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Sample records for basic spinal cord

  1. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krassioukov, A; Alexander, M S; Karlsson, Anders Hans

    2010-01-01

    To create an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Cardiovascular Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets.......To create an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Cardiovascular Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets....

  2. International Spinal Cord Injury Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, M S; Biering-Sørensen, F; Elliott, S

    2011-01-01

    To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets.......To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets....

  3. International spinal cord injury pulmonary function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Krassioukov, A; Alexander, M S

    2012-01-01

    To develop the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets in order to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic bronchopulmonary findings in the SCI population.......To develop the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets in order to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic bronchopulmonary findings in the SCI population....

  4. International spinal cord injury musculoskeletal basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Burns, A S; Curt, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International....

  5. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerstrom-Noga, E.; Bryce, T.; Cardenas, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To develop a basic pain data set (International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set, ISCIPDS:B) within the framework of the International spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets that would facilitate consistent collection and reporting of pain in the SCI population.Setting:International.M......Objective:To develop a basic pain data set (International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set, ISCIPDS:B) within the framework of the International spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets that would facilitate consistent collection and reporting of pain in the SCI population.......Setting:International.Methods:The ISCIPDS:B was developed by a working group consisting of individuals with published evidence of expertise in SCI-related pain regarding taxonomy, psychophysics, psychology, epidemiology and assessment, and one representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets...

  6. International Spinal Cord Injury Urinary Tract Infection Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, L L; Cardenas, D D; Kennelly, M

    2013-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research....

  7. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerstrom-Noga, E.; Bryce, T.; Cardenas, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To develop a basic pain data set (International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set, ISCIPDS:B) within the framework of the International spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets that would facilitate consistent collection and reporting of pain in the SCI population....... The members were appointed by four major organizations with an interest in SCI-related pain (International Spinal Cord Society, ISCoS; American Spinal Injury Association, ASIA; American Pain Society, APS and International Association for the Study of Pain, IASP). The initial ISCIPDS:B was revised based...... classification and questions related to the temporal pattern of pain for each specific pain problem. The impact of pain on physical, social and emotional function, and sleep is evaluated for each pain.Spinal Cord (2008) 46, 818-823; doi:10.1038/sc.2008.64; published online 3 June 2008 Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  8. International Spinal Cord Injury Upper Extremity Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bryden, A; Curt, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Upper Extremity Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets, which facilitates consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population. SETTING: International. METHODS: A first draft...

  9. International urodynamic basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craggs, M.; Kennelly, M.; Schick, E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create the International Urodynamic Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: International working group. METHODS: The draft of the data set was developed by a working group consisting of members appointed...... by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version...

  10. International urinary tract imaging basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Craggs, M; Kennelly, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create an International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: An international working group. METHODS: The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group comprising members appointed...... by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version...

  11. International bowel function basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, K; Perkash, I; Stiens, S A

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: International expert working group. OBJECTIVE: To develop an International Bowel Function Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on bowel function in daily practice or in research....... SETTING: Working group consisting of members appointed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS). METHODS: A draft prepared by the working group was reviewed by Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets, and later by ISCo...

  12. International spinal cord injury upper extremity basic data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bryden, A; Curt, A; Friden, J; Harvey, L A; Mulcahey, M J; Popovic, M R; Prochazka, A; Sinnott, K A; Snoek, G

    2014-09-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Upper Extremity Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets, which facilitates consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population. International. A first draft of a SCI Upper Extremity Data Set was developed by an international working group. This was reviewed by many different organisations, societies and individuals over several months. A final version was created. The final version of the International SCI Upper Extremity Data Set contains variables related to basic hand-upper extremity function, use of assistive devices, SCI-related complications to upper extremity function and upper extremity/hand reconstructive surgery. Instructions for data collection and the data collection form are freely available on the ISCoS website (www.iscos.org.uk). The International SCI Upper Extremity Basic Data Set will facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  14. International spinal cord injury skin and thermoregulation function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Annette; Krassioukov, A; Alexander, M S

    2012-01-01

    To create an international spinal cord injury (SCI) skin and thermoregulation basic data set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets.......To create an international spinal cord injury (SCI) skin and thermoregulation basic data set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets....

  15. International Spinal Cord Injury Female Sexual and Reproductive Function Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, M S; Biering-Sørensen, F; Elliott, S

    2011-01-01

    To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Female Sexual and Reproductive Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets.......To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Female Sexual and Reproductive Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets....

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Heather Taylor, PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, ... Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT Mary Jane Mulcahey, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  20. The international spinal cord injury endocrine and metabolic function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, W A; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Krassioukov, A

    2011-01-01

    To develop the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Endocrine and Metabolic Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets that would facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic endocrine and metabolic findings in the SCI population....

  1. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set (version 2.0)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerström-Noga, E; Biering-Sørensen, F; Bryce, T N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To revise the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set (ISCIPBDS) based on new developments in the field and on suggestions from the spinal cord injury (SCI) and pain clinical and research community. SETTING: International. METHODS: The ISCIPBDS working group evaluated...... suggestions regarding the utility of the ISCIPBDS and made modifications in response to these and to significant developments in the field. The revised ISCIPBDS (version 2.0) was reviewed by members of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets, the International Spinal Cord...... Society (ISCoS) Executive and Scientific Committees, the American Spinal Injury Association and American Pain Society Boards and the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the International Association for the Study of Pain, individual reviewers and societies and the ISCoS Council. RESULTS...

  2. [Spanish validation of the International Spinal Cord Injury Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set questionnaire for the study of the repercussion of spinal cord injury in the respiratory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Garrido, Alba; León Espitia, Ana María; Montesinos Magraner, Lluïsa; Ramirez Galceran, Lucrecia; Soler Canudes, Emilia; González Viejo, Miguel Angel

    2015-12-07

    The dysfunction of the respiratory system and the breathing complications in persons with injured spinal cord has an effect on the morbidity and the mortality of the disease. The objectives were: 1) to translate to Spanish and validate the questionnaire of international consensus: International Spinal Cord Injury Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set, and 2) to determine the influence of chronic spinal cord injury in the respiratory system in terms of respiratory functionalism. Translation to Spanish and validation of the questionnaire of international consensus intended for the study of the pulmonary function in spinal cord injury disease. We tested the reliability of that questionnaire. We conducted a descriptive transversal study to determine the degree of involvement of the respiratory system in spinal cord injury. A percentage of 91.9 did not have any respiratory pathology before spinal cord injury and 54.8% of patients smoked. A percentage of 27.4 of patients presented breathing complications one year after the injury. Results of the respiratory function tests were: FVC 67%, FEV1 72% and PEF 70%. Concordance and reliability were 98%. The Spanish version of the questionnaire of international consensus about the pulmonary function is a useful tool for the study of the respiratory involvement in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  6. Development of the International Spinal Cord Injury Activities and Participation Basic Data Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, M. W.; Charlifue, S.; Biering-Sorensen, F.; Catz, A.; Dijkers, M. P.; Horsewell, J.; Noonan, V. K.; Noreau, L.; Tate, D. G.; Sinnott, K. A.

    Study design: Consensus decision-making process. Objectives: The objective of this study was to develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Activities and Participation (A&P) Basic Data Set. Setting: International working group. Methods: A committee of experts was established to select and

  7. Relevance of the international spinal cord injury basic data sets to youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, A; Vogel, L C; Zebracki, K

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Mixed methods, using the Modified Delphi Technique and Expert Panel Review. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility and relevance of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core and Basic Data Sets for children and youth with SCI. SETTING: International. METHODS: Via 20 electronic...

  8. Reliability of the International Spinal Cord Injury Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baunsgaard, C B; Chhabra, H S; Harvey, L A

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Psychometric study. OBJECTIVES: To determine the intra- and inter-rater reliability and content validity of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set (ISCIMSBDS). SETTING: Four centers with one in each of the countries in Australia, England, India and...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  10. Development of the International Spinal Cord Injury Activities and Participation Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, M W; Charlifue, S; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2016-01-01

    from the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III to provide basic data on task execution in activities of daily living. Eight items were selected from the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique to provide basic data on the frequency of participation. An additional rating of satisfaction......STUDY DESIGN: Consensus decision-making process. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Activities and Participation (A&P) Basic Data Set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS: A committee of experts was established to select......, and a final version of the A&P Data Set was completed. RESULTS: Consensus was reached to define A&P and to incorporate both performance and satisfaction ratings. Items that were considered core to each A&P domain were selected from two existing questionnaires. Four items measuring activities were selected...

  11. International spinal cord injury bowel function basic data set (Version 2.0)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, K; Emmanuel, A; Perrouin-Verbe, B

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: International expert working group. OBJECTIVES: To revise the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Bowel Function Basic Data Set as a standardized format for the collecting and reporting of a minimal amount of information on bowel function in clinical practice and research. SETTING...... and the ASIA board. The revised data set was posted on the ASIA and ISCoS websites for 1 month to allow further comments and suggestions. Changes resulting from a Delphi process among experts in children with SCI were included. Members of ISCoS Executive and Scientific Committees and the ASIA board made......: Working group appointed by the American Spinal injury association (ASIA) and the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS). METHODS: The draft prepared by the working group was reviewed by the International SCI Data Set Committee and later by members of the ISCoS Executive and Scientific Committees...

  12. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  13. Reliability and validity of the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set items as self-report measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M P; Widerström-Noga, E; Richards, J S

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of a subset of International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set (ISCIBPDS) items that could be used as self-report measures in surveys, longitudinal studies and clinical trials.......To evaluate the psychometric properties of a subset of International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set (ISCIBPDS) items that could be used as self-report measures in surveys, longitudinal studies and clinical trials....

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  19. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  5. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  6. Reliability of the International Spinal Cord Injury Bowel Function Basic and Extended Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Therese; Bazzochi, G; Coggrave, M

    2011-01-01

    Study design: This study was designed as an international validation study. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of the International Spinal Cord Injury Bowel Function Basic and Extended Data Sets. Setting: Three European spinal cord injury centers...... and second tests were separated by 14 days. Cohen’s kappa was computed as a measure of agreement between raters. Results: Inter-rater reliability assessed by kappa statistics was very good (X0.81) in 5 items, good (0.61–0.80) in 11 items, moderate (0.41–0.60) in 20 items, fair (0.21–0.40) in 11 and poor (o0....... Methods: In total, 73 subjects with spinal cord injury and a history of bowel dysfunction, out of which 77% were men and median age of the subjects was 49 years (range 20–81), were studied. The inter-rater reliability was estimated by having two raters complete both data sets on the same subject. First...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  9. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  15. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  3. Version 1.1 of the international spinal cord injury skin and thermoregulation function basic data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Alexander, M. S.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; Donovan, W.; Krassioukov, A.; Post, M. W. M.

