-living leaves, reflecting incursion by fungi from the leaf exterior after leaf death and as leaves begin to decompose. However, fungi found only in living leaves do not differ consistently in cellulolytic activity from those fungi detected thus far only in dead leaves. Future analyses should consider Basidiomycota in addition to the Ascomycota fungi evaluated here, and should explore more dimensions of functional traits and persistence to further define the endophytism-to-saprotrophy continuum.

  20. A novel glucose dehydrogenase from the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus: production in Aspergillus niger and physicochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piumi, François; Levasseur, Anthony; Navarro, David; Zhou, Simeng; Mathieu, Yann; Ropartz, David; Ludwig, Roland; Faulds, Craig B; Record, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Data on glucose dehydrogenases (GDHs) are scarce and availability of these enzymes for application purposes is limited. This paper describes a new GDH from the fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CIRM BRFM 137 that is the first reported GDH from a white-rot fungus belonging to the Basidiomycota. The enzyme was recombinantly produced in Aspergillus niger, a well-known fungal host producing an array of homologous or heterologous enzymes for industrial applications. The full-length gene that encodes GDH from P. cinnabarinus (PcGDH) consists of 2,425 bp and codes for a deduced protein of 620 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 62.5 kDa. The corresponding complementary DNA was cloned and placed under the control of the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The signal peptide of the glucoamylase prepro sequence of A. niger was used to target PcGDH secretion into the culture medium, achieving a yield of 640 mg L(-1), which is tenfold higher than any other reported value. The recombinant PcGDH was purified twofold to homogeneity in a one-step procedure with a 41 % recovery using a Ni Sepharose column. The identity of the recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunodetection using western blot analysis and N-terminal sequencing. The molecular mass of the native PcGDH was 130 kDa, suggesting a homodimeric form. Optimal pH and temperature were found to be similar (5.5 and 60 °C, respectively) to those determined for the previously characterized GDH, i.e., from Glomerella cingulata. However PcGDH exhibits a lower catalytic efficiency of 67 M(-1) s(-1) toward glucose. This substrate is by far the preferred substrate, which constitutes an advantage over other sugar oxidases in the case of blood glucose monitoring. The substrate-binding domain of PcGDH turns out to be conserved as compared to other glucose-methanol-choline (GMCs) oxidoreductases. In addition, the ability of PcGDH to reduce oxidized quinones or radical

  1. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Xu, Xuexue; Liu, Yuhui; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK); flat plot with mulch (T1); on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2); on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3); on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4); and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5). NGS (Illumina) methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89%) in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%). The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella , whereas lower populations (1-2%) of Scutellinia , Cryphonectria , Acremonium , and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5) were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3), respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in

  2. Nitrogen Additions Increase the Diversity of Carbon Compounds Degraded by Fungi in Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, T. B.; Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    Boreal forest soils in North America harbor a large reservoir of organic C, and this region is increasingly exposed to long-range atmospheric N transport from Eurasia. By examining the responses of decomposers to N deposition in these forests, we hope to improve predictions of the fate of boreal carbon pools under global change. We tested the hypothesis that the functional diversity of decomposer fungi would increase under N fertilization in boreal forests where fungal growth was otherwise N-limited, owing to a reduction in competitive exclusion of fungal groups. We collected soil and leaf litter from three Alaskan sites that represent different successional stages at 5, 17, or 80 years following severe forest fire. Each site had been exposed for two years to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization in a factorial design, with four plots per treatment. Nutrient limitation of fungal growth varied depending on successional stage. The standing hyphal length of decomposer fungi in soil (i.e. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) responded to neither N nor P in the 5-year old site, increased under N fertilization in the 17-year old site, and increased where N and P was added simultaneously in the 80-year old site (site x N x P interaction: P = 0.001). We used BIOLOG microplates for filamentous fungi to obtain an index of the diversity of carbon use by decomposer fungi; each of 95 wells of these plates contains a different carbon-based compound, as well as a dye that changes color upon metabolism of the compound. Saline leaf litter extracts were mixed with fungal growth medium and then added to the microplates. The number of wells displaying metabolic activity was counted following incubation for five days. We found that N fertilization raised the average number of positive wells per plate from 14 to 27 (P = 0.012), with no significant differences in responses among sites. Phosphorus additions did not alter functional diversity of fungi in any site. Since increases in functional

  3. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Wei, Jiajie; Caster, Stephen Z; Smith, Kristina M; Michel, Audrey M; Zhang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E; Freitag, Michael; Dunlap, Jay C; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Atkins, John F; Sachs, Matthew S

    2017-06-27

    Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in its >700-nucleotide (nt) 5' leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5' region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5' conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs) in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression. IMPORTANCE There is a deepening and widening appreciation of the diverse roles of translation in controlling gene expression. A central fungal transcription factor, the best-studied example of which is Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4, is crucial for the response to amino acid limitation. Two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the GCN4 mRNA are critical for controlling GCN4 synthesis. We observed that two uORFs in the corresponding Neurospora crassa cpc-1 mRNA appear functionally analogous to the GCN4 uORFs. We also discovered that, surprisingly, unlike GCN4, the CPC1 coding sequence extends far

  4. Isolation and characterization of a quinclorac-degrading Actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. strain AH-B and its implication on microecology in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Zhe; Qi, Dan; Dong, Jianjiang; Ren, Liwei; Zhu, Qifa; Huang, Weiwei; Liu, Yongmin; Lu, Diannan

    2018-02-03

    Quinclorac, a highly selective auxin herbicide, is widely used for controlling weeds in rice field. However, the residual quinclorac is toxic to many crops, vegetables, and aquatic animals, resulting in one of the major problems in crop rotation. Here, we investigated the degradation of quinclorac by strain AH-B, which was isolated from long-term quinclorac-contaminated soil using continuous circulating fluidized bed reactor and subjected to atmospheric and room temperature plasma mutation. Morphological examination, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain AH-B was Streptomyces sp. The quinclorac degradation efficiency of AH-B in liquid medium was 97.2% after 18 days when the initial quinclorac concentration was 20 mg L -1 . The degradation products were 3-chloro-7-methoxy-8-quinoline-carboxylic, 3-chloro-7-methyl-8-quinoline-carboxylic, 3-chloro-7-oxyethyl-8-quinoline-carboxylic, and 3,7-dichloro-6-methyl-8-quinoline-carboxylic. The inoculum size, initial quinclorac concentration, pH, and temperature were found to affect quinclorac degradation efficiency of AH-B. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that quinclorac degradation by AH-B produced many products. In soil with initial quinclorac content of 1 mg kg -1 dry soil, addition of AH-B resulted in 87.5% quinclorac degradation after 42 days, while that in the control (without AH-B) was 22.4%. Furthermore, microecological analysis using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA geneshowed that some bacterial species, such as Bacterioides and Proteobacteria, could survive in quinclorac-contaminated soil, while some bacteria, such as Firmicutes, were very sensitive to quinclorac. Besides, some fungal species, such as Basidiomycota, could also survive quinclorac-contamination. After 42 days, the diversity of bacteria and fungi in soil treated with AH-B was higher than that in the control, implying that

