WorldWideScience

Sample records for basic vital signs

  1. Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lester R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the first edition of Vital Signs, a Worldwide Institute publication that provides an annual update on global environmental trends. Includes discussion of the dismantling of nuclear arms, reduction in chlorofluorocarbon production, growth in bicycle production, the decline in cigarette smoking, and decline in military…

  2. Non-Invasive Fiber-Optic Biomedical Sensor for Basic Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Nedoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the functionality verification of a novel non-invasive fibre-optic sensor monitoring basic vital signs such as Respiratory Rate (RR, Heart Rate (HR and Body Temperature (BT. The integration of three sensors in one unit is a unique solution patented by our research team. The integrated sensor is based on two Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs encapsulated inside an inert polymer (non-reactive to human skin called PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS. The PDMS is beginning to find widespread applications in the biomedical field due to its desirable properties, especially its immunity to ElectroMagnetic Interference (EMI. The integrated sensor's functionality was verified by carrying out a series of laboratory experiments in 10 volunteer subjects after giving them a written informed consent. The Bland-Altman statistical analysis produced satisfactory accuracy for the respiratory and heart rate measurements and their respective reference signals in all test subjects. A total relative error of 0.31% was determined for body temperature measurements. The main contribution of this article is a proof-of-concept of a novel noninvasive fiber-optic sensor which could be used for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor offers a potential to enhance and improve the comfort level of patients in hospitals and clinics and can even be considered for use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI environments.

  3. Aging changes in vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Aging changes in vital signs URL of this page: // ...

  4. Vital Signs - Child Passenger Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    This podcast is based on the February 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Over the past 10 years, more than 9,000 children 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes, and a third who died in 2011 weren't buckled up. Buckling up is the best way to reduce injuries and save lives.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  5. Vital Signs-Secondhand Smoke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-03

    This podcast is based on the February 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Secondhand smoke kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. Learn what can be done to prevent secondhand smoke exposure.  Created: 2/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/3/2015.

  6. Vital Signs-Trucker Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-03

    This podcast is based on the March 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In 2012 in the United States, about 317,000 motor vehicle crashes involved a large truck. Twenty-six thousand truck drivers and their passengers were injured in these crashes, and about 700 died. Learn what can be done to help truck drivers stay safe.  Created: 3/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/3/2015.

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VitalSigns – Childhood Obesity [PSA – 0:60 seconds] VitalSigns – Obesidad en niños: [PODCAST – 1:15 minutes] Childhood Overweight ... Prevention and Control MedlinePlus – Obesity in Children MedlinePlus – Obesidad en niños Top of Page Get Email Updates ...

  8. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  9. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group's (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone's malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed

  10. Vital Signs-Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-03

    This podcast is based on the June 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Norovirus infects about 20 million Americans each year. Learn how to protect yourself and your family from this very contagious, potentially serious illness.  Created: 6/3/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/3/2014.

  11. Vital Signs-Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-10-07

    This podcast is based on the October 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Motor vehicle crashes are costly and preventable. Learn what can be done to help prevent motor vehicle injuries.  Created: 10/7/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/7/2014.

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 0:60 seconds] On Other Web Sites MedlinePlus – Teenage Pregnancy MedlinePlus – Birth Control The Doctor’s Channel: CDC Vital Signs Long Acting Reversible Contraception [VIDEO – 3:30 minutes] Top of Page Get Email Updates To receive ... USA.gov TOP

  13. CDC Vital Signs-Heroin Epidemic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-07-07

    This podcast is based on the July 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Heroin use and heroin-related overdose deaths are increasing. Most people are using it with other drugs, especially prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to prevent and treat the problem.  Created: 7/7/2015 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 7/7/2015.

  14. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  15. Vital Signs-Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-07

    This podcast is based on the April 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Teen births in the U.S. have declined, but still, more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. Learn about the most effective types of birth control.  Created: 4/7/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/7/2015.

  16. CDC Vital Signs-Preventing Melanoma

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-06-02

    This podcast is based on the June 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. In 2011, there were more than 65,000 cases of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. Learn how everyone can help prevent skin cancer.  Created: 6/2/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 6/2/2015.

  17. Vital Signs-Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-06

    This podcast is based on the January 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In the United States, an average of six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. Learn what you can do to prevent binge drinking and alcohol poisoning.  Created: 1/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/6/2015.

  18. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  19. Vital Signs-Cervical Cancer is Preventable!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  20. CDC Vital Signs-Heart Age

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This podcast is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  1. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  2. CDC Vital Signs: HIV and Injection Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips HIV and Injection Drug Use Syringe Services Programs for HIV Prevention Language: English ( ... Pages Vital Signs Issue details: HIV and Injection Drug Use, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Vital Signs – ...

  3. Vital Signs Monitoring and Interpretation for Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan

    In current clinical practice, vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation level, respiratory rate and temperature are continuously measured for critically ill patients. Monitored by medical devices, each vital sign provides information about basic body functions and allows...... the estimation of physiological condition, text-based electronic health records (EHR) were collected, and time-labeled entries were extracted through algorithms from Natural Language Processing (NLP). The combination of EWS and NLP enabled the development of a system which could present and quantify...... between systolic and diastolic blood pressures during the first two hours of admission. The final study dealt with classification of diabetes mellitus (DM) in ischemic stroke patients, where current findings indicate that one third of patients have unrecognized DM. A support vector machine was trained...

  4. Extending role by Japanese pharmacists after training for performing vital signs monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Japan, the circumstances in which pharmacists work are changing. Pharmacists are expected to assess conditions of patients subject to medication to ensure proper use of pharmaceutical products. To ensure fulfilment of these roles, there have already been pharmacists’ efforts in performing vital signs monitoring. Objective: To clarify the necessity and related issues, by investigating the state of vital sign monitoring in clinical field by pharmacists who have been trained in vital sign monitoring. Method: A web survey was conducted from 4th October to 3rd December 2012, subjecting 1,026 pharmacists who completed the vital signs training hosted by The Japanese Association of Home Care Pharmacies (JAHCP. Survey items were 1 basic information of a respondent, 2 situation of homecare conducted by pharmacists, 3 seminar attendance status, and 4 vital signs monitoring status after the seminar. Results: The number of valid respondents was 430 and the response rate was 41.9%. As a result of the present research, it was revealed that 168 pharmacists (41.4%, had the opportunity to perform vital signs monitoring. By conducting vital sign monitoring, effects such as 1 improved motivation of pharmacists and better communication with patients, 2 proper use of medication, and 3 cost reduction were confirmed. Conclusion: Judging from the results of the survey, pharmacists can improve medication therapy for patients by attaining vital sign skills and conduct vital sign monitoring. Pharmacists who perform vital sign monitoring should share cases where they experienced positive patient outcomes.

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco Digital Media Tools About Vital Signs Subscribe to RSS ... of tobacco use E nforce bans on tobacco advertising R aise taxes on tobacco Establish comprehensive tobacco ...

  6. Physical Activity as a Vital Sign: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Golightly, Yvonne M.; Allen, Kelli D.; Ambrose, Kirsten R.; Stiller, Jamie L.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Voisin, Christiane; Hootman, Jennifer M.; Callahan, Leigh F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity (PA) is strongly endorsed for managing chronic conditions, and a vital sign tool (indicator of general physical condition) could alert providers of inadequate PA to prompt counseling or referral. This systematic review examined the use, definitions, psychometric properties, and outcomes of brief PA instruments as vital sign measures, with attention primarily to studies focused on arthritis. Methods Electronic databases were searched for English-language literatu...

  7. Observations and vital signs: ritual or vital for the monitoring of postoperative patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitz, Kathryn; McCutcheon, Helen

    2006-11-01

    Patient surveillance during the postoperative period has traditionally consisted of the collection of routine and regulated vital signs, supported by observations of other aspects of a patient's recovery. The purpose of this research was to determine if the frequent collection of postoperative vital signs assisted in detecting postoperative complications in the first 24 hours after a patient has returned to the ward setting. The study involved: (1) a survey of policy documents; (2) observations of postoperative nursing care; and (3) an audit of medical records. Major findings revealed that vital signs are collected based on tradition and are collected routinely, and there may not be a relationship between vital-signs collection and the occurrence or detection of complications.

  8. [CW bio-radar vital sign detector and experiment study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Zhangyan; Zhang, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact vital sign detection technique provides an effective usage in health monitoring applications. A vital sign detector was designed based on microwave bio-radar technique. Using Doppler principle, continuous wave bioradar was designed for tiny body movement detection, short-time Fourier transform and interpolation algorithm were adopted for heart and respiration rate extraction, embedded system was used for system integration, real-time signal processing software was designed on it. Experiments were done by using simulation device and human body for research and performance evaluation. The result shows that the proposed prototype can be used for single target vital signs detection at the distance of 90 cm, and the heart rate result shows a 96% recognition rate.

  9. CDC Vital Signs–Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This podcast is based on the September 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Each year, more than 140,000 people die and many survivors face disability. Eighty percent of strokes are preventable. Learn the signs of stroke and how to prevent them.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  10. CDC Vital Signs–Opioid Prescribing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This podcast is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  11. CDC Vital Signs–Arthritis in America

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This podcast is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  12. Vital Signs-Children Need More Fruits and Vegetables!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-05

    This podcast is based on the August 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Children in the U.S. aren't eating enough fruits and vegetables. Learn what you can do to impact this problem.  Created: 8/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2014.

  13. Vital Signs – Childhood Obesity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-06

    This podcast is based on the August 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. The rate of obesity among low-income preschoolers has declined, but one in eight is still obese. This program briefly discusses what can be done.  Created: 8/6/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/6/2013.

  14. Therapeutic touch: influence on vital signs of newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramada, Nadia Christina Oliveira; Almeida, Fabiane de Amorim; Cunha, Mariana Lucas da Rocha

    2013-12-01

    To compare vital signs before and after the therapeutic touch observed in hospitalized newborns in neonatal intensive care unit. This was a quasi-experimental study performed at a neonatal intensive care unit of a municipal hospital, in the city of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. The sample included 40 newborns submitted to the therapeutic touch after a painful procedure. We evaluated the vital signs, such as heart and respiratory rates, temperature and pain intensity, before and after the therapeutic touch. The majority of newborns were male (n=28; 70%), pre-term (n=19; 52%) and born from vaginal delivery (n=27; 67%). Respiratory distress was the main reason for hospital admission (n=16; 40%). There was a drop in all vital signs after therapeutic touch, particularly in pain score, which had a considerable reduction in the mean values, from 3.37 (SD=1.31) to 0 (SD=0.0). All differences found were statistically significant by the Wilcoxon test (ptouch promotes relaxation of the baby, favoring reduction in vital signs and, consequently in the basal metabolism rate.

  15. Therapeutic touch: influence on vital signs of newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramada, Nadia Christina Oliveira; Almeida, Fabiane de Amorim; Cunha, Mariana Lucas da Rocha

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective>: To compare vital signs before and after the therapeutic touch observed in hospitalized newborns in neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study performed at a neonatal intensive care unit of a municipal hospital, in the city of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. The sample included 40 newborns submitted to the therapeutic touch after a painful procedure. We evaluated the vital signs, such as heart and respiratory rates, temperature and pain intensity, before and after the therapeutic touch. Results: The majority of newborns were male (n=28; 70%), pre-term (n=19; 52%) and born from vaginal delivery (n=27; 67%). Respiratory distress was the main reason for hospital admission (n=16; 40%). There was a drop in all vital signs after therapeutic touch, particularly in pain score, which had a considerable reduction in the mean values, from 3.37 (SD=1.31) to 0 (SD=0.0). All differences found were statistically significant by the Wilcoxon test (p<0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that therapeutic touch promotes relaxation of the baby, favoring reduction in vital signs and, consequently in the basal metabolism rate. PMID:24488378

  16. Noise considerations for vital signs CW radar sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jensen, Thomas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    The use of continuous wave (CW) radars for measuring human vital signs have recently received a lot of attention due to its many promising applications like monitoring people at hospitals or infants at home without the need for wired sensors. This paper briefly presents the typical CW radar setup...

  17. Development of a vital-sign/fluid-balance flow sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, L A; Adkins, A T

    1993-01-01

    An improved flow sheet for recording vital signs and fluid balance on a medical oncology unit was developed and tested using quality-assurance techniques. The new form, which replaced three separate forms, measurably improved documentation on all quality-assurance monitors tested. Additional benefits include cost-savings and decreased time expenditures by nursing staff.

  18. Vital Signs – Making Health Care Safer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-05

    This podcast is based on the March 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses lethal infections from carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, germs and ways health care providers can help stop CRE infections.  Created: 3/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/5/2013.

  19. Vital Signs – Alcohol Screening and Counseling?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This podcast is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  20. Vital Signs – Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This podcast is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  1. Monitoring and analysis of vital signs of a patient through a multi-agent application system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel HERNÁNDEZ DE LA IGLESIA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the medical environment, the clinical study of the most basic vital signs of a patient represents the simplest and most effective way to detect and monitor health problems. There are many diseases that can be diagnosed and controlled through regular monitoring of these medical data. The purpose of this study is to develop a monitoring and tracking system for the various vital signs of a patient. In particular, this work focuses on the design of a multi-agent architecture composed of virtual organizations with capabilities to integrate different medical sensors on an open, low-cost hardware platform. This system integrates hardware and software elements needed for the routine measurement of vital signs, performed by the patient or caregiver without having to go to a medical center.

  2. CDC Vital Signs-Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-10-06

    This podcast is based on the October 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Hospitals can implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding to be designated as "Baby-Friendly" and support more moms in a decision to breastfeed.  Created: 10/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/6/2015.

  3. Noise considerations for vital signs CW radar sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jensen, Thomas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    and the underlying signal theory for such sensors. Then to point out and especially clarify one of the most important effects aiding the design of vital signs radars (VSR), a more detailed discussion concerning phase noise cancellation (or filtering) by range correlation is given. This discussion leads to some...... general conclusions about which system components are the most critical concerning noise contribution and thus detection accuracy and dynamic range....

  4. CDC Vital Signs-Safer Food Saves Lives

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-03

    This podcast is based on the November 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Contaminated food sent to several states can cause multistate outbreaks of foodborne illness and make a lot of people seriously ill. Learn what can be done to prevent and stop outbreaks.  Created: 11/3/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/3/2015.

  5. Vital Signs-Preventing Pregnancy in Younger Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-08

    This podcast is based on the April 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Births to teens are declining, still, in 2012, more than 86,000 teens ages 15 to 17 gave birth. This program discusses what health care providers, parents, and teens can do to help prevent teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/8/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/8/2014.

  6. Vital Signs – When Food Bites Back

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-04

    This podcast is based on the June 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. It discusses food poisoning and specifically, Listeria. If you're 65 or older, have a weakened immune system, or are pregnant, you must be especially careful when selecting, preparing, and storing food.  Created: 6/4/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/4/2013.

  7. Vital Signs – Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-02

    This podcast is based on the July 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. Prescription painkiller overdoses are an under-recognized and growing problem among women. This program includes things that women and health care providers can do to reduce the risk of overdose.  Created: 7/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/2/2013.

  8. CDC Vital Signs–HIV Testing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-28

    This podcast is based on the December 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. In the U.S., about 15 percent of people who have HIV don't know they have it. Learn about the importance of testing, early diagnosis, and treatment.  Created: 11/28/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/28/2017.

  9. CDC Vital Signs–African American Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-02

    This podcast is based on the May 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. The life expectancy of African Americans has improved, but it’s still an average of four years less than whites. Learn what can be done so all Americans can have the opportunity to pursue a healthy lifestyle.  Created: 5/2/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/2/2017.

  10. CDC Vital Signs-Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-03-03

    This podcast is based on the March 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Patients can get serious healthcare-associated infections, or HAIs, while receiving medical treatment in a healthcare facility. Learn how to prevent healthcare-associated infections.  Created: 3/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/3/2016.

  11. CDC Vital Signs-Communication Can Save Lives

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-04

    This podcast is based on the August 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotic-resistant germs cause at least 23,000 deaths each year. Learn how public health authorities and health care facilities can work together to save lives.  Created: 8/4/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/4/2015.

  12. Vital Signs-Physical Activity and Adults with Disabilities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-06

    This podcast is based on the May 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Adults with disabilities who get no aerobic physical activity are 50 percent more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer. Learn what you can do to help.  Created: 5/6/2014 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 5/6/2014.

  13. CDC Vital Signs–Cancer and Obesity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-04

    This podcast is based on the October 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Obesity is a leading cancer risk factor. Unfortunately, two out of three U.S. adults weigh more than recommended. Find out what can be done to help people get to and keep a healthy weight.  Created: 10/4/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/4/2017.

  14. [Modifications of vital signs during hygiene care in intensive care patients: an explorative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, Alberto; Giacovelli, Matteo; Elli, Stefano; Gariboldi, Roberto; Pelucchi, Giulia; Bondi, Herman; Brambilla, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Hygiene care in critical patients may alter vital signs. Aim of this paper is to measure vital signs and their modifications in critical patients during hygiene care and measure differences with pre and post hygiene values. Vital signs of 6 patients two hours before, during and 90 minutes after hygienic care were measured. During and 2 hours after the end of hygiene a modification of vital signs was observed compared to basic values (mean values during/90 min after, compared to baseline): heart rate +11.20%/ +1.48; systolic blood pressure +22.68%/+1.56; arterial capillary saturimetry -4.31/+0.27, Respiratory frequency +8.10/+2.66, tidal volume +4,04/-7,51, CO2 min/vol +5,34/- 22.33, bladder temperature -0.85/-0.60. Hygiene care in critical care patients may significantly alter vital signs. Therefore a strict haemodinamic and respiratory monitoring is warranted as well as protocols for the management of sedation and of vasoactive support.

  15. Data acquisition system for Doppler radar vital-sign monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Alexander M; Lubecke, Victor M

    2007-01-01

    Automatic gain control (AGC) units increase the dynamic range of a system to compensate for the limited dynamic range of analog to digital converters. This problem is compounded in wireless systems in which large changes in signal strength are effects of a changing environment. These issues are evident in the direct-conversion Doppler radar vital-sign monitor. Utilizing microwave radar signals reflecting off a human subject, a two-channel quadrature receiver can detect periodic movement resulting from cardio-pulmonary activity. The quadrature signal is analyzed using an arctangent demodulation that extracts vital phase information. A data acquisition (DAQ) system is proposed to deal with issues inherent in arctangent demodulation of a quadrature radar signal.

  16. CDC Vital Signs-E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-05

    This podcast is based on the January 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Most electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and may harm brain development. More than 18 million middle and high school students were exposed to e-cigarette ads. Exposure to these ads may be contributing to an increase in e-cigarette use among youth. Learn what can be done to keep our youth safe and healthy.  Created: 1/5/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/5/2016.

  17. Vital Signs – Defeating Breast Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    This podcast is based on the November 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Better screening and treatment have contributed to a decline in breast cancer deaths, however, not all women have benefited equally from these improvements. Learn how we can all help reduce deaths from breast cancer.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  18. CDC Vital Signs-Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-24

    This podcast is based on the November 24, 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Preexposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a daily medicine that can be used to prevent getting HIV. PrEP is for people who don’t have HIV but who are at very high risk for getting it from sex or injection drug use. Unfortunately, many people who can benefit from PrEP aren’t taking it.  Created: 11/24/2015 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/24/2015.

  19. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Fajkus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG. The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS. The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person's chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field.

  20. Job satisfaction and basic vital needs satisfaction among working women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalva I.

    2016-01-01

    Generally, all basic vital needs were satisfied on the lower level among married women. So, a presence of work-life imbalance indirectly has been shown in the married women, who have to sacrifice a better paid job for the sake of having more free time for the family. Such rejection of some social roles in working women (moms has been reported in literature.

  1. Wireless chest wearable vital sign monitoring platform for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, G; Guldenring, D; Finlay, D; McLaughlin, J

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension, a silent killer, is the biggest challenge of the 21 st century in public health agencies worldwide [1]. World Health Organization (WHO) statistic shows that the mortality rate of hypertension is 9.4 million per year and causes 55.3% of total deaths in cardiovascular (CV) patients [2]. Early detection and prevention of hypertension can significantly reduce the CV mortality. We are presenting a wireless chest wearable vital sign monitoring platform. It measures Electrocardiogram (ECG), Photoplethsmogram (PPG) and Ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals and sends data over Bluetooth low energy (BLE) to mobile phone-acts as a gateway. A custom android application relays the data to thingspeak server where MATLAB based offline analysis estimates the blood pressure. A server reacts on the health of subject to friends & family on the social media - twitter. The chest provides a natural position for the sensor to capture legitimate signals for hypertension condition. We have done a clinical technical evaluation of prototypes on 11 normotensive subjects, 9 males 2 females.

  2. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Can we improve the clinical utility of respiratory rate as a monitored vital sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; McKenna, Thomas M; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-06-01

    Respiratory rate (RR) is a basic vital sign, measured and monitored throughout a wide spectrum of health care settings, although RR is historically difficult to measure in a reliable fashion. We explore an automated method that computes RR only during intervals of clean, regular, and consistent respiration and investigate its diagnostic use in a retrospective analysis of prehospital trauma casualties. At least 5 s of basic vital signs, including heart rate, RR, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, were continuously collected from 326 spontaneously breathing trauma casualties during helicopter transport to a level I trauma center. "Reliable" RR data were identified retrospectively using automated algorithms. The diagnostic performances of reliable versus standard RR were evaluated by calculation of the receiver operating characteristic curves using the maximum-likelihood method and comparison of the summary areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Respiratory rate shows significant data-reliability differences. For identifying prehospital casualties who subsequently receive a respiratory intervention (hospital intubation or tube thoracotomy), standard RR yields an AUC of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.69), whereas reliable RR yields an AUC of 0.67 (0.57-0.77), P support algorithms.

  4. Prototyping sensor network system for automatic vital signs collection. Evaluation of a location based automated assignment of measured vital signs to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, T; Noma, H; Naito, C; Tada, M; Yamanaka, H; Takemura, T; Nin, K; Yoshihara, H

    2013-01-01

    Development of a clinical sensor network system that automatically collects vital sign and its supplemental data, and evaluation the effect of automatic vital sensor value assignment to patients based on locations of sensors. The sensor network estimates the data-source, a target patient, from the position of a vital sign sensor obtained from a newly developed proximity sensing system. The proximity sensing system estimates the positions of the devices using a Bluetooth inquiry process. Using Bluetooth access points and the positioning system newly developed in this project, the sensor network collects vital sign and its 4W (who, where, what, and when) supplemental data from any Bluetooth ready vital sign sensors such as Continua-ready devices. The prototype was evaluated in a pseudo clinical setting at Kyoto University Hospital using a cyclic paired comparison and statistical analysis. The result of the cyclic paired analysis shows the subjects evaluated the proposed system is more effective and safer than POCS as well as paper-based operation. It halves the times for vital signs input and eliminates input errors. On the other hand, the prototype failed in its position estimation for 12.6% of all attempts, and the nurses overlooked half of the errors. A detailed investigation clears that an advanced interface to show the system's "confidence", i.e. the probability of estimation error, must be effective to reduce the oversights. This paper proposed a clinical sensor network system that relieves nurses from vital signs input tasks. The result clearly shows that the proposed system increases the efficiency and safety of the nursing process both subjectively and objectively. It is a step toward new generation of point of nursing care systems where sensors take over the tasks of data input from the nurses.

  5. Validating emergency department vital signs using a data quality engine for data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, N; Chandra, D; Ellis, S; Baumlin, K

    2013-01-01

    Vital signs in our emergency department information system were entered into free-text fields for heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation. We sought to convert these text entries into a more useful form, for research and QA purposes, upon entry into a data warehouse. We derived a series of rules and assigned quality scores to the transformed values, conforming to physiologic parameters for vital signs across the age range and spectrum of illness seen in the emergency department. Validating these entries revealed that 98% of free-text data had perfect quality scores, conforming to established vital sign parameters. Average vital signs varied as expected by age. Degradations in quality scores were most commonly attributed logging temperature in Fahrenheit instead of Celsius; vital signs with this error could still be transformed for use. Errors occurred more frequently during periods of high triage, though error rates did not correlate with triage volume. In developing a method for importing free-text vital sign data from our emergency department information system, we now have a data warehouse with a broad array of quality-checked vital signs, permitting analysis and correlation with demographics and outcomes.

  6. Basic Color Terms in Estonian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, Liivi; Sutrop, Urmas

    2011-01-01

    The article is written in the tradition of Brent Berlin and Paul Kay's theory of basic color terms. According to this theory there is a universal inventory of eleven basic color categories from which the basic color terms of any given language are always drawn. The number of basic color terms varies from 2 to 11 and in a language having a fully…

  7. Pediatric Patients Discharged from the Emergency Department with Abnormal Vital Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Winter

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children often present to the emergency department (ED with minor conditions such as fever and have persistently abnormal vital signs. We hypothesized that a significant portion of children discharged from the ED would have abnormal vital signs and that those discharged with abnormal vital signs would experience very few adverse events. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review encompassing a 44-month period of all pediatric patients (aged two months to 17 years who were discharged from the ED with an abnormal pulse rate, respiratory rate, temperature, or oxygen saturation. We used a local quality assurance database to identify pre-defined adverse events after discharge in this population. Our primary aim was to determine the proportion of children discharged with abnormal vital signs and the frequency and nature of adverse events. Additionally, we performed a sub-analysis comparing the rate of adverse events in children discharged with normal vs. abnormal vital signs, as well as a standardized review of the nature of each adverse event. Results: Of 33,185 children discharged during the study period, 5,540 (17% of these patients had at least one abnormal vital sign. There were 24/5,540 (0.43% adverse events in the children with at least one abnormal vital sign vs. 47/27,645 (0.17% adverse events in the children with normal vital signs [relative risk = 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 2.4].However, upon review of each adverse event we found only one case that was related to the index visit, was potentially preventable by a 23-hour hospital observation, and caused permanent disability. Conclusion: In our study population, 17% of the children were discharged with at least one abnormal vital sign, and there were very few adverse (0.43% events associated with this practice. Heart rate was the most common abnormal vital sign leading to an adverse event. Severe adverse events that were potentially related to the abnormal

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Think Sepsis. Time Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... germs that can cause sepsis are Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli) , and some types of Streptococcus . *Among ... RSS VitalSigns RSS Related Links Download this factsheet [PDF – 1.75 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Topics Covered Alcohol Antibiotic Resistance Cancer Cardiovascular Diseases Diseases & Conditions Food Safety Healthcare- ... Clips Making Health Care Safer Protect patients from antibiotic resistance Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  10. Emergency nurses' decisions regarding frequency and nature of vital sign assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Katherine; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie

    2017-07-01

    To explore the factors emergency nurses use to inform their decisions regarding frequency and nature of vital sign assessment. Research related to clinical deterioration and vital sign assessment in the emergency department is in its infancy. Studies to date have explored the frequency of vital sign assessment in the emergency department; however, there are no published studies that have examined factors that emergency nurses use to inform their decisions regarding frequency and nature of ongoing vital sign assessment. A prospective exploratory design was used. Data were collected using a survey consisting of eight patient vignettes. The study was conducted in one emergency department in metropolitan Melbourne. Participants were emergency nurses permanently employed at the study site. A 96% response rate was achieved (n = 47/49). The most common frequency of patient reassessment nominated by participants was 15 or 30 minutely, with an equal number of participants choosing these frequency intervals. Abnormality in initial vital sign parameters was the most common factor identified for choosing either a 15- or 30-minute assessment interval. Frequency of assessment decisions was influenced by years of emergency nursing experience in one vignette and level of postgraduate qualification in three vignettes. Heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were all nominated by over 80% of participants as vital signs that participants considered important for reassessment. The frequency and nature of vital signs selected varied according to vignette content. There were significant negative correlations between assessment of conscious state and years of nursing experience and assessment of respiratory rate and years of emergency nursing experience. Level of postgraduate qualification did not influence selection of parameters for reassessment. Emergency nurses are tailoring vital sign assessment to patients' clinical status, and nurses are integrating known vital sign data

  11. VITAL SIGNS MEASUREMENT: AN INDICATOR OF SAFE CARE DELIVERED TO ELDERLY PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Cristiane Chagas; Boaventura, Rafaela Peres; Souza, Adrielle Cristina Silva; Paranaguá, Thatianny Tanferri de Brito; Bezerra, Ana Lúcia Queiroz; Bachion, Maria Márcia; Brasil, Virginia Visconde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study's aim was to analyze the importance assigned by the nursing staff to the recording of vital signs of elderly inpatients, as well as perceived barriers and benefits. Data were collected through interviews held with 13 nurses and the reports were analyzed using content analysis, considering the health belief model proposed by Rosenstock. The categories that emerged from the analysis indicate barriers that interfere in the proper monitoring of vital signs, namely: workload, la...

  12. CDC Signos Vitales-Seguridad de los camioneros (Vital Signs-Trucker Safety)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de marzo del 2015 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. En el 2012 en los Estados Unidos, ocurrieron cerca de 317 000 choques asociados a camiones pesados. Veintiséis mil camioneros y sus pasajeros sufrieron lesiones en esos choques, y cerca de 700 murieron. Infórmese sobre lo que se puede hacer para que los camioneros estén seguros.  Created: 3/3/2015 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 3/3/2015.

  13. CDC Vital Signs–Think Sepsis. Time Matters.

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-23

    This podcast is based on the August 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sepsis is a medical emergency and can happen quickly. Learn the signs of sepsis and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/23/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 8/23/2016.

  14. Vital signs: teen pregnancy--United States, 1991--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    In 2009, approximately 410,000 teens aged 15-19 years gave birth in the United States, and the teen birth rate remains higher than in other developed countries. To describe U.S. trends in teen births and related factors, CDC used data on 1) teen birth rates during 1991-2009 from the National Vital Statistics System, 2) sexual intercourse and contraceptive use among high school students during 1991-2009 from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and 3) sex education, parent communication, use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), and receipt of reproductive health services among teens aged 15-19 years from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth. In 2009, the national teen birth rate was 39.1 births per 1,000 females, a 37% decrease from 61.8 births per 1,000 females in 1991 and the lowest rate ever recorded. State-specific teen birth rates varied from 16.4 to 64.2 births per 1,000 females and were highest among southern states. Birth rates for black and Hispanic teens were 59.0 and 70.1 births per 1,000 females, respectively, compared with 25.6 for white teens. From 1991 to 2009, the percentage of high school students who ever had sexual intercourse decreased from 54% to 46%, and the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months but did not use any method of contraception at last sexual intercourse decreased from 16% to 12%. From 1999 to 2009, the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months and used dual methods at last sexual intercourse (condoms with either birth control pills or the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera) increased from 5% to 9%. During 2006-2008, 65% of female teens and 53% of male teens received formal sex education that covered saying no to sex and provided information on methods of birth control. Overall, 44% of female teens and 27% of male teens had spoken with their parents about both topics, but among teens who had ever had sexual intercourse, 20% of females and 31

  15. Exploring Vital Sign Data Quality in Electronic Health Records with Focus on Emergency Care Warning Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyttberg, Niclas; Chen, Rong; Blomqvist, Hans; Koch, Sabine

    2017-08-30

    Computerized clinical decision support and automation of warnings have been advocated to assist clinicians in detecting patients at risk of physiological instability. To provide reliable support such systems are dependent on high-quality vital sign data. Data quality depends on how, when and why the data is captured and/or documented. This study aims to describe the effects on data quality of vital signs by three different types of documentation practices in five Swedish emergency hospitals, and to assess data fitness for calculating warning and triage scores. The study also provides reference data on triage vital signs in Swedish emergency care. We extracted a dataset including vital signs, demographic and administrative data from emergency care visits (n=335027) at five Swedish emergency hospitals during 2013 using either completely paper-based, completely electronic or mixed documentation practices. Descriptive statistics were used to assess fitness for use in emergency care decision support systems aiming to calculate warning and triage scores, and data quality was described in three categories: currency, completeness and correctness. To estimate correctness, two further categories - plausibility and concordance - were used. The study showed an acceptable correctness of the registered vital signs irrespectively of the type of documentation practice. Completeness was high in sites where registrations were routinely entered into the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The currency was only acceptable in sites with a completely electronic documentation practice. Although vital signs that were recorded in completely electronic documentation practices showed plausible results regarding correctness, completeness and currency, the study concludes that vital signs documented in Swedish emergency care EHRs cannot generally be considered fit for use for calculation of triage and warning scores. Low completeness and currency were found if the documentation was not completely

  16. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios. PMID:26137365

  17. UnoViS: the MedIT public unobtrusive vital signs database

    OpenAIRE

    Wartzek, Tobias; Czaplik, Michael; Antink, Christoph Hoog; Eilebrecht, Benjamin; Walocha, Rafael; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    While PhysioNet is a large database for standard clinical vital signs measurements, such a database does not exist for unobtrusively measured signals. This inhibits progress in the vital area of signal processing for unobtrusive medical monitoring as not everybody owns the specific measurement systems to acquire signals. Furthermore, if no common database exists, a comparison between different signal processing approaches is not possible. This gap will be closed by our UnoViS database. It con...