    Objective: To describe the changes made to the international spinal cord injury (SCI) skin and thermoregulation function basic data set in version 1.1. Setting: International. Methods: An international working group reviewed suggested changes to the international SCI skin and thermoregulation

  4. Version 1.1 of the international spinal cord injury skin and thermoregulation function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Alexander, M S; van Asbeck, F W A

    2017-01-01

    ' or 'stages' with 'categories'; therefore, the word 'category' is used instead of 'grade' or 'stage'. CONCLUSIONS: Impracticable measurements have been adjusted and new terminology adopted. All are to be found on ISCoS website: http://www.iscos.org.uk/international-sci-skin-and-thermoregulation-function-data-sets.......OBJECTIVE: To describe the changes made to the international spinal cord injury (SCI) skin and thermoregulation function basic data set in version 1.1. SETTING: International. METHODS: An international working group reviewed suggested changes to the international SCI skin and thermoregulation...... function basic data set version 1.0. These changes were discussed and the agreed changes were made. Subsequently, the recommended adjustments were circulated for review to the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) Executive and Scientific Committees, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Board...

  5. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  6. Reliability of the radiographic variables in the International Spinal Cord Injury Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set compared with the AO classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucantoni, C; Krishnan, R G; Gehrchen, P M

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Intra- and interrater reliability study for radiological variables of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set. OBJECTIVES: To test reliability of the radiological variables in the International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set and compare...... it with the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification. SETTING: The database of Eastern Denmark Regional SCI Referral Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. METHODS: Ratings of the International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set radiological variables and AO classification were obtained by two international...... observers for all the surgically treated spine trauma patients between 1st October 2010 and 31st December 2012 at the Spine Unit, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Statistical analyses for intra- and interrater crude agreement and Cohen's unweighted kappa (κ) coefficients were performed. RESULTS: For 283 spine...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ...

  16. Reliability of the radiographic variables in the International Spinal Cord Injury Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set compared with the AO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucantoni, C; Krishnan, R G; Gehrchen, M; Hallager, D W; Biering-Sørensen, F; Dahl, B

    2016-10-01

    Intra- and interrater reliability study for radiological variables of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set. To test reliability of the radiological variables in the International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set and compare it with the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification. The database of Eastern Denmark Regional SCI Referral Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. Ratings of the International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set radiological variables and AO classification were obtained by two international observers for all the surgically treated spine trauma patients between 1st October 2010 and 31st December 2012 at the Spine Unit, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Statistical analyses for intra- and interrater crude agreement and Cohen's unweighted kappa (κ) coefficients were performed. For 283 spine injuries, the intra- and interrater reliability for the individual radiological variables of the International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set was at least substantial (κ=0.67-0.97 for interrater, κ=0.79-0.89 for the intrarater agreement). For the AO classification, intrarater reliability was moderate-to-substantial (κ=0.57-0.75), whereas interrater reliability was substantial (κ=0.67-0.69). The crude intra- and interrater agreement for a combined radiographic SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set variable showed no significant difference compared with the AO classification (P=0.067-0.895). The reliability of International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set radiological variables is comparable to the AO classification system. We encourage its use for spinal column injury description, thus facilitating data collection and comparison between centres and countries.

  17. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  18. Version 1.1 of the international spinal cord injury skin and thermoregulation function basic data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Alexander, M S; van Asbeck, F W A; Donovan, W; Krassioukov, A; Post, M W M

    2017-06-01

    To describe the changes made to the international spinal cord injury (SCI) skin and thermoregulation function basic data set in version 1.1. International. An international working group reviewed suggested changes to the international SCI skin and thermoregulation function basic data set version 1.0. These changes were discussed and the agreed changes were made. Subsequently, the recommended adjustments were circulated for review to the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) Executive and Scientific Committees, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Board, around 40 national and international societies, and to interested individuals who had signed up wishing to have the opportunity to review. In addition, the suggested changes were displayed at the ISCoS and ASIA websites for at least a month for possible comments. The recommendation 'largest diameter, including undermining' is changed to: 'Largest undermining', and a description of how to measure this is inserted. The 'smallest opening diameter' is changed to: 'Width' as the maximum dimension perpendicular to the length axis. In the literature, there is a tendency to replace 'grades' or 'stages' with 'categories'; therefore, the word 'category' is used instead of 'grade' or 'stage'. Impracticable measurements have been adjusted and new terminology adopted. All are to be found on ISCoS website: http://www.iscos.org.uk/international-sci-skin-and-thermoregulation-function-data-sets.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. [Basic research for visible laser unit for the spinal cord (a preliminary report)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, T; Yoshii, Y; Maki, Y

    1983-04-01

    The cat's spinal dorsal column was irradiated unilaterally with Ar. laser of which power output was 500 mW and the spot size was 2 mm in diameter. The somatosensory evoked potentials (S.E.P.) were recorded bilaterally. In other cats, the fluorescein was injected intravenously for photoactivation and the dorsal column was irradiated with Ar. laser. The conclusion can be summarized as follows: 1) When the small demarcated area was made in the surface of the dorsal column by Ar. laser-irradiation, the early component of S.E.P. was disappeared. The histological finding revealed the destruction of the irradiated dorsal column. 2) The photoactivation effect of Ar. laser was demonstrated in the spinal cord, by using a fluorescein drug. The S.E.P. and the histological finding were the same as those of the nonfluorescein drug group. 3) The S.E.P. was available for the concept of the Laser-Photo-Biological-Effect (L.P.B.E.).

  20. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  1. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Depression and Spinal Cord Injury [ Download this pamphlet: “Depression and Spinal Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that ...

  2. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condition Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information What is SCI? SCI is ... 3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Spinal cord injury: Hope through research. Retrieved June 19 , 2013 , from ...

  3. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  4. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  6. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT Isa ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  12. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  13. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  14. Relevance of the international spinal cord injury basic data sets to youth: an Inter-Professional review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, A; Vogel, L C; Zebracki, K; Noonan, V K; Biering-Sørensen, F; Mulcahey, M J

    2017-09-01

    Mixed methods, using the Modified Delphi Technique and Expert Panel Review. To evaluate the utility and relevance of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core and Basic Data Sets for children and youth with SCI. International. Via 20 electronic surveys, an interprofessional sample of healthcare professionals with pediatric SCI experience participated in an iterative critical review of the International SCI Data Sets, and submitted suggestions for modifications for use with four pediatric age groups. A panel of 5 experts scrutinized the utility of all data sets, correlated any modifications with the developing National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) pediatric SCI Common Data Elements (CDE) and distributed final recommendations for modifications required to the adult data sets to the International SCI Data Set Committee and the associated Working Groups. Two International SCI Data Sets were considered relevant and appropriate for use with children without any changes. Three were considered not appropriate or applicable for use with children, regardless of age. Recommendations were made for five data sets to enhance their relevance and applicability to children across the age groups, and recommendations for seven data sets were specific to infants and younger children. The results of this critical review are significant in that substantive recommendations to align the International SCI Core and Basic Data Sets to pediatric practice were made. This project was funded by the Rick Hansen Institute Grant# 2015-27.

  15. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... compressed by bone (which may result from cervical spondylosis or a fracture), an accumulation of blood (hematoma), ...

  16. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Huie, J Russell; Crown, Eric D; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Hook, Michelle A; Garraway, Sandra M; Lee, Kuan H; Hoy, Kevin C; Grau, James W

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI.

  18. Clinical Trials Network / Building Infrastructure to Accelerate Transfer of Basic Research in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    serious adverse effects or death. Increase in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels were found in 14–70% of patients, but these elevations returned to...Mexiletine – Oral contraceptives – Phenylpropanolamine – Thiabendazole – Zileuton Inducers: – Montelukast – Phenytoin *Note: no washout period required; if...clinical trials of the comparative effectiveness of new therapies for spinal cord injury using an established consortium of neurosurgery departments at

  19. Good validity of the international spinal cord injury quality of life basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, M W M; Adriaansen, J J E; Charlifue, S

    2016-01-01

    and 35 years of age, were at least 10 years post SCI and were wheelchair users in daily life.Measure(s):The International SCI QoL Basic Data Set consists of three single items on satisfaction with life as a whole, physical health and psychological health (0=complete dissatisfaction; 10=complete...... satisfaction). Reference measures were the Mental Health Inventory-5 and three items of the World Health Organization Quality of Life measure. RESULTS: Data of 261 participants were available. Mean time after SCI was 24.1 years (s.d. 9.1); 90.4% had a traumatic SCI, 81.5% a motor complete SCI and 40% had......, and Cronbach's alpha of the scale was good (0.81). Correlations with the reference measures showed the strongest correlations between the WHOQOL general satisfaction item and general QoL (0.64), the WHOQOL health and daily activities items and physical health (0.69 and 0.60) and the Mental Health Inventory-5...

  20. Spinal cord mechanisms of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, R; Dickenson, A H

    2008-07-01

    The spinal cord is the first relay site in the transmission of nociceptive information from the periphery to the brain. Sensory signals are transmitted from the periphery by primary afferent fibres into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where these afferents synapse with intrinsic spinal dorsal horn neurones. Spinal projection neurones then convey this information to higher centres in the brain, where non-noxious and noxious signals can be perceived. During nociceptive transmission, the output of the spinal cord is dependent on various spinal mechanisms which can either increase or decrease the activity of dorsal horn neurones. Such mechanisms include local excitatory and inhibitory interneurones, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and descending influences from the brainstem, which can be both inhibitory and excitatory in nature. After nerve injury or conditions of inflammation, shifts can occur in these excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms which modulate spinal excitability, often resulting in the heightened response of dorsal neurones to incoming afferent signals, and increased output to the brain, a phenomenon known as central sensitization. In this review, we consider the ways in which spinal cord activity may be altered in chronic pain states. In addition, we discuss the spinal mechanisms which are targeted by current analgesics used in the management of chronic pain.

  1. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea E-mail: a.rossi@panet.itandrearossi@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  2. Using the Spinal Cord Injury Common Data Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Charlifue, Susan; Devivo, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Sets include core, basic, and extended data sets. To date, 13 data sets have been published on the Web site of the International Spinal Cord Injury Society (ISCoS; www.iscos.org.uk), and several more are forthcoming. The data sets are constituted of data...

  3. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ...

  4. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... Care Providers Home Health A to Z List Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information How is it diagnosed? Share ...

  5. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  6. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  7. Caesarean section in a parturient with a spinal cord stimulator.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sommerfield, D

    2010-01-01

    A 35-year-old G2P1 parturient at 32 weeks of gestation with an implanted spinal cord stimulator was admitted for urgent caesarean section. Spinal anaesthesia was performed below the spinal cord stimulator leads at the L4-5 level, and a healthy female infant was delivered. A basic description of the technology and resulting implications for the parturient are discussed.