  5. Friend or foe? Evolutionary history of glycoside hydrolase family 32 genes encoding for sucrolytic activity in fungi and its implications for plant-fungal symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Timothy Y

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many fungi are obligate biotrophs of plants, growing in live plant tissues, gaining direct access to recently photosynthesized carbon. Photosynthate within plants is transported from source to sink tissues as sucrose, which is hydrolyzed by plant glycosyl hydrolase family 32 enzymes (GH32 into its constituent monosaccharides to meet plant cellular demands. A number of plant pathogenic fungi also use GH32 enzymes to access plant-derived sucrose, but less is known about the sucrose utilization ability of mutualistic and commensal plant biotrophic fungi, such as mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. The aim of this study was to explore the distribution and abundance of GH32 genes in fungi to understand how sucrose utilization is structured within and among major ecological guilds and evolutionary lineages. Using bioinformatic and PCR-based analyses, we tested for GH32 gene presence in all available fungal genomes and an additional 149 species representing a broad phylogenetic and ecological range of biotrophic fungi. Results We detected 9 lineages of GH32 genes in fungi, 4 of which we describe for the first time. GH32 gene number in fungal genomes ranged from 0–12. Ancestral state reconstruction of GH32 gene abundance showed a strong correlation with nutritional mode, and gene family expansion was observed in several clades of pathogenic filamentous Ascomycota species. GH32 gene number was negatively correlated with animal pathogenicity and positively correlated with plant biotrophy, with the notable exception of mycorrhizal taxa. Few mycorrhizal species were found to have GH32 genes as compared to other guilds of plant-associated fungi, such as pathogens, endophytes and lichen-forming fungi. GH32 genes were also more prevalent in the Ascomycota than in the Basidiomycota. Conclusion We found a strong signature of both ecological strategy and phylogeny on GH32 gene number in fungi. These data suggest that plant biotrophic fungi

  6. Phylogenetic relationships in Cortinarius, section Calochroi, inferred from nuclear DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammirati Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Section Calochroi is one of the most species-rich lineages in the genus Cortinarius (Agaricales, Basidiomycota and is widely distributed across boreo-nemoral areas, with some extensions into meridional zones. Previous phylogenetic studies of Calochroi (incl. section Fulvi have been geographically restricted; therefore, phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within this lineage at a global scale have been largely unknown. In this study, we obtained DNA sequences from a nearly complete taxon sampling of known species from Europe, Central America and North America. We inferred intra- and interspecific phylogenetic relationships as well as major morphological evolutionary trends within section Calochroi based on 576 ITS sequences, 230 ITS + 5.8S + D1/D2 sequences, and a combined dataset of ITS + 5.8S + D1/D2 and RPB1 sequences of a representative subsampling of 58 species. Results More than 100 species were identified by integrating DNA sequences with morphological, macrochemical and ecological data. Cortinarius section Calochroi was consistently resolved with high branch support into at least seven major lineages: Calochroi, Caroviolacei, Dibaphi, Elegantiores, Napi, Pseudoglaucopodes and Splendentes; whereas Rufoolivacei and Sulfurini appeared polyphyletic. A close relationship between Dibaphi, Elegantiores, Napi and Splendentes was consistently supported. Combinations of specific morphological, pigmentation and molecular characters appear useful in circumscribing clades. Conclusion Our analyses demonstrate that Calochroi is an exclusively northern hemispheric lineage, where species follow their host trees throughout their natural ranges within and across continents. Results of this study contribute substantially to defining European species in this group and will help to either identify or to name new species occurring across the northern hemisphere. Major groupings are in partial agreement with earlier morphology

  7. Phylogenetic relationships in Cortinarius, section Calochroi, inferred from nuclear DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica, Sigisfredo; Weiß, Michael; Oertel, Bernhard; Ammirati, Joseph; Oberwinkler, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Background Section Calochroi is one of the most species-rich lineages in the genus Cortinarius (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) and is widely distributed across boreo-nemoral areas, with some extensions into meridional zones. Previous phylogenetic studies of Calochroi (incl. section Fulvi) have been geographically restricted; therefore, phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within this lineage at a global scale have been largely unknown. In this study, we obtained DNA sequences from a nearly complete taxon sampling of known species from Europe, Central America and North America. We inferred intra- and interspecific phylogenetic relationships as well as major morphological evolutionary trends within section Calochroi based on 576 ITS sequences, 230 ITS + 5.8S + D1/D2 sequences, and a combined dataset of ITS + 5.8S + D1/D2 and RPB1 sequences of a representative subsampling of 58 species. Results More than 100 species were identified by integrating DNA sequences with morphological, macrochemical and ecological data. Cortinarius section Calochroi was consistently resolved with high branch support into at least seven major lineages: Calochroi, Caroviolacei, Dibaphi, Elegantiores, Napi, Pseudoglaucopodes and Splendentes; whereas Rufoolivacei and Sulfurini appeared polyphyletic. A close relationship between Dibaphi, Elegantiores, Napi and Splendentes was consistently supported. Combinations of specific morphological, pigmentation and molecular characters appear useful in circumscribing clades. Conclusion Our analyses demonstrate that Calochroi is an exclusively northern hemispheric lineage, where species follow their host trees throughout their natural ranges within and across continents. Results of this study contribute substantially to defining European species in this group and will help to either identify or to name new species occurring across the northern hemisphere. Major groupings are in partial agreement with earlier morphology-based and molecular phylogenetic

  8. Arbuscular and Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Associated with the Invasive Brazilian Pepper Tree (Schinus terebinthifolius) and Two Native Plants in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Karim; Esiobu, Nwadiuto