  18. Test-Retest Reliability of a Computerized Concussion Test: CNS Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Ashley C; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive testing is an important concussion evaluation tool, but for neurocognitive tests to be useful, their psychometric properties must be well established. Test-retest reliability of computerized neurocognitive tests can influence their clinical utility. The reliability for a commonly used computerized neurocognitive test, CNS Vital Signs, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to examine test-retest reliability and reliable change indices for CNS Vital Signs in a healthy, physically active college population. CNS Vital Signs yields acceptable test-retest reliability, with greater reliability between the second and third test administration compared with between the first and second administration. Cohort study. Level 3. Forty healthy, active volunteers (16 men, 24 women; mean age, 21.05 ± 2.17 years) reported to a clinical laboratory for 3 sessions, 1 week apart. At each session, participants were administered CNS Vital Signs. Outcomes included standard scores for the following CNS Vital Signs domains: verbal memory, visual memory, psychomotor speed, cognitive flexibility, complex attention, processing speed, reaction time, executive functioning, and reasoning. Participants performed significantly better on the second session and/or third session than they did on the first testing session on 6 of 9 neurocognitive domains. Pearson r test-retest correlations between sessions ranged from 0.11 to 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.10 to 0.86. Clinicians should consider using reliable change indices to account for practice effects, identify meaningful score changes due to pathology, and inform clinical decisions. This study highlights the importance of clinicians understanding the psychometric properties of computerized neurocognitive tests when using them in the management of sport-related concussion. If CNS Vital Signs is administered twice within a small time frame (such as 1 week), athletes should be expected to

  19. A controlled trial of electronic automated advisory vital signs monitoring in general hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ackerman, Michael; Bailey, Michael; Beale, Richard; Clancy, Greg; Danesh, Valerie; Hvarfner, Andreas; Jimenez, Edgar; Konrad, David; Lecardo, Michele; Pattee, Kimberly S; Ritchie, Josephine; Sherman, Kathie; Tangkau, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Deteriorating ward patients are at increased risk. Electronic automated advisory vital signs monitors may help identify such patients and improve their outcomes. A total of 349 beds, in 12 general wards in ten hospitals in the United States, Europe, and Australia. Cohort of 18,305 patients. Before-and-after controlled trial. We deployed electronic automated advisory vital signs monitors to assist in the acquisition of vital signs and calculation of early warning scores. We assessed their effect on frequency, type, and treatment of rapid response team calls; survival to hospital discharge or to 90 days for rapid response team call patients; overall type and number of serious adverse events and length of hospital stay. We studied 9,617 patients before (control) and 8,688 after (intervention) deployment of electronic automated advisory vital signs monitors. Among rapid response team call patients, intervention was associated with an increased proportion of calls secondary to abnormal respiratory vital signs (from 21% to 31%; difference [95% confidence interval] 9.9 [0.1-18.5]; p=.029). Survival immediately after rapid response team treatment and survival to hospital discharge or 90 days increased from 86% to 92% (difference [95% confidence interval] 6.3 [0.0-12.6]; p=.04). Intervention was also associated with a decrease in median length of hospital stay in all patients (unadjusted p<.0001; adjusted p=.09) and more so in U.S. patients (from 3.4 to 3.0 days; unadjusted p<.0001; adjusted ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.03 [1.00-1.06]; p=.026). The time required to complete and record a set of vital signs decreased from 4.1±1.3 mins to 2.5±0.5 mins (difference [95% confidence interval] 1.6 [1.4-1.8]; p<.0001). Deployment of electronic automated advisory vital signs monitors was associated with an improvement in the proportion of rapid response team-calls triggered by respiratory criteria, increased survival of patients receiving rapid response team calls, and

  20. Relationship Between Basic Psychological Needs and Mental Vitality in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Arabzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion The basic psychological needs are considered as an important factor for maintaining subjective vitality in the elderly. Therefore, understanding the basic psychological needs and strengthening these factors can be an effective method for enhancing the subjective vitality of elderly people.

  1. Vital Signs – Hepatitis C: What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-07

    This podcast is based on the May 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. It discusses hepatitis C, a serious viral infection, and the need for everyone born from 1945 through 1965 to get tested.  Created: 5/7/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/7/2013.

  2. CDC Vital Signs–Safe Sleep for Babies

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-09

    This podcast is based on the January 2018 CDC Vital Signs report. Every year, there are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among U.S. babies. Learn how to create a safe sleep environment for babies.  Created: 1/9/2018 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/9/2018.

  3. CDC Vital Signs–Zika Virus: Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    This podcast is based on the April 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects. Learn how to protect babies from Zika-related health conditions.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  4. CDC Vital Signs–Opioid Overdoses Treated in Emergency Departments

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-03-06

    This podcast is based on the March 2018 CDC Vital Signs report. Opioid overdoses continue to increase in the United States. Learn what can be done to help prevent opioid overdose and death.  Created: 3/6/2018 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/6/2018.

  5. Vital signs detection radar using low intermediate-frequency architecture and single-sideband transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous wave vital signs detection radar that utilizes a heterodyne transceiver architecture with a 10 MHz intermediate frequency to remove both unwanted DC offsets in the electronic components and the so-called null-detection-points. For successful removal of the latter...

  6. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  7. CDC Vital Signs–Cancer and Tobacco Use

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    This podcast is based on the November 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. There is a long list of cancers linked to tobacco use, the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. Learn more here.  Created: 11/10/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  8. Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Newest Vital Sign: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamichi Kogure

    Full Text Available Health literacy (HL refers to the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services, and is thus needed to make appropriate health decisions. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS is comprised of 6 questions about an ice cream nutrition label and assesses HL numeracy skills. We developed a Japanese version of the NVS (NVS-J and evaluated the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in patients with chronic pain. The translation of the original NVS into Japanese was achieved as per the published guidelines. An observational study was subsequently performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in 43 Japanese patients suffering from chronic pain. Factor analysis with promax rotation, using the Kaiser criterion (eigenvalues ≥1.0, and a scree plot revealed that the main component of the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors, and each factor consists of two NVS-J items. The criterion-related validity of the total NVS-J score was significantly correlated with the total score of Ishikawa et al.'s self-rated HL Questionnaire, the clinical global assessment of comprehensive HL level, cognitive function, and the Brinkman index. In addition, Cronbach's coefficient for the total score of the NVS-J was adequate (alpha = 0.72. This study demonstrated that the NVS-J has good validity and reliability. Further, the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors: "basic numeracy ability," "complex numeracy ability," and "serious-minded ability." These three HL abilities comprise a 3-step hierarchical structure. Adequate HL should be promoted in chronic pain patients to enable coping, improve functioning, and increase activities of daily living (ADLs and quality of life (QOL.

  9. Effect of simulation on the ability of first year nursing students to learn vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyikara, Evrim; Baykara, Zehra Göçmen

    2018-01-01

    The acquisition of cognitive, affective and psychomotor knowledge and skills are required in nursing, made possible via an interactive teaching method, such as simulation. This study conducted to identify the impact of simulation on first-year nursing students' ability to learn vital signs. A convenience sample of 90 first-year nursing students enrolled at a University, Ankara, in 2014-2015. Ninety students enrolled for lessons on the "Fundamentals of Nursing" were identified using a simple random sampling method. The students were taught vital signs theory via traditional methods. They were grouped into experimental 1, experimental 2 and control group, of 30 students each. Students in the experimental 1 group attended sessions on simulation and those in the experimental 2 group sessions on laboratory work, followed by simulation. The control group were taught via traditional methods and only attended the laboratory work sessions. The students' cognitive knowledge acquisition was evaluated using a knowledge test before and after the lessons. The ability to measure vital signs in adults (healthy ones and patients) was evaluated using a skill control list. A statistically significant difference was not observed between the groups in terms of the average pre-test scores on knowledge (p>0.050). Groups exposed to simulation obtained statistically significantly higher scores than the control group in post-test knowledge (psimulation to measure vital signs in healthy adults and patients was more successful than that the control group (pSimulation had a positive effect on the ability of nursing students to measure vital signs. Thus, simulation should be included in the mainstream curriculum in order to effectively impart nursing knowledge and skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. FM-CW radar sensors for vital signs and motor activity monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Adrian Postolache

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes on-going research on vital signs and motor activity monitoring based on radar sensors embedded in wheelchairs, walkers and crutches for in home rehabilitation. Embedded sensors, conditioning circuits, real-time platforms that perform data acquisition, auto-identification, primary data processing and data communication contribute to convert daily used objects in home rehabilitation into smart objects that can be accessed by caregivers during the training sessions through human–machine interfaces expressed by the new generation of smart phones or tablet computers running Android OS or iOS operating systems. The system enables the management of patients in home rehabilitation by providing more accurate and up-to-date information using pervasive computing of vital signs and motor activity records.

  11. MuSeSe - A multisensor armchair for unobtrusive vital sign estimation and motion artifact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Leonhardt, Steffen; Schulz, Florian; Walter, Marian

    2017-07-01

    Unobtrusive vital sign estimation with sensors integrated into objects of everyday living can substantially advance the field of remote monitoring. At the same time, motion artifacts cause severe problems and have to be dealt with. Here, the fusion of multimodal sensor data is a promising approach. In this paper, we present an armchair equipped with capacitively coupled electrocardiogram, two types of ballistocardiographic sensors, photoplethysmographic and two high-frequency impedance sensors. In addition, a video-based sensor for motion analysis is integrated. Using a defined motion protocol, the feasibility of the system is demonstrated in a self-experimentation. Moreover, the influence of different movements on different modalities is analyzed. Finally, robust beat-to-beat interval estimation demonstrates the benefits of multimodal sensor fusion for vital sign estimation in the presence of motion artifacts.

  12. CDC Vital Signs–Native Americans With Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-10

    This podcast is based on the January 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure and Native Americans have a greater chance of having diabetes than any other racial group in the U.S. Learn how to manage your diabetes to delay or prevent kidney failure.  Created: 1/10/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/10/2017.

  13. Vital Signs – HIV Among Youth in the US: Protecting a Generation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-27

    This podcast is based on the December 2012 CDC Vital Signs report, which presents information about the impact of HIV on youth, the factors that place youth at risk for HIV, and calls for prevention through parents, schools, and community-based HIV prevention programs for youth.  Created: 11/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/27/2012.

  14. CDC Vital Signs–HIV and Injection Drug Use

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-29

    This podcast is based on the December 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sharing needles, syringes, and other injection equipment puts you at risk for getting HIV and other infections, including hepatitis. Learn how to reduce your HIV risk.  Created: 11/29/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/29/2016.

  15. CDC Vital Signs–Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    This podcast is based on the October 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Dental sealants, applied soon after a child's permanent molars come in, can protect against cavities for up to nine years. Applying sealants in schools for low-income children could save millions in dental treatment costs.  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  16. CDC Vital Signs–Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-06

    This podcast is based on the July 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. In the U.S., about 90 people die in motor vehicle crashes each day and thousands more are injured, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in direct medical costs each year. Learn what you can do to stay safe.  Created: 7/6/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 7/6/2016.

  17. CDC Vital Signs-Zika and Pregnancy: What You Should Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-04-01

    This podcast is based on the April 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. A pregnant woman who is infected with Zika virus can pass it to her fetus which is linked to microcephaly, a serious birth defect. This podcast discusses how to protect yourself from Zika virus.  Created: 4/1/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/1/2016.

  18. Healthy Eating Vital Sign: A New Assessment Tool for Eating Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Jessica L. J.; Lin, Junji; Arguello, Danita; Ball, Trever; Shaw, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Most dietary questionnaires are not created for use in a clinical setting for an adult health exam. We created the Healthy Eating Vital Sign (HEVS) to assess eating behaviors associated with excess weight. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the HEVS. Methods. Using a cross-sectional study design, participants responded to the HEVS and the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). We analyzed the data descriptively, and, with Pearson's correlation and Cronba...

  19. Vital Signs-Reducing Sodium in Children’s Diets

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-09-09

    This podcast is based on the September 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Many children in the U.S. eat more sodium than recommended and one in six has elevated blood pressure. Learn what you can do to lower sodium intake.  Created: 9/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2014.

  20. CDC Vital Signs–Too Loud for Too Long!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-07

    This podcast is based on the February 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Being around too much loud noise—like a leaf blower or rock concert—can cause permanent hearing loss. Learn how to prevent hearing loss.  Created: 2/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/7/2017.

  1. CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-06

    This podcast is based on the June 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Legionnaires’ disease is a serious, often deadly lung infection. People most commonly get it by breathing in water droplets containing Legionella germs. Learn how to prevent infections from Legionella.  Created: 6/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/6/2017.

  2. Vital Signs – Binge Drinking Among Women and Girls

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-08

    This podcast is based on the January 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which presents information about binge drinking among women and girls. Binge drinking is defined for women as four or more drinks in a short period of time. It puts women and girls at greater risk for breast cancer, sexual assault, heart disease, and unintended pregnancy.  Created: 1/8/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/8/2013.

  3. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients' anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of whole body massage and the control group received routine care. The levels of State, Trait and overall anxiety and vital signs were assessed in both groups before and after intervention. Independent sample t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fischer exact tests were used for data analysis. The baseline overall mean score of anxiety was 79.43±29.34 in the intervention group and was decreased to 50.38±20.35 after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in the overall mean anxiety in the control group during the study. The baseline diastolic blood pressure was 77.05±8.12 mmHg and was decreased to 72.18±9.19 mmHg after the intervention (p=0.004). Also, significant decreases were occurred in heart rate and respiration rate of intervention group after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in vital signs of the control group during the study. The results suggest that whole body massage was effective in reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders.

  4. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients’ anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs-ADHD in Young Children: What You Should Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-03

    This podcast is based on the May 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. For children ages two to five who have ADHD, behavior therapy is recommended before prescribing medicine. This therapy teaches parents ways to improve their child’s behavior and can work as well as medicine, without the risk of side effects.  Created: 5/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/3/2016.

  6. Vital Signs-HIV Care Saves Lives: Viral Suppression is Key

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-25

    This podcast is based on the December 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. For people living with HIV, Viral suppression is critical. By getting tested and taking HIV medicines, individuals living with HIV can achieve very low levels of HIV in the body.  Created: 11/25/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/25/2014.

  7. Vital Signs – Adult Smoking Among People with Mental Illness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-05

    This podcast is based on the February 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which shows that cigarette smoking is a serious problem among adults with mental illness. More needs to be done to help adults with mental illness quit smoking and make mental health facilities tobacco-free.  Created: 2/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/5/2013.

  8. Validation of Prototype Continuous Real-Time Vital Signs Video Analytics Monitoring System CCATT Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-26

    10 3.5 Auxiliary Function and System Pressure Test ............................................................... 11 4.0 VALIDATION IN A REAL TRAUMA...release. Distribution is unlimited. Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2018-0730, 20 Feb 2018. To test the new system’s accuracy, reliability , and robustness, we...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2018-0003 Validation of Prototype Continuous Real-Time Vital Signs Video Analytics Monitoring System “CCATT Viewer

  9. Availability and performance of image/video-based vital signs monitoring methods: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirae Harford

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many vital signs, monitoring methods require contact with the patient and/or are invasive in nature. There is increasing interest in developing still and video image-guided monitoring methods that are non-contact and non-invasive. We will undertake a systematic review of still and video image-based monitoring methods. Methods We will perform searches in multiple databases which include MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane library, IEEE Xplore and ACM Digital Library. We will use OpenGrey and Google searches to access unpublished or commercial data. We will not use language or publication date restrictions. The primary goal is to summarise current image-based vital signs monitoring methods, limited to heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturations and blood pressure. Of particular interest will be the effectiveness of image-based methods compared to reference devices. Other outcomes of interest include the quality of the method comparison studies with respect to published reporting guidelines, any limitations of non-contact non-invasive technology and application in different populations. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic review of image-based non-contact methods of vital signs monitoring. Synthesis of currently available technology will facilitate future research in this highly topical area. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42016029167

  10. Prehospital vital signs can predict pain severity: analysis using ordinal logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Jason C; Simpson, Paul M; Middleton, Paul M

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether vital signs in patients suffering from acute pain in the out-of-hospital setting have any association with pain severity measured using an ordinal pain scale. We conducted a retrospective analysis of over 53 000 adult patients aged between 16 and 100 years, who presented to paramedics complaining of acute pain between 1 January 2004 and 30 November 2006. Simple correlation (Spearman's) and ordinal logistic regression techniques were used to create a proportional odds model to explore the relationship between patient-reported pain score and initial vital signs including respiratory rate, pulse rate and blood pressure. There was a weak but significant correlation between respiratory rate and initial pain score (R=0.15, Plogistic regression. In adults, a respiratory rate of 25 breaths/min or more was the most important predictor of having more severe pain. Tachycardia and systolic hypertension may also be important in younger and older patients, respectively. Simple correlation fails to show clinically important associations between prehospital vital signs and pain severity.

  11. Through-Wall Multiple Targets Vital Signs Tracking Based on VMD Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Targets located at the same distance are easily neglected in most through-wall multiple targets detecting applications which use the single-input single-output (SISO ultra-wideband (UWB radar system. In this paper, a novel multiple targets vital signs tracking algorithm for through-wall detection using SISO UWB radar has been proposed. Taking advantage of the high-resolution decomposition of the Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD based algorithm, the respiration signals of different targets can be decomposed into different sub-signals, and then, we can track the time-varying respiration signals accurately when human targets located in the same distance. Intensive evaluation has been conducted to show the effectiveness of our scheme with a 0.15 m thick concrete brick wall. Constant, piecewise-constant and time-varying vital signs could be separated and tracked successfully with the proposed VMD based algorithm for two targets, even up to three targets. For the multiple targets’ vital signs tracking issues like urban search and rescue missions, our algorithm has superior capability in most detection applications.

  12. The effect of live classical piano music on the vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Jorge G; Ruszkowski, Joseph M; Worak, Sandra R

    2008-06-25

    Music and surgery. To determine the effect of live classical piano music on vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Retrospective case series. 203 patients who underwent various ophthalmologic procedures in a period during which a piano was present in the operating room of St. Francis Medical Center. [Note: St. Francis Medical Center has recently been renamed Hawaii Medical Center East.] Demographic data, surgical procedures, and the vital signs of 203 patients who underwent ophthalmic procedures were obtained from patient records. Blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate measured in the preoperative holding area were compared with the same parameters taken in the operating room, with and without exposure to live piano music. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. 115 patients who were exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in the operating room compared with their vital signs measured in the preoperative holding area (P piano music showed a statistically significant increase in mean arterial blood pressure (P piano music lowered the blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

  13. A fuzzy model for processing and monitoring vital signs in ICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentim Ricardo AM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The area of the hospital automation has been the subject of much research, addressing relevant issues which can be automated, such as: management and control (electronic medical records, scheduling appointments, hospitalization, among others; communication (tracking patients, staff and materials, development of medical, hospital and laboratory equipment; monitoring (patients, staff and materials; and aid to medical diagnosis (according to each speciality. Methods In this context, this paper presents a Fuzzy model for helping medical diagnosis of Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients and their vital signs monitored through a multiparameter heart screen. Intelligent systems techniques were used in the data acquisition and processing (sorting, transforming, among others it into useful information, conducting pre-diagnosis and providing, when necessary, alert signs to the medical staff. Conclusions The use of fuzzy logic turned to the medical area can be very useful if seen as a tool to assist specialists in this area. This paper presented a fuzzy model able to monitor and classify the condition of the vital signs of hospitalized patients, sending alerts according to the pre-diagnosis done helping the medical diagnosis.

  14. Monitoring vital signs using early warning scoring systems: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacos, U; Jelsma, J; Jordan, S

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the need for, and the development and utility of, pen-and-paper (Modified) Early Warning Scoring (MEWS/EWS) systems for adult inpatients outside critical care and emergency departments, by reviewing published literature. Serious adverse events can be prevented by recognizing and responding to early signs of clinical and physiological deterioration. Of 534 papers reporting MEWS/EWS systems for adult inpatients identified, 14 contained useable data on development and utility of MEWS/EWS systems. Systems without aggregate weighted scores were excluded. MEWS/EWS systems facilitate recognition of abnormal physiological parameters in deteriorating patients, but have limitations. There is no single validated scoring tool across diagnoses. Evidence of prospective validation of MEWS/EWS systems is limited; neither is implementation based on clinical trials. There is no evidence that implementation of Westernized MEWS/EWS systems is appropriate in resource-poor locations. Better monitoring implies better care, but there is a paucity of data on the validation, implementation, evaluation and clinical testing of vital signs' monitoring systems in general wards. Recording vital signs is not enough. Patient safety continues to depend on nurses' clinical judgment of deterioration. Resources are needed to validate and evaluate MEWS/EWS systems in context. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  16. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Mauricio; Guazzi, Alessandro; Jorge, João; Davis, Sara; Watkinson, Peter; Green, Gabrielle; Shenvi, Asha; McCormick, Kenny; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-09-01

    Current technologies to allow continuous monitoring of vital signs in pre-term infants in the hospital require adhesive electrodes or sensors to be in direct contact with the patient. These can cause stress, pain, and also damage the fragile skin of the infants. It has been established previously that the colour and volume changes in superficial blood vessels during the cardiac cycle can be measured using a digital video camera and ambient light, making it possible to obtain estimates of heart rate or breathing rate. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on adult healthy human volunteers in controlled environments for short periods of time. The authors' current clinical study involves the continuous monitoring of pre-term infants, for at least four consecutive days each, in the high-dependency care area of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The authors have further developed their video-based, non-contact monitoring methods to obtain continuous estimates of heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation for infants nursed in incubators. In this Letter, it is shown that continuous estimates of these three parameters can be computed with an accuracy which is clinically useful. During stable sections with minimal infant motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimates of heart rate and the reference value derived from the ECG is similar to the mean absolute error between the ECG-derived value and the heart rate value from a pulse oximeter. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in the NICU using ambient light is feasible, and the authors have shown that clinically important events such as a bradycardia accompanied by a major desaturation can be identified with their algorithms for processing the video signal.

  17. Vital Signs - Sobredosis de analgésicos recetados (Prescription Drug Overdose)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-02

    Este podcast se basa en un informe de Vital Signs, publicado por los CDC en julio del 2013. La sobredosis de analgésicos recetados es un problema creciente y que no se identifica adecuadamente en las mujeres. Este programa incluye lo que pueden hacer las mujeres y los proveedores de atención médica para reducir el riesgo de sobredosis.  Created: 7/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/2/2013.

  18. Vital Signs - ¡Cuidado con ese bocado! (When Food Bites Back)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-04

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de junio del 2013. Trata sobre las intoxicaciones alimenticias y en particular de las causadas por listeria. Si usted tiene 65 años o más, tiene un sistema inmunitario debilitado o está embarazada, debe ser muy cuidadoso al seleccionar, preparar y guardar alimentos.  Created: 6/4/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/4/2013.

  19. CDC Vital Signs-Alcohol and Pregnancy: Why Take the Risk?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-02

    This podcast is based on the February 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. More than three million women in the U.S. are at risk for exposing their developing baby to alcohol. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities that can affect a child’s whole life. Learn what can be done to keep developing babies healthy.  Created: 2/2/2016 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 2/2/2016.

  20. Visualizing Patient Journals by Combining Vital Signs Monitoring and Natural Language Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan; Petersen, John Asger; Hoppe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-driven approach to graphically presenting text-based patient journals while still maintaining all textual information. The system first creates a timeline representation of a patients’ physiological condition during an admission, which is assessed by electronically...... monitoring vital signs and then combining these into Early Warning Scores (EWS). Hereafter, techniques from Natural Language Processing (NLP) are applied on the existing patient journal to extract all entries. Finally, the two methods are combined into an interactive timeline featuring the ability to see...... drastic changes in the patients’ health, and thereby enabling staff to see where in the journal critical events have taken place....

  1. Visualizing Patient Journals by Combining Vital Signs Monitoring and Natural Language Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan; Petersen, John Asger; Hoppe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    monitoring vital signs and then combining these into Early Warning Scores (EWS). Hereafter, techniques from Natural Language Processing (NLP) are applied on the existing patient journal to extract all entries. Finally, the two methods are combined into an interactive timeline featuring the ability to see......This paper presents a data-driven approach to graphically presenting text-based patient journals while still maintaining all textual information. The system first creates a timeline representation of a patients’ physiological condition during an admission, which is assessed by electronically...... drastic changes in the patients’ health, and thereby enabling staff to see where in the journal critical events have taken place....

  2. CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-07

    This podcast is based on the June 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. People can get Legionnaires’ disease, a serious type of lung infection, from breathing in small water droplets of water contaminated with Legionella germs. Learn what can be done to help prevent Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks and keep people safe.  Created: 6/7/2016 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/7/2016.

  3. Vital Signs – Defeating Breast Cancer PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the November 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Better screening and treatment have contributed to a decline in breast cancer deaths, however, not all women have benefited equally from these improvements. Learn how we can all help reduce deaths from breast cancer.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  4. Vital Signs – Have You Been Tested for Colorectal Cancer?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer screening saves lives, but only if you get tested. If you’re between 50 and 75, talk with your doctor about which test is best for you. If you have inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, ask your doctor if you should start screening before age 50.  Created: 11/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/5/2013.

  5. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. © 2015 AWHONN.

  6. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Gholami-Motlagh

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Massage therapy caused a decrease in systolic BP, pulse, and respiratory rate. It can be concluded that massage therapy was useful for decreasing the vital signs associated with anxiety in healthy women.

  7. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20minutes. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of one minute immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which nonverbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7 to 11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Measuring the influence of blood component infusion rate on recipient vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrie, E A; Hendrickson, J E; Tormey, C A

    2015-11-01

    One of the challenges surrounding blood component administration is the determination of an appropriate rate of infusion. There are very few evidence-based guidelines available to guide healthcare providers looking for a 'standard' infusion rate for red blood cells (RBCs), plasma or platelets (PLTs). Our objective was to determine the extent to which blood component infusion rates were associated with changes in transfusion recipient vital signs. We retrospectively examined records of 3496 component infusions (RBCs, n = 2359; PLTs, n = 478; plasma, n = 659) over a 1-year period at a 362-bed multispecialty hospital. The following data were collected for each transfusion: blood product volume and infusion time, recipient pre- and post-transfusion temperature, blood pressure and pulse rate, and hospital ward where transfusion occurred. Plasma (median 10.4 ml/min) was infused faster than PLTs (median 7.2 ml/min, P 20 ml/min) and clinically significant reported changes in vital signs. There does not appear to be a strong correlation between infusion rate and significant changes in recipient temperature, blood pressure or pulse rate. Based on these data, a reasonable rate for routine transfusion is 2-3 ml/min for RBCs and 7-10 ml/min for plasma and PLTs. Faster infusion rates (>20 ml/min) likely can be applied with close patient monitoring if there is a more urgent need for transfusion. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. Investigation of Sternal Photoplethysmography – Design of a Vital Sign Patch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chreiteh, Shadi

    It is important to obtain reliable measures of vital sign parameters, e.g. heart rate, respiratory rate (RR), and the oxygen saturation of the blood (SpO2). In current clinical practice the RR is assessed by manual count of the chest movements and pulse oximetry probes have been limited to the fi......It is important to obtain reliable measures of vital sign parameters, e.g. heart rate, respiratory rate (RR), and the oxygen saturation of the blood (SpO2). In current clinical practice the RR is assessed by manual count of the chest movements and pulse oximetry probes have been limited......-term recordings.  The main focus of this project is to investigate the clinical applicability of photoplethysmography (PPG) measured at the chest bone (sternum). PPG is an optical method from which the RR and the SpO2 level can be obtained. For this purpose we have developed a prototype of a wearable PPG sensor...... and conducted three clinical studies both on healthy participants and on patients with obstructive lung diseases. The first clinical study was a controlled desaturation study. All 14 subjects were exposed to hypoxia by breathing an air mixture of reduced oxygen concentration in a closed system. We obtained...

  10. The effect of music on pain and vital signs of children before and after endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Alireza; Kianifar, Hamidreza; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Saeidi, Masumeh; Ahanchian, Hamid; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Jarahi, Lida

    2017-07-01

    Gentle music has relaxing and pain reducing effects. In this study, the effect of music on patients' vital signs and pain was investigated before and after endoscopy. This clinical trial study was conducted on 100 children from seven to fourteen years of age in Gha'em Hospital, Mashhad in 2015. Children were divided into two equal groups (case group=50 and control group=50). The control group received endoscopy according to the standards, without any other procedure. For the case group, a classic musical piece by Clayderman was played during endoscopy (from the time of entering the endoscopy room to the end of the process). After conducting endoscopy, FALCC scale and Baker-Wong pain scale were filled for both groups. In addition, children's vital signs including: heart rate (pulse), diastolic and systolic blood pressure were measured before and after endoscopy for both groups. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS16 with the help of Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. No significant difference was found in age, gender distribution of case or control groups (p>0.05). Heart rate and diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the music (case) group compared to the control group before endoscopy (p=0.012). In addition, pain score in patients of the music group was lower than the control group (pmusic for children during endoscopy can reduce pain and anxiety in patients before and after endoscopy.

  11. The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety and Vital Signs of Children during Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on pain, anxiety and vital signs in children undergoing colonoscopy.   Method and Materials: This randomized study was carried out on 101 children (7 to 14 years old requiring colonoscopy. Children were randomly allocated to a control or case group. The case group was played relaxing music (by Clayderman during the procedure. Spiegelberger and pain questionaires were administered immediately after the colonoscopy. Pulse rate, blood pressure and percent blood oxygen saturation were recorded for each subject. The control group was treated in an identical manner, but was not played music during the procedure. Data were analyzed using SPSS software.   Results: Satisfaction, anxiety, pain, and blood pressure were significantly different between the groups                (P0.05.   Conclusion: Music can reduce anxiety and pain during colonoscopy.   Key words: Anxiety, Music,Vital signs, Colonoscopy

  12. Design Considerations for Aural Vital Signs Using PZT Piezoelectric Ceramics Sensor Based on the Computerization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerapong Tantrakoon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to illustrate how system developed for measurement of the aural vital signs such as patient’s heart and lung sounds in the hospital. For heart sounds measurement must operate the frequency response between 20 – 800 Hz, and lung sounds measurement must operate the frequency response between 160 – 4,000 Hz. The method was designed PZT piezoelectric ceramics for both frequency response in the same PZT sensor. It converts a signal from aural vital sign form to voltage signal. The signal is suitably amplified and re-filtered in band pass frequency band. It is converted to digital signal by an analog to digital conversion circuitry developed for the purpose. The results were that all signals can fed to personal computer through the sound card port. With the supporting software for drawing of graphic on the screen, the signal for a specific duration is accessed and stored in the computer’s memory in term of each patient’s data. In conclusion, the data of each patient call dot pcg (.pcg for drawing graph and dot wave (.wave for sound listening or automatic sending via electronic mail to the physician for later analysis of interpreting the sounds on the basis of their time domain and frequency domain representation to diagnose heart disorders.

  13. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    OpenAIRE

    Gholami-Motlagh, Farzaneh; Jouzi, Mina; Soleymani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an inseparable part of our lives and a serious threat to health. Therefore, it is necessary to use certain strategies to prevent disorders caused by anxiety and adjust the vital signs of people. Swedish massage is one of the most recognized techniques for reducing anxiety. This study aims to compare the effects of two massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study with a two-group, crossover desig...

  14. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Gholami-Motlagh; Mina Jouzi; Bahram Soleymani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an inseparable part of our lives and a serious threat to health. Therefore, it is necessary to use certain strategies to prevent disorders caused by anxiety and adjust the vital signs of people. Swedish massage is one of the most recognized techniques for reducing anxiety. This study aims to compare the effects of two massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study with a two-group, crossover d...

  15. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Kyu Leem

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash.

  16. The Vital Role of Basic Mathematics in Teaching and Learning the Mole Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Alka; Koul, Anjni

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the importance of activity-based teaching in understanding the mole concept and the vital role of basic mathematical operations. It describes needs-based training for teachers in a professional development programme in India. Analysis of test results before and after the training indicates that teachers improved their…

  17. Menstruation in girls and adolescents: using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Angela; Laufer, Marc R; Breech, Lesley L

    2006-11-01

    Young patients and their parents often are unsure about what represents normal menstrual patterns, and clinicians also may be unsure about normal ranges for menstrual cycle length and amount and duration of flow through adolescence. It is important to be able to educate young patients and their parents regarding what to expect of a first period and about the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. It is equally important for clinicians to have an understanding of bleeding patterns in girls and adolescents, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate young patients' conditions appropriately. Using the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign adds a powerful tool to the assessment of normal development and the exclusion of pathological conditions.

  18. Novel Flexible Wearable Sensor Materials and Signal Processing for Vital Sign and Human Activity Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servati, Amir; Zou, Liang; Wang, Z Jane; Ko, Frank; Servati, Peyman

    2017-07-13

    Advances in flexible electronic materials and smart textile, along with broad availability of smart phones, cloud and wireless systems have empowered the wearable technologies for significant impact on future of digital and personalized healthcare as well as consumer electronics. However, challenges related to lack of accuracy, reliability, high power consumption, rigid or bulky form factor and difficulty in interpretation of data have limited their wide-scale application in these potential areas. As an important solution to these challenges, we present latest advances in novel flexible electronic materials and sensors that enable comfortable and conformable body interaction and potential for invisible integration within daily apparel. Advances in novel flexible materials and sensors are described for wearable monitoring of human vital signs including, body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate, muscle movements and activity. We then present advances in signal processing focusing on motion and noise artifact removal, data mining and aspects of sensor fusion relevant to future clinical applications of wearable technology.

  19. Healthy eating vital sign: a new assessment tool for eating behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Jessica L J; Lin, Junji; Arguello, Danita; Ball, Trever; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Most dietary questionnaires are not created for use in a clinical setting for an adult health exam. We created the Healthy Eating Vital Sign (HEVS) to assess eating behaviors associated with excess weight. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the HEVS. Methods. Using a cross-sectional study design, participants responded to the HEVS and the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). We analyzed the data descriptively, and, with Pearson's correlation and Cronbach coefficient alpha. Results. We found moderate correlation (rho > 0.3) between multiple items of the HEVS and BFFQ. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.49. Conclusion. Our results support the criterion validity and internal reliability of the HEVS as compared to the BFFQ. The HEVS can help launch a dialogue between patients and providers to monitor and potentially manage dietary behaviors associated with many chronic health conditions, including obesity.

  20. A fundamental conflict of care: Nurses' accounts of balancing patients' sleep with taking vital sign observations at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Joanna; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Fogg, Carole; Griffiths, Peter; Smith, Gary B; Westwood, Greta; Schmidt, Paul E

    2017-12-21

    To explore why adherence to vital sign observations scheduled by an early warning score protocol reduces at night. Regular vital sign observations can reduce avoidable deterioration in hospital. early warning score protocols set the frequency of these observations by the severity of a patient's condition. Vital sign observations are taken less frequently at night, even with an early warning score in place, but no literature has explored why. A qualitative interpretative design informed this study. Seventeen semi-structured interviews with nursing staff working on wards with varying levels of adherence to scheduled vital sign observations. A thematic analysis approach was used. At night, nursing teams found it difficult to balance the competing care goals of supporting sleep with taking vital sign observations. The night-time frequency of these observations was determined by clinical judgement, ward-level expectations of observation timing and the risk of disturbing other patients. Patients with COPD or dementia could be under-monitored, while patients nearing the end of life could be over-monitored. In this study, we found an early warning score algorithm focused on deterioration prevention did not account for long-term management or palliative care trajectories. Nurses were therefore less inclined to wake such patients to take vital sign observations at night. However, the perception of widespread exceptions and lack of evidence regarding optimum frequency risks delegitimising the early warning score approach. This may pose a risk to patient safety, particularly patients with dementia or chronic conditions. Nurses should document exceptions and discuss these with the wider team. Hospitals should monitor why vital sign observations are missed at night, identify which groups are under-monitored and provide guidance on prioritising competing expectations. early warning score protocols should take account of different care trajectories. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of

  1. UnoViS: the MedIT public unobtrusive vital signs database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartzek, Tobias; Czaplik, Michael; Antink, Christoph Hoog; Eilebrecht, Benjamin; Walocha, Rafael; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    While PhysioNet is a large database for standard clinical vital signs measurements, such a database does not exist for unobtrusively measured signals. This inhibits progress in the vital area of signal processing for unobtrusive medical monitoring as not everybody owns the specific measurement systems to acquire signals. Furthermore, if no common database exists, a comparison between different signal processing approaches is not possible. This gap will be closed by our UnoViS database. It contains different recordings in various scenarios ranging from a clinical study to measurements obtained while driving a car. Currently, 145 records with a total of 16.2 h of measurement data is available, which are provided as MATLAB files or in the PhysioNet WFDB file format. In its initial state, only (multichannel) capacitive ECG and unobtrusive PPG signals are, together with a reference ECG, included. All ECG signals contain annotations by a peak detector and by a medical expert. A dataset from a clinical study contains further clinical annotations. Additionally, supplementary functions are provided, which simplify the usage of the database and thus the development and evaluation of new algorithms. The development of urgently needed methods for very robust parameter extraction or robust signal fusion in view of frequent severe motion artifacts in unobtrusive monitoring is now possible with the database.