  8. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  9. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  10. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  11. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  12. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  13. Development of a comprehensive survey of sexuality issues including a self-report version of the International Spinal Cord Injury sexual function basic data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, P W; Currie, K E

    2016-08-01

    Questionnaire development, validation and completion. Develop comprehensive survey of sexuality issues including validated self-report versions of the International Spinal Cord Injury male sexual function and female sexual and reproductive function basic data sets (SR-iSCI-sexual function). People with spinal cord damage (SCD) living in the community, Australia from August 2013 to June 2014. An iterative process involving rehabilitation medicine clinicians, a nurse specialising in sexuality issues in SCD and people with SCD who developed a comprehensive survey that included the SR-iSCI-sexual function. Participants recruitment through spinal rehabilitation review clinic and community organisations that support people with SCD. Surveys completed by 154 people. Most were male (n=101, 65.6%). Respondents' median age was 50 years (interquartile range (IQR) 38-58), and they were a median of 10 years (IQR 4-20) after the onset of SCD. Sexual problems unrelated to SCD were reported by 12 (8%) respondents, and 114 (n=75.5%) reported sexual problems because of SCD. Orgasms were much less likely (χ(2)=13.1, P=0.006) to be normal in males (n=5, 5%) compared with females (n=11, 22%). Males had significantly worse (χ(2)=26.0, P=0.001) psychogenic genital functioning (normal n=9, 9%) than females (normal n=13, 26%) and worse (χ(2)=10.8, P=0.013) reflex genital functioning. Normal ejaculation was reported in only three (3%) men. Most (n=26, 52%) women reported reduced or absent menstruation pattern since SCD. The SR-iSCI-sexual function provides a useful tool for researchers and clinicians to collect information regarding patient-reported sexual functioning after SCD and to facilitate comparative studies.

  14. Distribution of elements in human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Kobayashi, T.; Qiu, Y.; Kameda, N.; Ito, Y.; Otomo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of elements in human spinal cord was investigated on unfixed frozen cord material using PIXE technique. Distribution of Cu, Zn and Fe were not uniform in the cross section of the spinal cord and concentrations of these elements were higher in the anterior gray horn than in the other areas, while K and Cl distributed uniformly. The content of K changed along the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar level. These findings are discussed in relation to current understanding of the physiology of the spinal cord. (author)

  15. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  16. Spinal cord giant arteriovenous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymard, A.; Reizine, D.; Marciano, S.; Cervigon, E.G.; Gelbert, F.; Merland, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Giant extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas fed by spinal arteries are a rare type of spinal cord arteriovenous malformation. Among 11 patient (mean age, 20 years) with spinal hemorrhage in childhood, progressive paraplegia, and myelographic and angiographic diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the precised extramedulary location and complications (thrombosis 1). Angiography showed dilated spinal arteries feeding giant, high flow fistulas with much venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was performed in 11 cases, with balloons in seven, particulate embolization in three, and polymerizing agents in one. Complete closures of the shunt with clinical improvement was achieved in seven cases and partial closure with partial clinical recovery in two; there was one case each of paraplegia due to involuntary venous blockage by the balloon, and fatal bulbomedullary stroke in particulate embolization of cervical location. Careful endovascular techniques represent a valuable treatment in this severe pathology

  17. Sleep disordered breathing following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Jennum, Poul; Laub, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly complain about difficulty in sleeping. Although various sleep disordered breathing definitions and indices are used that make comparisons between studies difficult, it seems evident that the frequency of sleep disorders is higher in individuals...... with SCI, especially with regard to obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, there is a correlation between the incidence of sleep disturbances and the spinal cord level injured, age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdominal girth, and use of sedating medications. Regulation of respiration is dependent...... on wakefulness and sleep. Thus, it is important to be aware of basic mechanisms in the regulation and control of sleep and awake states. Supine position decreases the vital capacity in tetraplegic individuals, and diminished responsiveness to Pa(CO)(2) may further decrease ventilatory reserve. There also may...

  18. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  19. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  1. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-14

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  3. Changes of basic bone turnover parameters in short-term and long-term patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Andreas Ludwig; Volk, Andreas; Vollmar, Jens; Fromm, Bernd; Gerner, Hans Juergen

    2007-06-01

    The bone mineral density (BMD), the cross- links (PYD, DPD and NTx) and the bone specific alcaline phosphatase (BAP) was investigated in a cross-sectional study in 62 male patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), n = 28 short-term (0-1 year after SCI) and n = 34 long-term SCI patients (> 5 years after SCI). Knowledge about this parameters are necessary to find an adequate therapy for this special kind of osteoporosis. Immobilisation osteoporosis in SCI patients is a well-known problem that may lead to pathological fractures. Little is known regarding the extend of the osteoporosis as well as the causative factors. Measurements of the BMD in the proximal femur and the lumbar spine were performed with dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry (DEXA), of the osteoblast marker BAP (bone specific alkaline phosphatase) from serum and the osteoclast markers PYD (pyridinoline), DPD (desoxy-pyridinoline) and NTx (N-telopeptide of collagen type I) from urine. We found a significant decrease of BMD in the proximal femur and no relevant change in the lumbar spine compared to an age- and sex correlated control group (Z-score) in short-term and long-term SCI patients. There was a significant bone loss at the proximal femur between short and long-term SCI patients, whereas at the lumbar spine the BMD even slightly increases. Bone resorption (cross-links) was increased in both groups, though in long-term SCI patients it is significantly decreased compared to short-term SCI patients (DPD from 211.7 micro/g creatinine to 118.1 micro/g creatinine; NTx from 215.1 nmol/mmol creatinine to 83,6 nmol/mmol creatinine). The bone formation marker BAP is slightly below normal range in both groups (12.3 U/l in short-term, 9.7 U/l in long- term SCI patients). Only the proximal femur is affected by the immobilisation osteoporosis of SCI patients, therefore the BMD measurements in these patients should be performed at the lower limb. The problem of the immobilisation osteoporosis in SCI patients is the

  4. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pinprick. Doctors use the standard ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) Impairment Scale for this diagnosis. X-rays, ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2012). Spinal cord injury: Hope through research . Retrieved June 26, 2012, from ...

  5. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ...

  6. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Penetrating injuries of the spinal cord are among the most dangerous of injuries. They are often associated with injuries to other vital organs of the body, which may demand priority attention. The objectives of this study were to determine the pattern of the penetrating spinal cord injuries and to evaluate outcome ...

  8. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  9. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network ...

  11. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  12. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...

  13. Cellular Scaling Rules for Primate Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Burish, Mark J.; Peebles, J. Klint; Baldwin, Mary K.; Tavares, Luciano; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    The spinal cord can be considered a major sensorimotor interface between the body and the brain. How does the spinal cord scale with body and brain mass, and how are its numbers of neurons related to the number of neurons in the brain across species of different body and brain sizes? Here we determine the cellular composition of the spinal cord in eight primate species and find that its number of neurons varies as a linear function of cord length, and accompanies body mass raised to an expone...

  14. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  15. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Nabina Shah; Binav Shrestha; Kamana Subba

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the...

  18. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  19. Fine T cell receptor repertoire analysis of spinal cord T cells responding to the major and minor epitopes of myelin basic protein during rat autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Jee, Y; Sugisaki, M; Kim, G; Tanuma, N

    2000-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a disease induced by neuroantigen-reactive T cells bearing particular types of T cell receptor (TCR). Although the nature of TCRs of encephalitogenic T cells has been partially delineated using encephalitogenic T cell clones established in vitro, the entire TCR repertoire formed in situ after immunization with neuroantigen remains unclear. In the present study, we immunized Lewis rats with myelin basic protein (MBP) and its fragment peptides and determined the TCR repertoire of spinal cord T cells formed after the immunization by CDR3 spectra-typing. It was revealed that the oligoclonal expansion of Vbeta2, Vbeta8.2, and Vbeta17 spectratypes was detectable after immunization with guinea pig MBP and its immunodominant epitope, the 68-88 sequence, whereas immunization with a peptide containing a minor epitope induced Vbeta10 expansion. Immunization with rat MBP induced much broader TCR Vbeta expansion (all of the above Vbetas plus Vbeta3). These findings suggest that TCRs activated by immunization with guinea pig MBP used as heteroclitic immunogen recognize autoantigen, rat MBP. Furthermore, the strategy used in this study gives insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and provides useful information for designing TCR-based immunotherapy.

  20. Spinal cord injuries in Ilorin, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    passenger and load carriage, use of manual or motorised wheel barrow as against bearing heavy load on the head, principles of moving spinal injured patients taught every road traveller and establishment of spinal centres and training of specialised personnel. Keywords: Spinal Cord, Injury, Poraplegia, Quadriplegia.

  1. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustai...

  2. Experimental contusion of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemecek, S.; Suba, P.

    1982-01-01

    In 34 rabbits with intensive acute spinal trauma caused by an impact, 125 I-labelled human albumin (IHSA) was i.v. administered before injury and the animals were killed after 3 and 24 hours. In another series of experiments, IHSA was administered after injury, i.e., one hour before killing the animals, if they survived, and after 3, 24 and 48 hours. The radioactivity was measured in 1 cm long portions of the spinal cord and compared with serum values. The outflow of plasma from blood vessels was restricted to the site of the injury proper and declined with the period of survival. Exudation was minimal, but still present 48 hours after injury. From this site, as revealed by administration of IHSA before injury, the vasogenic oedema was propagated longitudinally by the spine to neighbouring segments. After 24 hours it proceeded further than after 3 hours. This investigation confirms and supplements former findings pertaining to the microscopic evaluation of spinal trauma after administration of Evans blue. Radioisotope labelled albumin revealed more sensitively the presence of albumin in tissue than Evans blue. (author)

  3. Cervical spinal cord injury in abused children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kenneth W; Avellino, Anthony M; Sugar, Naomi F; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2008-04-01

    Five infants and toddlers who sustained cervical spinal cord injury as the result of child abuse are described. Three cases are previously unreported. Diagnosis was complicated by coexistent brain injuries and their treatments, subtle and/or evolving paralysis, and central cord syndrome, in which arm function is diminished but leg function is preserved. Definitive spinal imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography, and plain radiographs was delayed because of life support efforts. When completed, the MRI was most sensitive to cord injury. Evidence of associated bony spinal injury was often absent or unapparent until healing occurred; 4 children had spinal cord injury without (or with minimal) radiological abnormality. The 3 children presenting to our hospital with cord injury represent 1% of the estimated cases of inflicted head injury seen during a 23-year period.

  4. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  5. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  6. Effect of lidocaine on spinal cord lipid peroxide levels after acute spinal cord trauma in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, A.S.; Özer, F.; Pamir, N.; Emerk, K.

    1991-01-01

    A standard spinal cord trauma was performed on control and lidocaine-treated (5 mg/kg. i.p.) rats. Spinal cord lipid peroxide levels in the lidocaine-trcaled group were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant difference was observed in plasma lipid peroxide levels. Our results suggest a protective role of lidocaine against lipid peroxidation after experimental spinal cord trauma in rats.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  8. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury. © 2006 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia/SPP.

  9. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I get more information? Glossary Introduction Until World War II, a serious spinal cord injury (SCI) usually ... counseling to provide social and emotional support. The education and active involvement of the newly injured person ...

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  11. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabina Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the establishment of the various hospitals with rehabilitation units, rehabilitation centres and physical therapy units in different institutions. However, the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting and scenario is different in Nepal from those in the developed countries since spinal cord injury rehabilitation care has not been adequately incorporated into the health care delivery system nor its importance has been realized within the medical community of Nepal. To name few, lack of human resource for the rehabilitation care, awareness among the medical personnel and general population, adequate scientific research evidence regarding situation of spinal injury and exorbitant health care policy are the important hurdles that has led to the current situation. Hence, it is our responsibility to address these apparent barriers to successful implementation and functioning of rehabilitation so that those with spinal injury would benefit from enhanced quality of life. Keywords: rehabilitation; spinal injury.