    2017-01-01

    The potential role of soil fungi in the invasion of the Brazilian pepper tree ( Schinus terebinthifolius -BP) in Florida is not known; although the low biotic resistance of Florida soils is often invoked to explain the prevalence of many invasive species. To gain an initial insight into BP's mycorrhizal associations, this study examined the rhizobiome of BP and two native plants ( Hamelia patens and Bidens alba ) across six locations. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with the roots of the target plants and bulk soil was characterized by spore morphotyping. Sequence analysis of metagenomic DNA from lateral roots/rhizosphere of BP ( n = 52) and a native shrub H. patens ( n = 37) on the same parcel yielded other fungal associates. Overall, the total population of AMF associated with BP was about two folds greater than that of the two native plants ( p = 0.0001) growing on the same site. The dominant AMF under Schinus were members of the common Glomus and Rhizophagus spp. By contrast, the most prevalent AMF in the bulk soil and rhizosphere of the two Florida native plants, Acaulospora spp (29%) was sharply diminished (9%) under BP rhizosphere. Analysis of the ITS2 sequences also showed that Schinus rhizosphere had a high relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi (76.5%) compared to the native H. patens (2.6%), with the species Lactifluus hygrophoroides (Basidiomycota) being the most prevalent at 61.5% ( p < 0.05). Unlike the native plants where pathogenic fungi like Phyllosticta sp., Phoma sp., and Neofusicoccum andium were present (8.1% for H. patens ), only one potentially pathogenic fungal taxon was detected (3.9%) under BP. The striking disparity in the relative abundance of AMF and other fungal types between BP and the native species is quite significant. Fungal symbionts could aide plant invasion via resource-use efficiency and other poorly defined mechanisms of protection from pathogens in their invaded range. This report exposes a potentially

  9. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  10. Energy balance associated with the degradation of lignocellulosic material by white-rot and brown-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Delphine; Bédu, Hélène; Buée, Marc; Kohler, Annegret; Goodell, Barry; Gelhaye, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Forest soils cover about 30% of terrestrial area and comprise between 50 and 80% of the global stock of soil organic carbon (SOC). The major precursor for this forest SOC is lignocellulosic material, which is made of polysaccharides and lignin. Lignin has traditionally been considered as a recalcitrant polymer that hinders access to the much more labile structural polysaccharides. This view appears to be partly incorrect from a microbiology perspective yet, as substrate alteration depends on the metabolic potential of decomposers. In forest ecosystems the wood-rotting Basidiomycota fungi have developed two different strategies to attack the structure of lignin and gain access to structural polysaccharides. White-rot fungi degrade all components of plant cell walls, including lignin, using enzymatic systems. Brown-rot fungi do not remove lignin. They generate oxygen-derived free radicals, such as the hydroxyl radical produced by the Fenton reaction, that disrupt the lignin polymer and depolymerize polysaccharides which then diffuse out to where the enzymes are located The objective of this study was to develop a model to investigate whether the lignin relative persistence could be related to the energetic advantage of brown-rot degradative pathway in comparison to white-rot degradative pathway. The model simulates the changes in substrate composition over time, and determines the energy gained from the conversion of the lost substrate into CO2. The energy cost for the production of enzymes involved in substrate alteration is assessed using information derived from genome and secretome analysis. For brown-rot fungus specifically, the energy cost related to the production of OH radicals is also included. The model was run, using data from the literature on populous wood degradation by Trametes versicolor, a white-rot fungus, and Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown-rot fungus. It demonstrates that the brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) was more efficient than the white

  11. Antifungal activity of macrofungi extracts on phytopathogenic fungal strains of genera Fusarium sp. and Alternaria sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spremo Nemanja R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, intensive application of synthetic fungicides in the agricultural crop protection practice caused growing concern for the existence of toxic chemical residues in food as well as in the whole environment. Instead of using synthetic fungicides, it is suggested that crop protection be carried out by using preparations based on compounds of natural origin (secondary metabolites of plants or microorganisms, including macrofungi from Basidiomycota as biological control agents. The potential of macrofungal species as biocontrol agents was analyzed in this investigation of eight autochthonous species from different locations in Serbia. Both the terricolous species: Coprinus comatus, Coprinellus truncorum, Amanita strobiliformis, Hydnum repandum and the lignicolous species: Flammulina velutipes, Stereum subtomentosum, Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera adusta were examined, with an aim to detect some novel sources of antifungal agents. This study surveyed antifungal activity of selected macrofungal extracts (MeOH, EtOH and CHCl3 against phytopathogenic Fusarium and Alternaria strains isolated from garlic, soybean and rice: F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. proliferatum, F. graminearum and A. padwickii. Microdilution method in 96 well microplates was applied for the estimation of antifungal effects of macrofungi extracts in the range from 24.75 to 198.00 mg/ml and determination of minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC. EtOH extract of mychorhizal species H. repandum showed antifungal activity against all analyzed phytopathogenic strains, with the strongest effect on Fusarium strains (MIC 24.75 mg/ml; MFC 24.75 mg/ml. Among others, MeOH extracts of S. subtomentosum and C. micaceus showed similar effects while only B. adusta showed slight effect on Fusarium strains (MIC 24.75-99.00 mg/ml; MFC 24.75-99.00 mg/ml and none effect on A. padwickii. The obtained results indicate the possibility of using

  12. Microbial monitoring in treated stone at the Royal Chapel of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Pinar, Guadalupe; González-Muñoz, Maria Theresa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Biomineralization processes have been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain). In few years, this conservation treatment has gained worth attention as environmentally friendly methodology for protection and consolidation of limestone because of the compatibilities shown between the new calcium carbonate cement and the original stone substrate. Moreover, the success of this approach may be related to the diversity of the microbiota inhabiting the stone and activated upon the biotreatment application and throughout the time. González-Muñoz et al. (2008) proposed a nutritional solution that activate among the bacteria inhabiting the stone those with carbonatogenic activity. In this study, a long-term (one, two and three years) monitoring of the microbiota present on the treated and untreated stones was done using a molecular strategy, including total DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA sequences, construction of clone libraries and fingerprinting by DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA revealed the dominant occurrence of members of Actinobacteria (44.20%), Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24%) and Chloroflexi (25.56%) after one year of the biotreatment. Whereas after two years, members of Cyanobacteria (22.10%) appeared and three years after, the microbiota consisted of only Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria with approximately the same percentage in comparison with the untreated stones, dominated exclusively by Actinobacteria (100%). Fungal diversity followed the same dynamic as bacterial diversity being Ascomicota the predominant order before treatment. After one year, members of Basidiomycota and Viridiplantae appeared on the stone while two years after, the Viridiplantae dominated with a percentage of 84.77%. Finally, three years after the treatment, fungi population started to stabilize again and Ascomicota predominated next to 16.67% of