  2. Impact of peer pressure on accuracy of reporting vital signs: An interprofessional comparison between nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Alyshah; Beran, Tanya N

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical relationship between nursing and medicine has long been known, yet its direct influence on procedural tasks has yet to be considered. Drawing on the theory of conformity from social psychology, we suggest that nursing students are likely to report incorrect information in response to subtle social pressures imposed by medical students. Second-year medical and third-year nursing students took vital signs readings from a patient simulator. In a simulation exercise, three actors, posing as medical students, and one nursing student participant all took a total of three rounds of vital signs on a high-fidelity patient simulator. In the first two rounds the three actors individually stated the same correct vital signs values, and on the third round the three actors individually stated the same incorrect vital sign values. This same procedure was repeated with actors posing as nursing students, and one medical student. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that nursing student participants (M = 2.84; SD = 1.24) reported a higher number of incorrect vital signs than did medical student participants (M = 2.13; SD = 1.07), F (1,100) = 5.51, p = 0.021 (Cohen's d = 0.61). The study indicated that social pressure may prevent nursing students from questioning incorrect information within interprofessional environments, potentially affecting quality of care.

  3. CDC Signos Vitales: Enfermedad del legionario (CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-07

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de junio del 2016 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Las personas pueden contraer la enfermedad del legionario, un tipo grave de infección pulmonar, al inhalar pequeñas gotitas de agua contaminada con bacterias Legionella. Obtenga más información sobre lo que se puede hacer para ayudar a prevenir brotes de enfermedad del legionario y mantener seguras a las personas.  Created: 6/7/2016 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/7/2016.

  4. Signos Vitales de los CDC Cómo prevenir los brotes de norovirus (Vital Signs-Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de junio del 2014 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Los norovirus infectan cada año a cerca de 20 millones de personas en los Estados Unidos. Sepa cómo protegerse y proteger a su familia de esta enfermedad que es muy contagiosa y potencialmente grave.  Created: 6/3/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/3/2014.

  5. Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Brandy Viera Valdés; Paula Aguila Solis; Francisco Valladares Carvajal; Marcos D. Iraola Ferrer; Pablo. A. Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    Background: Title: Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction. The cardiorespiratory reanimation is a proved procedure that can save a human life in case of a cardiorespiratory stop. For three years it is imparted in the University Hospital of Cienfuegos, a training for this procedure, to the family of patients with sharp myocardic infarction. Objective: To evaluate the knowledge acquired by the relatives of the patients during the training...

  6. Educational technology "Anatomy and Vital Signs": Evaluation study of content, appearance and usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; de Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Oliveira, Gustavo Faria; Felipe, Helena Reche

    2015-11-01

    The use of new technology has recently grown considerably as an increasing number of college students using Internet. In nursing education, the personal computer and the Internet facilitate teaching theoretical and practical knowledge. Evaluate an educational technology known as "Anatomy and Vital Signs" with respect to content, appearance and usability. This was a first stage evaluation-by specialists to verify content and functioning, prior to a second validation as to learning by students. A methodological study in which instructional technologists (11 participants) and nursing specialists (17 participants) used the technology in an unguided manner and completed three questionnaires. The evaluation was measured by the difference between disagreement and agreement for each statement in the questionnaires. Most of the items were positively evaluated at a level higher than 70% by most of the evaluators except for the following usability criteria: grouping by shape, minimum actions and user control, which did not attain the 70% agreement level among instructional technologists. The evaluation was useful to improve the technology and guarantee suitable product for nursing education. It may be a reliable educational tool for nursing education that applies technological resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xikun Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications.

  8. Certification in emergency nursing associated with vital signs attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Christian N; Polomano, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    Regimented vital signs (VS) assessment for all emergency patients is a common practice in many US emergency departments despite the paucity of evidence supporting its utility. Nurse attitude may be a factor that maintains this ritualized practice. Understanding the relationship between attitudes, practices, and nurse demographic factors may be the first step to challenging this ritual in order to implement evidence-based practices. A 20-item questionnaire was developed to assess emergency nurse attitudes and practices related to VS. A convenience sample of emergency nurses from the mid-Atlantic region of the United States was used. Eighty-one emergency nurses participated. Results demonstrated wide variations in VS practice and attitudes, though some strongly held attitudes are inconsistent with the literature. Certification in emergency nursing had significant associations with beliefs that nurses' clinical judgment should be the determinant for VS frequency (p nurse attitudes and practices of VS so that evidence-based changes can be implemented and further research on VS frequency conducted. It also demonstrates the relationship between specialty certification and evidence-supported attitudes and practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of therapeutic touch on the vital signs of patients before coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Zahra; Shahsavari, Hooman; Moeini, Mahin

    2010-01-01

    Currently healthy heart word considered to be the objective of community health applications in many countries of the world because cardiovascular diseases are the most important factor in mortality of humans, worldwide. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery is one of the most common surgery procedures for these patients. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of therapeutic touch on medical vital signs of patients before coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The present study is a clinical trial with 44 samples that were selected by easy sampling method and based on two separate lists of random numbers for both men and women; they were divided into two groups. In the therapeutic touch group, intervention therapy was applied on patents for 20 minutes. Data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Test results showed that there was a significant difference between the mean pulse rate before and after intervention in both groups (p touch therapy as a safe and effective intervention on the patients which were revealed in this study, this technique can be used as a simple, cheap and applicable technique in all health care centers to help these patients.

  10. Logistic regression function for detection of suspicious performance during baseline evaluations using concussion vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin David; Womble, Melissa N; Rohling, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized logistic regression to determine whether performance patterns on Concussion Vital Signs (CVS) could differentiate known groups with either genuine or feigned performance. For the embedded measure development group (n = 174), clinical patients and undergraduate students categorized as feigning obtained significantly lower scores on the overall test battery mean for the CVS, Shipley-2 composite score, and California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition subtests than did genuinely performing individuals. The final full model of 3 predictor variables (Verbal Memory immediate hits, Verbal Memory immediate correct passes, and Stroop Test complex reaction time correct) was significant and correctly classified individuals in their known group 83% of the time (sensitivity = .65; specificity = .97) in a mixed sample of young-adult clinical cases and simulators. The CVS logistic regression function was applied to a separate undergraduate college group (n = 378) that was asked to perform genuinely and identified 5% as having possibly feigned performance indicating a low false-positive rate. The failure rate was 11% and 16% at baseline cognitive testing in samples of high school and college athletes, respectively. These findings have particular relevance given the increasing use of computerized test batteries for baseline cognitive testing and return-to-play decisions after concussion.

  11. Computational Depth of Anesthesia via Multiple Vital Signs Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammar Sadrawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the depth of anesthesia (DoA index using artificial neural networks (ANN which is performed as the modeling technique. Totally 63-patient data is addressed, for both modeling and testing of 17 and 46 patients, respectively. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD is utilized to purify between the electroencephalography (EEG signal and the noise. The filtered EEG signal is subsequently extracted to achieve a sample entropy index by every 5-second signal. Then, it is combined with other mean values of vital signs, that is, electromyography (EMG, heart rate (HR, pulse, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and signal quality index (SQI to evaluate the DoA index as the input. The 5 doctor scores are averaged to obtain an output index. The mean absolute error (MAE is utilized as the performance evaluation. 10-fold cross-validation is performed in order to generalize the model. The ANN model is compared with the bispectral index (BIS. The results show that the ANN is able to produce lower MAE than BIS. For the correlation coefficient, ANN also has higher value than BIS tested on the 46-patient testing data. Sensitivity analysis and cross-validation method are applied in advance. The results state that EMG has the most effecting parameter, significantly.

  12. Is the Newest Vital Sign a Useful Measure of Health Literacy in HIV Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordovski, Victoria M; Woods, Steven Paul; Avci, Gunes; Verduzco, Marizela; Morgan, Erin E

    Limited health literacy is common among persons infected with HIV and has been linked to poor mental and physical health outcomes, but there are no well-validated screening measures of health literacy in this vulnerable clinical population. The present study evaluates the usefulness of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) as a brief measure of health literacy in HIV disease. Seventy-eight HIV+ adults were administered the NVS, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and Single Item Literacy Screener (SILS). Main criterion variables included plasma HIV viral load, medication management capacity, self-efficacy for medication management, and perceived relationships with healthcare providers. The NVS showed good internal consistency and moderate correlations with the REALM and SILS. Rates of limited health literacy were highest on the NVS (30.3%) as compared to SILS (6.6%) and REALM (9.2%). A series of regressions controlling for education showed that the NVS was incrementally predictive of viral load, medication management capacity and self-efficacy, and relationships with healthcare providers, above and beyond the REALM and SILS. The NVS shows evidence of reliability, convergent validity, and incremental criterion-related validity and thus may serve as useful screening tool for assessing health literacy in HIV disease.

  13. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xikun; Jin, Tian

    2016-11-30

    The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT) are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications.

  14. [Effects of blood transfusion on vital signs and heart function in preterm infants with anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying-Nian; Tong, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yun-Feng

    2015-04-01

    To explore the effects of blood transfusion on the vital signs and heart function in preterm infants with anemia. A total of 40 anemic preterm infants with gestational age less than 34 weeks who accepted blood transfusion one week after birth were enrolled for a prospective cohort study. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), fractional shortening (FS), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO) were determined with portable ultrasonic equipment before blood transfusion and within 24 hours after blood transfusion. Apnea was detected and the times of apnea were recorded within 24 hours before and after blood transfusion. The resting body temperature and blood pressure were also determined before and after blood transfusion. Additionally the resting heart rate, respiratory rate, and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were recorded within 4 hours before and after blood transfusion. The heart rate and respiratory rate decreased significantly within 4 hours after blood transfusion (Ptransfusion, and nobody had apnea within 24 hours after blood transfusion. The systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, and body temperature showed no significant changes after blood transfusion (P>0.05), and the LVEF, SV, CO, and FS showed no significant changes after blood transfusion as well (P>0.05). Blood transfusion can improve the clinical symptoms and shows no significant effect on the heart function in preterm infants with anemia.

  15. Overcoming the problem of diagnostic heterogeneity in applying measurement-based care in clinical practice: the concept of psychiatric vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Galione, Janine N

    2012-02-01

    Measurement-based care refers to the use of standardized scales to measure the outcome of psychiatric treatment. Diagnostic heterogeneity poses a challenge toward the adoption of a measurement-based care approach toward outcome evaluation in clinical practice. In the present article, we propose adopting the concept of psychiatric vital signs to facilitate measurement-based care. Medical vital signs are measures of basic physiologic functions that are routinely determined in medical settings. Vital signs are often a primary outcome measure, and they are also often adjunctive measurements. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we examined the frequency of depression and anxiety in a diagnostically heterogeneous group of psychiatric outpatients to determine the appropriateness of considering their measurement as psychiatric vital signs. Three thousand psychiatric outpatients were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV supplemented with items from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. We determined the frequency of depression and anxiety evaluated according to the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia items. In the entire sample of 3000 patients, 79.3% (n = 2378) reported clinically significant depression of at least mild severity, 64.4% (n = 1932) reported anxiety of at least mild severity, and 87.4% (n = 2621) reported either anxiety or depression. In all 10 diagnostic categories examined, most patients had clinically significant anxiety or depression of at least mild severity. These findings support the routine assessment of anxiety and depression in clinical practice because almost all patients will have these problems as part of their initial presentation. Even for those patients without depression or anxiety, the case could be made that the measurement of depression and anxiety is relevant and analogous to measuring certain physiologic

  16. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Walston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rapid-response teams (RRTs are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations. The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10% based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results: A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25-3.27], tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73-4.92], and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42-3.56] upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65-4.60], more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08-2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19-2.80] for high BP, higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44-7.07] and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43-3.67]. Early RRT activation was associated with increased healthcare

  17. Frequent Physical Health Monitoring as Vital Signs with Psychological Status Monitoring for Search and Rescue of Handicapped, Diseased and Eldery Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for frequent health monitoring as vital signs with psycholo9gical status monitoring for search and rescue of handicapped person is proposed. Heart beat pulse rate, body temperature, blood pressure, blesses and consciousness is well known vital signs. In particular for Alzheimer diseased persons, handicapped peoples, etc. it is very important to monitor vital signs in particular in the event of evacuation from disaster occurred areas together with location and attitude inform...

  18. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviours, and Cardiovascular Health: When Will Cardiorespiratory Fitness Become a Vital Sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Although it is generally agreed upon that a physically active lifestyle and regular exercise are good for heart health, it is much less appreciated by the public that the prolonged hours of sedentary time resulting from sitting at work or screen time are also risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes and other cardiometabolic diseases. In this short narrative review, evidence is discussed and prudent recommendations are made in the context of the sedentary, affluent lifestyle that characterizes a large proportion of our population. It has become overwhelmingly clear that a sedentary lifestyle is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. In addition, vigorous physical activity and exercise is also associated with metabolic and cardiovascular adaptations that are compatible with cardiovascular health. In that regard, cardiorespiratory fitness, a reliable metric to assess the ability of the cardiovascular system to sustain prolonged physical work, has been shown to be the most powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, way beyond classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. On the basis of the evidence available, it is proposed that both dimensions of overall physical activity level (reducing sedentary time and performing regular physical activity or endurance type exercise) should be targeted to reduce CVD risk. Finally, because of the robust evidence that poor cardiorespiratory fitness is an independent risk factor for CVD and related mortality, it is proposed that this simple physiological metric should be incorporated as a vital sign in CVD risk factor evaluation and management. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country.

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    Tim Baker

    Full Text Available Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU in Tanzania.Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001. A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR 4.9 (2.9-8.3. Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5-16.2. In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02 giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94.The introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol

  20. Statistical assessment on a combined analysis of GRYN-ROMN-UCBN upland vegetation vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    different results and/or computational instability. However, when only fixed effects are of interest, the survey package (svyglm and svyolr) may be suitable for a model-assisted analysis for trend. We provide possible directions for future research into combined analysis for ordinal and continuous vital sign indictors.

  1. Clinical validation study of the SignCare Vital Signs Monitor of Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Andrés Rodríguez-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The SignCare device is as reliable as the commercial monitor in the qualitative detection of morphologic alterations of electrocardiogram records, as well as in breathing, temperature, oxygen saturation and blood pressure parameters, which makes it recommendable for clinical use in adult population.

  2. Effects of hammock positioning in behavioral status, vital signs, and pain in preterms: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Valdecira Rodrigues de; Oliveira, Pricila Mara Novais de; Azevedo, Vivian Mara Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2018-03-15

    The hammock positioning within the incubators simulates the intrauterine environment, however, there is little evidence of its benefits and possible risks. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of hammock positioning on behavioral status, vital signs, and pain in very low birth weight preterm newborns. This is a quasi-experimental/case series study in which premature infants (Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Can Fluctuations in Vital Signs Be Used for Pain Assessment in Critically Ill Patients with a Traumatic Brain Injury?

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    Caroline Arbour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many critically ill patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI are unable to communicate. While observation of behaviors is recommended for pain assessment in nonverbal populations, they are undetectable in TBI patients who are under the effects of neuroblocking agents. Aim. This study aimed to validate the use of vital signs for pain detection in critically ill TBI patients. Methods. Using a repeated measure within subject design, participants (N=45 were observed for 1 minute before (baseline, during, and 15 minutes after two procedures: noninvasive blood pressure: NIBP (nonnociceptive and turning (nociceptive. At each assessment, vital signs (e.g., systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, capillary saturation (SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and intracranial pressure (ICP were recorded. Results. Significant fluctuations (P<0.05 in diastolic (F=6.087, HR (F=3.566, SpO2 (F=5.740, and ICP (F=3.776 were found across assessments, but they were similar during both procedures. In contrast, RR was found to increase exclusively during turning (t=3.933; P<0.001 and was correlated to participants’ self-report. Conclusions. Findings from this study support previous ones that vital signs are not specific for pain detection. While RR could be a potential pain indicator in critical care, further research is warranted to support its validity in TBI patients with different LOC.

  4. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Motlagh, Farzaneh; Jouzi, Mina; Soleymani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is an inseparable part of our lives and a serious threat to health. Therefore, it is necessary to use certain strategies to prevent disorders caused by anxiety and adjust the vital signs of people. Swedish massage is one of the most recognized techniques for reducing anxiety. This study aims to compare the effects of two massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women. This quasi-experimental study with a two-group, crossover design was conducted on 20 healthy women who were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to BNC (Back, Neck, and Chest) or LAF (Leg, Arm, and Face) groups. Massage therapy was carried out for a 14-week period (two 4-week massage therapy sessions and 6 weeks washout stage). Gathered data were analyzed using paired t-test with a significance level of P massage therapy (P Massage therapy caused a decrease in systolic BP, pulse, and respiratory rate. It can be concluded that massage therapy was useful for decreasing the vital signs associated with anxiety in healthy women.

  5. Vital Signs: Repeat Births Among Teens — United States, 2007–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin, Lorrie; Warner, Lee; O’Neil, Mary Elizabeth; Duong, Linh M.; Marshall, Cassondra; Hastings, Philip A.; Harrison, Ayanna T.; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Teen childbearing has potential negative health, economic, and social consequences for mother and child. Repeat teen childbearing further constrains the mother’s education and employment possibilities. Rates of preterm and low birth weight are higher in teens with a repeat birth, compared with first births. Methods To assess patterns of repeat childbearing and postpartum contraceptive use among teens, CDC analyzed natality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and t...

  6. Evaluating Effects of Language Recognition on Language Rights and the Vitality of New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rachel Locker; Manning, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Status planning through legislation made New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) an official language in 2006. But this strong symbolic action did not create resources or mechanisms to further the aims of the act. In this article we discuss the extent to which legal recognition and ensuing language-planning activities by state and community have affected…

  7. The Effect of Plastic Cover on Regulation of Vital Signs in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Cross-over Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the susceptibility of preterm infants to disturbances of vital signs, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of using plastic covers on regulation of vital signs in preterm neonates.Methods: This randomized, cross-over, clinical trial was carried out on 80 preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The study was conducted in two days (on the second and third days of the infants’ life. In group 1, plastic cover was used during the first day followed by the use of blanket on the second day, while the order was reversed in group 2. Digital thermometer was used to measure the infants’ axillary temperature. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured through monitoring. To analyze the data, descriptive (Mean and SE, 95%CI and inferential statistics (repeated measurement and ANCOVA tests were used in SPSS version 13 and MiniTab software.Results: Fourteen infants who were covered with blanket were found to suffer from hypothermia, while no infant with a plastic cover encountered this problem. The percentage of arterial blood oxygen saturation in the group with plastic covers was higher, and as a result, the infants received less oxygen supplements. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in heart rate between the groups.Conclusion: Use of plastic cover during NICU stay prevented hypothermia in premature infants, with the arterial blood oxygen saturation being within the normal limits. Yet, it did not seem to have a significant effect on other vital signs.

  8. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system.

  9. Distributions and Behavior of Vital Signs in Critically Ill Children by Admission Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eytan, Danny; Goodwin, Andrew J; Greer, Robert; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Mazwi, Mjaye; Laussen, Peter C

    2018-02-01

    Define the distributions of heart rate and intraarterial blood pressure in children at admission to an ICU based on admission diagnosis and examine trends in these physiologic signs over 72 hours from admission (or to discharge if earlier). A retrospective analysis of continuously acquired signals. A quaternary and primary referral children's hospital with a general PICU and cardiac critical care unit. One thousand two hundred eighty-nine patients less than 18 years old were analyzed. Data from individual patient admissions were divided into 19 groups by primary admission diagnosis or surgical procedure. None. Distributions at admission are dependent on patient age and admission diagnosis (p refinement of patient monitoring strategies.

  10. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on vital signs and perceived quality of sleep in the intermediate care unit: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Jamie; Mwatha, Catherine; Davis, Karen K

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation in hospitalized patients is common and can have serious detrimental effects on recovery from illness. Lavender aromatherapy has improved sleep in a variety of clinical settings, but the effect has not been tested in the intermediate care unit. To determine the effect of inhalation of 100% lavender oil on patients' vital signs and perceived quality of sleep in an intermediate care unit. A randomized controlled pilot study was conducted in 50 patients. Control patients received usual care. The treatment group had 3 mL of 100% pure lavender oil in a glass jar in place at the bedside from 10 pm until 6 am. Vital signs were recorded at intervals throughout the night. At 6 am all patients completed the Richard Campbell Sleep Questionnaire to assess quality of sleep. Blood pressure was significantly lower between midnight and 4 am in the treatment group than in the control group (P = .03) According to the overall mean change score in blood pressure between the baseline and 6 am measurements, the treatment group had a decrease in blood pressure and the control group had an increase; however, the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .12). Mean overall sleep score was higher in the intervention group (48.25) than in the control group (40.10), but the difference was not significant. Lavender aromatherapy may be an effective way to improve sleep in an intermediate care unit.

  11. Effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during laparotomy in dogs

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    H. Naddaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during and after laparotomy in dogs. Eight clinically healthy, adult male dogs, weighing 20 kg were used. All dogs were initially sedated by acepromazine. Thirty minutes later, ketamine plus xylazine was used to induce anesthesia. Surgical incision of laparotomy was done. After a 5 min manipulation of the abdominal organs, the incision was sutured. Vital signs including heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature (RT were recorded at the times of -30: premedication, 0: induction and Surgical incision, 30: End of surgery, 60, 90 and 120 min. Blood was sampled at the above mentioned times and analyzed using a commercial ELISA kit for cortisol. A significant decreasing trend in RT was observed during the studied times. No significant changes were observed in heart rate and respiratory rate (p>0.05, except at the time of 60 respiratory rate significantly decreased when compared to the time of 90 (p=0.026 and 120 (p=0.041. A non-significant but increasing trend in plasma levels of cortisol was observed.

  12. Optimizing usability and signal capture: a proactive risk assessment for the implementation of a wireless vital sign monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Rebecca; Capan, Muge; Lodato, Peter; Mosby, Danielle; Thomas, Tamekia; Arnold, Ryan; Miller, Kristen

    2017-11-01

    Wearable vital sign monitors are a promising step towards optimal patient surveillance, providing continuous data to allow for early detection and treatment of patient deterioration. However, as wearable monitors become more widely adopted in healthcare, there is a corresponding need to carefully design the implementation of these tools to promote their integration into clinical workflows and defend against potential misuse and patient harm. Prior to the roll-out of these monitors, our multidisciplinary team of clinicians, clinical engineers, information technologists and research investigators conducted a modified Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (HFMEA), a proactive evaluation of potential problems which could be encountered in the use of a wireless vital signs monitoring system. This evaluation was accomplished by focussing on the identification of procedures and actions that would be required during the devices' regular usage, as well as the implementation of the system as a comprehensive process. Using this method, the team identified challenges that would arise throughout the lifecycle of the device and developed recommendations to address them. This proactive risk assessment can guide the implementation of wearable patient monitors, optimising the use of innovative health information technology.

  13. Body indices and basic vital signs in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan; Koupil, Ilona; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Vorisek, Viktor; Seifert, Bohumil; Pozler, Oldrich; Zivny, Pavel; Douda, Tomas; Palicka, Vladimir; Holcik, Jan

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection may contribute to reduced stature, risk of hypertension or obesity. The aim was to evaluate body indices in Hp positive and negative persons. A total of 2436 subjects (4-100 years old) were tested for Hp status by 13 C-urea breath test. Data on height and weight were collected for 84%, and blood pressure for 80% of the study subjects. The prevalence of Hp infection was 41.6%. The odds ratio for a 10-year increase in age was 1.21 (95% CI 1.17-1.25, p-value <0.001). Statistically significant negative association of Hp positivity with body height was most pronounced in the younger age groups, while a positive association of Hp positivity with body mass index was only seen in those aged 15+ years. There was a negative effect of Hp positivity on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in subjects below 25 and a relatively strong positive effect on blood pressure in subjects over 65 years. Residual confounding by social characteristics as a possible explanation for the associations of Hp positivity with height and blood pressure cannot be excluded. Unmeasured factors related to social and family environment may cause the apparent association between Hp positivity and children's growth and blood pressure

  14. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient’s Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hristoskova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF. Its novelty is the integration of: (i personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient’s condition on the most suited device within the physician’s reach.

  15. Integration of Single-Center Data-Driven Vital Sign Parameters into a Modified Pediatric Early Warning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Catherine E; Harrysson, Iliana J; Goel, Veena V; Strandberg, Erika J; Kan, Peiyi; Franzon, Deborah E; Pageler, Natalie M

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric early warning systems using expert-derived vital sign parameters demonstrate limited sensitivity and specificity in identifying deterioration. We hypothesized that modified tools using data-driven vital sign parameters would improve the performance of a validated tool. Retrospective case control. Quaternary-care children's hospital. Hospitalized, noncritically ill patients less than 18 years old. Cases were defined as patients who experienced an emergent transfer to an ICU or out-of-ICU cardiac arrest. Controls were patients who never required intensive care. Cases and controls were split into training and testing groups. The Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System was modified by integrating data-driven heart rate and respiratory rate parameters (modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System 1 and 2). Modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System 1 used the 10th and 90th percentiles as normal parameters, whereas modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System 2 used fifth and 95th percentiles. The training set consisted of 358 case events and 1,830 controls; the testing set had 331 case events and 1,215 controls. In the sensitivity analysis, 207 of the 331 testing set cases (62.5%) were predicted by the original tool versus 206 (62.2%; p = 0.54) with modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System 1 and 191 (57.7%; p Early Warning System 2. For specificity, 1,005 of the 1,215 testing set control patients (82.7%) were identified by original Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System versus 1,013 (83.1%; p = 0.54) with modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System 1 and 1,055 (86.8%; p Early Warning System 2. There was no net gain in sensitivity and specificity using either of the modified Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System tools. Integration of data-driven vital sign parameters into a validated pediatric early warning system did not significantly impact sensitivity or specificity, and all the tools showed lower than desired sensitivity and

  16. Multicentre validation of a sepsis prediction algorithm using only vital sign data in the emergency department, general ward and ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qingqing; Jay, Melissa; Hoffman, Jana L; Calvert, Jacob; Barton, Christopher; Shimabukuro, David; Shieh, Lisa; Chettipally, Uli; Fletcher, Grant; Kerem, Yaniv; Zhou, Yifan; Das, Ritankar

    2018-01-26

    We validate a machine learning-based sepsis-prediction algorithm ( InSight ) for the detection and prediction of three sepsis-related gold standards, using only six vital signs. We evaluate robustness to missing data, customisation to site-specific data using transfer learning and generalisability to new settings. A machine-learning algorithm with gradient tree boosting. Features for prediction were created from combinations of six vital sign measurements and their changes over time. A mixed-ward retrospective dataset from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center (San Francisco, California, USA) as the primary source, an intensive care unit dataset from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, Massachusetts, USA) as a transfer-learning source and four additional institutions' datasets to evaluate generalisability. 684 443 total encounters, with 90 353 encounters from June 2011 to March 2016 at UCSF. None. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for detection and prediction of sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. For detection of sepsis and severe sepsis, InSight achieves an AUROC curve of 0.92 (95% CI 0.90 to 0.93) and 0.87 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.88), respectively. Four hours before onset, InSight predicts septic shock with an AUROC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.94 to 0.98) and severe sepsis with an AUROC of 0.85 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.91). InSight outperforms existing sepsis scoring systems in identifying and predicting sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. This is the first sepsis screening system to exceed an AUROC of 0.90 using only vital sign inputs. InSight is robust to missing data, can be customised to novel hospital data using a small fraction of site data and retains strong discrimination across all institutions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Vital Sign Prediction of Adverse Maternal Outcomes in Women with Hypovolemic Shock: The Role of Shock Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M El Ayadi

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal vital sign predictor of adverse maternal outcomes in women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage and to develop thresholds for referral/intensive monitoring and need for urgent intervention to inform a vital sign alert device for low-resource settings.We conducted secondary analyses of a dataset of pregnant/postpartum women with hypovolemic shock in low-resource settings (n = 958. Using receiver-operating curve analysis, we evaluated the predictive ability of pulse, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, shock index, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure for three adverse maternal outcomes: (1 death, (2 severe maternal outcome (death or severe end organ dysfunction morbidity; and (3 a combined severe maternal and critical interventions outcome comprising death, severe end organ dysfunction morbidity, intensive care admission, blood transfusion ≥ 5 units, or emergency hysterectomy. Two threshold parameters with optimal rule-in and rule-out characteristics were selected based on sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values.Shock index was consistently among the top two predictors across adverse maternal outcomes. Its discriminatory ability was significantly better than pulse and pulse pressure for maternal death (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively, diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome (p<0.01, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome and critical interventions (p<0.01. A shock index threshold of ≥ 0.9 maintained high sensitivity (100.0 with clinical practicality, ≥ 1.4 balanced specificity (range 70.0-74.8 with negative predictive value (range 93.2-99.2, and ≥ 1.7 further improved specificity (range 80.7-90.8 without compromising negative predictive value (range 88.8-98.5.For women with hypovolemic shock from obstetric hemorrhage, shock index was

  18. Vital signs: Repeat births among teens - United States, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    Teen childbearing has potential negative health, economic, and social consequences for mother and child. Repeat teen childbearing further constrains the mother's education and employment possibilities. Rates of preterm and low birth weight are higher in teens with a repeat birth, compared with first births. To assess patterns of repeat childbearing and postpartum contraceptive use among teens, CDC analyzed natality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2007-2010. Based on 2010 NVSS data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, of more than 367,000 births to teens aged 15-19 years, 18.3% were repeat births. The percentage of teen births that represented repeat births decreased by 6.2% between 2007 and 2010. Disparities in repeat teen births exist by race/ethnicity, with the highest percentages found among American Indian/Alaska Natives (21.6%), Hispanics (20.9%), and non-Hispanic blacks (20.4%) and lowest among non-Hispanic whites (14.8%). Wide geographic disparities in the percentage of teen births that were repeat births also exist, ranging from 22% in Texas to 10% in New Hampshire. PRAMS data from 16 reporting areas (15 states and New York City) indicate that 91.2% of teen mothers used a contraceptive method 2-6 months after giving birth, but only 22.4% of teen mothers used the most effective methods. Teens with a previous live birth were significantly more likely to use the most effective methods postpartum compared with those with no prior live birth (29.6% versus 20.9%, respectively). Non-Hispanic white and Hispanic teens were significantly more likely to use the most effective methods than non-Hispanic black teens (24.6% and 27.9% versus 14.3%, respectively). The percentage of teens reporting postpartum use of the most effective methods varied greatly geographically across the PRAMS reporting areas, ranging from 50.3% in Colorado to 7.2% in New York State. Although the

  19. Vital signs: births to teens aged 15-17 years--United States, 1991-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Romero, Lisa; Spitz, Alison; Gavin, Lorrie; Barfield, Wanda

    2014-04-11

    Teens who give birth at age 15-17 years are at increased risk for adverse medical and social outcomes of teen pregnancy. To examine trends in the rate and proportion of births to teens aged 15-19 years that were to teens aged 15-17 years, CDC analyzed 1991-2012 National Vital Statistics System data. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data from 2006-2010 were used to examine sexual experience, contraceptive use, and receipt of prevention opportunities among female teens aged 15-17 years. During 1991-2012, the rate of births per 1,000 teens declined from 17.9 to 5.4 for teens aged 15 years, 36.9 to 12.9 for those aged 16 years, and 60.6 to 23.7 for those aged 17 years. In 2012, the birth rate per 1,000 teens aged 15-17 years was higher for Hispanics (25.5), non-Hispanic blacks (21.9), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (17.0) compared with non-Hispanic whites (8.4) and Asians/Pacific Islanders (4.1). The rate also varied by state, ranging from 6.2 per 1,000 teens aged 15-17 years in New Hampshire to 29.0 in the District of Columbia. In 2012, there were 86,423 births to teens aged 15-17 years, accounting for 28% of all births to teens aged 15-19 years. This percentage declined from 36% in 1991 to 28% in 2012 (pteens aged 15-17 years received formal sex education on birth control or how to say no to sex, 24% had not spoken with parents about either topic; among sexually experienced female teens, 83% reported no formal sex education before first sex. Among currently sexually active female teens (those who had sex within 3 months of the survey) aged 15-17 years, 58% used clinical birth control services in the past 12 months, and 92% used contraception at last sex; however, only 1% used the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. Births to teens aged 15-17 years have declined but still account for approximately one quarter of births to teens aged 15-19 years. These data highlight opportunities to increase younger teens exposure to interventions that delay