  12. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment. SCS treatment consists of one or more leads implanted in the epidural space of the spinal canal, connected to an implantable pulse generator (IPG). Each lead carries...... a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...... is described in detail and illustrated with a series of intraoperative pictures. Finally, indications for SCS are discussed along with some of the controversies surrounding the therapy. Implications The reader is presented with a broad overview of spinal cord stimulation, including the historical...

  14. Sonographic findings of normal newborn spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Dong Gyu

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed spinal cord ultrasonography of 21 healthy newborn infants in Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Normal spinal cord revealed low echogenecity at that of cerebrospinal fluid and was demarcated by intense reflections from its dorsal and ventral surfaces. The central canal was routinely seen as a thin linear reflection in the center of the cord. The nerve roots making up the cauda equina formed a poorly defined collection of intense linear echoes extending from the conus. On real time image, the normal spinal cord exhibited rather slow and rhythmical anteroposterior movement within the subarachnoid fluid. A distinct and rapid vascular pulsation of the spinal cord was usually recognizable. The approximate level of vertebral bodies was determined as follows; most ventrally located vertebral body was thought to be L5 and S1 was seen slightly posterior to the L5 directed inferoposteriorly. According to the above criteria terminal portions of spinal cord were seen around the L2 body in 5 MHz and pointed termination of conus medullaris was clearly seen at L2-3 junction and in upper body of L3 by 7.5 MHz. So it would be better to examine by 5 MHz for spatial orientation and then by 7.5 MHz for more accurate examination. High-resolution, real-time ultrasonography was a safe, rapid screening technique for evaluation of the spinal cord in infants. Additional applications of spinal sonography may be possible in the evaluation of neonatal syringohydromyelia and meningocele as well as intraspinal cyst localization for possible percutaneous puncture by ultrasound guidance

  15. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  16. Optogenetics of the Spinal Cord: Use of Channelrhodopsin Proteins for Interrogation of Spinal Cord Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur; Nam, Youngpyo; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2017-12-29

    Spinal cord circuits play a key role in receiving and transmitting somatosensory information from the body and the brain. They also contribute to the timing and coordination of complex patterns of movement. Under disease conditions, such as spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain, spinal cord circuits receive pain signals from peripheral nerves, and are involved in pain development via neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators released from neurons and glial cells. Despite the importance of spinal cord circuits in sensory and motor functions, many questions remain regarding the relationship between activation of specific cells and behavioral responses. Optogenetics offers the possibility of understanding the complex cellular activity and mechanisms of spinal cord circuits, as well as having therapeutic potential for addressing spinal cord-related disorders. In this review, we discuss recent findings in optogenetic research employing the channelrhodopsin protein to assess the function of specific neurons and glia in spinal cord circuits ex vivo and in vivo. We also explore the possibilities and challenges of employing optogenetics technology in future therapeutic strategies for the treatment of spinal disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  18. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries

  19. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.D.; Lierse, W.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures at a Glance https://www.nscisc.uab.edu February 2012 This is a publication of the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. I ncidence : It is ...

  1. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  2. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  3. Prognosis by tumor location for pediatric spinal cord Ependymomas

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, MC; Sayegh, ET; Safaee, M; Sun, MHZ; Kaur, G; Kim, JM; Aranda, D; Molinaro, AM; Gupta, N; Parsa, AT

    2013-01-01

    Object. Ependymoma is a common CNS tumor in children, with spinal cord ependymomas making up 13.1% of all ependymomas in this age group. The clinical features that affect prognosis in pediatric spinal cord ependymomas are not well understood. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine whether a tumor location along the spinal cord is prognostically significant in children undergoing surgery for spinal cord ependymomas. Methods. A PubMed search was performed to identify all p...

  4. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    inflammation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord , spontaneous recovery, functional recovery, inflammation, biomarkers, trauma 16...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0614 TITLE: Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ona Bloom...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0614 W81XWH-15-1-0614 Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. Mechanisms of symptomatic spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR).......To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  6. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  7. Study and therapeutic progress on spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tiefeng; Guo, Yunbao; Shi, Lei; Yu, Jinlu

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PMAVFs) are rare and belong to type IV spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Little is known regarding the treatment and prognosis of spinal cord PMAVFs. In the present study the relevant literature from PubMed was reviewed, and it was found that these fistulas can occur at all ages but are more common in children. In children, most spinal cord PMAVFs are large and with high flow, begin with bleeding and are frequently associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. However, in adults, most spinal cord PMAVFs are small and with low flow and begin with progressive spinal cord dysfunction. The early diagnosis of spinal cord PMAVFs is generally difficult, and symptoms can be very severe at the time of diagnosis. Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard; however, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography are also promising. Spinal cord PMAVFs can be treated by endovascular embolization, surgical removal or a combination of the two methods. Most spinal cord PMAVFs show good outcomes after the appropriate treatment, and the prognosis is primarily associated with the blood flow of the PMAVF. For high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, endovascular embolization is more effective and can lead to a good outcome; however, for low-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, surgical removal or the combination with endovascular embolization is the optimal choice. The prognosis for low-flow types is slightly worse than for high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs in children, but the outcome is acceptable.

  8. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J

    2009-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was primarily to evaluate the efficacy of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) at- and below-level pain and secondarily to evaluate the effect on spasm severity. SETTING: Outpatients at two spinal cord units and a pain center...... severity following spinal cord injury....

  9. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  10. Neuroprotective effect corilagin in spinal cord injury rat model by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological functions get altered in a patient suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of corilagin in spinal cord injury rats by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. Materials and method: Spinal cord injury was ...

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  13. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  14. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  15. Breaking the News in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshblum, Steven; Fichtenbaum, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Breaking the bad news in terms of prognosis for significant motor recovery following a neurologically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most difficult tasks for the spinal cord medicine specialist. Learning the skills to facilitate this communication is extremely important to better assist patients to understand their prognosis as well as foster hope for their future. If bad news is delivered poorly it can cause confusion and long-lasting distress and resentment; if done well, it may assist understanding, adjustment, and acceptance. This article provides the physician who cares for patients with SCI with some concepts to consider when discussing prognosis with patients and their families. PMID:18533406

  16. Spinal Cord Ischemia after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall prevalence of Thoraco abdominal aneurysm has increased due to widespread use of imaging techniques and aging population. Surgical aneurysm repair and endovascular stent graft repair have refined as successful treatment modalities in preventing aneurysm progression and rupture. Since spinal cord depends on branches of thoracoabdominal aorta for blood supply ,spinal cord ischaemia is a dreadful complication of these procedures. However recent animal experiments and surgical series thrown light in tackling this anatomical obstructions by physiologic means. The adoption of techniques for avoiding hypovolumea, hypotension, CSF pressure has reduced this complication rate from 23% to 2-6%.

  17. Schwann cells for spinal cord repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oudega

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of spinal cord injury appears to demand a multifactorial repair strategy. One of the components that will likely be included is an implant that will fill the area of lost nervous tissue and provide a growth substrate for injured axons. Here we will discuss the role of Schwann cells (SCs in cell-based, surgical repair strategies of the injured adult spinal cord. We will review key studies that showed that intraspinal SC grafts limit injury-induced tissue loss and promote axonal regeneration and myelination, and that this response can be improved by adding neurotrophic factors or anti-inflammatory agents. These results will be compared with several other approaches to the repair of the spinal cord. A general concern with repair strategies is the limited functional recovery, which is in large part due to the failure of axons to grow across the scar tissue at the distal graft-spinal cord interface. Consequently, new synaptic connections with spinal neurons involved in motor function are not formed. We will highlight repair approaches that did result in growth across the scar and discuss the necessity for more studies involving larger, clinically relevant types of injuries, addressing this specific issue. Finally, this review will reflect on the prospect of SCs for repair strategies in the clinic.

  18. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  19. Inpatient migration patterns in persons with spinal cord injury: A registry study with hospital discharge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ronca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared patient migration patterns of persons with spinal cord injury, the general population and persons with morbid obesity, rheumatic conditions and bowel disease, for secondary health conditions, across administrative boundaries in Switzerland. The effects of patient characteristics and health conditions on visiting hospitals outside the residential canton were examined using complete, nationwide, inpatient health records for the years 2010 and 2011. Patients with spinal cord injury were more likely to obtain treatment outside their residential canton as compared to all other conditions. Facilitators of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury and the general hospital population were private or accidental health insurances covering costs. Barriers of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury were old age, severe multimorbidity, financial coverage by basic health insurance, and minority language region. Keywords: Spinal cord injury, Patient migration, Health services accessibility, Health care utilization, Inpatient hospital care

  20. Partly shared spinal cord networks for locomotion and scratching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Ari; Hao, Zhao-Zhe

    2011-12-01

    Animals produce a variety of behaviors using a limited number of muscles and motor neurons. Rhythmic behaviors are often generated in basic form by networks of neurons within the central nervous system, or central pattern generators (CPGs). It is known from several invertebrates that different rhythmic behaviors involving the same muscles and motor neurons can be generated by a single CPG, multiple separate CPGs, or partly overlapping CPGs. Much less is known about how vertebrates generate multiple, rhythmic behaviors involving the same muscles. The spinal cord of limbed vertebrates contains CPGs for locomotion and multiple forms of scratching. We investigated the extent of sharing of CPGs for hind limb locomotion and for scratching. We used the spinal cord of adult red-eared turtles. Animals were immobilized to remove movement-related sensory feedback and were spinally transected to remove input from the brain. We took two approaches. First, we monitored individual spinal cord interneurons (i.e., neurons that are in between sensory neurons and motor neurons) during generation of each kind of rhythmic output of motor neurons (i.e., each motor pattern). Many spinal cord interneurons were rhythmically activated during the motor patterns for forward swimming and all three forms of scratching. Some of these scratch/swim interneurons had physiological and morphological properties consistent with their playing a role in the generation of motor patterns for all of these rhythmic behaviors. Other spinal cord interneurons, however, were rhythmically activated during scratching motor patterns but inhibited during swimming motor patterns. Thus, locomotion and scratching may be generated by partly shared spinal cord CPGs. Second, we delivered swim-evoking and scratch-evoking stimuli simultaneously and monitored the resulting motor patterns. Simultaneous stimulation could cause interactions of scratch inputs with subthreshold swim inputs to produce normal swimming, acceleration

  1. Sphincter (ring muscle) gymnastics for spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, S

    2000-07-01

    Sphincter gymnastics seem to be able to recruit central pattern generators--networks of neurons that generate motor patterns--through peripheral rhythmic stimuli and to activate them without supraspinal signals. This physical therapy method is thus suitable for treating spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients, for it can reach below the injured segment and feed signals into the central nervous system, thus activating vital organs. This article presents some observations and discusses a possible mechanism.

  2. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  3. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  4. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Y; Oyama, D; Uehara, G; Somchai, N; Kawabata, S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  5. New trends in spinal cord tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2015), s. 129-145 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : biomaterial * cell therapy * regenerative medicine * spinal cord injury * stem cells scaffold * tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  6. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...... and theoretical background, practical implantation technique, and clinical application....

  7. Vocational perspectives after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonherr, MC; Groothoff, JW; Mulder, GA; Eisma, WH; Schönherr, M.C.