  13. Characterization of the bacterial and fungal microbiome in indoor dust and outdoor air samples: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Blake; Zhou, Yanjiao; Bautista, Eddy J; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Silverman, Frances; Muilenberg, Michael; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Weinstock, George; Sodergren, Erica; Gold, Diane R; Sordillo, Joanne E

    2016-06-15

    Environmental microbes have been associated with both protective and adverse health effects in children and adults. Epidemiological studies often rely on broad biomarkers of microbial exposure (i.e. endotoxin, 1 → 3-beta-d-glucan), but fail to identify the taxonomic composition of the microbial community. Our aim was to characterize the bacterial and fungal microbiome in different types of environmental samples collected in studies of human health effects. We determined the composition of microbial communities present in home, school and outdoor air samples by amplifying and sequencing regions of rRNA genes from bacteria (16S) and fungi (18S and ITS). Samples for this pilot study included indoor settled dust (from both a Boston area birth cohort study on Home Allergens and Asthma (HAA) (n = 12) and a study of school exposures and asthma symptoms (SICAS) (n = 1)), as well as fine and coarse concentrated outdoor ambient particulate (CAP) samples (n = 9). Sequencing of amplified 16S, 18S, and ITS regions was performed on the Roche-454 Life Sciences Titanium pyrosequencing platform. Indoor dust samples were dominated by Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria); the most abundant bacterial genera were those related to human flora (Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Lactobacillus). Outdoor CAPs were dominated by Gram-negative Proteobacteria from water and soil sources, in particular the genera Acidovorax, and Brevundimonas (which were present at very low levels or entirely absent in indoor dust). Phylum-level fungal distributions identified by 18S or ITS regions showed very similar findings: a predominance of Ascomycota in indoor dust and Basidiomycota in outdoor CAPs. ITS sequencing of fungal genera in indoor dust showed significant proportions of Aureobasidium and Leptosphaerulina along with some contribution from Cryptococcus, Epicoccum, Aspergillus and the human commensal Malassezia. ITS sequencing detected more than 70 fungal genera

  14. Characterization of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air by DNA sequence and restriction fragment analysis of ribosomal RNA genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, V. R.; Nowoisky, J. F.; Klose, M.; Conrad, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2007-12-01

    This study explores the applicability of DNA analyses for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA) particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and total suspended particulates (TSP) have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze). From filter segments loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP) were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses. Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high-alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m-3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~108 haploid bacterial genomes or ~105 haploid human genomes, respectively). Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42) and some from Actinobacteria (10) and Firmicutes (1). The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3) and Basidiomycota (1), which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2) and moss spores (2), while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist). Over 80% of the 53 bacterial sequences could be matched to one of the 19 T-RF peaks found in the PM2.5 samples, but only 40% of the T-RF peaks

  15. Molecular Tools for Monitoring the Ecological Sustainability of a Stone Bio-Consolidation Treatment at the Royal Chapel, Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomineralization processes have recently been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain). While this promising method has demonstrated its efficacy regarding strengthening of the stone, little is known about its ecological sustainability. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report molecular monitoring of the stone-autochthonous microbiota before and at 5, 12 and 30 months after the bio-consolidation treatment (medium/long-term monitoring), employing the well-known molecular strategy of DGGE analyses. Before the bio-consolidation treatment, the bacterial diversity showed the exclusive dominance of Actinobacteria (100%), which decreased in the community (44.2%) after 5 months, and Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24%) and Chloroflexi (25.56%) appeared. After 12 months, Gamma-proteobacteria vanished from the community and Cyanobacteria (22.1%) appeared and remained dominant after thirty months, when the microbiota consisted of Actinobacteria (42.2%) and Cyanobacteria (57.8%) only. Fungal diversity showed that the Ascomycota phylum was dominant before treatment (100%), while, after five months, Basidiomycota (6.38%) appeared on the stone, and vanished again after twelve months. Thirty months after the treatment, the fungal population started to stabilize and Ascomycota dominated on the stone (83.33%) once again. Members of green algae (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae) appeared on the stone at 5, 12 and 30 months after the treatment and accounted for 4.25%, 84.77% and 16.77%, respectively. Conclusions The results clearly show that, although a temporary shift in the bacterial and fungal diversity was observed during the first five months, most probably promoted by the application of the bio-consolidation treatment, the microbiota tends to regain its initial stability in a few months. Thus, the treatment does not seem to have any negative side effects on the stone-autochthonous microbiota over that time

  16. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-06-29

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  17. Ectomycorrhizal lifestyle in fungi: global diversity, distribution, and evolution of phylogenetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedersoo, Leho; May, Tom W; Smith, Matthew E

    2010-04-01

    The ectomycorrhizal (EcM) symbiosis involves a large number of plant and fungal taxa worldwide. During studies on EcM diversity, numerous misidentifications, and contradictory reports on EcM status have been published. This review aims to: (1) critically assess the current knowledge of the fungi involved in the EcM by integrating data from axenic synthesis trials, anatomical, molecular, and isotope studies; (2) group these taxa into monophyletic lineages based on molecular sequence data and published phylogenies; (3) investigate the trophic status of sister taxa to EcM lineages; (4) highlight other potentially EcM taxa that lack both information on EcM status and DNA sequence data; (5) recover the main distribution patterns of the EcM fungal lineages in the world. Based on critically examining original reports, EcM lifestyle is proven in 162 fungal genera that are supplemented by two genera based on isotopic evidence and 52 genera based on phylogenetic data. Additionally, 33 genera are highlighted as potentially EcM based on habitat, although their EcM records and DNA sequence data are lacking. Molecular phylogenetic and identification studies suggest that EcM symbiosis has arisen independently and persisted at least 66 times in fungi, in the Basidiomycota, Ascomycota, and Zygomycota. The orders Pezizales, Agaricales, Helotiales, Boletales, and Cantharellales include the largest number of EcM fungal lineages. Regular updates of the EcM lineages and genera therein can be found at the UNITE homepage http://unite.ut.ee/EcM_lineages . The vast majority of EcM fungi evolved from humus and wood saprotrophic ancestors without any obvious reversals. Herbarium records from 11 major biogeographic regions revealed three main patterns in distribution of EcM lineages: (1) Austral; (2) Panglobal; (3) Holarctic (with or without some reports from the Austral or tropical realms). The holarctic regions host the largest number of EcM lineages; none are restricted to a tropical