  20. Vital Signs – Derrotemos al cáncer de mama (Defeating Breast Cancer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    Este podcast está basado en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de noviembre del 2012. El cáncer de mama es la segunda causa principal de muerte por cáncer en las mujeres en los Estados Unidos. Mejores pruebas de detección y tratamientos han contribuido a una disminución en las muertes por cáncer de mama; sin embargo, no todas las mujeres se han beneficiado igualmente de estos avances. Sepa cómo todos podemos ayudar a reducir las muertes por esta enfermedad.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  1. Vital Signs: Births to Teens Aged 15–17 Years — United States, 1991–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Romero, Lisa; Spitz, Alison; Gavin, Lorrie; Barfield, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Background Teens who give birth at age 15–17 years are at increased risk for adverse medical and social outcomes of teen pregnancy. Methods To examine trends in the rate and proportion of births to teens aged 15–19 years that were to teens aged 15–17 years, CDC analyzed 1991–2012 National Vital Statistics System data. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data from 2006–2010 were used to examine sexual experience, contraceptive use, and receipt of prevention opportunities among female teens aged 15–17 years. Results During 1991–2012, the rate of births per 1,000 teens declined from 17.9 to 5.4 for teens aged 15 years, 36.9 to 12.9 for those aged 16 years, and 60.6 to 23.7 for those aged 17 years. In 2012, the birth rate per 1,000 teens aged 15–17 years was higher for Hispanics (25.5), non-Hispanic blacks (21.9), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (17.0) compared with non-Hispanic whites (8.4) and Asians/Pacific Islanders (4.1). The rate also varied by state, ranging from 6.2 per 1,000 teens aged 15–17 years in New Hampshire to 29.0 in the District of Columbia. In 2012, there were 86,423 births to teens aged 15–17 years, accounting for 28% of all births to teens aged 15–19 years. This percentage declined from 36% in 1991 to 28% in 2012 (pteens aged 15–17 years received formal sex education on birth control or how to say no to sex, 24% had not spoken with parents about either topic; among sexually experienced female teens, 83% reported no formal sex education before first sex. Among currently sexually active female teens (those who had sex within 3 months of the survey) aged 15–17 years, 58% used clinical birth control services in the past 12 months, and 92% used contraception at last sex; however, only 1% used the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. Conclusions Births to teens aged 15–17 years have declined but still account for approximately one quarter of births to teens aged 15–19 years. Implications for public health

  2. Non-contact video-based vital sign monitoring using ambient light and auto-regressive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarassenko, L; Villarroel, M; Guazzi, A; Jorge, J; Clifton, D A; Pugh, C

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of the reflectance photoplethysmogram using a video camera typically positioned 1 m away from the patient’s face is a promising method for monitoring the vital signs of patients without attaching any electrodes or sensors to them. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on human volunteers in controlled environments. We have been able to obtain estimates of heart rate and respiratory rate and preliminary results on changes in oxygen saturation from double-monitored patients undergoing haemodialysis in the Oxford Kidney Unit. To achieve this, we have devised a novel method of cancelling out aliased frequency components caused by artificial light flicker, using auto-regressive (AR) modelling and pole cancellation. Secondly, we have been able to construct accurate maps of the spatial distribution of heart rate and respiratory rate information from the coefficients of the AR model. In stable sections with minimal patient motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimate of heart rate and the reference value from a pulse oximeter is similar to the mean absolute error between two pulse oximeter measurements at different sites (finger and earlobe). The activities of daily living affect the respiratory rate, but the camera-derived estimates of this parameter are at least as accurate as those derived from a thoracic expansion sensor (chest belt). During a period of obstructive sleep apnoea, we tracked changes in oxygen saturation using the ratio of normalized reflectance changes in two colour channels (red and blue), but this required calibration against the reference data from a pulse oximeter. (paper)

  3. A protocol for developing early warning score models from vital signs data in hospitals using ensembles of decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Michael; Tam, Benjamin; Thabane, Lehana; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2015-09-09

    Multiple early warning scores (EWS) have been developed and implemented to reduce cardiac arrests on hospital wards. Case-control observational studies that generate an area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC) are the usual validation method, but investigators have also generated EWS with algorithms with no prior clinical knowledge. We present a protocol for the validation and comparison of our local Hamilton Early Warning Score (HEWS) with that generated using decision tree (DT) methods. A database of electronically recorded vital signs from 4 medical and 4 surgical wards will be used to generate DT EWS (DT-HEWS). A third EWS will be generated using ensemble-based methods. Missing data will be multiple imputed. For a relative risk reduction of 50% in our composite outcome (cardiac or respiratory arrest, unanticipated intensive care unit (ICU) admission or hospital death) with a power of 80%, we calculated a sample size of 17,151 patient days based on our cardiac arrest rates in 2012. The performance of the National EWS, DT-HEWS and the ensemble EWS will be compared using AUROC. Ethics approval was received from the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (#13-724-C). The vital signs and associated outcomes are stored in a database on our secure hospital server. Preliminary dissemination of this protocol was presented in abstract form at an international critical care meeting. Final results of this analysis will be used to improve on the existing HEWS and will be shared through publication and presentation at critical care meetings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Non-Contact Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Vital Signs Monitoring: A Review on Intelligent Phased-Array Doppler Sensor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Travis; Lie, Donald Y C; Nguyen, Tam Q; Mayeda, Jill C; Lie, Paul E; Lopez, Jerry; Banister, Ron E

    2017-11-15

    It has been the dream of many scientists and engineers to realize a non-contact remote sensing system that can perform continuous, accurate and long-term monitoring of human vital signs as we have seen in many Sci-Fi movies. Having an intelligible sensor system that can measure and record key vital signs (such as heart rates and respiration rates) remotely and continuously without touching the patients, for example, can be an invaluable tool for physicians who need to make rapid life-and-death decisions. Such a sensor system can also effectively help physicians and patients making better informed decisions when patients' long-term vital signs data is available. Therefore, there has been a lot of research activities on developing a non-contact sensor system that can monitor a patient's vital signs and quickly transmit the information to healthcare professionals. Doppler-based radio-frequency (RF) non-contact vital signs (NCVS) monitoring system are particularly attractive for long term vital signs monitoring because there are no wires, electrodes, wearable devices, nor any contact-based sensors involved so the subjects may not be even aware of the ubiquitous monitoring. In this paper, we will provide a brief review on some latest development on NCVS sensors and compare them against a few novel and intelligent phased-array Doppler-based RF NCVS biosensors we have built in our labs. Some of our NCVS sensor tests were performed within a clutter-free anechoic chamber to mitigate the environmental clutters, while most tests were conducted within the typical Herman-Miller type office cubicle setting to mimic a more practical monitoring environment. Additionally, we will show the measurement data to demonstrate the feasibility of long-term NCVS monitoring. The measured data strongly suggests that our latest phased array NCVS system should be able to perform long-term vital signs monitoring intelligently and robustly, especially for situations where the subject is sleeping

  5. Advances to the development of a basic Mexican sign-to-speech and text language translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bautista, G.; Trujillo-Romero, F.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.

    2016-09-01

    Sign Language (SL) is the basic alternative communication method between deaf people. However, most of the hearing people have trouble understanding the SL, making communication with deaf people almost impossible and taking them apart from daily activities. In this work we present an automatic basic real-time sign language translator capable of recognize a basic list of Mexican Sign Language (MSL) signs of 10 meaningful words, letters (A-Z) and numbers (1-10) and translate them into speech and text. The signs were collected from a group of 35 MSL signers executed in front of a Microsoft Kinect™ Sensor. The hand gesture recognition system use the RGB-D camera to build and storage data point clouds, color and skeleton tracking information. In this work we propose a method to obtain the representative hand trajectory pattern information. We use Euclidean Segmentation method to obtain the hand shape and Hierarchical Centroid as feature extraction method for images of numbers and letters. A pattern recognition method based on a Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to interpret the hand gestures. Finally, we use K-Fold Cross Validation method for training and testing stages. Our results achieve an accuracy of 95.71% on words, 98.57% on numbers and 79.71% on letters. In addition, an interactive user interface was designed to present the results in voice and text format.

  6. How basic psychological needs and motivation affect vitality and lifelong learning adaptability of pharmacists: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; van der Burgt, Stéphanie; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2018-01-31

    Insufficient professional development may lead to poor performance of healthcare professionals. Therefore, continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD) are needed to secure safe and good quality healthcare. The aim of the study was to investigate the hypothesized associations and their directions between pharmacists' basic psychological needs in CE, their academic motivation, well-being, learning outcomes. Self-determination theory was used as a theoretical framework for this study. Data were collected through four questionnaires measuring: academic motivation, basic psychological needs (BPN), vitality and lifelong learning adaptability of pharmacists in the CE/CPD learning context. Structural equation modelling was used to analyze the data. Demographic factors like gender and working environment influenced the observed scores for frustration of BPN and factors like training status and working experience influenced the observed scores for academic motivation. A good model fit could be found only for a part of the hypothesized pathway. Frustration of BPN is positively directly related to the less desirable type of academic motivation, controlled motivation (0.88) and negatively directly related to vitality (- 1.61) and negatively indirectly related to learning outcomes in CE. Fulfillment or frustration of BPN are important predictors for well-being and learning outcomes. Further research should be conducted to discover how we can prevent these needs from being frustrated in order to design a motivating, vitalizing and sustainable CE/CPD system for pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. Basic psychological needs are very important predictors for well-being and learning outcomes. Further research should be conducted to discover how we can prevent these needs from being frustrated in order to design a motivating, vitalizing and sustainable CE/CPD system for pharmacists and other healthcare professionals.

  7. Homocysteine and cognitive disorders of postmenopausal women measured by a battery of computer tests--central nervous system vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Loroch, Małgorzata; Owoc, Alfred; Łukawski, Krzysztof; Filip, Rafał; Bojar, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was the analysis of cognitive functions in postmenopausal women having different status of homocysteine levels by a battery of computer tests-central nervous system vital signs (CNS-VS). We examined whether homocysteine increases the risk of cognitive decline and which cognitive domains are more affected. We showed that the considerably better neurocognitive index was obtained by women with low homocysteine levels in comparison with those with hyperhomocysteinemia (p = 0.0017). Similarly, results were obtained in the field of executive functioning (p = 0.0011), complex attention (p = 0.0106), cognitive flexibility (p = 0.0016), and memory (p = 0.0145). Verbal memory and visual memory did not differ considerably among the studied groups. Also, we demonstrated that ε4/ε4 genotype was the most common (15.5 %) in women with hyperhomocysteinemia than in groups of patients with low (0 %) or normal (1.9 %) homocysteine levels. In summary, hyperhomocysteinemia was related with increased risk of decline in executive functioning, complex attention, cognitive flexibility, and memory in postmenopausal women.

  8. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 651: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  9. Committee Opinion No. 651 Summary: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  10. Providing chronic pain management in the "Fifth Vital Sign" Era: Historical and treatment perspectives on a modern-day medical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Hobelmann, J Greg; Compton, Peggy

    2017-04-01

    Over 100 million Americans are living with chronic pain, and pain is the most common reason that patients seek medical attention. Despite the prevalence of pain, the practice of pain management and the scientific discipline of pain research are relatively new fields compared to the rest of medicine - contributing to a twenty-first century dilemma for health care providers asked to relieve suffering in the "Fifth Vital Sign" era. This manuscript provides a narrative review of the basic mechanisms of chronic pain and history of chronic pain management in the United States - including the various regulatory, health system and provider factors that contributed to the decline of multidisciplinary pain treatment in favor of the predominant opioid treatment strategy seen today. Multiple non-opioid pain treatment strategies are then outlined. The manuscript concludes with three key questions to help guide future research at the intersection of pain and addiction. The assessment and treatment of chronic pain will continue to be one of the most common functions of a health care provider. To move beyond an over reliance on opioid medications, the addiction and pain research communities must unite with chronic pain patients to increase the evidence base supporting non-opioid analgesic strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the computerized neuropsychological test battery CNS Vital Signs : Evaluation in a Dutch healthy sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, S.D.; Rijnen, S.J.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Gehring, K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CNS Vital Signs (CNS VS) is a computerized neuropsychological test battery that is translated into many languages. Test-retest reliability and potential practice effects of CNS VS were evaluated. Method: Dutch healthy participants were tested with CNS VS (T0), and retested after 3 (T1)

  12. Remote sensing of multiple vital signs using a CMOS camera-equipped infrared thermography system and its clinical application in rapidly screening patients with suspected infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanghao; Nakayama, Yosuke; Dagdanpurev, Sumiyakhand; Abe, Shigeto; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Kirimoto, Tetsuo; Matsui, Takemi

    2017-02-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is used to screen febrile passengers at international airports, but it suffers from low sensitivity. This study explored the application of a combined visible and thermal image processing approach that uses a CMOS camera equipped with IRT to remotely sense multiple vital signs and screen patients with suspected infectious diseases. An IRT system that produced visible and thermal images was used for image acquisition. The subjects' respiration rates were measured by monitoring temperature changes around the nasal areas on thermal images; facial skin temperatures were measured simultaneously. Facial blood circulation causes tiny color changes in visible facial images that enable the determination of the heart rate. A logistic regression discriminant function predicted the likelihood of infection within 10s, based on the measured vital signs. Sixteen patients with an influenza-like illness and 22 control subjects participated in a clinical test at a clinic in Fukushima, Japan. The vital-sign-based IRT screening system had a sensitivity of 87.5% and a negative predictive value of 91.7%; these values are higher than those of conventional fever-based screening approaches. Multiple vital-sign-based screening efficiently detected patients with suspected infectious diseases. It offers a promising alternative to conventional fever-based screening. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

  14. Effects of therapeutic touch on anxiety, vital signs, and cardiac dysrhythmia in a sample of Iranian women undergoing cardiac catheterization: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Mitra; Eybpoosh, Sana; Hazrati, Maryam

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the effects of Therapeutic Touch (TT) on anxiety, vital signs, and cardiac dysrhythmia in women undergoing cardiac catheterization. It was a quasi-experimental study. The participants had no history of hallucination, anxiety, or other psychological problems. Participants had to be conscious and have attained at least sixth-grade literacy level. Participants were randomly assigned into an intervention group (n = 23; received 10-15 minutes TT), a placebo group (n = 23; received 10-15 minutes simulated touch), and a control group (n = 23; did not receive any therapy). Data were collected using Spielberger's anxiety test, cardiac dysrhythmia checklist, and vital signs recording sheet. Statistical analyses were considered to be significant at α = .05 levels. Sixty-nine women ranging in age from 35 to 65 years participated. TT significantly decreased state anxiety p < 0.0001 but not trait anxiety (p = .88), decreased the incidence of all cardiac dysrhythmias p < 0.0001 except premature ventricular contraction (p = .01), and regulated vital signs p < 0.0001 in the intervention group versus placebo and control group. TT is an effective approach for managing state anxiety, regulating vital signs, and decreasing the incidence of cardiac dysrhythmia during stressful situations, such as cardiac catheterization, in Iranian cardiac patients.

  15. Effect of inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil on stress and vital signs in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Seifi, Zahra; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza; Oshvandi, Khodayar

    2015-06-01

    At present, aromatherapy is used widely in medical research. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy using lavender essential oil to reduce mental stress and improve the vital signs of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 patients who had undergone CABG in a 2-day intervention that targeted stress reduction. Sixty subjects following coronary artery bypass surgery in two aromatherapy and control groups. The study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. On the second and third days after surgery, the aromatherapy group patients received two drops of 2% lavender essential oil for 20min and the control group received two drops of distilled water as a placebo. The primary outcome was mental stress, which was measured before and after the intervention using the DASS-21 questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were vital signs, including the heart rate, respiratory rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which were measured before and after the intervention. The individual characteristics of the aromatherapy and control groups were the same. There were no significant difference in the mean mental stress scores and vital signs of the aromatherapy and control groups on the second or third days after surgery. Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil had no significant effects on mental stress and vital signs in patients following CABG, except the systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The prognostic value of blood lactate levels relative to that of vital signs in the pre-hospital setting: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Jansen (Tim); J. van Bommel (Jasper); J.H. Rommes (Johannes Hans); S.J.M. Schieveld; J. Bakker (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: A limitation of pre-hospital monitoring is that vital signs often do not change until a patient is in a critical stage. Blood lactate levels are suggested as a more sensitive parameter to evaluate a patient's condition. The aim of this pilot study was to find presumptive

  17. Clinical testing and Data Validation of a Novel Continuous Vital Sign Monitoring System in Cancer Patients – a cross border (DK– DE) collaboration project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov; Dynesen, Anja Weirsøe; Llambias, Maria Therese

    monitoring systems and also to integrate patients and relatives in the treatment in their home as well as in the hospital.Aim: The aim of this study is to implement and validate vital sign (pulse, temperature, Blood test etc) technologies in hospital wards as well as in patient’s home and to gain knowledge...

  18. Non-Contact Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Vital Signs Monitoring: A Review on Intelligent Phased-Array Doppler Sensor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Hall

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been the dream of many scientists and engineers to realize a non-contact remote sensing system that can perform continuous, accurate and long-term monitoring of human vital signs as we have seen in many Sci-Fi movies. Having an intelligible sensor system that can measure and record key vital signs (such as heart rates and respiration rates remotely and continuously without touching the patients, for example, can be an invaluable tool for physicians who need to make rapid life-and-death decisions. Such a sensor system can also effectively help physicians and patients making better informed decisions when patients’ long-term vital signs data is available. Therefore, there has been a lot of research activities on developing a non-contact sensor system that can monitor a patient’s vital signs and quickly transmit the information to healthcare professionals. Doppler-based radio-frequency (RF non-contact vital signs (NCVS monitoring system are particularly attractive for long term vital signs monitoring because there are no wires, electrodes, wearable devices, nor any contact-based sensors involved so the subjects may not be even aware of the ubiquitous monitoring. In this paper, we will provide a brief review on some latest development on NCVS sensors and compare them against a few novel and intelligent phased-array Doppler-based RF NCVS biosensors we have built in our labs. Some of our NCVS sensor tests were performed within a clutter-free anechoic chamber to mitigate the environmental clutters, while most tests were conducted within the typical Herman-Miller type office cubicle setting to mimic a more practical monitoring environment. Additionally, we will show the measurement data to demonstrate the feasibility of long-term NCVS monitoring. The measured data strongly suggests that our latest phased array NCVS system should be able to perform long-term vital signs monitoring intelligently and robustly, especially for situations where the

  19. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINATION OF KANGAROO MOTHER CARE METHOD AND LULLABY MUSIC THERAPY ON VITAL SIGN CHANGE IN INFANTS WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuuva Yusuf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo mother care (KMC and lullaby music methods have been considered as the alternative treatment for vital sign changes in low birth weight infants. However, little is known about the combination of the two methods. Objective: To identify effectiveness of combinations of Kangaroo mother care and Lullaby music methods on changes in vital signs in low birth weight infants. Methods: A quasi experiment with non-equivalent control group design. This study was conducted on October– December 2016 at the General Hospital of Ambarawa and General Hospital of Ungaran, Semarang. There were 36 samples selected using consecutive sampling divided into three groups, namely: 1 a group of LBW infants with the combination of KMC and lullaby music, 2 a LBW infant group with the lullaby music intervention, and 3 a control group given standard care in LBW infants by KMC method. Paired t-test and MANOVA test were used to analyzed the data. Results: Findings revealed that there were significant differences between the combination group, lullaby music group, and control group in temperature (p=0.003, pulse (p=0.001, respiration (p=0.001, and oxygen saturation (p=0.014 with significant value of <0.05, which indicated that there was a statistically significant difference in vital sign changes among the three groups. Conclusion: The combination of KMC method and Lullaby music intervention was effective on vital sign changes (temperature, pulse, respiration, and oxygen saturation compared with the lullaby music group alone and control group with KMC method in low birth weight infants. It is suggested that the combination of KMC and Lullaby music methods can be used as an alternative to improve LBW care for mothers in the NICU and at home and to reach the stability of the baby's vital signs.

  20. Signos Vitales de los CDC La actividad física y los adultos con discapacidades (Vital Signs-Physical Activity and Adults with Disabilities)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-06

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Signos Vitales de los CDC de mayo del 2014. Los adultos con discapacidades que no hacen actividad física aeróbica tienen un 50 % más de probabilidades de tener enfermedades cardiacas, accidentes cerebrovasculares, diabetes o cáncer. Sepa qué puede hacer para ayudar.  Created: 5/6/2014 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 5/6/2014.

  1. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  2. Vector Autoregressive Models and Granger Causality in Time Series Analysis in Nursing Research: Dynamic Changes Among Vital Signs Prior to Cardiorespiratory Instability Events as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Eliezer; Hravnak, Marilyn; Sereika, Susan M

    Patients undergoing continuous vital sign monitoring (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], pulse oximetry [SpO2]) in real time display interrelated vital sign changes during situations of physiological stress. Patterns in this physiological cross-talk could portend impending cardiorespiratory instability (CRI). Vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling with Granger causality tests is one of the most flexible ways to elucidate underlying causal mechanisms in time series data. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the development of patient-specific VAR models using vital sign time series data in a sample of acutely ill, monitored, step-down unit patients and determine their Granger causal dynamics prior to onset of an incident CRI. CRI was defined as vital signs beyond stipulated normality thresholds (HR = 40-140/minute, RR = 8-36/minute, SpO2 change in RR caused change in HR (21%; i.e., RR changed before HR changed) more often than change in HR causing change in RR (15%). Similarly, changes in RR caused changes in SpO2 (15%) more often than changes in SpO2 caused changes in RR (9%). For HR and SpO2, changes in HR causing changes in SpO2 and changes in SpO2 causing changes in HR occurred with equal frequency (18%). Within this sample of acutely ill patients who experienced a CRI event, VAR modeling indicated that RR changes tend to occur before changes in HR and SpO2. These findings suggest that contextual assessment of RR changes as the earliest sign of CRI is warranted. Use of VAR modeling may be helpful in other nursing research applications based on time series data.

  3. The CRADLE vital signs alert: qualitative evaluation of a novel device designed for use in pregnancy by healthcare workers in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Hannah L; Boene, Helena; Munguambe, Khatia; Sevene, Esperança; Akeju, David; Adetoro, Olalekan O; Charanthimath, Umesh; Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B; de Greeff, Annemarie; Anthony, John; Hall, David R; Steyn, Wilhelm; Vidler, Marianne; von Dadelszen, Peter; Chappell, Lucy C; Sandall, Jane; Shennan, Andrew H

    2018-01-05

    Vital signs measurement can identify pregnant and postpartum women who require urgent treatment or referral. In low-resource settings, healthcare workers have limited access to accurate vital signs measuring devices suitable for their environment and training. The CRADLE Vital Signs Alert (VSA) is a novel device measuring blood pressure and pulse that is accurate in pregnancy and designed for low-resource settings. Its traffic light early warning system alerts healthcare workers to the need for escalation of care for women with hypertension, haemorrhage or sepsis. This study evaluated the usability and acceptability of the CRADLE VSA device. Evaluation was conducted in community and primary care settings in India, Mozambique and Nigeria and tertiary hospitals in South Africa. Purposeful sampling was used to convene 155 interviews and six focus groups with healthcare workers using the device (n = 205) and pregnant women and their family members (n = 41). Interviews and focus groups were conducted in the local language and audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English for analysis. Thematic analysis was undertaken using an a priori thematic framework, as well as an inductive approach. Most healthcare workers perceived the CRADLE device to be easy to use and accurate. The traffic lights early warning system was unanimously reported positively, giving healthcare workers confidence with decision-making and a sense of professionalism. However, a minority in South Africa described manual inflation as tiring, particularly when measuring vital signs in obese and hypertensive women (n = 4) and a few South African healthcare workers distrusted the device's accuracy (n = 7). Unanimously, pregnant women liked the CRADLE device. The traffic light early warning system gave women and their families a better understanding of the importance of vital signs in pregnancy and during the postpartum period. The CRADLE device was well accepted by healthcare workers

  4. Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) for Severe Pelvic Fracture and Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhagic Shock Using Continuous Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Project: IRB task management , IT design and assist with reporting. . Name: Ryne C. Jenkins Project Role: Assistant Researcher...The stability of vital signs readings during REBOA placement will be compared to patient outcomes. Triple redundant VS collection system and real... implemented a single VS collection server-based VSDR system in the past 10 years. The effective real-time data collection rate is between 60% to 80% for

  5. Vital Signs – Cómo hacer el cuidado de salud más seguro (Making Health Care Safer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-05

    Este podcast se basa en el informe de los CDC Vital Signs de marzo del 2013, que trata sobre las infecciones mortales por enterobacterias resistentes a los carbapenemes o ERC y formas en que los proveedores de atención médica pueden detener dichas infecciones.  Created: 3/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/5/2013.

  6. Effects of prenatal music stimulation on fetal cardiac state, newborn anthropometric measurements and vital signs of pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, J; Ventura Miranda, M I; Manchon García, F; Pallarés Ruiz, T I; Marin Gascón, M L; Requena Mullor, M; Alarcón Rodriguez, R; Parron Carreño, T

    2017-05-01

    Music has been used for medicinal purposes throughout history due to its variety of physiological, psychological and social effects. To identify the effects of prenatal music stimulation on the vital signs of pregnant women at full term, on the modification of fetal cardiac status during a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph, and on anthropometric measurements of newborns taken after birth. A randomized controlled trial was implemented. The four hundred and nine pregnant women coming for routine prenatal care were randomized in the third trimester to receive either music (n = 204) or no music (n = 205) during a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph. All of the pregnant women were evaluated by measuring fetal cardiac status (basal fetal heart rate and fetal reactivity), vital signs before and after a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph (maternal heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure), and anthropometric measurements of the newborns were taken after birth (weight, height, head circumference and chest circumference). The strip charts showed a significantly increased basal fetal heart rate and higher fetal reactivity, with accelerations of fetal heart rate in pregnant women with music stimulation. After the fetal monitoring cardiotocograph, a statistically significant decrease in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate in women receiving music stimulation was observed. Music can be used as a tool which improves the vital signs of pregnant women during the third trimester, and can influence the fetus by increasing fetal heart rate and fetal reactivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BASIC COLOUR TERMS IN FIVE FINNOUGRIC LANGUAGES AND ESTONIAN SIGN LANGUAGE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liivi Hollman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we compare five Finno-Ugric languages – Estonian,Finnish, Hungarian, Udmurt and Komi-Zyrian – and the Estonian Sign Language (unclassified in different aspects: established basic colour terms, the proportion of basic colour terms and different colour terms in the collected word-corpora, the cognitive salience index values in the list task and the number of dominant colour tiles in the colour naming task. The data was collected, using the field method of Davies and Corbett, from all languages under consideration, providing a distinctive foundation for linguistic comparison. We argue that Finno-Ugric languages seem to possess relatively large colour vocabularies,especially due to their rich variety of word-formation types,e.g. the composition of compound words. All of the languages under consideration have developed to Stage VI or VII, possessing 7 to 11lexicalised basic colour terms. The cognitive salience index helps to distinguish primary and secondary basic colour terms, showing certain comprehensive patterns which are similar to Russian and English.

  8. Examination of Sign Language Education According to the Opinions of Members from a Basic Sign Language Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmese, Pelin Pistav

    2016-01-01

    Being hearing impaired limits one's ability to communicate in that it affects all areas of development, particularly speech. One of the methods the hearing impaired use to communicate is sign language. This study, a descriptive study, intends to examine the opinions of individuals who had enrolled in a sign language certification program by using…

  9. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite. - An assessment of the risk of foliar ozone injury on plants was conducted for 269 parks in support of the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network Program

  10. Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for Intensive Care Unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the Emergency Department - A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Charlotte; Laurtizen, Marlene Mp; Danker, Jakob K

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting...... outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerod Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs......, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures. METHODS: The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category...

  11. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered. PMID:22203851

  12. Enhancing nursing students' skills in vital signs assessment by using multimedia computer-assisted learning with integrated content of anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveevivitchai, Chularuk; Chuengkriankrai, Benchaporn; Luecha, Yuwadee; Thanooruk, Rujires; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2009-01-01

    Due to constraints of increasing number of nursing students and a disproportionate shortfall of faculty members in nursing schools, it was necessary to supplement traditional lecture or lecture-demonstration with on-line multimedia materials and/or multimedia compact discs for enhancing learning. The authors have developed a computer-assisted learning (CAL) multimedia on vital signs with animation and audio features for teaching in the classroom based on the 5Es inquiry cycle. When the CAL was tried on second-year undergraduates in two comparable schools, all groups of students gained significantly higher performance skills regardless of whether the groups were subjected to CAL/lecture or CAL/lecture/demonstration. However, they did not gain in factual knowledge.

  13. Controlled Pilot Study of High-Impact Low-Frequency Exercise on Bone Loss and Vital-Sign Stabilization in Adolescents With Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susanne P K; Bachrach, Laura K; Golden, Neville H

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) face an increased lifetime risk of bone fragility. This randomized controlled study examined the efficacy and safety of a high-impact activity program on markers of bone turnover and stabilization of vital signs (VSS). Forty-one hospitalized adolescents with AN were randomly assigned to routine care or routine care plus 20 jumps twice daily. Bone markers were measured at baseline days 1-3 (T1), days 4-6 (T2), and days 7-9 (T3). The primary outcome was change in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) at T3 adjusted for BSAP and % median body mass index at T1. Secondary outcomes were serum N-telopeptide (NTX) and osteocalcin at T3. Safety was determined by comparing weight gain, time to VSS and length of stay for each group. BSAP, NTX, or osteocalcin did not differ between groups at baseline or at T3. BSAP and NTX at T3 were not associated with group of enrollment or % median body mass index. VSS was significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with the control group (11.6 ± 5.7 days vs. 17 ± 10.5 days, p = .049). There was no significant difference in weight gain or length of stay between groups. Twice-daily jumping activity failed to influence markers of bone turnover in adolescents with AN but was well tolerated, shortened time to vital-sign stabilization and did not slow weight gain. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E gene and cognitive functions of postmenopausal women, measured by battery of computer tests - Central Nervous System Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, Iwona; Wojcik-Fatla, Angelina; Owoc, Alfred; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene belongs to the group of genes increasing the risk of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) development. The purpose of the study was the analysis of cognitive functions in postmenopausal women having different polymorphisms of APOE gene; battery of computer tests - Central Nervous System Vital Signs (CNS-VS) were employed. The women were qualified into the examined group on the grounds of clinical symptoms (minimum 2 years after the last menstruation), as well as on the basis of FSH concentration. At the qualification stage, a short test - Montreal Scale of Cognitive Function Assessment (MoCA) was conducted. The assessment of cognitive functions was made with the use of diagnostic CNS-Vital Signs equipment. Genomic DNA isolation was extracted from human whole blood. Multiplex PCR reactions have been performed in a single reaction tube with six (6) primers, consisting of 2 common primers and 4 specific primers [2 - for each of 2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites]. About half of the examined postmenopausal women were placed below average in the majority of the examined cognitive functions. The biggest impairments occurred in the field of processing speed, and the smallest - in the field of verbal and visual memory. Polymorphisms of APOE gene were considerably linked with the level of results of the majority of cognitive functions among postmenopausal women, as measured by battery of computer tests - CNS-VS. The presence of ε2/ε3 polymorphism of APOE gene impacted positively the obtained results of cognitive functions, whereas the presence of ε3/ε4, or ε4/ε4 polymorphisms worsened the obtained results.

  15. Using vital sign flow sheets can help to identify neoplastic fever and other possible causes in oncology patients: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Chuang-Chi; Huang, Jen-Sheng; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chang, John W C; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Liau, Chi-Ting

    2010-08-01

    It is important to determine the etiology of fever in cancer patients. Such patients often undergo extensive laboratory and radiographic investigations and prolonged anti-infective therapy that are time- and resource- consuming, risk drug toxicity, and postpone systemic chemotherapy. To investigate neoplastic fever (NF) patterns from vital sign flow sheets. Between September 1997 and February 2009, data on 150 consecutive hospitalized patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors documented to have NF were retrospectively collected. Sixty patients with sepsis were used as a comparison group. All patients with NF demonstrated intermittent fever patterns. Peak body temperature was 39.0+/-0.6 degrees C (38.0-40.8 degrees C). Baseline pulse rates in 139 (93%) patients showed no increase except during febrile periods. The remaining 11 (7%) patients had transiently elevated baseline pulse rates at the time of cessation of postchemotherapy dexamethasone. Once-daily fever spike patterns occurred in 108 (72%) patients. Fever spikes were most commonly found at 9 am (42%) and 5 pm (37%). Twice-daily fever spike patterns were noted in the 42 (28%) remaining patients. In the comparison group, baseline pulse rate elevated in all patients during febrile periods and 20 (33%) showed intermittent fever patterns. We conclude that the NF pattern is characterized by intermittent fever without an obvious increase in baseline pulse rate except during febrile periods. Knowing NF patterns from vital sign flow sheets can help identify NF and other possible causes of fever in oncology patients. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 'Down-triage' for children with abnormal vital signs: evaluation of a new triage practice at a paediatric emergency department in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takuto; Inoue, Nobuaki; Shimizu, Naoki; Terakawa, Toshiro; Goldman, Ran D

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of abnormal vital signs in triage is a challenge in the paediatric emergency department (PED), since vital signs may reflect anxiety, fever or pain rather than the clinical deterioration of the child. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of subjective 'down-triage' (change of the initially determined acuity levels) of Japanese Triage and Acuity Scale (JTAS). This is a retrospective cohort study of patients in PED up to 15 years of age at a tertiary paediatric medical centre in Japan during a 1-year period. At the end of every JTAS triage process, PED nurses were allowed to 'down-triage' acuity levels of well-appearing patients with abnormal HR or RR, which were presumably attributable to fever, crying or being upset. We compared predictive performance of the triage system before and after 'down-triage' using admission rate as the primary outcome. Among 37 961 PED visits during the study period, we analysed 37 219 records. A total of 17 089 patients (45.9%) were 'down-triaged' after their initial triage allocation upon arrival. Admission rates after 'down-triage' (83%, 33%, 7%, 1% and 3% for levels 1-5, respectively), compared with those of unmodified initial level (16%, 11%, 6%, 2% and 6% for levels 1-5, respectively), had a better apparent relevance with the anticipated admission rates of Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale. Modification of JTAS through 'down-triage' by experienced staff improves prediction of disposition in a PED. Further research is needed to determine an objective protocol for 'down-triage' to ensure safe practice in a PED. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Sinais vitais e expressão facial de pacientes em estado de coma Signos vitales y expresión facial de pacientes en estado de coma Vital signs and facial expression of patients in coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Giesbrecht Puggina

    2009-06-01

    induced comas. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial was done. The sample was consisted of 30 patients from Intensive Care Unit, being divided in 2 groups: Group Control (without auditory stimuli and Experimental Group (with auditory stimuli. The patients were submitted to 3 sessions for consecutive days. Significant statistical alterations of the vital signs were noted (oxygen saturation - session 1; oxygen saturation - session 3; respiratory frequency - session 3 during the message playback and with facial expression, session 1, during both music and message. Apparently, the voice message is a stronger stimulus than the music in relation to the capacity of producing suggestive physiological auditory responses.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... preventable with more effective water management. Problem Water management problems can lead to Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks. What ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living HIV / AIDS Injury, Violence & Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... Child Injury Prevention Protect the Ones You Love Color Me Safe Child Injury: What You Need to ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... living below the poverty level, and those who rent housing. State and city officials can help protect ... housing. Creating tobacco- and smoke-free environments for employees, customers, and partners. States and communities can Work ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... youth should not drink alcohol. Support effective community strategies to prevent binge drinking, such as those recommended by the Community Guide.* Support local control of the marketing and sale of alcohol. Support the minimum legal drinking age ...