    Objective: To give insight into the vocational situation several years after a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and describe the personal experiences and unmet needs; to give an overview of health and functional status per type of SCI and their relationship with employment status. Design:

  8. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Tashiro, Kunio; Naganuma, Mutsuo; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  9. Somatostatin in the caudal spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin in the rat spinal cord was studied immunohistochemically with particular reference to the localization in the caudal centers that innervate the pelvic organs. For detailed studies of the laminar distribution of somatostatin the combination of immunohistochemistry...... and acetylcholinesterase enzyme histochemistry was employed. Deafferentation experiments were carried out to shed light on the origin of the somatostatin-containing axons. These experiments showed that the bulk of the spinal somatostatin has a spinal origin. The structures showing somatostatin immunoreactivity formed...... in the sacral parasympathetic intermediolateral nucleus. In contrast, very few appeared in the sympathetic nuclei. Immunoreactive somata were present in the surroundings of the central canal at all levels. Moreover, positive neurons were found in the intermediolateral nucleus of the sacral cord. By combined...

  10. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ...

  12. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves: Basic principles and procedures for routine clinical and research application. An updated report from an I.F.C.N. Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R; Cohen, L G; Daskalakis, Z; Di Iorio, R; Di Lazzaro, V; Ferreri, F; Fitzgerald, P B; George, M S; Hallett, M; Lefaucheur, J P; Langguth, B; Matsumoto, H; Miniussi, C; Nitsche, M A; Pascual-Leone, A; Paulus, W; Rossi, S; Rothwell, J C; Siebner, H R; Ugawa, Y; Walsh, V; Ziemann, U

    2015-06-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation, especially for TMS. Recent guidelines can be found in the literature covering specific aspects of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as safety (Rossi et al., 2009), methodology (Groppa et al., 2012) and therapeutic applications (Lefaucheur et al., 2014). This up-dated review covers theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-05-15

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomaterials for revascularization and immunomodulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Agnes E; Maldonado-Lasuncion, Ines; Oudega, Martin

    2018-01-23

    Spinal cord injury causes immediate damage to the nervous tissue accompanied by loss of motor and sensory function. The limited self-repair competence of injured nervous tissue underscores the need for reparative interventions to recover function after spinal cord injury. The vasculature of the spinal cord plays a crucial role in spinal cord injury and repair. Ruptured and sheared blood vessels in the injury epicenter and blood vessels with a breached blood-spinal cord barrier in the surrounding tissue cause bleeding and inflammation, which contribute to the overall tissue damage. The insufficient formation of new functional vasculature in and near the injury impedes endogenous tissue repair and limits the prospect of repair approaches. Limiting the loss of blood vessels, stabilizing the blood-spinal cord barrier, and promoting the formation of new blood vessels are therapeutic targets for spinal cord repair. Inflammation is an integral part of injury-mediated vascular damage, with deleterious and reparative consequences. Inflammation and the formation of new blood vessels are intricately interwoven. Biomaterials can be effectively used for promoting and guiding blood vessel formation or modulating the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury, thereby governing the extent of damage and the success of reparative interventions. This review deals with the vasculature after spinal cord injury, the reciprocal interactions between inflammation and blood vessel formation, and the potential of biomaterials to support revascularization and immunomodulation in damaged spinal cord nervous tissue. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  16. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that the means of transport are generally not optimal for those with spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was therefore to highlight the importance of prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients and the contribution of these injuries to mortality in Nigeria. Patients, materials and methods. The records of spinal ...

  17. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some...... theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments....

  18. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field in...

  19. Spinal cord testing: auditing for quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1991-04-01

    A quality assurance audit of spinal cord testing as documented by staff nurses was carried out. Twenty-five patient records were examined for accuracy of documented testing and compared to assessments performed by three investigators. A pilot study established interrater reliability of a tool that was designed especially for this study. Results indicated staff nurses failed to meet pre-established 100% standard in all categories of testing when compared with investigator's findings. Possible reasons for this disparity are discussed as well as indications for modifications in the spinal testing record, teaching program and preset standards.

  20. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  1. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  2. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  3. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  5. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  6. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  7. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  8. Neural plasticity after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Lianying; Wang, Chunxin; Yang, Maoguang

    2012-02-15

    Plasticity changes of uninjured nerves can result in a novel neural circuit after spinal cord injury, which can restore sensory and motor functions to different degrees. Although processes of neural plasticity have been studied, the mechanism and treatment to effectively improve neural plasticity changes remain controversial. The present study reviewed studies regarding plasticity of the central nervous system and methods for promoting plasticity to improve repair of injured central nerves. The results showed that synaptic reorganization, axonal sprouting, and neurogenesis are critical factors for neural circuit reconstruction. Directed functional exercise, neurotrophic factor and transplantation of nerve-derived and non-nerve-derived tissues and cells can effectively ameliorate functional disturbances caused by spinal cord injury and improve quality of life for patients.

  9. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal cord and muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilonius, S.M.; Askmark, H.; Gilberg, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Current knowledge regarding the distribution of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cholineacetyltranferase (ChAT) and cholinergic receptors in the spinal cord is presented as well as changes in these markers coupled to the degenerations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The principal changes in ChAT and nicotonic receptors in rat hindleg muscles during denervation and reinnervation is discussed as a background for quantitative studies in human muscle biopsies. It is noted that thefirst published autoradiograph on spinal cord muscarinic receptors was from the rat, depicting an intense binding of radiolabeled quinuclikiny benzilate (tritium-QNB) in the ventral horn, and expecially in an apical part of the dorsal horn claimed to correspond to correspond to sustantia gelatinosa

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh P Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a complex disease process that involves both primary and secondary mechanisms of injury and can leave patients with devastating functional impairment as well as psychological debilitation. While no curative treatment is available for spinal cord injury, current therapeutic approaches focus on reducing the secondary injury that follows SCI. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy has shown promising neuroprotective effects in several experimental studies, but the limited number of clinical reports have shown mixed findings. This review will provide an overview of the potential mechanisms by which HBO therapy may exert neuroprotection, provide a summary of the clinical application of HBO therapy in patients with SCI, and discuss avenues for future studies.

  11. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 45 Gy - tolerance dose spinal cord - dogma or the facts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Hliniak, A.; Danczak-Ginalska, Z.; Meder, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.; Korzeniowski, S.; Peszynski, J.; Jassem, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dose of 45 Gy as a tolerance dose for spinal cord was questioned based on review of clinical data. Some data show that for conventional fractionation with the dose per fraction of less than 2.0 Gy spinal cord tolerance dose may arise up to 50-55 Gy. This was the base for round-table discussion and the importance of clinical and physical risk factors of postirradiation spinal cord injury was discussed and previous diseases of spinal cord, size of dose per fraction and length of irradiated spinal cord were pointed out as high risk factors. It was concluded that from clinical point of view there is no reason and on need to verify and to increase tolerance dose for spinal cord. (author)

  13. Advanced Restoration Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    of myelin formation. We will also further our imaging work by developing methodology to use rs-fMRI for examination of cortical plasticity in...transgenic mouse that promises to be transformative not only for the study of FES in myelination but in all myelin related pathologies. SECTION 2...KEYWORDS Spinal cord injury (SCI) Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) Functional electrical stimulation (FES) Neurological recovery 5 Myelination

  14. Assessment of rat spinal cord injury models

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complicated and devastating condition, causing different extents of motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. In addition, there is a risk for secondary complications after SCI including posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS) that can cause further functional loss. Since there is no available effective treatment, tremendous efforts have been made to develop new therapeutic strategies to promote functional recovery after SCI. In experimental r...

  15. Biocompatible hydrogels in spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejčl, Aleš; Lesný, Petr; Přádný, Martin; Michálek, Jiří; Jendelová, Pavla; Štulík, J.; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S121-S132 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) 1A8697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Spinal cord injury * Hydrogel * Tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  16. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  17. Treating Chronic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    translational pain therapies after SCI. 3 Introduction Pain develops in approximately two-thirds of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) [24;54;55...useful model system for examining effects of candidate translational pain therapies . Methods Experimental Design Studies were performed using a...effect, suggesting that elevated connexin-43 maintains pain-like behaviors primarily through enhanced coupling between adjacent cells. These drugs had no

  18. Levodopa therapy in incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Oliver; Zörner, Björn; Dietz, Volker

    2008-11-01

    We studied the influence of levodopa (L-Dopa) on training effects in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI). A low-dose of L-Dopa per day is known to enhance the effects of physical training after stroke. This is tested here in subjects suffering a SCI. Twelve subacute, incomplete SCI (iSCI) subjects (ASIA C and D) were randomized in a trial with a double-blind, crossover design to receive 6 weeks of L-Dopa (200 mg), followed by 6 weeks of placebo, or vice versa. Outcome measures were ASIA Motor-Score (AMS) reflecting motor recovery; walking ability, assessed by the Walking Index of Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI); and Activities of Daily Living (ADL), as monitored by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Both placebo and L-Dopa, in combination with physiotherapy, produced a significant motor recovery after SCI. The combination of L-Dopa and physiotherapy had no greater effect on the outcome than placebo and physiotherapy. The possible reasons for the different effect of L-Dopa in stroke and iSCI subjects are discussed.

  19. Tracking Changes following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Armin; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is often disabling and recovery of function is limited. As a consequence of damage, both spinal cord and brain undergo anatomical and functional changes. Besides clinical measures of recovery, biomarkers that can detect early anatomical and functional changes might be useful in determining clinical outcome—during the course of rehabilitation and recovery—as well as furnishing a tool to evaluate novel treatment interventions and their mechanisms of action. Recent evidence suggests an interesting three-way relationship between neurological deficit and changes in the spinal cord and of the brain and that, importantly, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques, both structural and functional, provide a sensitive tool to lay out these interactions. This review describes recent findings from multimodal imaging studies of remote anatomical changes (i.e., beyond the lesion site), cortical reorganization, and their relationship to clinical disability. These developments in this field may improve our understanding of effects on the nervous system that are attributable to the injury itself and will allow their distinction from changes that result from rehabilitation (i.e., functional retraining) and from interventions affecting the nervous system directly (i.e., neuroprotection or regeneration). PMID:22730072

  20. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  1. Spinal cord compression--an oncologic emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A R

    1990-08-01

    Spinal cord compression secondary to epidural metastatic tumor is an emergency clinical situation that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment if permanent neurologic damage is to be prevented. Physicians caring for patients with cancer must maintain a high index of suspicion for this problem. Back pain is a common clinical situation in the general population but in the cancer patient, one should consider this sign indicative of possible spinal cord compression even though a long tumor-free interval has occurred since the original diagnosis of neoplasm. The diagnosis is established by thorough neurologic examination, plain x-rays, myelography, CT and MRI scanning. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment is instituted with steroids, decompressive surgery and postoperative irradiation or external irradiation alone depending upon the emergent nature of the clinical situation. Regardless of the initial treatment, patients with spinal cord compression require management in a multi-disciplinary fashion. Early therapy will result in the best relief of symptoms and maintenance of the ability to walk. The ultimate prognosis of such patients is very dismal in view of the metastatic nature of their disease but prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary to prevent devastating sequelae for the patients and their families.