  18. Correction: Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The version of this article published in BMC Genomics 2013, 14: 274, contains 9 unpublished genomes (Botryobasidium botryosum, Gymnopus luxurians, Hypholoma sublateritium, Jaapia argillacea, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Conidiobolus coronatus, Laccaria amethystina, Paxillus involutus, and P. rubicundulus) downloaded from JGI website. In this correction, we removed these genomes after discussion with editors and data producers whom we should have contacted before downloading these genomes. Removing these data did not alter the principle results and conclusions of our original work. The relevant Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6; and Table 1 have been revised. Additional files 1, 3, 4, and 5 were also revised. We would like to apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may have caused. Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 94 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed

  19. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota, which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. Results In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. Conclusion On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence

  20. Identification and analysis of candidate fungal tRNA 3'-end processing endonucleases tRNase Zs, homologs of the putative prostate cancer susceptibility protein ELAC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Wei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background tRNase Z is the endonuclease that is responsible for the 3'-end processing of tRNA precursors, a process essential for tRNA 3'-CCA addition and subsequent tRNA aminoacylation. Based on their sizes, tRNase Zs can be divided into the long (tRNase ZL and short (tRNase ZS forms. tRNase ZL is thought to have arisen from a tandem gene duplication of tRNase ZS with further sequence divergence. The species distribution of tRNase Z is complex. Fungi represent an evolutionarily diverse group of eukaryotes. The recent proliferation of fungal genome sequences provides an opportunity to explore the structural and functional diversity of eukaryotic tRNase Zs. Results We report a survey and analysis of candidate tRNase Zs in 84 completed fungal genomes, spanning a broad diversity of fungi. We find that tRNase ZL is present in all fungi we have examined, whereas tRNase ZS exists only in the fungal phyla Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota. Furthermore, we find that unlike the Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina, which contain a single tRNase ZL, Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts (Taphrinomycotina contain two tRNase ZLs encoded by two different tRNase ZL genes. These two tRNase ZLs are most likely localized to the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively, suggesting partitioning of tRNase Z function between two different tRNase ZLs in fission yeasts. The fungal tRNase Z phylogeny suggests that tRNase ZSs are ancestral to tRNase ZLs. Additionally, the evolutionary relationship of fungal tRNase ZLs is generally consistent with known phylogenetic relationships among the fungal species and supports tRNase ZL gene duplication in certain fungal taxa, including Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts. Analysis of tRNase Z protein sequences reveals putative atypical substrate binding domains in most fungal tRNase ZSs and in a subset of fungal tRNase ZLs. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of pseudo-substrate recognition and catalytic motifs at

  1. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhao Qin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK; flat plot with mulch (T1; on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2; on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3; on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4; and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5. NGS (Illumina methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89% in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%. The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella, whereas lower populations (1–2% of Scutellinia, Cryphonectria, Acremonium, and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5 were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3, respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in

  2. The Intestinal Mycobiota in Wild Zebrafish Comprises Mainly Dothideomycetes While Saccharomycetes Predominate in Their Laboratory-Reared Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhugouda Siriyappagouder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As an integral part of the resident microbial community of fish intestinal tract, the mycobiota is expected to play important roles in health and disease resistance of the host. The composition of the diverse fungal communities, which colonize the intestine, is greatly influenced by the host, their diet and geographic origin. Studies of fungal communities are rare and the majority of previous studies have relied on culture-based methods. In particular, fungal communities in fish are also poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to provide an in-depth overview of the intestinal mycobiota in a model fish species (zebrafish, Danio rerio and to determine differences in fungal composition between wild and captive specimens. We have profiled the intestinal mycobiota of wild-caught (Sharavati River, India, laboratory-reared (Bodø, Norway and wild-caught-laboratory-kept (Uttara, India zebrafish by sequencing the fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 region on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Wild fish were exposed to variable environmental factors, whereas both laboratory groups were kept in controlled conditions. There were also differences in husbandry practices at Bodø and Uttara, particularly diet. Zebrafish from Bodø were reared in the laboratory for over 10 generations, while wild-caught-laboratory-kept fish from Uttara were housed in the laboratory for only 2 months before sample collection. The intestine of zebrafish contained members of more than 15 fungal classes belonging to the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Fungal species richness and diversity distinguished the wild-caught and laboratory-reared zebrafish communities. Wild-caught zebrafish-associated mycobiota comprised mainly Dothideomycetes in contrast to their Saccharomycetes-dominated laboratory-reared counterparts. The predominant Saccharomycetes in laboratory-reared fish belonged to the saprotrophic guild. Another characteristic feature of laboratory-reared fish

  3. Microfungal oasis in an oligotrophic desert: diversity patterns and community structure in three freshwater systems of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Velez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB comprises several oligotrophic aquatic ecosystems limited by phosphorus. These aquatic systems are dominated by a high prokaryotic diversity, shaped by the stress of low nutrient supplies and interspecific competition. Although fungi constitute a diverse and important component of microbial diversity, the microfungal diversity in the CCB remains to be unveiled. With the aim to explore microfungal diversity and ecological patterns in this area, we present the first investigation analyzing cultivable taxa from sediment and water, as well as lignocellulolytic taxa obtained from incubated submerged plant debris, and wood panels in three contrasting freshwater systems in the CCB: Churince, Becerra and Pozas Rojas. We chose a culture-based approach to analyze sediment and water samples in order to obtain fungal cultures, providing opportunities for a posteriori studies, and the possibility of ex situ preservation of the diversity. We evaluated sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer including the 5.8 rDNA region for 126 isolates, revealing 37 OTUs. These OTUs were phylogenetically affiliated to several genera in the fungal phyla: Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Ascomycota. We recorded two OTUs with saline affinity, agreeing with previous findings on the prokaryotic communities with ancestral marine resemblances. All the studied systems showed moderate diversity levels, however discrepancies among the diversity indexes were observed, due to the occurrence of abundant taxa in the samples. Our results indicated that lignocellulolytic microfungal communities are dominated by transient fungal taxa, as resident species were not recorded perhaps as a result of the long-term strong competition with the highly adapted prokaryotic community. Moreover, the obtained microfungal taxa occurred mostly on the resident plant debris, rather than submerged wood panels, perhaps as a result of the high adaptation