  3. Vital Signs - High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    In the U.S., nearly one third of the adult population have high blood pressure, the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke - two of the nation's leading causes of death.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Injury Prevention & Control Gateway to Health Communication & Social Marketing Practice On Other Web Sites MedlinePlus – Hispanic American ... MB] en Español [PDF – 1.61 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not use the device. Include warning statements in marketing materials about the risk of using the device. ... MB] en Español [PDF – 1.16 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: ...

  6. Pregnancy physiology pattern prediction study (4P study): protocol of an observational cohort study collecting vital sign information to inform the development of an accurate centile-based obstetric early warning score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Fiona; Kemp, Jude; Edwards, Clare; Pullon, Rebecca M; Loerup, Lise; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Salvi, Dario; Gibson, Oliver; Gerry, Stephen; MacKillop, Lucy H; Tarassenko, Lionel; Watkinson, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Successive confidential enquiries into maternal deaths in the UK have identified an urgent need to develop a national early warning score (EWS) specifically for pregnant or recently pregnant women to aid more timely recognition, referral and treatment of women who are developing life-threatening complications in pregnancy or the puerperium. Although many local EWS are in use in obstetrics, most have been developed heuristically. No current obstetric EWS has defined the thresholds at which an alert should be triggered using evidence-based normal ranges, nor do they reflect the changing physiology that occurs with gestation during pregnancy. An observational cohort study involving 1000 participants across three UK sites in Oxford, London and Newcastle. Pregnant women will be recruited at approximately 14 weeks' gestation and have their vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature) measured at 4 to 6-week intervals during pregnancy. Vital signs recorded during labour and delivery will be extracted from hospital records. After delivery, participants will measure and record their own vital signs daily for 2 weeks. During the antenatal and postnatal periods, vital signs will be recorded on an Android tablet computer through a custom software application and transferred via mobile internet connection to a secure database. The data collected will be used to define reference ranges of vital signs across normal pregnancy, labour and the immediate postnatal period. This will inform the design of an evidence-based obstetric EWS. The study has been approved by the NRES committee South East Coast-Brighton and Sussex (14/LO/1312) and is registered with the ISRCTN (10838017). All participants will provide written informed consent and can withdraw from the study at any point. All data collected will be managed anonymously. The findings will be disseminated in international peer-reviewed journals and through research conferences.

  7. The effect of aromatherapy with the essential oil of orange on pain and vital signs of patients with fractured limbs admitted to the emergency ward: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Hekmatpou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Pain is an emotional and unpleasant experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. The literature shows no study on the effect of aromatherapy with the essential oil of orange on unpleasant feelings of patients with fractured limbs. In this regard, this paper aims at studying the effect of aromatherapy with the essential oil of orange on patients with fractured limbs admitted to the emergency ward. Methods: Sixty patients admitted to the emergency ward of Vali-e-Asr Hospital were selected by purposive sampling method and then were divided into two groups of control and experiment by block method. This study was done in one shift work (morning or afternoon. Four drops of the orange oil were poured on a pad and were pinned with a plastic pin to the patient's collar, about 20 cm distant from head. The old pad was replaced by the new one every 1 h. The patients' pain and vital signs were checked every 1 h for at last 6 h. The data were analyzed by SPSS Version 21. Results: Forty (66.7% patients were male and twenty (33.3% were female. Their age average was 37.93 ± 18.19 years old. The most fractured cases were in the scapular (11 patients [18.3%]. Friedman test showed that pain in the experiment group (P = 0.0001 decreased significantly rather than the control group (0.339. However, in vital signs, there could be found that no significant change between the two groups was seen. Conclusion: Aromatherapy with orange oil can relieve pain in patients with fractured limbs but has no effect on their vital signs. Therefore, aromatherapy with orange oil can be used as a complementary medicine in these patients.

  8. Vital Signs – El VIH en los jóvenes en los Estados Unidos: Cómo proteger a una generación (HIV Among Youth in the US: Protecting a Generation)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-27

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de diciembre del 2012, que contiene información acerca del impacto del VIH en los jóvenes y los factores que ponen a la juventud en riesgo de contagiarse con el VIH. También hace un llamado a la prevención a través de los padres, las escuelas y los programas comunitarios dirigidos a los jóvenes.  Created: 11/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/27/2012.

  9. CDC Vital Signs- Proteja a los pacientes contra la resistencia a los antibióticos (Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-03-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de marzo del 2016 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Mientras reciben atención médica en un centro hospitalario, los pacientes pueden contraer infecciones graves asociadas a la atención médica. Infórmese sobre cómo prevenir las infecciones asociadas a la atención médica.  Created: 3/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/3/2016.

  10. BASIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Schmidt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    BPP. Tilgangen består dels af den overordnede proces-model BASIC og dels af et iboende framework, ABCD, der er en model for systematisk adfærdsanalyse, udvikling, test og implementering af adfærdsrettede løsningskoncepter. Den samlede model gør det muligt for forskere såvel som offentligt ansatte...

  11. Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) for Severe Pelvic Fracture and Intra Abdominal Hemorrhagic Shock using Continuous Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    strategies for all medical personnel, including pre-hospital providers and non-surgeons. Thus, our research will benefit civilian pre-hospital...without prior endovascular experience were included. All subjects received didactic instruction of the Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma (BEST...Fifteen trainees in either an ACGME-approved General Surgery or Surgical Critical Care Fellowship at one institution received didactic and

  12. Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagkal Midilli, Tulay; Ciray Gunduzoglu, Nazmiye

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of Reiki on pain and vital signs when applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of the body after cesarean section surgery. The study was single-blinded, randomized, and double-controlled (Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups). Forty-five patients, equalized by age and number of births, were randomly assigned to the Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups. The treatment, which was applied to the patients in these 3 groups, was applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of body in the first 24 and 48 hours after the operation within 4 to 8 hours of the application of standard analgesics. The study data were collected using a patient follow-up form and a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups and times (P Reiki group patients between day 1 pre-tx and after application on the second day (day 2 post-tx) measurements. Mean breathing rate and systolic blood pressure measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups (P Reiki group was observed to use fewer analgesics throughout the study and to need them after a longer time than the sham Reiki and control groups (P Reiki applied for 15 minutes to the incision area after a cesarean operation had the expected effects on pain and the need for the use of analgesics, but it had no effect on vital signs.

  13. Vitalism as Pathos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Thomas

    This paper addresses the remarkable longevity (in spite of numerous 'refutations') of the idea of vitalism in the biological sciences and beyond. If there is to be a renewed vitalism today, however, we need to ask - on what kind of original conception of life should it be based ? This paper argues that recent invocations of a generalized, processual variety of vitalism in the social sciences and humanities above all, however exciting in their scope, miss much of the basic originality - and interest - of the vitalist perspective itself. The paper argues that any renewed spirit of vitalism in the contemporary era would have to base itself on the normativity of the living organism rather than on any generalized conceptions of process or becoming. In the terms of the paper, such a vitalism would have to be concrete and 'disciplinary' rather than processual or generalized. Such a vitalism would also need to accommodate, crucially, the pathic aspects of life - pathology, sickness, error; in short everything that makes us, as living beings, potentially weak, without power, at a loss. Sources for such a pathic vitalism might be found above all in the work of Georges Canguilhem - and Friedrich Nietzsche - rather than primarily in Bergson, Whitehead or Deleuze.

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dogs until steaming hot before eating. Not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk or eat soft cheeses made from it. Be aware that Mexican-style cheeses made from pasteurized milk, such as queso fresco, likely contaminated during ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Today's Heroin Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... guidelines for chronic pain. Supporting the use of prescription drug monitoring programs (electronic databases that track the dispensing of certain ... heroin addiction: addiction to prescription opioid painkillers. Make prescription drug monitoring programs timely and easy to use. Providers can analyze ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for substance abuse and mental health problems. Use prescription drug monitoring programs to identify patients who may be improperly obtaining ... treatment options, such as opioid agonist therapy. Use prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs)—electronic databases that track all controlled substance ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States can Consider ways to increase use of prescription drug monitoring programs, which are state-run databases that track prescriptions ... States can Consider ways to increase use of prescription drug monitoring programs, which are state-run databases that track prescriptions ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Cervical Cancer is Preventable Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... 000 More than 4,000 women die of cervical cancer each year. 93% As many as 93% of ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... guidelines. Avoid drinks with unknown alcohol content or mixing alcohol with energy drinks. Caffeine can mask alcohol's ... PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... services in state and community programs, using computers, smartphones, and other electronic devices. Help conduct community activities ... be made worse by drinking. Top of Page Science Behind the Issue MMWR Science Clips Related Pages ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Methadone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relievers The White House – Office of National Drug Control Policy SAMSHA – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Drug Enforcement Administration – Office of Diversion Control National ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the best way to save lives and reduce injuries. Child passenger restraint laws result in more children being ... booster seat, and seat belt use and reducing child motor vehicle injuries and deaths. Options for effective strategies include: Child ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Asthma in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Who's At Risk? Asthma by age and sex US, 2001-2009 Percentages are age-adjusted SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics; 2010. Asthma self-management education by age, US, 2008 SOURCE: National Health Interview ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the restroom. Use utensils and single-use disposable gloves to avoid touching ready-to-eat foods with ... Visit www.FoodSafety.gov for the latest information. Top of Page Science Behind the Issue MMWR Science ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they are trying to get pregnant or could get pregnant. Ask their partner, family, and friends to support their choice not to drink during ... they are trying to get pregnant or could get pregnant. Ask their partner, family, and friends to support their choice not to drink during ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... live birth before age 20. Problem Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Safer Food Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trace foods from source to destination. Use store loyalty card and distribution records to help investigators identify what made people sick. Recall products linked to an outbreak and notify customers. Choose only suppliers that use food safety best ...

  8. Vital Signs: Seismology of Icy Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven D.; Kedar, Sharon; Panning, Mark P.; Stähler, Simon C.; Bills, Bruce G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Pike, W. T.; Castillo, Julie C.; Lognonné, Philippe; Tsai, Victor C.; Rhoden, Alyssa R.

    2018-01-01

    Ice-covered ocean worlds possess diverse energy sources and associated mechanisms that are capable of driving significant seismic activity, but to date no measurements of their seismic activity have been obtained. Such investigations could reveal the transport properties and radial structures, with possibilities for locating and characterizing trapped liquids that may host life and yielding critical constraints on redox fluxes and thus on habitability. Modeling efforts have examined seismic sources from tectonic fracturing and impacts. Here, we describe other possible seismic sources, their associations with science questions constraining habitability, and the feasibility of implementing such investigations. We argue, by analogy with the Moon, that detectable seismic activity should occur frequently on tidally flexed ocean worlds. Their ices fracture more easily than rocks and dissipate more tidal energy than the Moon and Mars. Icy ocean worlds also should create less thermal noise due to their greater distance and consequently smaller diurnal temperature variations. They also lack substantial atmospheres (except in the case of Titan) that would create additional noise. Thus, seismic experiments could be less complex and less susceptible to noise than prior or planned planetary seismology investigations of the Moon or Mars.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help hospitals improve maternity care practices. Tracking hospital policies and practices that support breastfeeding using CDC’s Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey to evaluate federal, state ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... every trip, no matter how short. Obey speed limits. Never use a cell phone or text while driving. Parents can Understand that most teens ... teen passengers Never use a cell phone or text while driving Obey speed limits Get your copy of CDC's parent-teen driving ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when appropriate actions are not taken. MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ) infections commonly cause pneumonia and sepsis that can be deadly. The germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause HAIs, including ... infections. Strains resistant to almost all antibiotics have been found in ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in 3 crash deaths in the US involved drunk driving, and almost 1 in 3 involved speeding. Lower ... seats contributed to over 9,500 crash deaths. Drunk driving contributed to more than 10,000 crash deaths. ...

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in nearly 11,000 deaths in 2009. Driving drunk is never OK. Choose not to drink and ... interlocks prevent drivers who were convicted of alcohol-impaired driving from operating their vehicles if they have been ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Where's the Sodium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Web Sites MedlinePlus – Heart Diseases MedlinePlus – Coronary Artery Disease MedlinePlus – High Blood Pressure MedlinePlus – Dietary Sodium ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  15. Vital Recorder—a free research tool for automatic recording of high-resolution time-synchronised physiological data from multiple anaesthesia devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyung-Chul; Jung, Chul-Woo

    2018-01-01

    The current anaesthesia information management system (AIMS) has limited capability for the acquisition of high-quality vital signs data. We have developed a Vital Recorder program to overcome the disadvantages of AIMS and to support research. Physiological data of surgical patients were collected from 10 operating rooms using the Vital Recorder. The basic equipment used were a patient monitor, the anaesthesia machine, and the bispectral index (BIS) monitor. Infusion pumps, cardiac output mon...

  16. Article Commentary: Group Learning Assessments as a Vital Consideration in the Implementation of New Peer Learning Pedagogies in the Basic Science Curriculum of Health Profession Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte L. Briggs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by reports of successful outcomes in health profession education literature, peer learning has progressively grown to become a fundamental characteristic of health profession curricula. Many studies, however, are anecdotal or philosophical in nature, particularly when addressing the effectiveness of assessments in the context of peer learning. This commentary provides an overview of the rationale for using group assessments in the basic sciences curriculum of health profession programs and highlights the challenges associated with implementing group assessments in this context. The dearth of appropriate means for measuring group process suggests that professional collaboration competencies need to be more clearly defined. Peer learning educators are advised to enhance their understanding of social psychological research in order to implement best practices in the development of appropriate group assessments for peer learning.

  17. [Vital contact with reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravagnan, L M

    1976-12-01

    From the standpoint of existential phenomenology, the contact with reality lies in the very phocus of theory, being closely related to another basic conception: that of being-in-the-world. In order to ratify those conceptions, the author reviews some concepts imported from Kurt Lewin's Field Theory, among which: a) vital psychological space, embedding the subject and in close interchange with him; b) intrapsychic regions, having, to a certain extent, autonomous functions, but being related to each other and integrated into the higher unity of the subject. As both systems are interdependent, any modification of the equilibrium of one of them reverberates into the other's, and changes the general conditions of both of them. Reviewing, at the same time, Minkowski's views on schizophrenia, the author sets forth the production of an inner world that becomes autonomous and possesses a degree of reality that overwhelms the true outer world. There is not only the splitting from reality, but the creation of a whole fantastic field, in which the individual participates with all his vital availability. Both views lead to a similar contention: that in some pathological states, the primal link man-real world, is replaced by a new inner correspondence, focused on the imaginary and having effects similar to those of the real world.

  18. SIGNS The sandwich sign

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appearance of necrosis or rim enhancement, as typically seen in TB.1. This theory was refuted by a single study in 2008 by Lien et al. which documents biopsy-proven non-lymphomatous causes of the sandwich sign.4 The authors reported that in addition to lymphoma being the most common cause of the sandwich sign, ...

  19. Exercise: A vitally important prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechanova, Rachel L; Wegler, Jennifer L; Forest, Christopher P

    2017-04-01

    Sedentary lifestyles and low physical activity have led to rising health concerns and increasing mortality risks. With the growing concern of the inactivity of adult Americans, it is important that physical activity be promoted to prevent disease and reduce health risks. This article reviews the benefits of physical activity and the steps that primary care providers should take to evaluate physical activity as the fifth vital sign in every patient encounter. The 5A's (assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange) should be applied in order to implement an exercise prescription into the practice of medicine.

  20. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Vital tooth bleaching with Nightguard vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, V B; Robinson, F G

    1997-01-01

    Between July 1994 and May 1996, several landmark articles were published concerning the safety and efficacy of vital tooth bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in a customfitted tray. The American Dental Association (ADA) published guidelines for ADA acceptance, and three products received approval. Long-term clinical trials on 38 patients indicated 92% successful bleaching after 6 weeks of treatment. Results were stable in 74% of the patients at 1.5 years, and in 62% of the patients at 3-year follow-up with no further treatment. Clinical pulpal studies and periodontal studies indicated no detrimental safety problems, although some laboratory cell studies suggested concerns. The noncarcinogenic potential of 10% carbamide peroxide was established in animal studies. Successful bleaching of tetracycline-stained teeth was achieved after 6 months of treatment, with no tooth problems detected clinically or by scanning electron micrograph. Extended treatment times are effective on other stains from dentinogenesis imperfecta or nicotine. On insertion in the mouth, 10% carbamide peroxide elevated the pH in the tray and saliva. After 4 hours of clinical wear, over 60% of the newer, thicker materials (Opalescence [Ultraclent Products, South Jordon, UT] and Platinum [Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Canton, MA]) was present and active in the tray. Nightguard vital bleaching seems to be the most cost-efficient, user-friendly, patient-accepted method of bleaching teeth available to the profession and is safe and effective. Over-the-counter products can have harmful effects on tooth structure and may not lighten teeth.

  2. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  3. Mineralogy and geochemistry of alkaline basic dykes from the northern Indian plate: signs of more than one episode of rifting and associated magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad; Andersen, Jens; Arif, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Rift related magmatism during Permian time in the northern margin of Indian plate, north-west Pakistan is shown by the occurrence of roughly linear array of alkaline rocks in the region. The constituent rocks include alkali granites, granodiorites, nepheline syenites, carbonatites and dykes of basic composition. The field relations, mineralogy and whole rock geochemistry of these basic dykes has been investigated. Significant textural and mineralogical distinctions have divided the basic dykes into a) dolerite and b) epidote amphibolites, cross cutting other alkaline rocks and pre-Permian rocks in the region. Clinopyroxene having augitic composition is a major mineral in dolerite, however, it is completely absent in epidote amphibolites. Amphiboles in dolerites are brown coloured having pargasitic composition while it is green to light green in colour having the composition of magnesio-hornblende in epidote amphibolites. Compositionally different types of olivine are present in dolerites while it is absent in epidote amphibolites. Intra-plate tectonic settings for both the rock types has been interpreted by Hf-Ta-Th and FeO-MgO-Al2O3 discrimination plots. Lower Zr/Nb ratio (<10) and K/Ba ratio (amid 20-40) for both the rock types further show their affinity to within-plate magmatism. Dolerites show depletion in REEs and other incompatible elements as compared to epidote amphibolites. The equilibrium partial melting models from primitive mantle using Dy/Yb, La/Yb, Sm/Yb, La/Sm and Nb/Y ratios show that both of these dykes originate form spinel lherzolite mantle. However, the degrees of partial melting from mantle is different i.e. epidote amphibolite show smaller degree (<5%) of partial melting of mantle than the dolerites (<10%). The contrasting geochemistry suggests that both of these dykes originated from heterogeneous mantle in two pulses with different degrees partial melting followed by fractional crystallization. Compositional zoning in plagioclase and

  4. Vital Recorder-a free research tool for automatic recording of high-resolution time-synchronised physiological data from multiple anaesthesia devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Chul; Jung, Chul-Woo

    2018-01-24

    The current anaesthesia information management system (AIMS) has limited capability for the acquisition of high-quality vital signs data. We have developed a Vital Recorder program to overcome the disadvantages of AIMS and to support research. Physiological data of surgical patients were collected from 10 operating rooms using the Vital Recorder. The basic equipment used were a patient monitor, the anaesthesia machine, and the bispectral index (BIS) monitor. Infusion pumps, cardiac output monitors, regional oximeter, and rapid infusion device were added as required. The automatic recording option was used exclusively and the status of recording was frequently checked through web monitoring. Automatic recording was successful in 98.5% (4,272/4,335) cases during eight months of operation. The total recorded time was 13,489 h (3.2 ± 1.9 h/case). The Vital Recorder's automatic recording and remote monitoring capabilities enabled us to record physiological big data with minimal effort. The Vital Recorder also provided time-synchronised data captured from a variety of devices to facilitate an integrated analysis of vital signs data. The free distribution of the Vital Recorder is expected to improve data access for researchers attempting physiological data studies and to eliminate inequalities in research opportunities due to differences in data collection capabilities.

  5. The expressions of spatial relations during interaction in american sign language, croatian sign language, and turkish sign language

    OpenAIRE

    Arık, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Signers use their body and the space in front of them iconically. Does iconicity lead to the same mapping strategies in construing space during interaction across sign languages? The present study addressed this question by conducting an experimental study on basic static and motion event descriptions during interaction (describer input and addressee re-signing/retelling) in American Sign Language, Croatian Sign Language, and Turkish Sign Language. I found that the three sign languages are si...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Hepatitis C Testing baby boomers saves lives Recommend on Facebook ... boomers got infected before the dangers of hepatitis C were well known. Anyone can get hepatitis C, ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable Language: English (US) ... and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Seat Belt Use in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know [PODCAST – 1:20 minutes] Seat Belts- What You Need to Know [PSA – 1:00 minute] On Other Web Sites The Community Guide: Primary Versus Secondary Enforcement Laws MedlinePlus – Motor Vehicle Safety MedlinePlus – Injuries Top of Page Get Email Updates To receive email updates about ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than other men. Research has shown that young gay and bisexual males who have sex with older partners are at a greater risk ... infected with HIV. Less than half (44%) of gay and bisexual males in high ... had sex. Preventing risky behaviors in youth Many effective programs ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men who have sex with men (MSM) as gay or bisexual. Sexually active refers to people who have had sex in the past year. Top of Page On ... for getting HIV: 1 in 4 sexually active gay and bisexual adult men without ... unknown and Have anal sex without a condom, or Recently had a sexually ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and nurses could use this opportunity to discuss advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods and the ... Director for Communications (OADC) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding ...

  12. Monitors Track Vital Signs for Fitness and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Have you ever felt nauseous reading a book in the back seat of a car? Or woken from a deep sleep feeling disoriented, unsure which way is up? Momentary mixups like these happen when the sensory systems that track the body's orientation in space become confused. (In the case of the backseat bookworm, the conflict arises when the reader s inner ear, part of the body s vestibular system, senses the car s motion while her eyes are fixed on the stationary pages of the book.) Conditions like motion sickness are common on Earth, but they also present a significant challenge to astronauts in space. Human sensory systems use the pull of gravity to help determine orientation. In the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station, for example, the body experiences a period of confusion before it adapts to the new circumstances. (In space, even the body s proprioceptive system, which tells the brain where the arms and legs are oriented without the need for visual confirmation, goes haywire, meaning astronauts sometimes lose track of where their limbs are when they are not moving them.) This Space Adaptation Syndrome affects a majority of astronauts, even experienced ones, causing everything from mild disorientation to nausea to severe vomiting. "It can be quite debilitating," says William Toscano, a research scientist in NASA s Ames Research Center Psychophysiology Laboratory, part of the Center s Human Systems Integration Division. "When this happens, as you can imagine, work proficiency declines considerably." Since astronauts cannot afford to be distracted or incapacitated during critical missions, NASA has explored various means for preventing and countering motion sickness in space, including a range of drug treatments. Many effective motion sickness drugs, however, cause undesirable side effects, such as drowsiness. Toscano and his NASA colleague, Patricia Cowings, have developed a different approach: Utilizing biofeedback training methods, the pair can teach astronauts, military pilots, and others susceptible to motion sickness to self-regulate their own physiological responses and suppress the unpleasant symptoms. This NASA-patented method invented by Cowings is called the Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (ATFE), and several studies have demonstrated its promise

  13. CDC Vital Signs: More People Walk to Better Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise, or for activities such as walking the dog. The percentage of people who report walking at ... lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Improving spaces and having ...

  14. Vital Signs: Asthma in Children - United States, 2001-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hatice S; Bailey, Cathy M; Damon, Scott A; Garbe, Paul L; Breysse, Patrick N

    2018-02-09

    Asthma is the most common chronic lung disease of childhood, affecting approximately 6 million children in the United States. Although asthma cannot be cured, most of the time, asthma symptoms can be controlled by avoiding or reducing exposure to asthma triggers (allergens and irritants) and by following recommendations for asthma education and appropriate medical care. CDC analyzed asthma data from the 2001-2016 National Health Interview Survey for children aged 0-17 years to examine trends and demographic differences in health outcomes and health care use. Asthma was more prevalent among boys (9.2%) than among girls (7.4%), children aged ≥5 years (approximately 10%) than children aged Asthma prevalence among children increased from 8.7% in 2001 to 9.4% in 2010, and then decreased to 8.3% in 2016. Although not all changes were statistically significant, a similar pattern was observed among subdemographic groups studied, with the exception of Mexican/Mexican-American children, among whom asthma prevalence increased from 5.1% in 2001 to 6.5% in 2016. Among children with asthma, the percentage who had an asthma attack in the past 12 months declined significantly from 2001 to 2016. Whereas asthma prevalence was lower among children aged 0-4 years than among older children, the prevalence of asthma attacks (62.4%), emergency department or urgent care center (ED/UC) visits (31.1%), and hospitalization (10.4%) were higher among children with asthma aged 0-4 years than among those aged 12-17 years (44.8%, 9.6%, and 2.8%, respectively). During 2013, children with asthma aged 5-17 years missed 13.8 million days of school per year (2.6 days per child). Compared with 2003, in 2013, the prevalence of adverse health outcomes and health care use were significantly lower and the prevalence of having an action plan to manage asthma was higher. Asthma remains an important public health and medical problem. The health of children with asthma can be improved by promoting asthma control strategies, including asthma trigger reduction, appropriate guidelines-based medical management, and asthma education for children, parents, and others involved in asthma care.

  15. CDC Vital Signs: E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014. Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which causes addiction, may harm brain development, and could lead to ... also now used to advertise e-cigarettes – including sex, independence, and rebellion. During the time e-cigarette ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lower the level of virus in the body. ART helps people with HIV live longer, healthier lives ... need. Lowering the amount of virus in the body can keep a person with HIV ... regular medical care, take ART and have the HIV virus under control. The ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food and pizza restaurant foods, and 9% from school cafeteria foods. View larger image and text description Top of Page Infographic View larger image and text ... government is Applying new nutrition standards for foods sold and served in schools that will reduce sodium up to 50% by ...

  18. Amniotic fluid as a vital sign for fetal wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magann, Everett F

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Amniotic fluid, once thought to merely provide protection and room for necessary movement and growth for the fetus, is now understood to be a highly complex and dynamic system that is studied as a data point to interpret fetal wellbeing. Methods: Assessment of amniotic fluid volume is now routine when performing a sonographic evaluation of fetal status and is an important consideration in the assessment and management of perinatal morbidity and mortality. 1 , 2 In this review, we will cover the dynamics that affect amniotic fluid volume, review methods for measurement and quantification of volume, review definitions for normative data as related to neonatal outcomes, and provide evidence based guidance on the workup and management options for oligoydramnios and polyhydramnios in singleton and twin pregnancies. Conclusions: When abnormalities of fluid exist, appropriate workup to uncover the underlying etiology should be initiated as adverse fetal outcomes are sometimes associated with these variations from normalcy. PMID:28191176

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Making Food Safer to Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... where food is grown to cutting boards in kitchens. What we eat and how we eat have ... Sprouts, leafy greens, roots, fish, grains-beans, shellfish, oil-sugar, and dairy. Source: CDC National Outbreak Reporting ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Smoking among People with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence shows that there has been direct tobacco marketing to people with mental illness and other vulnerable ... Associate Director for Communications (OADC) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  1. Microwave Instrument for Human Vital Signs Detection and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup

    front-end was initiated. With financial support from the Danish fund H. C. Ørsteds Fonden, the IC was fabricated in the SG25H3 SiGe:C BiCMOS technology from Innovations for High Performance microelectronics (IHP) GmbH in Germany. The radar transceiver has been measured and altough some adjustments could...... methods is presented and real measurements verifies its operation. At the moment of writing, VISDAM consists of two heterodyne radar units operating at X-band with IF frequency at 1 kHz. A small scale test is performed with VISDAM showing its capabilities to track the heart rate of a person in various...... be of benefit, it is assessed that the radar chip can contribute to a full VSD system. Time did not allow for this latter system implementation of the IC....

  2. Finding Basic Writing's Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mary P.; Brossell, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Posits that basic writing serves a vital function by providing writing support for at-risk students and serves the needs of a growing student population that universities accept yet feel needs additional writing instruction. Concludes that the basic writing classroom is the most effective educational support for at-risk students and their writing.…

  3. Elan vital chez Bergson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    محمود نوالی

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La Philosphie de Bergson vise la vie spirituelle, le spiritualisme, la joie, l’appétit et le changement perpétuel de la réalité. En conséquence las trios notions de la durée, de la mémoire et de l’élan vital constituent la réalité de la vie dans son cheminement et dans son progrès. L’ensemble de ces notions fondamentales décèle la contenu de la vie, et dégage la réalité de ses rigidités de l’automatisme. Or, élan vital, ou élan original est à la base de tous les mouvements d’ordre matériel ou spirituel du monde.

  4. Signing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Dress for success At a recent physics teachers meeting a colleague commented to me on the generally poor state of the throng's sartorial elegance. It's not that she thought they should all be clothes horses or catwalk models but certain rules seem to have been ignored. This didn't just apply to the older people in the crowd. In the interests of physics we drew up a few basic rules that seemed to have gone awry and we present them here for the benefit of new members of the profession: Trousers should meet shoes, or at least come within 2 cm of the laces. NB. Pedal pushers are not acceptable male attire. Sandals and socks should also be avoided. One of the few equations that all of the general public know (like E = mc2) is Socks + Sandals = Beard. Hair should be washed at least once a week (whether it needs to be or not), combing should take place more frequently. Particular styles are not important, but avoid hiding receding hair using the comb-over. If your jacket/cardigan frays at the elbow throw it away. Patching it up with leather patches is not decorous or clever. NB. Carpet samples are not an acceptable alternative. If you are watching a re-run of a 1970s television show one afternoon and you find yourself thinking how much you admire the actors' dress sense then it is time to go clothes shopping. Colours should match and complement each other. Some combinations should be banned, for example brown jacket with orange shirts are a no-no. Under no circumstances should you try to match brown tweed with anything, unless it's the inside of your dustbin. Men and ties. It is very common to want to wear one's old school or college tie to show off your origins and this is to be commended. However, it is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Ironing should be done on all outer garments, though there is no need to iron creases (fore and aft) so

  5. The Vitality of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, social scientists have carried out empirical studies in the laboratories, clinics and patient associations within and through which biological knowledge, biomedical practice, biosocialities and biological citizens are being co-produced. In this chapter, I sketch a novel analytics of what we might be conceptualised as the vitality of disease. Medical interventions are increasingly as much about improving (quality of) life as they are about saving and prolonging life. As a co...

  6. Quantifiers in Russian Sign Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Paperno, D.; Keenan, E.L.

    2017-01-01

    After presenting some basic genetic, historical and typological information about Russian Sign Language, this chapter outlines the quantification patterns it expresses. It illustrates various semantic types of quantifiers, such as generalized existential, generalized universal, proportional,

  7. Making the Vital Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Genevieve

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how libraries have the potential to support and motivate adults wanting to improve their literacy skills. Reports on a British initiative to bring together libraries and basic skills providers. (Author/JOW)

  8. Energy brands lack vitality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godri, S.; Wilders, E.

    2004-01-01

    The three Dutch energy companies (Nuon, Essent and Eneco Energie) have relatively little brand strength. The brands are not perceived to be sufficiently different from one another and are not valued by consumers. With liberalisation imminent, this is hardly a strong starting point. How can you win over consumers if it is not clear what is on offer? In the business market, decision-makers are better placed to distinguish between brands. However, the brands lack vitality in this sector of the market too. The only consolation is that the situation is by no means exclusive to the Netherlands [nl

  9. The Vitality of Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2017-01-01

    of what we might be conceptualised as the vitality of disease. Medical interventions are increasingly as much about improving (quality of) life as they are about saving and prolonging life. As a consequence, morbid living has come to be disciplined, for example, in patient schools aimed at teaching...... patients to learn how to live with their disease, through rating scales used to measure treatment effect on the ‘quality of life’ of patients in clinical trials and through disease-specific ‘Living with’ guides aimed at patients and carers....

  10. Sign Languages of the World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This handbook provides information on some 38 sign languages, including basic facts about each of the languages, structural aspects, history and culture of the Deaf communities, and history of research. The papers are all original, and each has been specifically written for the volume by an expert...... or team of experts in the particular sign language, at the invitation of the editors. Thirty-eight different deaf sign languages and alternate sign languages from every continent are represented, and over seventy international deaf and hearing scholars have contributed to the volume....

  11. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  12. [Basic life support in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Macías, A; Manrique Martínez, I; Rodríguez Núñez, A; López-Herce Cid, J

    2006-09-01

    Basic life support (BLS) is the combination of maneuvers that identifies the child in cardiopulmonary arrest and initiates the substitution of respiratory and circulatory function, without the use of technical adjuncts, until the child can receive more advanced treatment. BLS includes a sequence of steps or maneuvers that should be performed sequentially: ensuring the safety of rescuer and child, assessing unconsciousness, calling for help, positioning the victim, opening the airway, assessing breathing, ventilating, assessing signs of circulation and/or central arterial pulse, performing chest compressions, activating the emergency medical service system, and checking the results of resuscitation. The most important changes in the new guidelines are the compression: ventilation ratio and the algorithm for relieving foreign body airway obstruction. A compression/ ventilation ratio of 30:2 will be recommended for lay rescuers of infants, children and adults. Health professionals will use a compression: ventilation ratio of 15:2 for infants and children. If the health professional is alone, he/she may also use a ratio of 30:2 to avoid fatigue. In the algorithm for relieving foreign body airway obstruction, when the child becomes unconscious, the maneuvers will be similar to the BLS sequence with chest compressions (functioning as a deobstruction procedure) and ventilation, with reassessment of the mouth every 2 min to check for a foreign body, and evaluation of breathing and the presence of vital signs. BLS maneuvers are easy to learn and can be performed by anyone with adequate training. Therefore, BLS should be taught to all citizens.