  2. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukuda, Teruo

    1988-01-01

    Forty-three MR examinations of 30 patients with spinal cord injuries were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate MR findings of the injured cord and to correlate them with the time interval from the day of spinal cord injury. There were 18 cysts, 8 ''myelomalacias'', 2 cord atrophies, one intramedullary hematoma and two transections. In one patient, ''myelomalacia'' became a cyst on the follow-up study. Large cysts of more than 6 vertebral segments were found in 7 patients, all of whom had had trauma more than 5 years prior to examination. Small cysts of less than half a vertebral height were seen in 5 patients, all of whom were studied 3 to 6 months after the injury. Intermediate cysts were seen in 7 patients who had sustained trauma more than a year before. In a majority (13/14 scans) of ''myelomalacia'', the time interval from injury until examination was only 2 weeks to 6 months. Of the 14 patients who showed post-traumatic progressive myelopathy, seven had large cysts. It is known that intramedullary hematoma becomes a cyst, and that post-traumatic myelomalacia probably results in a cyst in animal studies. Our clinical study seems to support a strong causal relation between myelomalacia and post-traumatic cysts. Since post-traumatic progressive myelopathy with a cyst is surgically treatable, follow-up MR imaging is preferable in cases with myelomalacia. (author)

  4. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White-Schenk D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Désirée White-Schenk,1,4 Riyi Shi,1–3 James F Leary1–4 1Interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences Program, 2Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Lynn School of Veterinary Medicine, 4Birck Nanotechnology Center, Discovery Park, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA Abstract: Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. Keywords: spinal cord injury, acrolein, drug delivery, methylprednisolone, secondary injury

  5. SCIM--spinal cord independence measure: a new disability scale for patients with spinal cord lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catz, A; Itzkovich, M; Agranov, E; Ring, H; Tamir, A

    1997-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a new disability scale developed specifically for patients with spinal cord lesions in order to make the functional assessments of patients with paraplegia or tetraplegia more sensitive to changes. The SCIM includes the following areas of function: self-care (subscore (0-20), respiration and sphincter management (0-40) and mobility (0-40). Each area is scored according to its proportional weight in these patients' general activity. The final score ranges from 0 to 100. This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the SCIM and its sensitivity to functional changes in spinal cord lesion patients compared with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Thirty patients were included. Scores were recorded one week after admission and thereafter every month during hospitalization. Each area of function was assessed by a pair of staff members from the relevant discipline. The comparison of scores between each pair of rates revealed a remarkable consistency (r = 0.91-0.99; P SCIM score (mean = 51, SD = 21) was lower than the total FIM score (mean = 87, SD = 23) owing to the difference in scale range structure and the relatively high cognitive scores of our patients; however, a relationship was noted between the scores of both scales (r = 0.85, P SCIM was more sensitive than the FIM to changes in function of spinal cord lesion patients: the SCIM detected all the functional changes detected by the FIM total scoring, but the FIM missed 26% of the changes detected by the SCIM total scoring. The mean difference between consecutive scores was higher for the SCIM (P SCIM is a reliable disability scale and is more sensitive to changes in function in spinal cord lesion patients than the FIM. The SCIM when administered by a multidisciplinary team, may be a useful instrument for assessing changes in everyday performance in patients with spinal cord lesion.

  6. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Seccion de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barkovich, James A. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio [Seccion de Neurpediatria, Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28041 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  8. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-dong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury.

  9. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangbing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging of spinal cord parenchyma lesion in rat with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Pei, Xiao-Jiao; Lei, Jian-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Wei, Rui-Han; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2018-04-01

    Adequate evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma and accurate identification of injury range are considered two premises for the research and treatment of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information about water diffusion in spinal cord, and thus makes it possible to realize these premises. In this study, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Wistar rats 84days after spinal cord contusion. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) from different positions of the injured cord were collected, analyzed, and compared with the histological results and locomotor outcomes. Moreover, we performed fiber tractography, and examined the difference in cavity percentage obtained respectively via conventional MRI, DTI and histology. Results showed that the chronic SCI rats had the largest changes of all DTI metrics at the epicenter; the farther away from the epicenter, the smaller the variation. FA, AD and RD were all influenced by SCI in a greater space range than MD. The good consistency of FA values and histological results in specific regions evidenced FA's capability of reflecting Wallerian degeneration after SCI. DTI metrics at the epicenter in ventral funiculus also showed a close correlation with the BBB scores. Additionally, supported by the histological results, DTI enables a more accurate measurement of cavity percentage compared to the conventional MRI. DTI parameters might comprehensively reflect the post-SCI pathological status of spinal cord parenchyma at the epicenter and distal parts during the chronic stage, while showing good consistency with locomotor performance. DTI combined with tractography could intuitively display the distribution of spared fibers after SCI and accurately provide information such as cavity area. This may shed light on the research and treatment of chronic SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Spinal cord injury, dendritic spine remodeling, and spinal memory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can persist for months and years after injury. Although many aberrant changes to sensory processing contribute to the development of chronic pain, emerging evidence demonstrates that mechanisms similar to those underlying classical learning and memory can contribute to central sensitization, a phenomenon of amplified responsiveness to stimuli in nociceptive dorsal horn neurons. Notably, dendritic spines have emerged as major players in learning and memory, providing a structural substrate for how the nervous system modifies connections to form and store information. Until now, most information regarding dendritic spines has been obtained from studies in the brain. Recent experimental data in the spinal cord, however, demonstrate that Rac1-regulated dendritic spine remodeling occurs on second-order wide dynamic range neurons and accompanies neuropathic pain after SCI. Thus, SCI-induced synaptic potentiation engages a putative spinal memory mechanism. A compelling, novel possibility for pain research is that a synaptic model of long-term memory storage could explain the persistent nature of neuropathic pain. Such a conceptual bridge between pain and memory could guide the development of more effective strategies for treatment of chronic pain after injury to the nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries ... Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, ...

  13. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    weight. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal cord injury, stretching, physical therapy , rehabilitation, locomotor recovery 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...David S. K. Magnuson, PhD. University of Louisville. Introduction: This research focuses on the impact of stretching ( physical therapy maneuvers...lesions. Physical therapists use stretching maneuvers to maintain extensibility of soft tissues and to manage spasticity . Previous studies in our lab

  14. Brain and spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bragg, D.G.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional means of detecting CNS neoplasms include plain film studies, isotope brain scans, angiography, pneumoencephalography, and myelography. Computed tomography (CT) scanning has replaced nearly all of these studies in both the initial detection and follow-up of brain tumors. Air studies (pneumoencephalography and ventriculography) have been virtually eliminated, except in certain unusual circumstances when two positions need to be checked, or hydrocephalus followed. The nuclear brain scan has a very limited role at present, being useful primarily for detecting skull or meningeal metastases. Myelography, however, remains a valuable imaging tool for the assessment of tumors of the spinal canal. CT scanning has not only improved our ability to detect smaller brain tumors, but also CT guided stereotactic biopsy techniques provide a safer means of obtaining tissue from these smaller lesions, regardless of location. Surgical techniques, guided by CT sterotactic techniques, show promise as well, but the impact of these therapeutic techniques on survival statistics remains to be defined. CT has revolutionized the approach to the detection and diagnosis of space-occupying lesions in the brain. Tumors can be detected at a smaller site

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  16. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury in Nigeria is associated with significant morbid- ity and mortality.1-8 Socio-economic factors, poor care in hospital and inadequate rehabilitation of the victims after discharge may be responsible for this situation. Studies9-10 have identified many risk factors11-21 for morbidity and mortality after spinal cord ...

  17. Intramedullary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Intramedulary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord. Tadios Muni, Hagos Biluts. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 9 Number 2 - December 2004. 56. Intramedullary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord: A case report and Literature. Review. 1Tadios Muni M.D, 2Hagos Biluts M.D.. 1Senior ...

  18. Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan) inhibits spinal cord injury-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan) inhibits spinal cord injury-induced inflammatory responses in rats. Liang Chen, Wei-Chun Guo. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the effect of Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan), a traditional Chinese medicine, on rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: In this study a total of 40 adult rats ...

  19. Surgical Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Background: There are controversies regarding the importance and timing of spinal cord decompression following trauma. Documented evidence shows that early decompression in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) improves neurologic outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate the outcome of ...

  20. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  1. Conservative Management Of Third Trimester Cervical Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury, though an important cause of morbidity appears to be uncommon in pregnant women or perhaps, has not been accurately documented among them. Superimposed on the many impairments resulting from spinal cord injury is the presence of the foetus in the womb, which in itself normally brings about ...

  2. Non-traumatic spinal cord compression at Parirenyatwa Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compression of the spinal cord by encroachment on its space is of major importance as a cause of injury to its tissues, with serious neurological consequences. Patients with non-traumatic spinal cord compression represent a significant proportion of paraplegic/paretic individuals attended to in the neurosurgical units in ...

  3. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  4. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of lesions in rabbit spinal cord with microwave hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.H.; Popovic, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a variety of injury models in different species to produce spinal cord lesions by trauma or ischemia has often given rise to conflicting or inconclusive data. A new model has been developed in rabbits. Spinal cord lesions were produced in selected spinal cord segments of male New Zealand white rabbits by non-invasive irradiation with microwaves in the near field at 915 MHz. Graded injuries of predictable severity can be produced by the non-invasive induction of moderate hyperthermia in the thoracic spinal cord at precise dosage levels of temperature elevation and duration. Histological changes in microwave-induced hyperthermia closely parallel those seen in traumatic lesions of the human spinal cord, as well as those produced in animals with the classical weight-drop method of Allen. In addition to grading the spinal cord lesions with respect to residual neurological function, dose-response observations made with somatosensory evoked responses, blood-spinal cord barrier tracers, and neurohistological and enzyme histochemical preparations, suggest that it will be possible to use this approach to develop a standardized, calibrated model in rabbits to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of spinal cord injury

  6. Intramedullary cavernous haemangioma of spinal cord: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thoracic myelography done showed bilateral symmetrical funnelling of the contrast at the level of T5 with widening of the spinal cord, which are typical characteristics of an intramedullary mass of spinal cord. T2-T6 Laminectomy was done. Near total excision of a 4 by 2.5 cm intradural, intramedulary bluish black, necrotic, ...

  7. Late effects of radiation on the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogel, A.J. van der.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes experiments concerned with the mechanisms of the development of late radiation damage in the spinal cord. Male rats were used in most of the experiments. The effects of 300 kV X-rays or 15 MeV neutrons were evaluated for different regions of the spinal cord. (Auth.)

  8. Prognosis in patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Larsen, Claus Falck

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 2321 patients consecutively admitted to one center and diagnosed with acute symptoms of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC).......A retrospective cohort study of 2321 patients consecutively admitted to one center and diagnosed with acute symptoms of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC)....