  4. Correction: Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2014-01-03

    The version of this article published in BMC Genomics 2013, 14: 274, contains 9 unpublished genomes (Botryobasidium botryosum, Gymnopus luxurians, Hypholoma sublateritium, Jaapia argillacea, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Conidiobolus coronatus, Laccaria amethystina, Paxillus involutus, and P. rubicundulus) downloaded from JGI website. In this correction, we removed these genomes after discussion with editors and data producers whom we should have contacted before downloading these genomes. Removing these data did not alter the principle results and conclusions of our original work. The relevant Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6; and Table 1 have been revised. Additional files 1, 3, 4, and 5 were also revised. We would like to apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may have caused. Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 94 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH

  5. Molecular Tools for Monitoring the Ecological Sustainability of a Stone Bio-Consolidation Treatment at the Royal Chapel, Granada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadwa Jroundi

    Full Text Available Biomineralization processes have recently been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain. While this promising method has demonstrated its efficacy regarding strengthening of the stone, little is known about its ecological sustainability.Here, we report molecular monitoring of the stone-autochthonous microbiota before and at 5, 12 and 30 months after the bio-consolidation treatment (medium/long-term monitoring, employing the well-known molecular strategy of DGGE analyses. Before the bio-consolidation treatment, the bacterial diversity showed the exclusive dominance of Actinobacteria (100%, which decreased in the community (44.2% after 5 months, and Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24% and Chloroflexi (25.56% appeared. After 12 months, Gamma-proteobacteria vanished from the community and Cyanobacteria (22.1% appeared and remained dominant after thirty months, when the microbiota consisted of Actinobacteria (42.2% and Cyanobacteria (57.8% only. Fungal diversity showed that the Ascomycota phylum was dominant before treatment (100%, while, after five months, Basidiomycota (6.38% appeared on the stone, and vanished again after twelve months. Thirty months after the treatment, the fungal population started to stabilize and Ascomycota dominated on the stone (83.33% once again. Members of green algae (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae appeared on the stone at 5, 12 and 30 months after the treatment and accounted for 4.25%, 84.77% and 16.77%, respectively.The results clearly show that, although a temporary shift in the bacterial and fungal diversity was observed during the first five months, most probably promoted by the application of the bio-consolidation treatment, the microbiota tends to regain its initial stability in a few months. Thus, the treatment does not seem to have any negative side effects on the stone-autochthonous microbiota over that time. The molecular strategy employed here is suggested

  6. FORMULACIÓN DE GRÁNULOS BASES PARA LA INCORPORACIÓN DE INGREDIENTES ACTIVOS CON EFECTO BIOLÓGICO SOBRE EL HONGO SIMBIÓTICO CULTIVADO POR LAS HORMIGAS FORRAJERAS DEL GÉNERO Atta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ena Edith Herrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Las hormigas forrajeras (Atta spp. pueden destruir plantaciones completas de hortalizas y de otras plantas de importancia económica en América Tropical y Subtropical. Cortan el tejido de las plantas y lo transportan a nidos subterráneos, donde cultivan un hongo del Phylum basidiomycota, que es su alimento principal. En la actualidad, no se cuenta con una estrategia efectiva de manejo de esta plaga. La mayoría de productos disponibles comercialmente son muy poco efectivos, dejan residuos en el ambiente y tienen un precio alto para los pequeños agricultores. La presente investigación se propuso evaluar diferentes ingredientes en la preparación de granulados que presenten alto nivel de acarreo y potencial para la incorporación de ingredientes activos con efecto biológico contra el hongo simbiótico que cultivan las hormigas forrajeras. Se prepararon gránulos con diferentes combinaciones y concentraciones de excipientes o coadyuvantes. Además se evaluó citropulpa, extracto alcohólico de cáscaras de naranja y aceite de semillas de naranja, como atrayentes. A los mejores formulados se incorporó extracto de Azadirachta indica (neem, 3 cepas de Trichoderma spp., y levaduras en diferentes concentraciones, para comprobar la compatibilidad de las formulaciones con ingredientes activos. Se evaluó diferentes características de los gránulos como indicadores de viabilidad y estabilidad del formulado. Se encontró que los cebos formulados con citropulpa son capaces de mantener estable la acidez y, además, conservan la viabilidad de Trichoderma spp., y levaduras por más tiempo que los formulados elaborados con extracto alcohólico de cáscaras de naranja como atrayente. Además, el gránulo base con citropulpa presentó un costo de producción más bajo. Se concluye que el formulado con citropulpa como atrayente es una base apropiada para la incorporación de ingredientes activos con efecto biológico contra el hongo simbiótico y tiene

  7. Friend or foe? Evolutionary history of glycoside hydrolase family 32 genes encoding for sucrolytic activity in fungi and its implications for plant-fungal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrent, Jeri Lynn; James, Timothy Y; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Taylor, Andrew Fs

    2009-06-30

    Many fungi are obligate biotrophs of plants, growing in live plant tissues, gaining direct access to recently photosynthesized carbon. Photosynthate within plants is transported from source to sink tissues as sucrose, which is hydrolyzed by plant glycosyl hydrolase family 32 enzymes (GH32) into its constituent monosaccharides to meet plant cellular demands. A number of plant pathogenic fungi also use GH32 enzymes to access plant-derived sucrose, but less is known about the sucrose utilization ability of mutualistic and commensal plant biotrophic fungi, such as mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. The aim of this study was to explore the distribution and abundance of GH32 genes in fungi to understand how sucrose utilization is structured within and among major ecological guilds and evolutionary lineages. Using bioinformatic and PCR-based analyses, we tested for GH32 gene presence in all available fungal genomes and an additional 149 species representing a broad phylogenetic and ecological range of biotrophic fungi. We detected 9 lineages of GH32 genes in fungi, 4 of which we describe for the first time. GH32 gene number in fungal genomes ranged from 0-12. Ancestral state reconstruction of GH32 gene abundance showed a strong correlation with nutritional mode, and gene family expansion was observed in several clades of pathogenic filamentous Ascomycota species. GH32 gene number was negatively correlated with animal pathogenicity and positively correlated with plant biotrophy, with the notable exception of mycorrhizal taxa. Few mycorrhizal species were found to have GH32 genes as compared to other guilds of plant-associated fungi, such as pathogens, endophytes and lichen-forming fungi. GH32 genes were also more prevalent in the Ascomycota than in the Basidiomycota. We found a strong signature of both ecological strategy and phylogeny on GH32 gene number in fungi. These data suggest that plant biotrophic fungi exhibit a wide range of ability to access plant