  13. When longevity meets vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendorp, Rudi G J; Schalkwijk, Frank H

    2014-08-01

    Alarmed by the sustainability of our health and social security systems, longevity has become a great societal challenge. In line with evolutionary logic we see a continuous increase of average life expectancy and maximal lifespan. Striving for a healthy old age, however, is an infelicitous expression as for human subjects the ageing process cannot be ultimately postponed. Not disregarding the huge variation in health trajectories, in old age we will all suffer from frailty and infirmity. As yet efforts of the biomedical arena are almost exclusively focused on stalling the ageing process and preventing dysfunction. Too little effort is spend on how to inspire and coach the great majority of people who still feel relatively well notwithstanding the presence of multiple age-related disorders. There is a strong rationale to separate the quest to live in good health for longer from actively and effectively negotiating the challenge of functional decline in old age. In particular, we emphasise a focus on adjusting the environment in order to correct the gene-environment mismatch that contributes to ill health. An additional strategy is to empower people to set ambitions and to realise appropriate goals, in spite of infirmity. Striving for vitality presents a striking opportunity to achieve subjective feelings of life satisfaction when ageing.

  14. A Segmental Framework for Representing Signs Phonetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The arguments for dividing the signing stream in signed languages into sequences of phonetic segments are compelling. The visual records of instances of actually occurring signs provide evidence of two basic types of segments: postural segments and trans-forming segments. Postural segments specify an alignment of articulatory features, both manual…

  15. Reactor vital equipment determination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, T.F.; Thomas, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Reactor Vital Equipment Determination Techniques program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is discussed. The purpose of the program is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with technical support in identifying vital areas at nuclear power plants using a fault-tree technique. A reexamination of some system modeling assumptions is being performed for the Vital Area Analysis Program. A short description of the vital area analysis and supporting research on modeling assumptions is presented. Perceptions of program modifications based on the research are outlined, and the status of high-priority research topics is discussed

  16. Basic management of medical emergencies: recognizing a patient's distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kenneth L

    2010-05-01

    Medical emergencies can happen in the dental office, possibly threatening a patient's life and hindering the delivery of dental care. Early recognition of medical emergencies begins at the first sign of symptoms. The basic algorithm for management of all medical emergencies is this: position (P), airway (A), breathing (B), circulation (C) and definitive treatment, differential diagnosis, drugs, defibrillation (D). The dentist places an unconscious patient in a supine position and comfortably positions a conscious patient. The dentist then assesses airway, breathing and circulation and, when necessary, supports the patient's vital functions. Drug therapy always is secondary to basic life support (that is, PABCD). Prompt recognition and efficient management of medical emergencies by a well-prepared dental team can increase the likelihood of a satisfactory outcome. The basic algorithm for managing medical emergencies is designed to ensure that the patient's brain receives a constant supply of blood containing oxygen.

  17. Methods of sperm vitality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Librach, Clifford L

    2013-01-01

    Sperm vitality is a reflection of the proportion of live, membrane-intact spermatozoa determined by either dye exclusion or osmoregulatory capacity under hypo-osmotic conditions. In this chapter we address the two most common methods of sperm vitality assessment: eosin-nigrosin staining and the hypo-osmotic swelling test, both utilized in clinical Andrology laboratories.

  18. Factores asociados al desgaste profesional en los trabajadores del soporte vital básico del País Vasco: Un estudio cualitativo Factors associated with professional burnout among basic life support caregivers in the Basque Country: A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendoa Ballesteros Peña

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar factores de riesgo de desgaste profesional percibidos por los técnicos en emergencias sanitarias de las unidades de soporte vital básico del País Vasco. Metodología: Investigación cualitativa realizada mediante análisis de discurso en ocho entrevistas individuales a trabajadores del soporte vital básico con puntuaciones compatibles con afectación por desgaste profesional en el Inventario de Burnout de Maslach. Las variables estructurales tenidas en cuenta para la elección de los participantes fueron la antigüedad profesional (superior o inferior a 10 años y el centro de trabajo. Resultados: Los trabajadores presentan disconformidad con la actual estructura organizacional del sistema de emergencias y falta de proyección y reconocimiento de su rol profesional. Además manifiestan un progresivo distanciamiento afectivo para con los pacientes, con quienes ha aumentado el número de enfrentamientos debidos a dificultades de entendimiento causadas por situaciones de inadecuación del uso de los recursos asistenciales. Conclusiones: La estructura de organización del sistema de emergencias, el trato con el paciente y su familia y la situación profesional del técnico en emergencias son percibidos como elementos clave predisponentes de desgaste profesional.Objective: To identify possible factors associated with professional burnout among basic life support caregivers in the Basque Country. Method: A qualitative research was performed. We conducted an analysis of the discus of eight interpretive individual interviews with caregivers in basic life support units who presented scores compatible with burnout on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The selection of participants was intentional. Results: The data analysis found that ambulance personnel have disagreed with emergency system organizational structure and recognition of their professional role. They show a progressive emotional detachment to patients. An inadequate use

  19. Sign order in Slovenian Sign Language locative constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matic Pavlič

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In both sign and spoken languages, locative relations tend to be encoded within constructions that display the non-basic word/sign order. In addition, in such an environment, sign languages habitually use a distinct predicate type – a classifier predicate – which may independently affect the order of constituents in the sentence. In this paper, I present Slovenian Sign Language (SZJ locative constructions, in which (i the argument that enables spatial anchoring (“ground” precedes both the argument that requires spatial anchoring (“figure” and the predicate. At the same time, (ii the relative order of the figure with respect to the predicate depends on the type of predicate employed: a non-classifier predicate precedes the figure, while a classifier predicate only comes after the figure.

  20. Baldwin Borough Signs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — An inventory by location of the signs on Borough of Baldwin roads and properties, such as street signs, traffic signs, and warning signs.

  1. Name signs in Danish Sign Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakken Jepsen, Julie

    2018-01-01

    A name sign is a personal sign assigned to deaf, hearing impaired and hearing persons who enter the deaf community. The mouth action accompanying the sign reproduces all or part of the formal first name that the person has received by baptism or naming. Name signs can be compared to nicknames...... in spoken languages, where a person working as a blacksmith by his friends might be referred to as ‘The Blacksmith’ (‘Here comes the Blacksmith!’) instead of using the person’s first name. Name signs are found not only in Danish Sign Language (DSL) but in most, if not all, sign languages studied to date....... This article provides examples of the creativity of the users of Danish Sign Language, including some of the processes in the use of metaphors, visual motivation and influence from Danish when name signs are created....

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  4. Sign Language and the Brain: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ruth; MacSweeney, Mairead; Waters, Dafydd

    2008-01-01

    How are signed languages processed by the brain? This review briefly outlines some basic principles of brain structure and function and the methodological principles and techniques that have been used to investigate this question. We then summarize a number of different studies exploring brain activity associated with sign language processing…

  5. Sign (di) lemma for dimension shifting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Getting these signs right is important in order to avoid basic contradictions. We illustrate the result – which we call as the sign lemma for dimension shifting – by some de Rham ... Author Affiliations. Nitin Nitsure1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  6. Vitality detection in personal authentication systems using fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Coli, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Fingerprints are considered as the sign of each human being, and this has contributed the development of biometric applications based on such features. Since 2002, an important vulnerability has been shown: it is possible to deceive fingerprint scanners through artificial replicas of fingertips. In order to address this shortcoming it is need to recognize a spoofing attempt with artificial fingers looking for some “life signs” each time an user submit a fingerprint (vitality detection problem...

  7. Evaluation of Efficiency Improvement in Vital Documentation Using RFID Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eizen; Nakai, Miho; Ishihara, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We introduced medical devices with RFID tags and the terminal with RFID reader in our hospital. Time study was conducted in two phases. In phase I, nurses round as usual, and in phase II, the nurse round the ward with a terminal installed on a cart. This study concluded that RFID system shortens the time for vital sign documentation. However, deploying the terminals at every bedside did not contribute the more time reduction.

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ...

  9. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the intermixing of local sign languages and French Sign Language (LSF, or Langue des Signes Française). ... phrases with similar neural mechanisms as when we speak, new study finds New York University ( 4/03/ ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  12. TranSign Android Sign Translator

    OpenAIRE

    Monforte Batiste, Pol

    2013-01-01

    Projecte realitzat en el marc d’un programa de mobilitat amb l'Institute of Applied Informatics, FIIT STU in Bratislava TranSign goal is to translate words from signs (with black letters and white background) from one language to another.

  13. The Forbidden Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    is an important addition that offers insight into the hardware requirements for bio-semiosis. As any type of semiosis must be dependent upon Semiotic scaffolds, I recently argued that the process of semiosis has to be divided into two separate processes of sign establishment and sign interpretation......, and that misalignment between the two processes result in faulty sign interpretation and over-signification. Such faulty signs were forbidden in the sign classification system of Peirce, so I defined them as forbidden signs. Here I present an analysis of the forbidden sign categories with examples from Occult semiotics....... I also show that biological semiosis offers examples of forbidden signs, where the faulty interpretation of signs may lead to decimation of whole evolutionary lines of organisms. A new concept of Evolutionary memory which is applicable to both human and biological semiosis is explained...

  14. Vital Stats (Vital Statistics Tables and files- Births, Infant Deaths, Fetal Deaths)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VitalStats: A collection of vital statistics products including tables, data files, and reports that allow users to access and examine vital statistics and...

  15. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  16. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  18. Warning Signs After Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care > Warning signs after birth Warning signs after birth E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... health problems new moms may have after giving birth? Chances are that you’ll be healthy after ...

  19. Basics of statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller-Kirsten, Harald J W

    2013-01-01

    Statistics links microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, and requires for this reason a large number of microscopic elements like atoms. The results are values of maximum probability or of averaging. This introduction to statistical physics concentrates on the basic principles, and attempts to explain these in simple terms supplemented by numerous examples. These basic principles include the difference between classical and quantum statistics, a priori probabilities as related to degeneracies, the vital aspect of indistinguishability as compared with distinguishability in classical physics, the differences between conserved and non-conserved elements, the different ways of counting arrangements in the three statistics (Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein), the difference between maximization of the number of arrangements of elements, and averaging in the Darwin-Fowler method. Significant applications to solids, radiation and electrons in metals are treated in separate chapters, as well as Bose-Eins...

  20. Signed languages and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddinga, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf people who form part of a Deaf community communicate using a shared sign language. When meeting people from another language community, they can fall back on a flexible and highly context-dependent form of communication called international sign, in which shared elements from their own sign

  1. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  2. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  3. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  7. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ... messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell organelles. ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  17. The cross-cultural importance of satisfying vital needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Allen Andrew A

    2009-11-01

    Ethical beliefs may vary across cultures but there are things that must be valued as preconditions to any cultural practice. Physical and mental abilities vital to believing, valuing and practising a culture are such preconditions and it is always important to protect them. If one is to practise a distinct culture, she must at least have these basic abilities. Access to basic healthcare is one way to ensure that vital abilities are protected. John Rawls argued that access to all-purpose primary goods must be ensured. Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum claim that universal capabilities are what resources are meant to enable. Len Doyal and Ian Gough identify physical health and autonomy as basic needs of every person in every culture. When we disagree on what to prioritize, when resources to satisfy competing demands are scarce, our common needs can provide a point of normative convergence. Need-based rationing, however, has been criticized for being too indeterminate to give guidance for deciding which healthcare services to prioritize and for tending to create a bottomless-pit problem. But there is a difference between needing something (first-order need) and needing to have the ability to need (second-order need). Even if we disagree about which first-order need to prioritize, we must accept the importance of satisfying our second-order need to have the ability to value things. We all have a second-order need for basic healthcare as a means to protect our vital abilities even if we differ in what our cultures consider to be particular first-order needs.

  18. Traffic Signs Inventory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ružbarský

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on practical application of Cambridge Correlator. The goal is to propose a traffic signs inventory system by using excellent characteristics of correlator in the rapid optical correlation. The proposal of this inventory system includes obtaining of traffic signs to create the database either collecting the GPS coordinates. It is necessary to know the traffic signs position and also to document the entire surface route for later evaluation in offline mode.

  19. New radiation warning sign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.; Mason, C.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation accidents involving orphan radioactive sources have happened as a result of people not recognizing the radiation trefoil symbol or from being illiterate and not understanding a warning statement on the radiation source. The trefoil symbol has no inherent meaning to people that have not been instructed in its use. A new radiation warning sign, to supplement the existing trefoil symbol, has been developed to address these issues. Human Factors experts, United Nations member states, and members of the international community of radiation protection professionals were consulted for input on the design of a new radiation warning sign that would clearly convey the message of 'Danger- Run Away- Stay Away' when in close proximity to a dangerous source of radiation. Cultural differences of perception on various warning symbols were taken into consideration and arrays of possible signs were developed. The signs were initially tested in international children for identification with the desired message and response. Based on these test results and further input from radiation protection professionals, five warning signs were identified as the most successful in conveying the desired message and response. These five signs were tested internationally in eleven countries by a professional survey company to determine the best sign for this purpose. The conclusion of the international testing is presented. The new radiation warning sign is currently a draft ISO standard under committee review. The design of the propose d radiation warning sign and the proposed implementation strategy outlined in the draft ISO standard is presented. (authors)

  20. Client training vital for NFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  1. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  2. Dense Alternating Sign Matrices and Extensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Hall, F.J.; Stroev, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 444, 1 March (2014), s. 219-226 ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : alternating sign matrix * dense matrix * totally unimodular matrix * combined matrix * generalized complementary basic matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2014

  3. Basic conceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    In this part of book author presents the basic conceptions of minerals studying. The course of minerals deposits is the most important branch of geology science and studying the geology, material constitution, formation conditions and regularity of distribution in earth crust different types of mineral raw materials

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at ... Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by which the cell sends information to receiving neurons. cell body —Contains the nucleus and cytoplasm of a ... circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  8. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  9. Vital soil; function, value and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, P.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Healthy soil, with active soil life, deters long-term soil degradation and ensures that geo-physical processes are undisturbed. Is the vitality of soil under threat due to human civilization? Or is it due to contamination, intensification, and deforestation? Vital Soil aims to look at the effects

  10. Vital exhaustion and risk for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Prescott, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Vital exhaustion, defined as feelings of depression and fatigue, has previously been investigated mainly as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The authors investigated the association between depressive feelings and fatigue as covered by the concept of vital exhaustion and the risk...... for cancer....

  11. Vital exhaustion and risk for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Prescott, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Vital exhaustion, defined as feelings of depression and fatigue, has previously been investigated mainly as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The authors investigated the association between depressive feelings and fatigue as covered by the concept of vital exhaustion and the risk...

  12. Completely random signed measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar

    Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases.......Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases....

  13. Standardization of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  14. Bone vitality in the cat's irradiated jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dambrain, R.; Dhem, A.; Gueulette, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1988-01-01

    The vitality of the mandible in cats was studied from two to 15 months after irradiation. Dose of 80 Gy in three days was delivered using three hairpin shape iridium-192 wires surrounding the mandibula. The osseous vitality was assessed from the percentages of lacunae inhabited by osteocytes (IL). The results are compared with those obtained by microradiography. At two months, a small reduction of vitality is already observed, it becomes progressively more important. At one year, vitality is recovered nearly fully in the ventral part of the mandibula, mainly at the level of the alveolar crest. Vitality remains reduced in the dorsal part. Microradiographic lesions appear more slowly; they are apparent at six months. (orig.) [de

  15. PRESERVASI ARSIP VITAL (STUDI KASUS DI BIRO UMUM, HUKUM & KEPEGAWAIAN UNIVERSITAS NEGERI SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmawati Elmawati

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vital archives preservation is very important to continuity organization, as valid prossesing evidence and to protecting the rights and obligations of employees, starts from creation phase till saving and reducing phase. BUHK is chosen to research location because based on observations begin result, a lot of activities in each sub-division potentially create vital archives. This situation is not supported by good human resources and infrastructure. Method of this research is case study with qualitative approach. Data collection techniques that used in this research are documentation, interview and observation. Data validity is done by triangulation technique. Informants of this research are 6 sub-division chiefs, 10 stafs, service & information coordinator of Archives Unit, and Unnes archivist. The results of this research showed that BUHK UNNES has not identified vital archives yet. Based on law analysis and risk analysis, there are 38 types of archives included in the vital category, they are consisted of: 11% of administrative archives, 21% law archives, 8% employment archives, 18% household archives, 34% archives of goods goverment own archieves, and 8% leader activity archieves. Vital archives preservation is done by several staff whose duties are related with vital archives. BUHK has not had the procedure of prevention and recovery of vital archives pre-disaster.The conclusion of this research, BUHK is one of work units at UNNES that manages a lot of vital archives. Preservation that has not maximum gives effect unready to BUHK in prevention and recovery pre-disaster of vital archives. Suggestion that given in this research are to make work team to analyse and to decide about vital archieves. To maximum preservation vital archieves, BUHK should recruit one person whose archieves education basic, standard facilities provisioning, and vital archive program implementation.

  16. Wavelet basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Since the study of wavelets is a relatively new area, much of the research coming from mathematicians, most of the literature uses terminology, concepts and proofs that may, at times, be difficult and intimidating for the engineer. Wavelet Basics has therefore been written as an introductory book for scientists and engineers. The mathematical presentation has been kept simple, the concepts being presented in elaborate detail in a terminology that engineers will find familiar. Difficult ideas are illustrated with examples which will also aid in the development of an intuitive insight. Chapter 1 reviews the basics of signal transformation and discusses the concepts of duals and frames. Chapter 2 introduces the wavelet transform, contrasts it with the short-time Fourier transform and clarifies the names of the different types of wavelet transforms. Chapter 3 links multiresolution analysis, orthonormal wavelets and the design of digital filters. Chapter 4 gives a tour d'horizon of topics of current interest: wave...

  17. The Person: Vital Core of the Pedagogic Mediation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Cervantes, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to place the person as the basic element in education and, particularly, in the pedagogic mediation process. Based on her own personal and professional experiences, and inspired by writers such as Gutiérrez, Krishnamurti, Maturana, Morin and Prieto, the author uses the terms student-person and teacher-person as a way of truly re-discovering and re-learning that vital element immersed in a magical relational space, where the human being is strengthened as an i...

  18. Vitality at work and its associations with lifestyle, self-determination, organizational culture, and with employees' performance and sustainable employability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Scheppingen, Arjella R; de Vroome, Ernest M M; Ten Have, Kristin C J M; Zwetsloot, Gerard I J M; Wiezer, Noortje; van Mechelen, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Vitality at work is an important factor for optimal functioning and sustainable employability. To date, knowledge on how to promote vitality at work is fragmented. Contribute to knowledge on how to promote vitality at work. Determinants of vitality at work are identified from three scientific fields, and used in a comprehensive model. Regression analyses on cross-sectional data from a Dutch dairy company (N= 629) are performed to examine the associations between these factors, vitality at work, and employees' perceived effective personal functioning and sustainable employability. Vitality at work is most strongly associated with basic psychological needs of self-determination, but also with healthy lifestyle behavior, having a balanced workstyle, and social capital. Vitality at work is also associated with effective personal functioning and with sustainable employability. The study confirms the multifactorial nature of vitality at work. Since organizational culture may support self-determination, and cultural aspects themselves are positively associated with vitality, organizational culture seems particular important in promoting vitality at work. Additionally, a healthy lifestyle appears important. The associations between vitality at work and effective personal functioning and sustainable employability endorse the combined health-based, business-related and societal importance of vitality at work.

  19. Understanding the roles of signs and norms in organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamper, R.K.; Liu, Kecheng; Liu, Kecheng; Hafkamp, Mark; Ades, Y.; Ades, Yasser

    2000-01-01

    To apply semiotics to organizational analysis and information systems design, it is essential to unite two basic concepts: the sign and the norm. A sign is anything that stands for something else for some community. A norm is a generalized disposition to the world shared by members of a community.

  20. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  1. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Some basic explanations are given of the principles underlying the nuclear fuel cycle, starting with the physics of atomic and nuclear structure and continuing with nuclear energy and reactors, fuel and waste management and finally a discussion of economics and the future. An important aspect of the fuel cycle concerns the possibility of ''closing the back end'' i.e. reprocessing the waste or unused fuel in order to re-use it in reactors of various kinds. The alternative, the ''oncethrough'' cycle, discards the discharged fuel completely. An interim measure involves the prolonged storage of highly radioactive waste fuel. (UK)

  2. Crocodile jaw sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This teaching image highlights the CT abdominal imaging finding of 'crocodile jaw sign' which should raise concern about the presence of an incomplete annular pancreas which causes partial encasement of the duodenum.

  3. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for MDA Blog Donate Search MDA.org Close Dermatomyositis Share print email share facebook twitter google plus ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? For many decades, dermatomyositis was considered “ polymyositis with ...

  4. Vital directions for mathematics education research

    CERN Document Server

    Leatham, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    In this book, experts discuss vital issues in mathematics education and what they see as viable directions for research in mathematics education to address them. Their recommendations take the form of overarching principles and ideas that cut across the field.

  5. Pulse and vital sign measurement in mixed reality using a HoloLens

    OpenAIRE

    Mcduff , Daniel; Hurter , Christophe; Gonzalez-Franco , Mar

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Cardiography, quantitative measurement of the functioning of the heart, traditionally requires customized obtrusive contact sensors. Using new methods photoplethysmography and ballistocardiography signals can be captured using ubiquitous sensors, such as webcams and accelerometers. However, these signals are not visible to the unaided eye. We present Cardiolens-a mixed reality system that enables real-time, hands-free measurement and visu-alization of blood ow and vita...

  6. Detecting Specific Health-Related Events Using an Integrated Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Adnane

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for the detection of apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data is presented. The method is based on the intelligent combination of an integrated sensor system for long-time cardiorespiratory signal monitoring and dedicated signal-processing packages. Integrated sensors are a PVDF film and conductive fabric sheets. The signal processing package includes dedicated respiratory cycle (RC and QRS complex detection algorithms and a new method using the respiratory cycle variability (RCV for detecting apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data. Results show that our method is suitable for online analysis of long time series data.

  7. Vital Signs: Disability and Physical Activity — United States, 2009–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dianna D.; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A.; Stevens, Alissa C.; Sloan, Michelle L.; Lullo, Carolyn; Visser, Susanna N.; Fox, Michael H.; Armour, Brian S.; Campbell, Vincent A.; Brown, David R.; Dorn, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adults with disabilities are less active and have higher rates of chronic disease than the general population. Given the health benefits of physical activity, understanding physical activity, its relationship with chronic disease, and health professional recommendations for physical activity among young to middle-age adults with disabilities could help increase the effectiveness of health promotion efforts. Methods Data from the 2009–2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to estimate the prevalence of, and association between, aerobic physical activity (inactive, insufficiently active, or active) and chronic diseases (heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer) among adults aged 18–64 years by disability status and type (hearing, vision, cognitive, and mobility). The prevalence of, and association between, receiving a health professional recommendation for physical activity and level of aerobic physical activity was assessed using 2010 data. Results Overall, 11.6% of U.S. adults aged 18–64 years reported a disability, with estimates for disability type ranging from 1.7% (vision) to 5.8% (mobility). Compared with adults without disabilities, inactivity was more prevalent among adults with any disability (47.1% versus 26.1%) and for adults with each type of disability. Inactive adults with disabilities were 50% more likely to report one or more chronic diseases than those who were physically active. Approximately 44% of adults with disabilities received a recommendation from a health professional for physical activity in the past 12 months. Conclusions Almost half of adults with disabilities are physically inactive and are more likely to have a chronic disease. Among adults with disabilities who visited a health professional in the past 12 months, the majority (56%) did not receive a recommendation for physical activity. Implications for Public Health These data highlight the need for increased physical activity among persons with disabilities, which might require support across societal sectors, including government and health care. PMID:24807240

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Heart Age - Is Your Heart Older Than You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age. About 3 in 4 heart attacks and strokes are due to risk factors that increase heart age. Problem US adults have ... and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Doctors, nurses, and other ... the effect of risk factors on their heart health. Help patients choose a ...

  9. Vital Signs: Preventing Antibiotic-Resistant Infections in Hospitals - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Lindsey M; Fridkin, Scott K; Aponte-Torres, Zuleika; Avery, Lacey; Coffin, Nicole; Dudeck, Margaret A; Edwards, Jonathan R; Jernigan, John A; Konnor, Rebecca; Soe, Minn M; Peterson, Kelly; McDonald, L Clifford

    2016-03-11

    Health care-associated antibiotic-resistant (AR) infections increase patient morbidity and mortality and might be impossible to successfully treat with any antibiotic. CDC assessed health care-associated infections (HAI), including Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and the role of six AR bacteria of highest concern nationwide in several types of health care facilities. During 2014, approximately 4,000 short-term acute care hospitals, 501 long-term acute care hospitals, and 1,135 inpatient rehabilitation facilities in all 50 states reported data on specific infections to the National Healthcare Safety Network. National standardized infection ratios and their percentage reduction from a baseline year for each HAI type, by facility type, were calculated. The proportions of AR pathogens and HAIs caused by any of six resistant bacteria highlighted by CDC in 2013 as urgent or serious threats were determined. In 2014, the reductions in incidence in short-term acute care hospitals and long-term acute care hospitals were 50% and 9%, respectively, for central line-associated bloodstream infection; 0% (short-term acute care hospitals), 11% (long-term acute care hospitals), and 14% (inpatient rehabilitation facilities) for catheter-associated urinary tract infection; 17% (short-term acute care hospitals) for surgical site infection, and 8% (short-term acute care hospitals) for CDI. Combining HAIs other than CDI across all settings, 47.9% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin resistant, 29.5% of enterococci were vancomycin-resistant, 17.8% of Enterobacteriaceae were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype, 3.6% of Enterobacteriaceae were carbapenem resistant, 15.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant, and 52.6% of Acinetobacter species were multidrug resistant. The likelihood of HAIs caused by any of the six resistant bacteria ranged from 12% in inpatient rehabilitation facilities to 29% in long-term acute care hospitals. Although there has been considerable progress in preventing some HAIs, many remaining infections could be prevented with implementation of existing recommended practices. Depending upon the setting, more than one in four of HAIs excluding CDI are caused by AR bacteria. Physicians, nurses, and health care leaders need to consistently and comprehensively follow all recommendations to prevent catheter- and procedure-related infections and reduce the impact of AR bacteria through antimicrobial stewardship and measures to prevent spread.

  10. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, David M.; Neff, Linda J.; King, Brian A.; Caraballo, Ralph S.; Bunnell, Rebecca E.; Babb, Stephen D.; Garrett, Bridgette E.; Sosnoff, Connie S.; Wang, Lanqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) from burning tobacco causes disease and death in nonsmoking children and adults. No risk-free level of SHS exposure exists. Methods National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999–2012 were used to examine SHS exposure among the nonsmoking population aged ≥3 years. SHS exposure among nonsmokers was defined as a serum cotinine level (a metabolite of nicotine) of 0.05–10 ng/mL. SHS exposure was assessed overall and by age, sex, race/ethnicity, poverty level, education, and whether the respondent owned or rented their housing. Results Prevalence of SHS exposure in nonsmokers declined from 52.5% during 1999–2000 to 25.3% during 2011–2012. During this period, declines were observed for all population subgroups, but disparities exist. During 2011–2012, SHS was highest among: children aged 3–11 years (40.6%), non-Hispanic blacks (46.8%), persons living below the poverty level (43.2%), and persons living in rental housing (36.8%). Among children aged 3–11 years, 67.9% of non-Hispanic blacks were exposed to SHS compared with 37.2% of non-Hispanic whites and 29.9% of Mexican Americans. Conclusion Overall, SHS exposure in the United States has been reduced by half since 1999–2000. However, 58 million persons were still exposed to SHS during 2011–2012, and exposure remains higher among children, non-Hispanic blacks, those living in poverty, and those who rent their housing. Implications for Public Health Practice Eliminating smoking in indoor spaces fully protects nonsmokers from SHS exposure; separating smokers from nonsmokers, cleaning the air and ventilating buildings cannot completely eliminate exposure. Continued efforts to promote implementation of comprehensive statewide laws prohibiting smoking in workplaces and public places, smoke-free policies in multiunit housing, and voluntary smoke-free home and vehicle rules are critical to protect nonsmokers from this preventable health hazard in the places they live, work, and gather. PMID:25654612

  11. Sleep stage classification by non-contact vital signs indices using Doppler radar sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Suzumura, Kazuki; Matsui, Takemi

    2016-08-01

    Disturbed sleep has become more common in recent years. To improve the quality of sleep, undergoing sleep observation has gained interest as a means to resolve possible problems. In this paper, we evaluate a non-restrictive and non-contact method for classifying real-time sleep stages and report on its potential applications. The proposed system measures heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body movements, and respiratory signals of a sleeping person using two 24-GHz microwave radars placed beneath the mattress. We introduce a method that dynamically selects the window width of the moving average filter to extract the pulse waves from the radar output signals. The Pearson correlation coefficient between two HR measurements derived from the radars overnight, and the reference polysomnography was the average of 88.3% and the correlation coefficient for HRV parameters was the average of 71.2%. For identifying wake and sleep periods, the body-movement index reached sensitivity of 76.0%, and a specificity of 77.0% with 10 participants. Low-frequency (LF) components of HRV and the LF/HF ratio had a high degree of contribution and differed significantly across the three sleep stages (REM, LIGHT, and DEEP; p 0.05). We applied a canonical discriminant analysis to identify wake or sleep periods and to classify the three sleep stages with leave-one-out cross validation. Classification accuracy was 66.4% for simply identifying wake and sleep, 57.1% for three stages (wake, REM, and NREM) and 34% for four stages (wake, REM, LIGHT, and DEEP). This is a novel system for measuring HRs, HRV, body movements, and respiratory intervals and for measuring high sensitivity pulse waves using two radar signals. It simplifies measurement of sleep stages and may be employed at nursing care facilities or by the general public to improve sleep quality.

  12. Vital Signs Screening for Alcohol Misuse in a Rural Primary Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, J. Paul; Guyinn, Monique R.; Matthews, Michael; Okosun, Ike; Dent, M. Marie

    2008-01-01

    Context: Alcohol misuse is more common in rural areas, and rural problem drinkers are less likely to seek alcohol treatment services. Rural clinics face unique challenges to implementing routine alcohol screening and intervention. Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using the single alcohol screening question (SASQ) during routine nursing vital…

  13. Vital signs: oil supplies improving but natural gas tight enough to keep prices high

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunan, D.

    2000-01-01

    Canada's 1999 year-end oil reserves were boosted by 2.1 million barrels by the launch of new oil sands mining projects near Fort McMurray and revisions in two existing operations, offsetting a decline of 3.7 per cent in remaining conventional reserves. Total oil reserves at year end stood at some 11.9 billion barrels, up from 9.8 billion barrels a year earlier. Conventional crude reserves dropped to 4.37 billion barrels. Despite the decline, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) were encouraged by a 70 per cent replacement rate, on production of 441 million barrels of oil, despite low activity resulting from soft prices in early part of 1999. Production from offshore Newfoundland sites amounted to 38.6 million barrels; remaining reserves in the Hibernia and Terra Nova field are estimated at 868 million barrels. Meanwhile, natural gas reserves slipped by about a trillion cubic feet to about 61 trillion cubic feet, reflecting an 83 per cent replacement rate which, however, represented an improvement from 76 per cent in 1998. Reserves replacement in 2000 is expected to improve over 1999 due to improved prices resulting in increased activity in 2000 which is expected to continue into 2001. Despite improvements in replacement, consumers have much to worry about as far as further consumer price increases are concerned. The situation can be traced back to the summer 2000 storage injection period when supplies normally stored for use in the winter were sold instead, to take advantage of high prices. The injection for storage was reduced due largely to continued strong demand from the US electric power generating sector. This situation will continue, barring a dramatic softening of the US economy

  14. Is Heart Rate Variability Better Than Routine Vital Signs for Prehospital Identification of Major Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    time-sensitive interventions such as surgery and optimal resusci- tation [18,19]. In theory, a reliable and simple diagnostic indicator of which...trol resuscitation is associated with a reduction in resuscitation volumes and im- provement in survival in 390 damage control laparotomy patients

  15. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs Identified Patients with Substantial Bleeding Prior to Hospital Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    threatening bleeding may be effectively treated when surgery and blood resuscitation are provided sufficiently quickly after injury [1, 2]. Standard...HFM-254 resuscitation volumes and improvement in survival in 390 damage control laparotomy patients," Ann Surg, vol. 254, no. 4, pp. 598-605, Oct

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... hospitals had at least one patient with a CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) infection during the first half ...

  17. Effects of prayer on the vital signs of patients with chronic kidney disease: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Thaila Oliveira Zatiti; Prado, Andressa Anunciação de Oliveira; Assis, Bianca Bacelar de; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Lima, Rogério Silva; Chaves, Erika de Cassia Lopes

    2017-07-20

    To assess the effect of prayer on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in patients with chronic kidney disease and learn their perception of the intervention. A randomized controlledtrial, double blind with a sample of volunteers, randomized into an intervention group (n=42) and a control group (n=37). Questionnaires addressing socio-demographic, clinical and spiritual characteristics and the Duke University Religious Index were applied. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were measured. The prayer was conducted at three different moments on alternating weeks. The qualitative data were organized and analyzed through Thematic Analysis. The sample consisted of 95 randomized volunteers. In the intra-group analysis, a statistically significant reduction (Pvalores de pressão arterial, frequência cardíaca e respiratória em todas as análises das pessoas que receberam a prece. Aanálise qualitativa resultou nos temasA Prece em um "Lugar de Sofrimento" e Avaliação Positiva e nos subtemas Alívio do Sofrimento, Esperança de Superação, Enfrentamento do Tratamento Hemodialítico. A prece reduziu os valores da pressão arterial, frequência cardíaca e respiratória de pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica e a avaliação dos voluntários em relação à intervenção foi positiva. Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clínicos: RBR-2zv39y.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programs such as the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. State and local officials can Include nutrition ... MB] CDC Guide to Strategies to Increase the Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables [PDF – 2.1 MB] ...

  19. Analysis of non-invasive FBG sensor for monitoring patient vital signs during MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    This article focuses on the analysis and verification of a non-invasive fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor used for the monitoring of a patient`s heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) in a magnetic resonance environment (MRI). Measuring heart and respiratory rate were carried out on a group of five volunteers with their written consent during MRI examinations. The type of the scanner used in the experiment was GE Signa HDxt 1.5T. The benefit of this article lies in the design of a sensor in the form of a sensor pad. The sensor is placed beneath a patient`s body lying supine. The purpose is to increase and improve the patient`s safety as well as to help doctors to predict panic and hyperventilation attacks of patients during MRI examinations. Provided Bland-Altman statistical analysis demonstrates the heart and respiratory rate detection with a satisfactory accuracy for all five volunteers.