  9. An ovine model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Saul; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Miller, John W; Reddy, Chandan G; Safayi, Sina; Fredericks, Douglas C; Jeffery, Nicholas D; DeVries-Watson, Nicole A; Shivapour, Sara K; Viljoen, Stephanus; Dalm, Brian D; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Johnson, Michael D; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A

    2017-05-01

    To develop a large animal model of spinal cord injury (SCI), for use in translational studies of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the treatment of spasticity. We seek to establish thresholds for the SCS parameters associated with reduction of post-SCI spasticity in the pelvic limbs, with implications for patients. The weight-drop method was used to create a moderate SCI in adult sheep, leading to mild spasticity in the pelvic limbs. Electrodes for electromyography (EMG) and an epidural spinal cord stimulator were then implanted. Behavioral and electrophysiological data were taken during treadmill ambulation in six animals, and in one animal with and without SCS at 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.9 V. All surgical procedures were carried out at the University of Iowa. The gait measurements were made at Iowa State University. Nine adult female sheep were used in these institutionally approved protocols. Six of them were trained in treadmill ambulation prior to SCI surgeries, and underwent gait analysis pre- and post-SCI. Stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements were also made in conscious animals. Gait analysis revealed repeatable quantitative differences in 20% of the key kinematic parameters of the sheep, pre- and post-SCI. Hock joint angular velocity increased toward the normal pre-injury baseline in the animal with SCS at 0.9 V. The ovine model is workable as a large animal surrogate suitable for translational studies of novel SCS therapies aimed at relieving spasticity in patients with SCI.

  10. MRI in chronic spinal cord trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, W.L.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Kendall, B.E.; Moseley, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-seven patients aged 16-68 years have been examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following spinal injury. The MRI findings have been correlated with length of history between trauma and investigation, extent of residual function and site of injury. They include changes at the site of injury consistent with myelomalacia in 37%, a syrinx in 40%, persistent cord compression in 32% and atrophy in 18%. An extensive syrinx can develop within 2 months of injury and it is nearly twice as common in patients with complete paralysis as in those whose paralysis was incomplete. It is suggested that investigation and management of spinal trauma should include early and repeated MRI examinations to detect sequelae at an early stage. (orig.)

  11. Cavernous hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.M.; Lin, J.C.T.; Morris, J.H.; Fischer, E.G.; Petersen, R.

    1988-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a four-year history of progressive right-lower-extremity weakness and atrophy and a left hemisensory deficit was found. Metrizamide-enhanced spinal CT scan showed an intramedullary lesion at the level of T1-T2; this had expanded the cord in fusiform fashion but showed no evidence of a cystic component. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. Two and one-half years later, her left hemisensory deficit was worsening and a spinal MRI showed high signal intensity mass in the region of the previous surgery consistent with chronic hematoma which was re-evacuated with some improvement in the patient's neurological condition. (orig.)

  12. MRI diagnosis of acute spinal cord decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Yuan Fengmei; Ma Heng; Xu Yongzhong; Gai Qingzhu; Wang Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness. Methods: MRI findings of 5 cases with clinical definite acute spinal cord decompression sickness were retrospectively analyzed. The main clinical informations included underwater performance history against regulations, short-term complete or incomplete spinal cord injury symptoms after fast going out of water, sensory disability and urinary and fecal incontinence, etc. Results: Spinal cord vacuole sign was found in all 5 cases. Iso-signal intensity (n=3), high signal intensity (n=1), and low signal intensity (n=1) was demonstrated on T 1 WI, and high signal intensity (n=5) was found on T 2 WI. Owl eye sign was detected in 3 cases, and lacune foci were seen in 2 cases. Conclusion: MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness had some characteristics, and it was easy to diagnose by combining diving history with clinical manifestations. (authors)

  13. Sonographic evaluation of spinal cord birth trauma with pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyn, P S; Chuang, S H; Daneman, A; Davidson, G S

    1988-10-01

    Birth trauma to the spinal cord is a serious potential complication of delivery. Determining the presence, severity, and extent of injury poses a difficult problem because of the often confusing clinical setting. Myelography has been recommended for assessing spinal cord birth trauma but is invasive and may not be helpful. The role of sonography in evaluating spinal cord birth trauma has not been previously described. We assessed the value of sonography in four patients, three of whom also had CT metrizamide myelography. Autopsy correlation was available in three patients. Sonography was able to easily demonstrate the cord configuration, allowing for multiple assessments over time. Internal cord echogenicity was helpful in a case of hematomyelia and in demonstrating the changes of myelomalacia. Sonography is useful in evaluating neonates with severe spinal cord injury; it obviates the need for myelography and also may allow less severely injured patients to be assessed more frequently.

  14. Spinal cord stimulation therapy for localized central pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the pathophysiology of localized central pain and the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation. There were 10 cases; 7 males and 3 females from 24 to 77 years old. Pain was caused by peripheral nerve injury in one case, spinal cord injury in two cases and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (thalamic pain) in 7 cases. All cases were treated by epidural spinal cord stimulation and followed from 0.8 to 8.8 years. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in one case of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury and in 4 cases of CVD. Moderate pain control was achieved in 2 cases of CVD. In one each case of spinal cord injury and of CVD, pain control was ineffective. In cases with thalamic pain, we studied the correlation between the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation and the clinical features, MRI, fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) findings before operation. MRI revealed a small to moderate sized lesion on the thalamus or putamen in each case. PET also showed decreased accumulation of FDG on the affected thalamus. In all cases without one fair responder to spinal cord stimulation, we could recognize definite SEP originating in the sensory cortex ipsilateral side to the CVD lesion during contralateral median or posterior tibial nerve stimulation. In the good responders, we could recognize SEP originating in the sensory cortex of the lesion side with less delayed latency or decreased amplitude than in the moderate responders. In this group, test stimulation with low voltage on the spinal cord evoked a sensory effect (paresthesia) over the painful part of the body. Spinal cord stimulation proved to be an effective treatment for localized central pain. In cases with localized central pain after CVD, we could expect to ameliorate the intractable pain in those cases in which SEP or spinal cord test stimulation revealed that the thalamo-cortical system was preserved. (author)

  15. Assessment of in vivo spinal cord conduction velocity in rats in an experimental model of ischemic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, H; Kurtoglu, T; Cetin, N K; Bilgin, M D; Kiylioglu, N

    2013-08-01

    Experimental laboratory investigation of spinal cord conductivity alterations in a rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). To observe the epidural spinal cord stimulation-induced electromyography responses, and to investigate the possible alterations of spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) after ischemic SCI in rats. Adnan Menderes University, Institute of Health Science, Aydin, Turkey. SCI was induced by transient occlusion of the abdominal aorta in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Spinal cord histopathology was examined to determine neuronal damage and Tarlov scale was used to grade locomotor functions. Epidural electrical stimulation of spinal cord was performed by monopolar needle electrodes sequentially at L1-L2 and L5-L6 levels, and CMAPs were recorded from the left gastrocnemius muscle by surface electrodes. Amplitudes and durations of CMAPs were evaluated and SCCVs were calculated by analyzing the latency difference of CMAPs. Ischemia-induced SCI resulted in significant reduction of Tarlov scores and a significant decline in number of viable neurons. Similarly, a significant decrement was observed in SCCV following spinal cord ischemia. This study demonstrated that measurement of SCCV via epidural electrical stimulation is possible and displays a significant decline after spinal cord ischemia in rats. We suggest that this method can be beneficial to quantify neuronal damage after experimental ischemic SCI.

  16. Primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour in pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kyoko; Orisaka, Makoto; Yamamoto, Makoto; Nishijima, Koji; Yoshida, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Primary spinal cord tumours can lead to severe neurological complications and even death. Pregnant women often complain of discomfort of the lower limbs, which is usually caused by sciatica. Here we present the case of a pregnant woman, who was initially considered to have sciatica, but was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour. A 28-year-old pregnant woman presented to our hospital with inexplicable numbness in her lower limbs. She was initially considered to have sciatica, but acute deterioration of neurological symptoms and plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested malignancy. The patient was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour at the C3-Th5 region. An emergency caesarean section was performed, after which the spinal cord lesion was evaluated using contrast-enhanced MRI, positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-d-glucose integrated with computed tomography, and spinal angiography, and further treatment was initiated. However, while the patient's spinal cord tumour surgery was performed in early postpartum, her paraplegia and bladder and rectal disturbances remained unchanged even 1 year after surgery. Because of the low incidence of spinal cord tumours during pregnancy, no definite reports have been published on the treatment of pregnant patients with spinal cord tumours. Although safe imaging tests during pregnancy are limited, intervention in such patients should be performed as early as possible to avoid irreversible neurological deterioration.

  17. Ischemic Tolerance of the Brain and Spinal Cord: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Kanda, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Hirashita, Koji; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2017-11-15

    Ischemic tolerance is an endogenous neuroprotective phenomenon induced by sublethal ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), the first discovered form of ischemic tolerance, is widely seen in many species and in various organs including the brain and the spinal cord. Ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord is less familiar among neurosurgeons, although it has been reported from the viewpoint of preventing ischemic spinal cord injury during aortic surgery. It is important for neurosurgeons to have opportunities to see patients with spinal cord ischemia, and to understand ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord as well as the brain. IPC has a strong neuroprotective effect in animal models of ischemia; however, clinical application of IPC for ischemic brain and spinal diseases is difficult because they cannot be predicted. In addition, one drawback of preconditioning stimuli is that they are also capable of producing injury with only minor changes to their intensity or duration. Numerous methods to induce ischemic tolerance have been discovered that vary in their timing and the site at which short-term ischemia occurs. These methods include ischemic postconditioning (IPoC), remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPoC), which has had a great impact on clinical approaches to treatment of ischemic brain and spinal cord injury. Especially RIPerC and RIPoC to induce spinal cord tolerance are considered clinically useful, however the evidence supporting these methods is currently insufficient; further experimental or clinical research in this area is thus necessary.

  18. [Acute traumatic spinal cord injuries: Epidemiology and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, N; Perrin, F E; Lonjon, M; Fattal, C; Segnarbieux, F; Privat, A; Bauchet, L

    2012-10-01

    Specify the epidemiological data on the acute spinal cord injuries and define a group of patients that could benefit from cellular transplantation therapy designed with the aim of repair and regeneration of damaged spinal cord tissues. Five years monocentric (Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France) retrospective analysis of patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal cord injured-patients, defined as sensory-motor complete, underwent a clinical evaluation following American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and functional type 2 Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM2) scorings as well as radiological evaluation through spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and fifty-seven medical records were reviewed and we selected and re-examined 20 patients with complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. Clinical and radiological evaluations of these patients demonstrated, in 75 % of the cases, an absence of clinical progression after a mean of 49months. Radiological abnormalities were constantly present in the initial (at the admission to hospital) and control (re-evaluation) MRI and no reliable predictive criteria of prognosis had been found. We compare our results to the literature and discuss advantages and limits of cellular transplantation strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Utility of MR imaging in pediatric spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsberg, G.J.; Tien, R.D.; Osumi, A.K.; Cardenas, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of MR imaging in pediatric patients with acute and subacute spinal cord injuries. MR imaging of 22 pediatric patients with suspected traumatic spinal cord injuries was reviewed. MR findings were correlated with physical examination and compared to available radiographs and CT examinations performed at time of presentation. Twelve patients had abnormalities on MR imaging. Seven had spinal cord contusions; five contusions were hemorrhagic. Five of seven patients with cord contusion had normal radiographs and CT exams. Six patients with normal radiographs and CT examinations had abnormal MR studies revealing cord contusion, ligamentous injury, disc herniation, and epidural hematoma. MR is useful in initial evaluation of pediatric patients with spinal cord injuries and in prognosis of future neurologic function. In the setting of spinal cord symptomatology and negative radiographic studies, MR imaging should be performed. Surgically correctable causes of cord compression demonstrated by MR imaging include disc herniation, epidural hematoma, and retropulsed fracture fragments. The entity of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality is a diagnosis of exclusion which should only be made after radiologic investigation with radiographs, high-resolution thin-section CT, and MR imaging. (orig.)