  8. Gene expression and proteomic analysis of the formation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi appressoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Christine L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phakopsora pachyrhizi is an obligate fungal pathogen causing Asian soybean rust (ASR. A dual approach was taken to examine the molecular and biochemical processes occurring during the development of appressoria, specialized infection structures by which P. pachyrhizi invades a host plant. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH was utilized to generate a cDNA library enriched for transcripts expressed during appressoria formation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy analysis were used to generate a partial proteome of proteins present during appressoria formation. Results Sequence analysis of 1133 expressed sequence tags (ESTs revealed 238 non-redundant ESTs, of which 53% had putative identities assigned. Twenty-nine of the non-redundant ESTs were found to be specific to the appressoria-enriched cDNA library, and did not occur in a previously constructed germinated urediniospore cDNA library. Analysis of proteins against a custom database of the appressoria-enriched ESTs plus Basidiomycota EST sequences available from NCBI revealed 256 proteins. Fifty-nine of these proteins were not previously identified in a partial proteome of P. pachyrhizi germinated urediniospores. Genes and proteins identified fell into functional categories of metabolism, cell cycle and DNA processing, protein fate, cellular transport, cellular communication and signal transduction, and cell rescue. However, 38% of ESTs and 24% of proteins matched only to hypothetical proteins of unknown function, or showed no similarity to sequences in the current NCBI database. Three novel Phakopsora genes were identified from the cDNA library along with six potentially rust-specific genes. Protein analysis revealed eight proteins of unknown function, which possessed classic secretion signals. Two of the extracellular proteins are reported as potential effector proteins. Conclusions Several genes and proteins were identified that are expressed

  9. Field Observations of Bioaerosols: What We've Learned from Fluorescence, Genetic, and Microscopic Techniques (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Després, V. R.; Elbert, W.; Sinha, B.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    biodiversity [3,4]. Filters collected at a semi-urban site in Germany for approximately one year determined that ~34% of the airborne fungal species were Ascomycota (sac fungi), 64% were Basidiomycota (club fungi), and that their relative proportions changed seasonally. Numerical simulations with state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry and climate models are helping to unravel the regional and global distribution and transport of PBA [5]. The atmospheric abundance and environmental effects of PBA are particularly pronounced in tropical regions, where both the biological activity at the Earth’s surface and the physicochemical processes in the atmosphere are particularly intense and important for the Earth system and global climate. If climate change and human activities lead to changes in the abundance and properties of PBA, this might influence the hydrological cycle and provide a feedback to climate change [1]. [1] Elbert et al. (2007) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569 - 4588. [2] Huffman et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 17705 - 17751. [3] Després et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1127-1141. [4] Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2009) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 106, 12814 - 12819. [5] Burrows et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 10829 - 10881.

  10. STUDY OF THE ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF CERTAIN SAPROPHYTIC OBLIGATE MARINE FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyuzhnaya O.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Today promising area of the development and introduction of new antimicrobial agents is to search for new antibiotics from natural sources, namely among marine organisms - microscopic fungi. Such saprophytic fungi as Ascomycota (families Arenariomyces, Ceriosporopsis, Corollospora, Halosphaeria and Basidiomycota (family Nia, which are widely spreaded in Ukraine (salty estuaries and the coast of the Black Sea, are the objects of the study of this work. These types of marine organisms have been provided by the Odessa Branch of the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas after collecting samples of water, sediment, cellulose substrates and subsequent isolation and obtain pure cultures by accumulation in the form fruiting bodies of Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes - ascocarps and basidiocarps that can be stored 3-5 months in sterile seawater. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antimicrobial properties of saprophytic fungi obligate marine, which are characteristic for residents in Ukraine, namely the Black Sea. Materials and methods. At this stage the study of antimicrobial activity was performed by agar diffusion method and method of cocultivation of marine fungi with test strains in liquid culture medium. We have used reference strains of microorganisms: Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 6896, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and opportunistic fungus Candida albicans ATCC 885-653. Results and Discussion. Determination of antimicrobial activity by agar diffusion method showed that all samples had antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive test strains (S. aureus and B. subtilis, effect for the Gramnegative bacteria (E. coli, P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa was much smaller or non-existent, and it isn’t observed against C. albicans (exclusion Nia vibrissa with zone of growth inhibition – 6.2 mm. The results of the counting of cells test strains

  11. Bacterial and fungal community composition and functioning of two different peatlands in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Jianqing; Bu, Zhaojun; Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are important carbon sinks which store one third of the global soil carbon ( 550 Gt) with only 3% of the land surface. The slow rate of organic matter decomposition associated with low microbial diversity and limited functioning under cold, acidic and anoxic condition is of critical importance in controlling biogeochemical cycles in northern peatlands. To evaluate the variation in microbial community composition and functionality can advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the biogeochemical processes and interactions. However, there is still a lack of information for Chinese peatlands. Here, we sampled peat profiles at three different depths (10-20, 30-40 and 60-70 cm) from two typical peatlands in China: a rich fen in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) and a poor fen in the Changbai Mountains (CBM). We investigated the bacterial (16S rRNA) and fungal (ITS2) community composition and diversity with high-throughput sequencing and predicted the metagenome functioning with PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States). The results showed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were the most abundant bacterial phyla in the upper peat layer (10-20 cm) for both sites, with increasing abundance of Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes down to the saturated zone (60-70 cm in CMB; 30-40 and 60-70 cm in QTP). For fungi, Ascomycota, Ciliophora and Basidiomycota were the most abundant phyla in both sites, with decreasing Ciliophora abundance down to the saturated zone. The α-diversity of both bacterial and fungal showed a decreasing trend with depth in QTP, with the largest diversity occurring at the depth of 30-40 cm in CMB. Regardless of sampling sites, the bacterial communities at the depth of 60-70 cm were more similar than the other depths. The fungal community was clustered into two groups, corresponding to two sampling sites. The variation in fungal community with depth was larger in QTP than in

  12. Characterization of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air by DNA sequence and restriction fragment analysis of ribosomal RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Després

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the applicability of DNA analyses for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 and total suspended particulates (TSP have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze.