  20. Vital signs: sodium intake among U.S. school-aged children - 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Mary E; Yuan, Keming; Gunn, Janelle P; Gillespie, Cathleen; Sliwa, Sarah; Galuska, Deborah A; Barrett, Jan; Hirschman, Jay; Moshfegh, Alanna J; Rhodes, Donna; Ahuja, Jaspreet; Pehrsson, Pamela; Merritt, Robert; Bowman, Barbara A

    2014-09-12

    A national health objective is to reduce average U.S. sodium intake to 2,300 mg daily to help prevent high blood pressure, a major cause of heart disease and stroke. Identifying common contributors to sodium intake among children can help reduction efforts. Average sodium intake, sodium consumed per calorie, and proportions of sodium from food categories, place obtained, and eating occasion were estimated among 2,266 school-aged (6–18 years) participants in What We Eat in America, the dietary intake component of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010. U.S. school-aged children consumed an estimated 3,279 mg of sodium daily with the highest total intake (3,672 mg/d) and intake per 1,000 kcal (1,681 mg) among high school–aged children. Forty-three percent of sodium came from 10 food categories: pizza, bread and rolls, cold cuts/cured meats, savory snacks, sandwiches, cheese, chicken patties/nuggets/tenders, pasta mixed dishes, Mexican mixed dishes, and soups. Sixty-five percent of sodium intake came from store foods, 13% from fast food/pizza restaurants, 5% from other restaurants, and 9% from school cafeteria foods. Among children aged 14–18 years, 16% of total sodium intake came from fast food/pizza restaurants versus 11% among those aged 6–10 years or 11–13 years (pschool meal on the day assessed, 26% of sodium intake came from school cafeteria foods. Thirty-nine percent of sodium was consumed at dinner, followed by lunch (29%), snacks (16%), and breakfast (15%). Sodium intake among school-aged children is much higher than recommended. Multiple food categories, venues, meals, and snacks contribute to sodium intake among school-aged children supporting the importance of populationwide strategies to reduce sodium intake. New national nutrition standards are projected to reduce the sodium content of school meals by approximately 25%–50% by 2022. Based on this analysis, if there is no replacement from other sources, sodium intake among U.S. school-aged children will be reduced by an average of about 75–150 mg per day and about 220–440 mg on days children consume school meals.

  1. Management in the Ministry of Health: what are the vital signs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, S; Ahmed, A A; al-Darazi, F

    1997-01-01

    Effective and efficient management of health services is becoming more and more important in all countries and in all organizations whether profit or non-profit. Management practices and attitudes which may have been accepted in previous years are no longer appropriate. A study was conducted in the Ministry of Health, State of Bahrain to determine the current status of management skills and attitudes. Participants were asked to identify the best and the worst practices of managers. Eight key areas of concern were identified: participative vs. non-participative style, communication, motivation, delegation, human relations skills, style of supervision, goal-oriented behavior, and use of supervisory power. In each of these management-related skill areas, examples of best and worst practices are provided in order to aid the manager/leader in self-assessing his/her abilities as a first step toward improving management.

  2. Vital signs : spending hit new high as industry stepped on the gas to reap strong prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunan, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presented a review of Canadian oil industry expenditures plus oil and gas revenues for Alberta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Manitoba since 1991. In the year 2000, the oil and gas industry boosted expenditures by 33 per cent and drilled a record number of wells in an effort to cash in on record natural gas prices and near-record crude oil prices which were a result of soaring demand and low supply. Total expenditures by Canadian oil and gas companies reached $33.98 billion in 2000 from $25.5 billion in 1999. A total of 16,507 wells were completed. Canada-wide development drilling expenditures increased to $5.7 billion in 2000 from $4.2 billion in 1999. In addition, exploration dollars and land expenditures also rose, as did investments in production facilities and production costs. Most of the new spending was concentrated in Alberta where most of the development drilling took place. Exploration efforts were held back to boost deliverability from known reserves. As a result, exploration spending in Alberta rose only slightly to $2.6 billion from $2.3 billion in 1999. Total crude and equivalent production for the Canadian oil patch in year 2000 rose only about 5 per cent, with most of the increase being associated with higher output from offshore development. Total sales of Canadian gas rose a modest 3 per cent, but measured by financial growth, these results are very positive. Most companies are reporting record revenues, cash flow and earnings for year 2000. 2 tabs., 1 fig

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives (for example, in the prompt treatment of sepsis, a life-threatening infection throughout the body), they can also put patients at risk for a Clostridium difficile infection, deadly diarrhea that causes at least 250,000 infections and 14,000 ...

  4. Vital Signs – Presión arterial alta (High Blood Pressure)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    En los EE. UU. casi un tercio de la población adulta tiene presión arterial alta, el principal factor de riesgo de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares, dos de las principales causas de muerte en el país.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  5. Vital signs: food categories contributing the most to sodium consumption - United States, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Most of the U.S. population consumes sodium in excess of daily guidelines (consumption raises blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation's first and fourth leading causes of death. Identifying food categories contributing the most to daily sodium consumption can help reduction. Population proportions of sodium consumption from specific food categories and sources were estimated among 7,227 participants aged ≥2 years in the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008. Mean daily sodium consumption was 3,266 mg, excluding salt added at the table. Forty-four percent of sodium consumed came from 10 food categories: bread and rolls, cold cuts/cured meats, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches, cheese, pasta mixed dishes, meat mixed dishes, and savory snacks. For most of these categories, >70% of the sodium consumed came from foods obtained at a store. For pizza and poultry, respectively, 51% and 27% of sodium consumed came from foods obtained at fast food/pizza restaurants. Mean sodium consumption per calorie consumed was significantly greater for foods and beverages obtained from fast food/pizza or other restaurants versus stores. Average sodium consumption is too high, reinforcing the importance of implementing strategies to reduce U.S. sodium intake. Nationwide, food manufacturers and restaurants can strive to reduce excess sodium added to foods before purchase. States and localities can implement policies to reduce sodium in foods served in institutional settings (e.g., schools, child care settings, and government cafeterias). Clinicians can counsel most patients to check food labels and select foods lower in sodium.

  6. Assessing Vital Signs: Applying Two Participatory Evaluation Frameworks to the Evaluation of a College of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Susan C.; Magilvy, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation research has been in progress to clarify the concept of participatory evaluation and to assess its impact. Recently, two theoretical frameworks have been offered--Daigneault and Jacob's participatory evaluation measurement index and Champagne and Smits' model of practical participatory evaluation. In this case report, we apply these…

  7. Detection of Low-volume Blood Loss: Compensatory Reserve Versus Traditional Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    the second most common cause of trauma-related death and is the leading cause of death within 48 hours of hospital admission.16 Humans have a multitude...and mortality.23,24 BD can increase, however, because of any derangement causing metabolic acidosis and is not limited to intravascular volume loss... syncope in humans. J Geophys Res. 2009;587:4987 4999. 11. Ryan KL, Batchinsky A, McManus JG, Rickards CA, Convertino VA. Changes in pulse character and

  8. Influence on Calculated Blood Pressure of Measurement Posture for the Development of Wearable Vital Sign Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhei Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a wearable blood pressure sensor using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor, which is a highly accurate strain sensor. This sensor is installed at the pulsation point of the human body to measure the pulse wave signal. A calibration curve is built that calculates the blood pressure by multivariate analysis using the pulse wave signal and a reference blood pressure measurement. However, if the measurement height of the FBG sensor is different from the reference measurement height, an error is included in the reference blood pressure. We verified the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation with respect to the measurement height difference and the posture of the subject. As the difference between the measurement height of the FBG sensor and the reference blood pressure measurement increased, the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation decreased. When the measurement height was identical and only posture was changed, good accuracy was achieved. In addition, when calibration curves were built using data measured in multiple postures, the blood pressure of each posture could be calculated from a single calibration curve. This will allow miniaturization of the necessary electronics of the sensor system, which is important for a wearable sensor.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking a Serious, Under-Recognized Problem Among Women and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequently – about 3 times a month – and have about 6 drinks per binge. There are effective actions communities can take to prevent binge drinking among women and girls. *Binge drinking for women is defined as consuming 4 ormore alcohol drinks (beer, wine, or liquor) on an occasion. Problem Drinking too ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Blood Pressure Control -- Helping Patients Take Their Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking their blood pressure medicine as directed. Problem Medicines don’t work if people don’t take ... reasons people don’t take their blood pressure medicine as directed vary: Not filling the prescription – Nearly ...

  11. Femoral head vitality after intracapsular hip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemqvist, B.

    1983-01-01

    Femoral head vitality before, during and at various intervals from the operation was determined by tetracycline labeling and/or 99 sp (m)Tc-MDP scintimetry. In a three-year follow-up, healing prognosis could be determined by scintimetry 3 weeks from operation; deficient femoral head vitality predicting healing complications and retained vitality predicting uncomplicated healing. A comparison between pre- and postoperative scintimetry indicated that further impairment of the femoral head vitality could be caused by the operative procedure, and as tetracycline labeling prior to and after fracture reduction in 370 fractures proved equivalent, it was concluded that the procedure of osteosynthesis probably was responsible for capsular vessel injury, using a four-flanged nail. The four-flanged nail was compared with a low-traumatic method of osteosynthesis, two hook-pins, in a prospective randomized 14 month study, and the postoperative femoral head vitality was significantly better in the hook-pin group. This was also clearly demonstrated in a one-year follow-up for the fractures included in the study. Parallel to these investigations, the reliability of the methods of vitality determination was found satisfactory in methodologic studies. For clinical purpose, primary atraumatic osteosynthesis, postoperative prognostic scintimetry and early secondary arthroplasty when indicated, was concluded to be the appropriate approach to femoral neck fracture treatment. (Author)

  12. Incident command linkup: the vital key for CBRN response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.

    2009-01-01

    The most vital element for responding emergency personnel to a CBRN attack is the incident command linkup and dissemination of information. Incident Command, the basic foundation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS), is the first thing that must be effectively established when a response is required in any emergency. When initial evaluation of the scene determines that the incident involves CBRN, specialized resources from a wide array of assets must be activated quickly to mitigate the hazards. In this paper, we examine the information that the Incident Commander must be prepared to convey to those specialized assets responding. We will also look at what questions those specialized resources may ask while en route and upon arrival. Another key element that will be discussed is the placement of those resources in the hierarchy of the National Incident Management System. The information that the Incident Commander (IC) must be prepared to convey to those specialized assets responding is crucial for an efficient response and effective deployment. What questions might those specialized CBRN resources ask while en route and upon arrival? At a bare minimum, the four basic questions of who is in charge of the incident, where is the incident located, what transpired to trigger a response, and when did the incident occur must be answered. These questions should be answered while en route to the scene so that the Commander of the responding CBRN unit can formulate a plan on the move and prepare his response accordingly. While in transit, the CBRN responders should maintain contact with a representative of the Incident Command at the scene so that the latest information is available. Discussions should include anticipated logistical requirements such as personal protective equipment (PPE), decon requirements, communications protocols, and medical care issues. The CBRN Commander will need to know if the site is secure, has it been cleared of explosive hazards

  13. Adolf Kussmaul and Kussmaul's sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navreet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kussmaul's has provided us with three important signs: Pulses paradoxus, Kussmaul's sign and Kussmaul Breathing. This article discusses Kussmaul's sign, its discovery, first description, pathophyiology and exceptions.

  14. Retention of first aid and basic life support skills in undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim A. de Ruijter

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undergraduate medical students follow a compulsory first aid (FA and basic life support (BLS course. Retention of BLS seems poor and only little information is provided on the retention of FA skills. This study aims at evaluating 1- and 2-year retention of FA and BLS training in undergraduate medical students. Methods: One hundred and twenty students were randomly selected from first year (n=349 medical students who successfully followed a compulsory FA and BLS course. From these 120 students, 94 (78% and 69 (58% participated in retention tests of FA and BLS skills after 1 and 2 years, respectively. The assessment consisted of two FA stations and one BLS station. Results: After 1 year, only 2% passed both FA and BLS stations and 68% failed both FA and BLS stations. After 2 years, 5% passed and 50% failed both FA and BLS stations. Despite the high failure rate at the stations, 90% adequately checked vital signs and started cardiopulmonary resuscitation appropriately. Conclusions: The long-term retention of FA and BLS skills after a compulsory course in the first year is poor. Adequate check of vital signs and commencing cardiopulmonary resuscitation retained longer.

  15. Retention of first aid and basic life support skills in undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, Pim A; Biersteker, Heleen A; Biert, Jan; van Goor, Harry; Tan, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate medical students follow a compulsory first aid (FA) and basic life support (BLS) course. Retention of BLS seems poor and only little information is provided on the retention of FA skills. This study aims at evaluating 1- and 2-year retention of FA and BLS training in undergraduate medical students. One hundred and twenty students were randomly selected from first year (n=349) medical students who successfully followed a compulsory FA and BLS course. From these 120 students, 94 (78%) and 69 (58%) participated in retention tests of FA and BLS skills after 1 and 2 years, respectively. The assessment consisted of two FA stations and one BLS station. After 1 year, only 2% passed both FA and BLS stations and 68% failed both FA and BLS stations. After 2 years, 5% passed and 50% failed both FA and BLS stations. Despite the high failure rate at the stations, 90% adequately checked vital signs and started cardiopulmonary resuscitation appropriately. The long-term retention of FA and BLS skills after a compulsory course in the first year is poor. Adequate check of vital signs and commencing cardiopulmonary resuscitation retained longer.

  16. Contents and assessment of basic tourism resources

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic, Rade

    2008-01-01

    The article looks at the attractive factors of basic tourism resources and the structure of their attractions. The general term ‘resource’ refers to both natural and anthropogenic resources, while the content of this concept refers to elements used in creating a tourism product. Basic tourism resources are the most important factors of tourism processes, with a vital attribute of direct and indirect tourism resources being their substitutability. Natural (biotropic) resources are consid...

  17. Computational triadic algebras of signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadrozny, W. [T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present a finite model of Peirce`s ten classes of signs. We briefly describe Peirce`s taxonomy of signs; we prove that any finite collection of signs can be extended to a finite algebra of signs in which all interpretants are themselves being interpreted; and we argue that Peirce`s ten classes of signs can be defined using constraints on algebras of signs. The paper opens the possibility of defining multimodal cognitive agents using Peirce`s classes of signs, and is a first step towards building a computational logic of signs based on Peirce`s taxonomies.

  18. Protection of the vital infrastructure. Quick-scan of vital products and services (management summary); Bescherming vitale infrastructuur. Quick-scan naar vitale producten en diensten (Managementdeel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luijf, H.A.M.; Burger, H.H.; Klaver, M.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report is part of the project 'Protection of the vital infrastructure' that started April 2002 and will be finalized in April 2004. The aim of the project is (1) to set up and implement measures to protect the infrastructure of the government and businesses in the Netherlands, e.g. the information and communication infrastructure and the energy infrastructure; and (2) to embed those measures in the business operations. [Dutch] Dit rapport is een tussenstap in het project Bescherming Vitale Infrastructuur dat in april 2002 is gestart en loopt tot april 2004. In dit project werkt het ministerie van Binenlandse Zaken (BZK) nauw samen met alle departementen, het bedrijfsleven en de medeoverheden. Het doel van het project is tweeledig: (1) een samenhangend pakket van maatregelen ter bescherming van de infrastructuur van overheid en bedrijfsleven, waaronder ICT, en (2) de verankering van dat pakket van maatregelen in de normale bedrijfsvoering. Het project is tevens onderdeel van het Actieplan Terrorismebestrijding en Veiligheid. Het gaat bij de bescherming van vitale belangen in Nederland niet alleen om de bescherming tegen terroristische aanslagen, maar ook tegen andersoortige calamiteiten, als natuurgeweld, organisatorische en technische gebreken. In de volgende fase van het overheidsproject Bescherming Vitale Infrastructuur zijn de vitale sectoren aan zet. Zij zullen risicoanalyses, scenariostudies en inventarisaties van reeds genomen maatregelen moeten uitvoeren.

  19. From Vitality to Vital Exhaustion and Other States of "Tense Tiredness": A New Biopsychosocial Risk Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan; Cohen, Randy

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue is a common prodromal symptom for various medical conditions, including acute myocardial infarction. Fatigue is also the core component of vital exhaustion, which consists of a specific triad: excessive fatigue, increased irritability, and feelings of demoralization. In this issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, Frestad and Prescott present a meta-analysis of 16 studies, involving 53,337 participants, which found vital exhaustion to be associated with an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and recurrent cardiac events among individuals with established CHD. After discussing methodological limitations of the studies included in this meta-analysis, we describe these findings in terms of a larger genre of risk that is biopsychosocial in origin and tied to two types of tiredness: "calm tiredness" and "tense tiredness." The former is regenerative, while the latter enhances disease risk. We propose that besides vital exhaustion, other symptoms of negative affect may combine with tiredness to produce increased clinical risk, such as the presence of depressed mood, an inability to relax or recover after work, and symptoms of burnout. We further propose that vital exhaustion can be considered as part of a larger paradigm, ranging from a positive state of vitality to a negative state of exhaustion of vitality. We conclude this editorial by emphasizing the importance of improving vitality and the need to clarify biobehavioral mechanisms that play a role in the association between vital exhaustion and adverse CHD outcomes. New interventions are needed that target reducing exhaustion and improving vitality for individuals at high risk of CHD.

  20. Toward the Ideal Signing Avatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Adamo-Villani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses ongoing research on the effects of a signing avatar's modeling/rendering features on the perception of sign language animation. It reports a recent study that aimed to determine whether a character's visual style has an effect on how signing animated characters are perceived by viewers. The stimuli of the study were two polygonal characters presenting two different visual styles: stylized and realistic. Each character signed four sentences. Forty-seven participants with experience in American Sign Language (ASL viewed the animated signing clips in random order via web survey. They (1 identified the signed sentences (if recognizable, (2 rated their legibility, and (3 rated the appeal of the signing avatar. Findings show that while character's visual style does not have an effect on subjects' perceived legibility of the signs and sign recognition, it has an effect on subjects' interest in the character. The stylized signing avatar was perceived as more appealing than the realistic one.

  1. Is Lhasa Tibetan Sign Language emerging, endangered, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Theresia

    2017-05-24

    This article offers the first overview of the recent emergence of Tibetan Sign Language (TibSL) in Lhasa, capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), China. Drawing on short anthropological fieldwork, in 2007 and 2014, with people and organisations involved in the formalisation and promotion of TibSL, the author discusses her findings within the nine-fold UNESCO model for assessing linguistic vitality and endangerment. She follows the adaptation of this model to assess signed languages by the Institute of Sign Languages and Deaf Studies (iSLanDS) at the University of Central Lancashire. The appraisal shows that TibSL appears to be between "severely" and "definitely" endangered, adding to the extant studies on the widespread phenomenon of sign language endangerment. Possible future influences and developments regarding the vitality and use of TibSL in Central Tibet and across the Tibetan plateau are then discussed and certain additions, not considered within the existing assessment model, suggested. In concluding, the article places the situation of TibSL within the wider circumstances of minority (sign) languages in China, Chinese Sign Language (CSL), and the post-2008 movement to promote and use "pure Tibetan language".

  2. Basic Writers and the Echoes of Intertextuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cheryl Hogue

    2011-01-01

    Intertextuality is a vital component of college reading and writing. In order to write a paper that requires the synthesizing of readings, students must recognize the intertextual connections among all their sources. Instruction that fosters intertextual awareness in basic writers can help them overcome their tendency to compartmentalize what they…

  3. [Confusion and solution for vital pulp therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingming, Huang; Qian, Lu; Qian, Liao; Ling, Ye; Xuedong, Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Dental pulp tissue plays a role in forming dentin, providing nutrition, conducting pain, and generating protective responses to environmental stimuli. Bacterial infection is the main cause of pulp disease, where histopathological changes are the histological basis for determining the choice of treatment and the evaluation of therapeutic effect. Thus, particular attention should be given to eliminate infection, as well as preserve and maintain pulpal health in teeth that show reversible or limited pulpal injuries. Vital pulp therapy, especially its indications and prognostic factors, has been a research hotspot that often causes confusion among clinicians. In this paper, we briefly introduce the confusion and solution for vital pulp therapy in terms of indications, pulp condition assessment, infection elimination, and capping material selection. In addition, we develop a clinical pathway and an operation normalization of vital pulp therapy to better perform the therapy.

  4. [Vital pulp therapy of damaged dental pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuedong, Zhou; Dingming, Huang; Jianguo, Liu; Zhengwei, Huang; Xin, Wei; Deqin, Yang; Jin, Zhao; Liming, Chen; Lin, Zhu; Yanhong, Li; Jiyao, Li

    2017-08-01

    The development of an expert consensus on vital pulp therapy can provide practical guidance for the improvement of pulp damage care in China. Dental pulp disease is a major type of illness that adversely affects human oral health. Pulp capping and pulpotomy are currently the main methods for vital pulp therapy. Along with the development of minimal invasion cosmetic dentistry, using different treatment technologies and materials reasonably, preserving healthy tooth tissue, and extending tooth save time have become urgent problems that call for immediate solution in dental clinics. This paper summarizes the experiences and knowledge of endodontic experts. We develop a clinical path of vital pulp therapy for clinical work by utilizing the nature, approach, and degree of pulp damage as references, defense and self-repairing ability of pulp as guidance, and modern technologies of diagnosis and treatment as means.

  5. Investigating the Predictive Role of Authenticity on Subjective Vitality with Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Umran; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity is a basic personality characteristic that has an important influence on both the psychological and social lives of individuals. Subjective vitality also assumes a facilitative role regarding positive mental health indicators. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the predictive role of authenticity on subjective…

  6. These signs here now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    1995-01-01

    Hallidays (1984) formulations of systemic-functional linguistics together with Hodge and Kress' (1988) social semiotics share the assumption that signs are not arbitrary: People make choices out of a web of possible constructions or expressions, and those choices can be shown to be motivated. Con...

  7. Sign Language Web Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  8. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  9. Derivative Sign Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  10. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    OpenAIRE

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in ...

  11. Re-vitalizing an indigenous language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    The re-vitalization of indigenous languages depend on political and legal support and the imple-mentation of language rights depend on knowledge of vocabulary and grammar structures of the individual languages. Throughout the nineteenth century world, compilers of dictionaries adapted indigenous...... languages to match standards defined in nation-building and, thereby, enabled latent possibilities for indigenous populations to re-vitalize their languages in connection with the United Nations Year for Indigenous Peoples in 1993, and the first United Nations Decade for Indigenous Peoples, 1995...

  12. Stable isotope 'vital effects' in coccolith calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziveri, P.; Stoll, H.; Probert, I.; Klaas, C.; Geisen, M.; Ganssen, G.M.; Young, J.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainties about the origin of the many disequilibrium or 'vital effects' in a variety of calcifying organisms, and whether these effects are constant or variable, have hampered paleoceanographic application of carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios. Unraveling the source of these effects will improve

  13. Entrepreneurship education: a vital instrument for youth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concern of this paper is to explore Entrepreneurship Education (EE) as one of the vital tools for youth empowerment, industrial development and consolidation of national integration in Nigeria. To achieve this feat, the paper takes its roots from the role of EE in youth empowerment programmes, national integration and ...

  14. The Impact of Zodiac Signs on Human Nature and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Naira

    2015-07-01

    Horoscope signs have unavoidable impact on human behaviour and interests, health and even fate. Moreover, intermingled with the impact of planets they become a powerful force able to bring about unbelievable changes. The investigation reveals that horoscopes have existed in the Armenian reality since ancient times. The most striking fact about their eistence is that in order to have and use zodiak signs in one's national culture, the nation should first of all have sufficient knowledge in Astrological Sciences since the system of zodiak signs has a direct reference to the cognitive processes and scientific knowledge of the universe, astrological issues and sometimes even there is a hint on hidden signs and messages. Anania Shirakatsi, one of the learned Armenians, had to display much diplomacy with the Armenian Church and religion when discussing the topic in his manuscripts. His observations are still of much importance and vitality even today.

  15. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  16. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  17. Dense MCA Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department after being found down at home, last seen normal 7 ½ hours prior to arrival. Patient had a history of hypertension, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation and breast cancer status post chemotherapy/radiation and lumpectomy. Physical exam showed right gaze preference, left facial droop and tongue deviation and flaccid left hemiplegia. Significant findings: A non-contrast computed tomography (CT scan showed a hyperdensity along the right middle cerebral artery (MCA consistent with acute thrombus. The red arrow highlights the hyperdensity in the annotated image. Discussion: The dense MCA sign can serve as an important tool in the diagnosis of acute stroke. It typically appears before other signs of infarct are apparent on CT imaging, and identifies an intracranial large artery occlusion and corresponding infarct, in the correct clinical setting.1 Calcifications in the same area of the brain could be mistaken for an MCA sign, but this sign carries a high specificity (95% and lower sensitivity (52% for arterial obstruction in ischemic stroke.2 Early identification allows for a wider array of treatment options for a patient with an ischemic stroke, including intra-venous or intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. This patient was subsequently taken for mechanical thrombectomy. Mechanical thrombectomy was chosen for this patient because the resources were available, and recent clinical trials have shown that newer types of mechanical thrombectomy have a positive functional outcome in patients with an ischemic stroke from an intracranial large artery occlusion, as compared to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPa alone.3,4,5,6 In facilities lacking the capability for mechanical thrombectomy, treatment considerations include rapid transfer to a facility with capability, or proceeding with intravenous tPa. After intervention, this

  18. The Person: Vital Core of the Pedagogic Mediation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Miranda Cervantes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to place the person as the basic element in education and, particularly, in the pedagogic mediation process. Based on her own personal and professional experiences, and inspired by writers such as Gutiérrez, Krishnamurti, Maturana, Morin and Prieto, the author uses the terms student-person and teacher-person as a way of truly re-discovering and re-learning that vital element immersed in a magical relational space, where the human being is strengthened as an individual and as part of a planetary family.  Most of all, the author gives the deserved emphasis to the bond constructed from a true intertwining emotional flow.  Academic insides are accompanied by experiences based on the use of the Parallel Text as a pedagogic mediation

  19. VIPEX (Vital-area Identification Package EXpert) Software Verification and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Woo Sik; Suh, Jae Seung

    2010-06-01

    The purposes of this report are (1) to perform a Verification and Validation (V and V) test for the VIPEX(Vital-area Identification Package EXpert) software and (2) to improve a software quality through the V and V test. The VIPEX was developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the Vital Area Identification (VAI) of nuclear power plants. The version of the VIPEX which was distributed is 3.2.0.0. The VIPEX was revised based on the first V and V test and the second V and V test was performed. We have performed the following tasks for the V and V test on Windows XP and VISTA operating systems: Ο Testing basic functions including fault tree editing Ο Testing all kind of functions Ο Research for update from Visual BASIC 6.0 to Visual BASIC 2008

  20. The Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The entries of the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary have four sections:  Entry header: In this section the sign headword is shown as a photo and a gloss. The first occurring location and handshape of the sign are shown as icons.  Video window: By default the base form of the sign headword...... forms of the sign (only for classifier entries). In addition to this, frequent co-occurrences with the sign are shown in this section. The signs in the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary can be looked up through:  Handshape: Particular handshapes for the active and the passive hand can be specified...... to find signs that are not themselves lemmas in the dictionary, but appear in example sentences.  Topic: Topics can be chosen as search criteria from a list of 70 topics....

  1. Vital stability of territory: the contents and ways of strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Stepanovich Bochko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that the traditional outlook on development of territories as the process of alignment of their socio-economic development with the help of external influences should be advanced and replaced by a new vision. The purpose of the work is the definition of the basic rules of the concept of vital stability of territories. The creation by the local population of the riches and well being by expansion of manufacturing industry on the basis of the use of intelligence — technological and moral — ethical factors are shown as the basic contents of the offered concept. A consequence of such approach is the growing feedback of made expenses, as technologically completed production will be realized but not raw material or semi-finished item. Only the differentiation industrial development of the territory is capable to deduce it from a condition of poverty and depression. The understanding of development of the territory as creation of conditions for growth of people’s wellbeing and formation of a man as a person is opened. The accent of the attention on the promotion of a man not only as the purpose of transformation of territory, but also as the factor of its safe development through an increase of his or her intellectual and spiritual levels is made. The measures and instruction on innovation to the strengthening of vital stability of territories are offered. The separate results of research were used at the prolongation of the Plan for strategic development of Yekaterinburg up to 2020. Authorities of territories at the formation of their development strategy can apply the new offered rules.

  2. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  3. Habitats, activities, and signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh; Brynskov, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Digital habitats is a framework for designing and modeling environments for activities that involve mobile and embedded computing systems. This paper 1) introduces the basic concepts of the framework, i.e. activity, thematic role, and the three ‘dimensions’ of a habitat: physical, informational...

  4. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.; Arendsen, J.; De Ridder, H.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Hendriks, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of

  5. Sign language typology: The contribution of rural sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, C.; Pfau, R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the field of sign language typology has shown that sign languages exhibit typological variation at all relevant levels of linguistic description. These initial typological comparisons were heavily skewed toward the urban sign languages of developed countries, mostly in the Western

  6. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  7. Refuting the lipstick sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Bean, Betsey R; Greenhouse, Alyssa R; Yu, Henry H; Arrington, Edward D; Friedman, Richard J; Eichinger, Josef K

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic examination of the tendon has been described as the "gold standard" for diagnosis of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps (LHB). An arthroscopic finding of an inflamed and hyperemic LHB within the bicipital groove has been described as the "lipstick sign." Studies evaluating direct visualization in diagnosis of LHB tendinitis are lacking. During a 1-year period, 363 arthroscopic shoulder procedures were performed, with 16 and 39 patients prospectively selected as positive cases and negative controls, respectively. All positive controls had groove tenderness, positive Speed maneuver, and diagnostic ultrasound-guided bicipital injection. Negative controls had none of these findings. Six surgeons reviewed randomized deidentified arthroscopic pictures of enrolled patients The surgeons were asked whether the images demonstrated LHB tendinitis and if the lipstick sign was present. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 49% and 66%, respectively, for detecting LHB tendinitis and 64% and 31%, respectively, for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for interobserver reliability ranged from 0.042 to 0.419 (mean, 0.215 ± 0.116) for tendinitis and from 0.486 to 0.835 (mean, 0.680 ± 0.102) for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.264 to 0.854 (mean, 0.615) for tendinitis and from 0.641 to 0.951 (mean, 0.783) for erythema. The presence of the lipstick sign performed only moderately well in a rigorously designed level III study to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity. There is only fair agreement among participating surgeons in diagnosing LHB tendinitis arthroscopically. Consequently, LHB tendinitis requiring tenodesis remains a clinical diagnosis that should be made before arthroscopic examination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Signs in Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting, however it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can also influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below....

  9. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  10. Designing radiation protection signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.A.; Richey, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Entry into hazardous areas without the proper protective equipment is extremely dangerous and must be prevented whenever possible. Current postings of radiological hazards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) do not incorporate recent findings concerning effective warning presentation. Warning information should be highly visible, quickly, and easily understood. While continuing to comply with industry standards (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines), these findings can be incorporated into existing radiological sign design, making them more effective in terms of usability and compliance. Suggestions are provided for designing more effective postings within stated guidelines

  11. INFINITY construction contract signed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  12. Psoas sign: a reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kye, Jong Sik; Lim, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Yup; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1987-01-01

    In general, the psoas sign has been known to be a reliabler index of presence of a retroperitoneal pathology. However, obliterated psoas margin may be caused by various other conditions in so far as the amount of fat around the psoas muscle is not enough to be visualized. On the other hand, retroperitoneal pathology does not always obliterates the psoas margin. Authors analyzed obliterated psoas margins in 72 patients by comparing simple radiographs and computed tomography, and attempted to explain the mechanism of obliterated psoas margin, on simple radiograph. The results are as follows : 1. The psoas margin is obliterated by the retroperitoneal pathology and various other conditions such as kidney-psoas contract, scanty extraperitoneal fat, scoliosis, bowel interposition and angled psoas muscle. 2. The psoas margin is preserved as far as the perinephric fat is intact and X-ray beam strikes the lateral margin of the psoas muscle tangentially. 3. The psoas sign is considered not to be a reliable index of a retroperitoneal pathology

  13. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  14. Information Structure in Sign Languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Pfau, R.; Féry, C.; Ishihara, S.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates that the Information Structure notions Topic and Focus are relevant for sign languages, just as they are for spoken languages. Data from various sign languages reveal that, across sign languages, Information Structure is encoded by syntactic and prosodic strategies, often

  15. Sign language: an international handbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sign language linguists show here that all the questions relevant to the linguistic investigation of spoken languages can be asked about sign languages. Conversely, questions that sign language linguists consider - even if spoken language researchers have not asked them yet - should also be asked of

  16. Issues in Sign Language Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwitserlood, Inge; Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ge lexicography has thus far been a relatively obscure area in the world of lexicography. Therefore, this article will contain background information on signed languages and the communities in which they are used, on the lexicography of sign languages, the situation in the Netherlands as well...... as a review of a sign language dictionary that has recently been published in the Netherlands...

  17. Traffic sign detection and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic sign recognition (TSR) is a research field that has seen much activity in the recent decade. This paper introduces the problem and presents 4 recent papers on traffic sign detection and 4 recent papers on traffic sign classification. It attempts to extract recent trends in the field and t...

  18. Herdable Systems Over Signed, Directed Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Ruf, Sebastian F.

    2018-04-11

    This paper considers the notion of herdability, a set-based reachability condition, which asks whether the state of a system can be controlled to be element-wise larger than a non-negative threshold. The basic theory of herdable systems is presented, including a necessary and sufficient condition for herdability. This paper then considers the impact of the underlying graph structure of a linear system on the herdability of the system, for the case where the graph is represented as signed and directed. By classifying nodes based on the length and sign of walks from an input, we find a class of completely herdable systems as well as provide a complete characterization of nodes that can be herded in systems with an underlying graph that is a directed out-branching rooted at a single input.

  19. Traffic Sign Recognition System based on Cambridge Correlator Image Comparator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Turan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents basic information about application of Optical Correlator (OC, specifically Cambridge Correlator, in system to recognize of traffic sign. Traffic Sign Recognition System consists of three main blocks, Preprocessing, Optical Correlator and Traffic Sign Identification. The Region of Interest (ROI is defined and chosen in preprocessing block and then goes to Optical Correlator, where is compared with database of Traffic Sign. Output of Optical Correlation is correlation plane, which consist of highly localized intensities, know as correlation peaks. The intensity of spots provides a measure of similarity and position of spots, how images (traffic signs are relatively aligned in the input scene. Several experiments have been done with proposed system and results and conclusion are discussed.

  20. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This iframe contains the logic ... 2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This iframe contains the logic ...