    From filter segments loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses.

    Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high-alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m−3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~108 haploid bacterial genomes or ~105 haploid human genomes, respectively.

    Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42 and some from Actinobacteria (10 and Firmicutes (1. The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3 and Basidiomycota (1, which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2 and moss spores (2, while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist.

  13. Microbial degradation of a metal organic biocide in soils; Mikrobieller Abbau eines im Holzschutz verwendeten metallorganischen Biozids im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Desiree

    2010-06-17

    -fingerprinting technique. Shifts in the bacterial community structure were analyzed by correspondence analysis to explore the effect of WP and incubation time on the microbial community patterns. Bacterial and eukaryotic community structure differed significant between samples with Cu-Amine treated samples and Cu-HDO treated samples. To identify abundant eukaryotic community members a cloning and sequencing approach was carried out. Only few fungal sequences were obtained of the eukaryotic sequence diversity in the interface of wood and soil, which were affiliated to pronounced shifts in the eukaryotic community structure along the incubation time. One of these was the white-rotter Sphaerobolus stellatus (basidiomycota) and the mold-rotter Lecytophora multabilis (ascomycota). The dominant eukaryotic community members were affiliated to the phyla Alveolata, Disicicrista, Amoebozoa, Arthropoda or Nematoda. However, the majority of these phyla are known to have a bacteriovorious lifestyle and are not able to degrade or metabolize wood, WP or WP ingredients. This finding suggests that the majority of eukaryotes grazes on the bacterial population and is rarely involved in Cu-HDO degradation. In conclusion, a defined bacterial population is involved in Cu-HDO degradation and both the bacterial and eukaryotic community was significantly directly and indirectly affected by the presence of Cu-HDO. (orig.)

  14. Stem rust of small grains and grasses caused by Puccinia graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Kurt J; Szabo, Les J

    2005-03-01

    SUMMARY Stem rust has been a serious disease of wheat, barley, oat and rye, as well as various important grasses including timothy, tall fescue and perennial ryegrass. The stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis, is functionally an obligate biotroph. Although the fungus can be cultured with difficulty on artificial media, cultures grow slowly and upon subculturing they develop abnormal ploidy levels and lose their ability to infect host plants [Bushnell and Bosacker (1982) Can. J. Bot. 60, 1827-1836]. P. graminis is a typical heteroecious rust fungus with the full complement of five distinct spore stages that occur during asexual reproduction on its gramineous hosts and sexual reproduction that begins in the resting spore stage and culminates on the alternate host, barberry (Berberis spp.). There appears to be little polymorphism for resistance/susceptibility in Berberis species, but complex polymorphisms of resistance/susceptibility and matching virulence/avirulence exist in gene-for-gene relationships between small grain species and the forms of P. graminis that infect them. Puccinia graminis is a rust fungus in the phylum Basidiomycota, class Urediniomycetes, order Uredinales, and family Pucciniaceae, which contains 17 genera and approximately 4121 species, of which the majority are in the genus Puccinia[Kirk et al. (2001) Ainsworth and Bisby's Dictionary of the Fungi. Wallingford, UK: CAB International]. Various subdivisions of P. graminis into subspecies, varieties and formae speciales have been proposed based on spore size and host range. Crossing studies and DNA sequence comparisons support the separation of at least two subspecies, but not the proposed separation based on spore size. The host range of P. graminis is very broad compared with that of most Puccinia spp.; it includes at least 365 species of cereals and grasses in 54 genera [Anikster (1984) The Cereal Rusts. Orlando, FL: Academic Press, pp. 115-130]. Wheat stem rust, P. graminis f. sp. tritici, was

  15. Safeguarding saproxylic fungal biodiversity in Apennine beech forest priority habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Oriana; Lunghini, Dario; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The FAGUS LIFE Project (LIFE11/NAT/IT/135) targets two European priority habitats, i.e. Habitat 9210* Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex, and Habitat 9220* Apennine beech forests with Abies alba, within two National Parks: Cilento, Vallo di Diano and Alburni; Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga. The current limited distribution of the target habitats is also due to the impact of human activities on forest systems, such as harvesting and grazing. The FAGUS project aims at developing and testing management strategies able to integrate the conservation of priority forest habitats (9210* and 9220*) and the sustainable use of forest resources. In order to assess the responses to different management treatments the BACI monitoring design (Before-After, Control-Intervention) has been applied on forest structure and diversity of focus taxa before and after experimental harvesting treatments. Conventional management of Apennine beech forests impacts a wealth of taxonomic groups, such as saproxylic beetles and fungi, which are threatened throughout Europe by the lack of deadwood and of senescing trees, and by the homogeneous structure of managed forests. Deadwood has been denoted as the most important manageable habitat for biodiversity in forests not only for supporting a wide diversity of organisms, but also for playing a prominent role in several ecological processes, creating the basis for the cycling of photosynthetic energy, carbon, and nutrients stored in woody material. Especially fungi can be regarded as key group for understanding and managing biodiversity associated with decaying wood. The before-intervention field sampling was carried out in Autumn 2013 in 33 monitoring plots across the two national Parks. The occurrence at plot level of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota sporocarps was surveyed. All standing and downed deadwood with a minimum diameter of 10 cm was sampled for sporocarps larger than 1 mm, and information on decay class and fungal morphogroups

  16. Biodiversity of Soil Microbial Communities Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland: An Assessment Using Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, I. B.; Gentry, T. J.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    significantly different between remnant grasslands and all woody plant community types. Phylum-level classification of the 16S bacterial sequences showed that five phyla (Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Gemmatiomonadetes) represented 85-91% of classifiable sequences in all landscape elements. The relative abundances of Acidobacteria were significantly higher (p<0.05) in grassland samples (29.5%) than in all wooded landscape elements (17.1-25.6%), while the relative abundances of Actinobacteria was lower in grasslands (8.8%) than wooded areas (16.1-19.7%). Phylum-level classification of fungal sequences showed that four phyla accounted for 61.8 to 86.3% of identified sequences. Ascomycota was the most common phylum in all samples (55.8-62.1%), with significant contributions from Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Blastocladiomycota. The largest change in fungal community composition at the phylum level was observed in the Chytridiomycota, which declined from 4.0% in the grasslands to 0.8-1.4% in the wooded landscape elements. These significant changes in microbial community composition that occur following grassland to woodland conversion may have important implications for key biogeochemical processes that influence ecosystem structure and function in this region.