  1. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Signs Treating ADHD Reprints For More Information Share Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): The Basics Download PDF ... Overview Do you find it hard to pay attention? Do you feel the need to move constantly ...

  2. Rim Sign in Acute Cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Eun Mi; Lee, Kyung Han; Yang, Seoung Oh; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon

    1989-01-01

    The 'rim sign' is a rim of increased hepatic activity adjacent to the gall bladder fossa and known as an useful indicator of acute cholecystitis. Also, many reports suggested that if rim sign is positive there is an increased risk for complications such as perforation and gangrene. To evaluate the usefulness of this rim sign, we reviewed 32 cases that were pathologically confirmed. The incidence of rim sign was 47% similar to other reports but with our results, the rim sign was not specific to acute cholecystitis nor indicator of increased risk for complications.

  3. Signs in neuroradiology - part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes, E-mail: goncalves.neuroradio@gmail.co [McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Montreal General Hospital; Barra, Filipe Ramos; Jovem, Cassio Lemos [Hospital Universitario de Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Matos, Valter de Lima [Hospital Santa Luzia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do [MedImagem - Hospital da Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Carpio-O' Donovan, Raquel del [McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    The use of signs or analogies for interpretation and description of medical images is an old and common practice among radiologists. Comparison of findings with animals, food or objects is not unprecedented and routinely performed. Many signs are quite specific and, in some cases, pathognomonic. Indeed, notwithstanding their degree of specificity, signs may help in the characterization of certain diseases. Several neuroradiological signs have been already described. The authors will present 15 neuroradiology signs in the present essay, approaching their main characteristics, the significance of their role in the clinical practice, as well as their respective imaging findings. (author)

  4. Signs in neuroradiology - part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes; Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do

    2011-01-01

    The use of signs or analogies for interpretation and description of medical images is an old and common practice among radiologists. Comparison of findings with animals, food or objects is not unprecedented and routinely performed. Many signs are quite specific and, in some cases, pathognomonic. Indeed, notwithstanding their degree of specificity, signs may help in the characterization of certain diseases. Several neuroradiological signs have been already described. The authors will present 15 neuroradiology signs in the present essay, approaching their main characteristics, the significance of their role in the clinical practice, as well as their respective imaging findings. (author)

  5. Signes et artefacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Périgois

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Les opérations de requalification des centres des petites villes se sont multipliées depuis deux décennies. Cet article analyse comment le réaménagement des centres-villes s’inscrit dans un processus de patrimonialisation qui participe à une nouvelle conception de l’urbanité à travers une mise en scène des espaces centraux. Cette mise en scène des espaces publics passe par la multiplication de signes d’ancienneté. On peut distinguer des modalités différentes selon que les artefacts mobilisés renvoient à l’histoire du lieu, à des éléments hérités du passé et réinscrits dans l’espace ou qu’ils relèvent d’une ancienneté générique telle qu’elle s’est popularisée dans l’usage des mobiliers urbains « de style » — comme les candélabres « tradition » et bornes en fonte symbolisant l’appartenance à une urbanité d’apparence. Ce phénomène identitaire particulier vise à produire une urbanité, au moins physique. Cette artefactualisation amène à une redéfinition de la patrimonialisation. La tendance actuelle à la substitution d’« objets patrimoines » par des signes rappelant leur existence passée et les artefacts simulant de l’ancienneté et suscitant de l’historicité mobilisent les notions d’ambiance, d’esthétique et de « simulacre » selon le terme utilisé par Jean Baudrillard. La combinaison des références au patrimoine local et à l’ancien générique participe d’une mise en scène plus globale visant à inscrire le centre dans le temps long et à la production esthétique d’une néo-archéo urbanité « petite ville ». Refitting operations of downtown areas of small cities have increased for two decades. This article analyzes how this restructuring falls under a process of “patrimonialisation” which takes part in a new design of “urbanity” through a setting in scene of central spaces. This setting in scene of public spaces finds expression in

  6. Fault tree analysis for vital area identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ortiz, N.R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of fault tree analysis to identify those areas of nuclear fuel cycle facilities which must be protected to prevent acts of sabotage that could lead to sifnificant release of radioactive material. By proper manipulation of the fault trees for a plant, an analyst can identify vital areas in a manner consistent with regulatory definitions. This paper discusses the general procedures used in the analysis of any nuclear facility. In addition, a structured, generic approach to the development of the fault trees for nuclear power reactors is presented along with selected results of the application of the generic approach to several plants

  7. Negation switching invariant signed graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A signed graph (or, $sigraph$ in short is a graph G in which each edge x carries a value $\\sigma(x \\in \\{-, +\\}$ called its sign. Given a sigraph S, the negation $\\eta(S$ of the sigraph S is a sigraph obtained from S by reversing the sign of every edge of S. Two sigraphs $S_{1}$ and $S_{2}$ on the same underlying graph are switching equivalent if it is possible to assign signs `+' (`plus' or `-' (`minus' to vertices of $S_{1}$ such that by reversing the sign of each of its edges that has received opposite signs at its ends, one obtains $S_{2}$. In this paper, we characterize sigraphs which are negation switching invariant and also see for what sigraphs, S and $\\eta (S$ are signed isomorphic.

  8. Translating Signs, Producing Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Neilson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper moves between two streets: Liverpool Road in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield and Via Sarpi in the Italian city of Milan. What connects these streets is that both have become important sites for businesses in the Chinese diaspora. Moreover, both are streets on which locals have expressed desires for Chinese signs to be translated into the national lingua franca. The paper argues that the cultural politics inherent in this demand for translation cannot be fully understood in the context of national debates about diversity and integration. It is also necessary to consider the emergence of the official Chinese Putonghua as global language, which competes with English but also colonizes dialects and minority languages. In the case of these dual language signs, the space between languages can neither be reduced to a contact zone of minority and majority cultures nor celebrated as a ‘third space’ where the power relations implied by such differences are subverted. At stake is rather a space characterised by what Naoki Sakai calls the schema of co-figuration, which allows the representation of translation as the passage between two equivalents that resemble each other and thus makes possible their determination as conceptually different and comparable. Drawing on arguments about translation and citizenship, the paper critically interrogates the ethos of interchangeability implied by this regime of translation. A closing argument is made for a vision of the common that implies neither civilisational harmony nor the translation of all values into a general equivalent. Primary sources include government reports, internet texts and media stories. These are analyzed using techniques of discourse analysis and interpreted with the help of secondary literature concerning globalisation, language and migration. The disciplinary matrix cuts and mixes between cultural studies, translation studies, citizenship studies, globalization studies and

  9. Rigler’s sign and the football sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Daya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rigler’s sign was first described in 1941 by L G Rigler as a new radiological sign for recognising free air in the peritoneal cavity on supine radiograph. The presence of pneumoperitoneum allows free intraperitoneal air to be contrasted with intraluminal gas, accentuating the wall of gas-containing viscera. It is observed in infants and very ill patients where only limited radiographs of the abdomen are possible. The football sign was first described by R E Miller in the 1960s. Seen on supine abdominal radiographs, this describes an oval radiolucency resembling an American football. It is important for the radiologist to recognise the supporting signs of pneumoperitoneum, such as Rigler’s sign and the football sign, on supine abdominal radiographs, especially in neonates and infants, where erect chest/abdominal radiographs are not always possible.

  10. Vital parameters of Holstein calves from birth to weaning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Toledo Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Silva B.T., Henklein A., Marques R. De S., de Oliveira P.L., Leite S.B.P., Novo S.M.F., Baccili C.C., Reis J.F. & Gomes V. Vital parameters of Holstein calves from birth to weaning. [Parâmetros vitais de bezerros Holandeses do nascimento ao desmame.] Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(3:299- 304, 2016. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, São Paulo, SP 05508-270, Brasil. E-mail: brunotoledovet@hotmail.com The neonatal period is represented by the inability of newborns to adapt themselves to extra-uterine environment and execution of vital functions until then executed by the mother, such as thermoregulation, basic acid balance, cardiorespiratory functions, nutrition and development of the immune system. This study aimed to evaluate the physiological adaptations of Holstein calves during milk-feeding period (60 days. We selected 22 newborn Holstein male calves, born between the months of September to March (n = 18 and April to August (n = 4. Heart rate values (HR, respiratory rate (RR were recorded daily for 60 days by semiotic technique of auscultation, and the rectal temperature (RT was measured with the use of digital clinical thermometer. The daily results of the experiment were divided in periods of six days each (P1 to P10. The first week of postnatal life was marked by physiological changes related to the adaptation of cardiorespiratory functions of newborns, observing stabilization of HR and RR on subsequent periods, with few variations probably attributed to climate fluctuation (10 a 37ºC of the calves’ rearing environment. These data demonstrated direct impact of extra-uterine adaptation period on physiological parameters of newborn calves.

  11. Financial derivatives in power marketing: The basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, V.C.; Ghosh, K.

    1996-01-01

    With the ongoing changes in the power industry worldwide, electricity is beginning to be traded like other commodities. The use of financial derivative instruments in power markets is on the rise. The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of these derivatives in risk management which is vital for survival in the increasingly competitive industry. Starting with the familiar cash markets, the paper discusses the basics of futures, options, and swap markets as applied to electric energy trading

  12. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/.

  13. Hutchinson’s Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Lau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old African American male presents with two days of gradually worsening vesicular pruritic rash over the left naris, left upper lip, and inferior to medial epicanthus, initially noted just on the upper lip the night before. By the next day it had spread to the nose and cheek. Patient denies any fever, pain, discharge from the rash, ear or nose, or changes in vision. He denies exposure to any new hygiene products, household cleaning products, recent outdoor activities, travel, or insect bites. Past medical history significant for a childhood varicella infection. Patient works for a moving company, and had an episode of heat exhaustion at work one week prior to onset. Denies alcohol or drug abuse. Significant findings: The unilateral distribution of vesicular lesions over the patient’s left naris, cheek, and upper lip are consistent with Herpes zoster reactivation with Hutchinson’s sign. Hutchinson’s sign is a herpes zoster vesicle present on the tip or side of the nose.1 It reflects zoster involvement of the 1st branch of the trigeminal nerve, and is concerning for herpes zoster ophthalmicus.1 Herpes zoster vesicles may present as papular lesions or macular vesicles on an erythematous base.2,3 Emergent diagnosis must be made to prevent long-term visual sequelae.4 Discussion: The history of a childhood viral exanthem, specifically a past varicella infection, helps direct the diagnosis.2 Herpes zoster ophthalmicus is an ophthalmological emergency and results from viral reactivation within the V1 branch of CN V, leading to direct ocular involvement.1 Symptoms of ocular involvement include red eye, blurry vision, eye pain or photophobia.1 If left untreated, corneal ulceration, scarring, perforation, glaucoma, cataracts, and blindness may occur.1 Fluorescein staining with slit lamp examination will show a characteristic “dendritic ulcer” within the epithelial layer of the cornea.1 Treatment is generally

  14. Trad. Daniele Vitale, Arquitectos portugueses. Identidade, nacionalidade, modernidade

    OpenAIRE

    Marnoto, Rita

    2010-01-01

    (2010. Trad.). Daniele Vitale, Arquitectos portugueses. Identidade, nacionalidade, modernidade, JA Jornal Arquitectos. Publicação Trimestral da Ordem dos Arquitectos Portugal, 237, 93-101. ISSN 0870 1504 Trad. Daniele Vitale

  15. A Detection Device for the Signs of Human Life in Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Li; Ruilan, Zhang; Jian, Liu; Ruirui, Cheng; Yuhong, Diao

    2017-12-01

    A detection device for the signs of human life in accidents is a device used in emergency situations, such as the crash site. the scene of natural disasters, the battlefield ruins. it designed to detect the life signs of the distress under the injured ambulance vital signs devices. The device can on human vital signs, including pulse, respiration physiological signals to make rapid and accurate response. After some calculations, and after contrast to normal human physiological parameters given warning signals, in order for them to make timely ambulance judgment. In this case the device is required to do gymnastics convenience, ease of movement, power and detection of small flexible easy realization. This device has the maximum protection of the wounded safety significance.

  16. Ley de urgencia y riesgo vital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Leoncio Tay, Dr.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El artículo expone las disposiciones vigentes que deben ser observadas en las Unidades de Emergencias en el momento de atender pacientes que están cursando una urgencia médica con compromiso vital o riesgo de la pérdida total la función de un órgano o extremidad, que requiere una atención médica inmediata e impostergable, condición que debe presentarse simultáneamente. Se detalla el marco jurídico administrativo y el proceso operativo que se debe considerar para el buen desarrollo de la aplicación de la Ley de Urgencia. La Ley comporta beneficios para los pacientes, como el acceso a la atención sin mediar garantía previa y el respaldo económico, para lo cual se deben cumplir ciertas condiciones.

  17. Measles (Rubeola): Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Measles Signs and Symptoms Transmission Photos of Measles Complications Frequently Asked Questions Top Things Parents Need to Know Measles Vaccination Cases and Outbreaks For Healthcare Professionals For ...

  18. Importancia de los acontecimientos vitales como factores de cambio en el ciclo vital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis MELERO MARCOS

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: A lo largo del ciclo vital, los individuos experimentan una serie de acontecimientos que, sin duda, influyen en su desarrollo individual y colectivo. Tales acontecimientos parecen introducir cambios en la vida de los sujetos. El presente trabajo pretende analizar la importancia de los acontecimientos vitales como factores de cambio, desde la consideración de que el estudio de los mismos es consustancial con el estudio del ciclo vital. Desde este punto de partida, se ha establecido la existencia de diversos tipos de clasificaciones de acontecimientos, como la aportada por Rodrigo (1985, que plantea la existencia de tres tipos de eventos, eventos normativos relacionados con la edad, eventos normativos relacionados con el tiempo histórico, y finalmente, un tercer tipo de acontecimientos considerados como no normativos, que solamente son experimentados por algunos sujetos a lo largo de su vida. Analizaremos aquellos factores que adquieren significado en el desarrollo de los acontecimientos vitales y en la forma como los perciben los individuos que los experimentan, desde la revisión de los principales modelos explicativos, polarizados en dos grandes paradigmas, organicista y mecanicista, así como el intento de aproximación a través de modelos contextúales-dialécticos a una posición intermedia entre el paradigma organicista y el paradigma mecanicista.ABSTRACT: Throughout the vital cycle, individuals undergo experiences which no doubt exert an influence on their development. The present article analyzes the importance of vital events as change factors. We assume their inseparability. Adopting the classification established by Rodrigo (1985 we distinguish three classes of events, namely, normative events related to age, normative events related to historical time and non normative events which are not universally experienced by all subjects. We will analyze those factors which have relevant meaning in the development of vital events

  19. Ranks of dense alternating sign matrices and their sign patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Gao, W.; Hall, F.J.; Jing, G.; Li, Z.; Stroev, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 471, April (2015), s. 109-121 ISSN 0024-3795 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07880S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : alternating sign matrix * dense matrix * sign pattern matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.965, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024379515000257

  20. Automatic sign language recognition inspired by human sign perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic sign language recognition is a relatively new field of research (since ca. 1990). Its objectives are to automatically analyze sign language utterances. There are several issues within the research area that merit investigation: how to capture the utterances (cameras, magnetic sensors,

  1. Inuit Sign Language: a contribution to sign language typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, J.; Baker, A.; Pfau, R.

    2011-01-01

    Sign language typology is a fairly new research field and typological classifications have yet to be established. For spoken languages, these classifications are generally based on typological parameters; it would thus be desirable to establish these for sign languages. In this paper, different

  2. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign…

  3. Awareness of Deaf Sign Language and Gang Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia; Morgan, Robert L.

    There have been increasing incidents of innocent people who use American Sign Language (ASL) or another form of sign language being victimized by gang violence due to misinterpretation of ASL hand formations. ASL is familiar to learners with a variety of disabilities, particularly those in the deaf community. The problem is that gang members have…

  4. Psychobiological stress in vital exhaustion. Findings from the Men Stress 40+ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Emilou; Fischer, Susanne; Ruppen, Jessica; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2018-02-01

    Despite the increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity associated with vital exhaustion (VE), the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. Allostatic load may constitute the missing link between VE and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether men with different degrees of VE would differ in terms of allostatic load, chronic stress, and social support. The Men Stress 40+ study sample consisted of N=121 apparently healthy men aged 40 to 75years. The following allostatic load markers were aggregated to create a cumulative index of biological stress: salivary cortisol, salivary dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), waist-to-hip-ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Long-term cortisol and DHEA were additionally measured in hair. Chronic stress and social support were assessed via validated questionnaires. Groups of mildly, substantially, and severely exhausted men were compared using one-way ANOVAs with appropriate post-hoc tests. Men who reported mild or severe levels of vital exhaustion had the highest scores on the cumulative index of biological stress. Hair cortisol was unrelated to vital exhaustion; hair DHEA was highest in men with substantial levels of exhaustion. Men with mild exhaustion reported the lowest levels of chronic stress, while men with severe exhaustion reported the lowest levels of social support. Signs of allostatic load are detectable in vitally exhausted men at a stage where no major cardiovascular consequences have yet ensued. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Overhead guide sign retroreflectivity and illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Roadway guide sign visibility during darkness is fundamental to driver safety, especially elderly drivers. Guide : sign visibility can be improved by external sign illumination or the use of retroreflective sheeting on signs. Because : energy conserv...

  6. The relationships between Internet addiction, subjective vitality, and subjective happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, Ahmet

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the relationships between Internet addiction, subjective vitality, and subjective happiness. The participants were 328 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Subjective Vitality Scale, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. According to the results, subjective vitality and subjective happiness were negatively predicted by Internet addiction. On the other hand, subjective happiness was positively predicted by subjective vitality. In addition, subjective vitality mediated the relationship between Internet addiction and subjective happiness. Results were discussed in light of the literature.

  7. Mina Shaughnessy in the 1990s: Some Changing Answers in Basic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlexander, Patricia J.

    Although Mina Shaughnessy remains influential in the basic writing field, her answers to the vital questions of who basic writers are and why they underachieve as writers are changing. Whether she intended to or not, Shaughnessy's book "Errors and Expectations" (published in 1977) was a major force in forming an image of basic writers as…

  8. Incidence and clinical vital parameters in primary ketosis of Murrah buffaloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankit; Sindhu, Neelesh; Kumar, Parmod; Kumar, Tarun; Charaya, Gaurav; Surbhi; Jain, V. K.; Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence and clinical vital parameters in cases of primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes brought to teaching veterinary clinical complex, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar and from adjoining villages of the district Hisar, Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The investigation was conducted on 24 clinical cases (out of total 145 screened) of primary ketosis. The diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of clinical signs and significantly positive two tests for ketone bodies in urine (Rothera’s and Keto-Diastix strip test). Data collected were statistically analyzed using independent Student’s t-test. Results: Overall incidence of disease in these areas was found to be 16.55% and all the animals were recently parturited (mean: 1.42±0.14 month), on an average in their third lactation (mean: 2.38±0.30) and exhibited clinical signs such as selective anorexia (refusal to feed on concentrate diet), drastic reduction in milk yield (mean: 64.4±5.35%), ketotic odor from urine, breath, and milk and rapid loss of body condition. All the clinical vital parameters in ketotic buffaloes (body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and rumen movements) were within normal range. Conclusion: Primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes was the most common seen in the third lactation, within the first 2 months after parturition with characteristics clinical signs and no variability in vital parameters. The disease has severe effect on the production status of affected animal. PMID:27047203

  9. Incidence and clinical vital parameters in primary ketosis of Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence and clinical vital parameters in cases of primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes brought to teaching veterinary clinical complex, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar and from adjoining villages of the district Hisar, Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The investigation was conducted on 24 clinical cases (out of total 145 screened of primary ketosis. The diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of clinical signs and significantly positive two tests for ketone bodies in urine (Rothera’s and Keto-Diastix strip test. Data collected were statistically analyzed using independent Student’s t-test. Results: Overall incidence of disease in these areas was found to be 16.55% and all the animals were recently parturited (mean: 1.42±0.14 month, on an average in their third lactation (mean: 2.38±0.30 and exhibited clinical signs such as selective anorexia (refusal to feed on concentrate diet, drastic reduction in milk yield (mean: 64.4±5.35%, ketotic odor from urine, breath, and milk and rapid loss of body condition. All the clinical vital parameters in ketotic buffaloes (body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and rumen movements were within normal range. Conclusion: Primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes was the most common seen in the third lactation, within the first 2 months after parturition with characteristics clinical signs and no variability in vital parameters. The disease has severe effect on the production status of affected animal.

  10. The linguistics of sign languages - an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Pfau, R.; Schermer, T.

    2016-01-01

    How different are sign languages across the world? Are individual signs and signed sentences constructed in the same way across these languages? What are the rules for having a conversation in a sign language? How do children and adults learn a sign language? How are sign languages processed in the

  11. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  12. The Three-Dimensional Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the three-dimensional sign proposed by Harris (1990) for general linguistic theory and the philosophy of language. The article places the principal characteristics of the three-dimensional sign (contextuality, cotemporality, communicational relevance, and experiential grounding) against those of the two-dimensional…

  13. Evaluation of Guide Sign Fonts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Researchers at Texas A&M Transportation Institute completed a study of E-modified, Enhanced E-Modified, and Clearview 5W for overhead and shoulder-mounted guide signs. The overhead guide signed consisted of three six-letter words stacked over each ot...

  14. Learning to Detect Traffic Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the performance of sign detection based on synthetic training data to the performance of detection based on real-world training images. Viola-Jones detectors are created for 4 different traffic signs with both synthetic and real data, and varying numbers of training samples. T...

  15. Concise Lexicon for Sign Linguistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Jan Nijen Twilhaar; Dr. Beppie van den Bogaerde

    2016-01-01

    This extensive, well-researched and clearly formatted lexicon of a wide variety of linguistic terms is a long overdue. It is an extremely welcome addition to the bookshelves of sign language teachers, interpreters, linguists, learners and other sign language users, and of course of the Deaf

  16. Rim sign in acute cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachman, M.B.; Goodman, M.D.; Waxman, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the cause for the rim sign and to compare the sensitivity of hepatobiliary scintigraphy and US for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis (AC). The authors compared 15 patients with a definite rim sign to 15 patients without a rim sign. Images of 750,000 counts were taken up to 4 hours after administration of 148 MBq of Tc-99m disofenin. A pathologist evaluated gallbladder (GB) specimens for polymorphonuclear lymphocyte (PMN) infiltration, transmural reaction (TR), and gangrene or other complication (GAN). Liver tissue was attached to the GB specimen in three cases; acute hepatic inflammation was present in the one case with a rim sign but was absent in the two specimens without a rim sign

  17. Modeling online social signed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Gu, Ke; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2018-04-01

    People's online rating behavior can be modeled by user-object bipartite networks directly. However, few works have been devoted to reveal the hidden relations between users, especially from the perspective of signed networks. We analyze the signed monopartite networks projected by the signed user-object bipartite networks, finding that the networks are highly clustered with obvious community structure. Interestingly, the positive clustering coefficient is remarkably higher than the negative clustering coefficient. Then, a Signed Growing Network model (SGN) based on local preferential attachment is proposed to generate a user's signed network that has community structure and high positive clustering coefficient. Other structural properties of the modeled networks are also found to be similar to the empirical networks.

  18. Automatic Recognition of Road Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Kohashi, Yuuichirou; Ishikawa, Naoto; Nakajima, Masato

    2002-11-01

    The increase in traffic accidents is becoming a serious social problem with the recent rapid traffic increase. In many cases, the driver"s carelessness is the primary factor of traffic accidents, and the driver assistance system is demanded for supporting driver"s safety. In this research, we propose the new method of automatic detection and recognition of road signs by image processing. The purpose of this research is to prevent accidents caused by driver"s carelessness, and call attention to a driver when the driver violates traffic a regulation. In this research, high accuracy and the efficient sign detecting method are realized by removing unnecessary information except for a road sign from an image, and detect a road sign using shape features. At first, the color information that is not used in road signs is removed from an image. Next, edges except for circular and triangle ones are removed to choose sign shape. In the recognition process, normalized cross correlation operation is carried out to the two-dimensional differentiation pattern of a sign, and the accurate and efficient method for detecting the road sign is realized. Moreover, the real-time operation in a software base was realized by holding down calculation cost, maintaining highly precise sign detection and recognition. Specifically, it becomes specifically possible to process by 0.1 sec(s)/frame using a general-purpose PC (CPU: Pentium4 1.7GHz). As a result of in-vehicle experimentation, our system could process on real time and has confirmed that detection and recognition of a sign could be performed correctly.

  19. Defining the vital condition for organ donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamperetti Nereo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The issue of organ donation and of how the donor pool can or should be increased is one with significant practical, ethical and logistic implications. Here we comment on an article advocating a paradigm change in the so-called "dead donor rule". Such change would involve the societal and legal abandonment of the above rule and the introduction of mandated choice. In this commentary, we review some of the problems associated with the proposed changes as well as the problems associated with the current model. We emphasize the continuing problems with the definition of death and the physiological process of dying; we discuss the difficulties associated with a dichotomous view of death; we review the difficulties with non-beating heart donation and emphasize the current limitations of society's understanding of these complex issues. We conclude that public education remains the best approach and that such education should not be merely promotion of a particular ideology but honest debate of what is socially and morally acceptable and appropriate given the changes in vital organ support technology and the need to respect patient autonomy.

  20. Purpose and Vitality of Rumours: Political Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with social instrumental intention of rumours and their expression. It also reveals the social and political role of rumours in controlling the behaviour of a group of members and preserving its identity. The dual nature of rumours is analyzed as well as gnosiological, psychological and sociological reasons. On the one hand, the roots of rumour vitality are hidden in the dualism of this phenomenon, where in a strange way contradictory things get on well together ­ private and public, moral and immoral, the truth and the lie, between which it is not easy to draw a clear boundary even in everyday life. On the other hand, a rumour is alive because of our constant thirst for additional and fresher information, trying to perceive a person, an action or a phenomenon better. At the same time, it stimulates the proclaimers of the official political information to find the ways for the provided information to be more accurate, open, exhaustive as possible, presented in an understandable and accessible form. There the power of the effect of a rumour lays, a phenomenon without authorship, but with an authority to which, more or less, all of us are to obey. 

  1. A VITAL service for predictive MOV maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Motor-operated valve (MOV) maintenance can be a major contributor to unplanned plant downtime, either because valve malfunctions cause unscheduled outages, or because unnecessary valve maintenance lengthens scheduled outages. The cause of both situations is a preventive approach to valve maintenance, where maintenance is scheduled according to a timetable instead of according to a demonstrated need. To move towards a predictive maintenance approach, inexpensive methods of collecting and diagnosing real-time data on the conditions of a valve must be made available. Such a system must be capable of detecting and diagnosing degrading mechanical and electrical behaviour at an early stage, as well as being able to predict the time of failure. Without this data, a predictive approach to maintenance is impossible. Westinghouse is addressing the requirements for a predictive approach to MOV maintenance with the introduction of a third-generation of diagnostic systems for motor-operated valves -the portable Valve Intelligent Test and Analysis System (VITALS) and the on-line Valve Monitoring System (VMS). (author)

  2. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statement 312-284-2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This iframe ... Counseling 312-284-2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This iframe ...

  3. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Privacy Statement 312-284-2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This ... Peer Counseling 312-284-2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Your email address * This ...

  4. Sign Inference for Dynamic Signed Networks via Dictionary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile online social network (mOSN is a burgeoning research area. However, most existing works referring to mOSNs deal with static network structures and simply encode whether relationships among entities exist or not. In contrast, relationships in signed mOSNs can be positive or negative and may be changed with time and locations. Applying certain global characteristics of social balance, in this paper, we aim to infer the unknown relationships in dynamic signed mOSNs and formulate this sign inference problem as a low-rank matrix estimation problem. Specifically, motivated by the Singular Value Thresholding (SVT algorithm, a compact dictionary is selected from the observed dataset. Based on this compact dictionary, the relationships in the dynamic signed mOSNs are estimated via solving the formulated problem. Furthermore, the estimation accuracy is improved by employing a dictionary self-updating mechanism.

  5. Sociolinguistic Typology and Sign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Adam; Fenlon, Jordan; Cormier, Kearsy; Johnston, Trevor

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the possible relationship between proposed social determinants of morphological 'complexity' and how this contributes to linguistic diversity, specifically via the typological nature of the sign languages of deaf communities. We sketch how the notion of morphological complexity, as defined by Trudgill (2011), applies to sign languages. Using these criteria, sign languages appear to be languages with low to moderate levels of morphological complexity. This may partly reflect the influence of key social characteristics of communities on the typological nature of languages. Although many deaf communities are relatively small and may involve dense social networks (both social characteristics that Trudgill claimed may lend themselves to morphological 'complexification'), the picture is complicated by the highly variable nature of the sign language acquisition for most deaf people, and the ongoing contact between native signers, hearing non-native signers, and those deaf individuals who only acquire sign languages in later childhood and early adulthood. These are all factors that may work against the emergence of morphological complexification. The relationship between linguistic typology and these key social factors may lead to a better understanding of the nature of sign language grammar. This perspective stands in contrast to other work where sign languages are sometimes presented as having complex morphology despite being young languages (e.g., Aronoff et al., 2005); in some descriptions, the social determinants of morphological complexity have not received much attention, nor has the notion of complexity itself been specifically explored.

  6. Sanal Lidzhiev, Signs and Omens

    OpenAIRE

    Gedeeva, Darina; Ubushieva, Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Seeing a hare is a good sign, because your plans will materialize. It is a bad sign to see a fox or a corsac on the road. It is also a bad sign when children snort. It is forbidden for pregnant women to eat long intestines or mildly cooked meat with blood. Only one person can eat a cooked sheep's head. If two people eat the same head, they will quarrel. A sheep's head that people present to each other at weddings should be burnt on a fire. If someone brings meat, show it to all who are pres...

  7. Introducing Viewpoints of Mechanics into Basic Growth Analysis : (VII) Mathematical Properties of Basic Growth Mechanics in Ruminant

    OpenAIRE

    Shimojo, Masataka; Shao, Tao; Masuda, Yasuhisa; 下條, 雅敬; 増田, 泰久

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate mathematical properties of basic growth mechanics in ruminant by introducing newly developed viewpoints into mathematical operations of basic growth function. The negative sign, which appeared naturally by taking the square root of the differential equation based on basic growth mechanics, gave mathematical contradictions to the differential principle. In the process of correcting those contradictions, viewpoints of interest were newly introduced to giv...

  8. How to describe mouth patterns in the Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Boye Niemela, Janne

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Sign Language dictionary project aims at creating an electronic dictionary of the basic vocabulary of Danish Sign Language. One of many issues in compiling the dictionary has been to analyse the status of mouth patterns in Danish Sign Language and, consequently, to decide at which level...... mouth patterns should be described in the dictionary: That is either at the entry level or at the meaning level....

  9. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Health Insurance Basics What's ... advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  10. PASCAL vs BASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundie, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between PASCAL and BASIC as general purpose microprocessor languages rates PASCAL above BASIC in such points as program structure, data types, structuring methods, control structures, procedures and functions, and ease in learning. (CMV)

  11. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ...

  13. Lexical Properties of Slovene Sign Language: A Corpus-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintar, Špela

    2015-01-01

    Slovene Sign Language (SZJ) has as yet received little attention from linguists. This article presents some basic facts about SZJ, its history, current status, and a description of the Slovene Sign Language Corpus and Pilot Grammar (SIGNOR) project, which compiled and annotated a representative corpus of SZJ. Finally, selected quantitative data…

  14. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  15. Programming Visual Basic 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    This information-packed guide helps you understand Visual Basic 2005, the next-generation release of the popular Visual Basic programming language. This book aims to make you immediately productive in creating Windows and web applications using Visual Basic 2005 and all of its tools. Perfect for experienced VB6 and novice programmers

  16. 3 CFR - Presidential Signing Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... basis of policy disagreements. At the same time, such signing statements serve a legitimate function in... interpretations of the Constitution that are well-founded. 3. To promote transparency and accountability, I will...

  17. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  18. Single Sign On Internal (SSOi)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides single sign-on solution for internal facing VA applications. Allows internal users access to a variety of VA systems and applications using a reduced set of...

  19. Restoring Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine When Burnout Threatens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshana T; Williams, Valerie N; Thorndyke, Luanne E; Marsh, E Eugene; Sonnino, Roberta E; Block, Steven M; Viggiano, Thomas R

    2017-11-21

    Increasing rates of burnout-with accompanying stress and lack of engagement-among faculty, residents, students, and practicing physicians have caused alarm in academic medicine. Central to the debate among academic medicine's stakeholders are oft-competing issues of social accountability; cost containment; effectiveness of academic medicine's institutions; faculty recruitment, retention, and satisfaction; increasing expectations for faculty; and mission-based productivity.The authors propose that understanding and fostering what contributes to faculty and institutional vitality is central to preventing burnout during times of change. They first look at faculty vitality and how it is threatened by burnout, to provide a framework for a greater understanding of faculty well-being. Then they draw on higher education literature to determine how vitality is defined in academic settings and what factors affect faculty vitality within the context of academic medicine. Next, they propose a model to explain and examine faculty vitality in academic medicine, followed by a discussion of the need for a greater understanding of faculty vitality. Finally, the authors offer conclusions and propose future directions to promote faculty vitality.The authors encourage institutional decision makers and other stakeholders to focus particular attention on the evolving expectations for faculty, the risk of extensive faculty burnout, and the opportunity to reduce burnout by improving the vitality and resilience of these talented and crucial contributors. Faculty vitality, as defined by the institution, has a critical role in ensuring future institutional successes and the capacity for faculty to thrive in a complex health care economy.

  20. [Effects of Self-directed Feedback Practice using Smartphone Videos on Basic Nursing Skills, Confidence in Performance and Learning Satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Gi; Shin, Yun Hee

    2016-04-01

    This study was done to verify effects of a self-directed feedback practice using smartphone videos on nursing students' basic nursing skills, confidence in performance and learning satisfaction. In this study an experimental study with a post-test only control group design was used. Twenty-nine students were assigned to the experimental group and 29 to the control group. Experimental treatment was exchanging feedback on deficiencies through smartphone recorded videos of nursing practice process taken by peers during self-directed practice. Basic nursing skills scores were higher for all items in the experimental group compared to the control group, and differences were statistically significant ["Measuring vital signs" (t=-2.10, p=.039); "Wearing protective equipment when entering and exiting the quarantine room and the management of waste materials" (t=-4.74, pnursing skills. The significance is that it can help nursing students gain confidence in their nursing skills for the future through improvement of basic nursing skills and performance of quality care, thus providing patients with safer care.