  20. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

  1. Corporeal illusions in chronic spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandola, Michele; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Avesani, Renato; Bertagnoni, Gianettore; Marangoni, Anna; Moro, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    While several studies have investigated corporeal illusions in patients who have suffered from a stroke or undergone an amputation, only anecdotal or single case reports have explored this phenomenon after spinal cord injury. Here we examine various different types of bodily misperceptions in a comparatively large group of 49 people with spinal cord injury in the post-acute and chronic phases after the traumatic lesion onset. An extensive battery of questionnaires concerning a variety of body related feelings was administered and the results were correlated to the main clinical variables. Six different typologies of Corporeal Illusion emerged: Sensations of Body Loss; Body-Part Misperceptions; Somatoparaphrenia-like sensations; Disownership-like sensations; Illusory motion and Misoplegia. All of these (with the exception of Misoplegia) are modulated by clinical variables such as pain (visceral, neuropathic and musculoskeletal), completeness of the lesion, level of the lesion and the length of time since lesion onset. In contrast, no significant correlations between bodily illusions and personality variables were found. These results support data indicating that at least some cognitive functions (in particular the body, action and space representations) are embodied and that somatosensory input and motor output may be necessary to build and maintain a typical self-body representation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to relieve...

  3. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Huie, J Russell; Crown, Eric D; Grau, James W

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome) learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training). Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection). Because formalin-induced central sensitization has been shown to involve NMDA receptor activation, we tested whether pre-treatment with NMDA would also affect spinal learning in manner similar to formalin. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24 h. These

  4. From the Rodent Spinal Cord Injury Model to Human Application: Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Volker; Schwab, Martin E

    2017-05-01

    Repair of the spinal cord and improvement of mobility after injury has been a matter of basic and clinical research for several decades. A number of repair approaches were performed in animals, mainly rodent models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Some of these experimental therapies resulted in significant regeneration of tract fibers, formation of new connections and circuits, and associated improvement of mobility. Some clinical trials aiming at translating these approaches to the human condition of an SCI are currently on-going. The present therapy, however, remains rehabiliation: Mobility of patients with an SCI can be improved to a limited extent by the exploition of neuroplasticity. In this article the present state of the art in the field of SCI research will be discussed. Studies dealing with the promotion of spinal cord repair and those directed to improve mobility by exploition of neuroplasticity will be summarized. The promises and challenges of translational basic research in rodent SCI models will be presented.

  5. Sleep disordered breathing in spinal cord injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Anthony E; Sitrin, Robert G; Bauman, Kristy A

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury commonly results in neuromuscular weakness that impacts respiratory function. This would be expected to be associated with an increased likelihood of sleep-disordered breathing. (1) Understand the incidence and prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in spinal cord injury. (2) Understand the relationship between injury and patient characteristics and the incidence of sleep disordered breathing in spinal cord injury. (3) Distinguish between obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea incidence in spinal cord injury. (4) Clarify the relationship between sleep disordered breathing and stroke, myocardial infarction, metabolic dysfunction, injuries, autonomic dysreflexia and spasticity incidence in persons with spinal cord injury. (5) Understand treatment tolerance and outcome in persons with spinal cord injury and sleep disordered breathing. Extensive database search including PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Web of Science. Given the current literature limitations, sleep disordered breathing as currently defined is high in patients with spinal cord injury, approaching 60% in motor complete persons with tetraplegia. Central apnea is more common in patients with tetraplegia than in patients with paraplegia. Early formal sleep study in patients with acute complete tetraplegia is recommended. In patients with incomplete tetraplegia and with paraplegia, the incidence of sleep-disordered breathing is significantly higher than the general population. With the lack of correlation between symptoms and SDB, formal study would be reasonable. There is insufficient evidence in the literature on the impact of treatment on morbidity, mortality and quality of life outcomes.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  7. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  8. Medication before and after a spinal cord lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Elmo K; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2014-01-01

    for each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System group were registered for all patients, who were discharged from Department for Spinal Cord Injuries during 2010. The changes in medication per se were calculated for different parts of the population: non-traumatic, traumatic patients......OBJECTIVE: To map the impact of spinal cord lesion (SCL) on medication. STUDY DESIGN: Registration of medication for 72 patients before SCL and at discharge from the Department for Spinal Cord Injuries. SETTING: Department for Spinal Cord Injuries, East Denmark. METHODS: The changes in medication......, men, women, paraplegia, tetraplegia, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A, B or C, AIS D, age 0-45, 46-60 and 60+. In addition, comparisons of changes in medication were made between complementary parts of the population. RESULTS: The overall increase in medication after SCL...

  9. Clinical and imaging findings in spinal cord arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Dong Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Jeon, Pyoung; Ihn, Yeon Kwon

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and selective spinal angiography of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (SCAVMs) and to investigate the correlation of these findings with the development of clinical symptoms. In 16 patients diagnosed as suffering from SCAVMs, MR imaging and selective spinal angiograms were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with clinical symptoms. Clinical data were reviewed, especially concerning the mode of onset of clinical symptoms, and MR images of SCAVMs were evaluated with regard to the following parameters: spinal cord swelling with T2 hyperintensity, cord atrophy, intramedullary hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement of the spinal cord. Selective spinal angiographic findings of SCAVMs were also evaluated in terms of the following , parameters: type of SCAVM, presence of aneurysms, and patterns of venous drainage. Imaging findings were also correlated with the development of clinical symptoms. Systematic evaluation of the findings of MR imaging and angiography provides detailed information on the type of AVM and status of the spinal cord parenchyma, and this can be correlated with clinical manifestations of SCAVM. In patients suffering from this condition, spinal cord dysfunction due to venous congestion appears to be the main cause of clinical symptoms. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  10. Transient Spinal Cord Ischemia as Presenting Manifestation of Polycythemia Vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal arterial vascularization is supplied by a large anastomotic net, making spinal ischemic events far less common than ischemic cerebral strokes. Polycythemia vera, due to blood hyperviscosity and activated platelet aggregation, is associated with a higher risk of arterial and venous thrombotic events. We report a patient with spinal cord transient ischemic attacks, a rarely presenting manifestation, and polycythemia vera, which highlights the thrombotic potential of this disease, and the requirement of exhaustive diagnostic workout of a spinal ischemic event.

  11. Making sense out of spinal cord somatosensory development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Rebecca P.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal cord integrates and relays somatosensory input, leading to complex motor responses. Research over the past couple of decades has identified transcription factor networks that function during development to define and instruct the generation of diverse neuronal populations within the spinal cord. A number of studies have now started to connect these developmentally defined populations with their roles in somatosensory circuits. Here, we review our current understanding of how neuronal diversity in the dorsal spinal cord is generated and we discuss the logic underlying how these neurons form the basis of somatosensory circuits. PMID:27702783

  12. Propitious Therapeutic Modulators to Prevent Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption in Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Ropper, Alexander E; Lee, Soo-Hong; Han, Inbo

    2017-07-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a specialized protective barrier that regulates the movement of molecules between blood vessels and the spinal cord parenchyma. Analogous to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BSCB plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis and internal environmental stability of the central nervous system (CNS). After spinal cord injury (SCI), BSCB disruption leads to inflammatory cell invasion such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. In this review, we focus on the major proteins mediating the BSCB disruption or BSCB repair after SCI. This review is composed of three parts. Section 1. SCI and the BSCB of the review describes critical events involved in the pathophysiology of SCI and their correlation with BSCB integrity/disruption. Section 2. Major proteins involved in BSCB disruption in SCI focuses on the actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), angiopoietins (Angs), bradykinin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelins (ETs) in BSCB disruption and repair. Section 3. Therapeutic approaches discusses the major therapeutic compounds utilized to date for the prevention of BSCB disruption in animal model of SCI through modulation of several proteins.

  13. Cervical Spinal Cord Compression: A Rare Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chime, Chukwunonso; Arjun, Shiva; Reddy, Pavithra; Niazi, Masooma

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of liver. Distant metastasis to various organs is well known. Skeletal metastasis is also reported to various locations. Vertebral metastasis has been reported mostly to thoracic spine. However, cervical spinal cord involvement leading to cord compression has been reported very rarely in literature. We present a case of 58-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting as neck pain. Further work-up revealed metastatic HCC to cervical spinal cord resulting in acute cord compression. Patient has been treated with neurosurgical intervention. PMID:28299213

  14. The Protective Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation Postconditioning Against Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huixian; Dong, Xiuhua; Jin, Mu; Cheng, Weiping

    2018-01-18

    Delayed paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) remains one of the most severe complications of thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery, for which effective prevention and treatment is still lacking. The current study investigates whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) postconditioning has neuroprotective effects against spinal cord IRI. Ninety-six New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups as follows: a sham group and three experimental groups (C group, 2 Hz group, and 50 Hz group) n = 24/group. Spinal cord ischemia was induced by transient infrarenal aortic balloon occlusion for 28 min, after which rabbits in group C underwent no additional intervention, while rabbits in the other two experimental groups underwent 2 Hz or 50 Hz epidural SCS for 30 min at the onset of reperfusion and then daily until sacrifice. Hind limb neurologic function of rabbits was assessed using Jacob scale. Lumbar spinal cords were harvested immediately after sacrifice for histological examination and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The number of viable α-motor neurons in ventral horn was counted and TUNEL-positive rate of α-motor neurons was calculated. Spinal cord IRI was caused by transient infrarenal aorta occlusion for 28 min. Both 2 Hz and 50 Hz SCS postconditioning had neuroprotective effects, particularly the 2 Hz SCS postconditioning. Comparing to C group and 50 Hz group, rabbits in the 2 Hz group demonstrated better hind limb motor function and a lower rate of TUNEL-positive α-motor neuron after eight hours, one day, three days, and seven days of spinal cord reperfusion. More viable α-motor neurons were preserved after one and three days of spinal cord reperfusion in 2 Hz group rabbits than in C group and 50 Hz group rabbits. SCS postconditioning at 2 Hz protected the spinal cord from IRI. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Spinal cord injury, immunodepression, and antigenic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Katherine S; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    The inability to effectively control microbial infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Available evidence from clinical studies as well as animal models of SCI demonstrate that increased susceptibility to infection is derived from disruption of central nervous system (CNS) communication with the host immune system that ultimately leads to immunodepression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing muted cellular and humoral responses that occur post-injury resulting in impaired host defense following infection is critical for improving the overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. This review focuses on studies performed using preclinical animal models of SCI to evaluate how injury impacts T and B lymphocyte responses following either viral infection or antigenic challenge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spinal cord injury and outdoor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Almut

    2004-03-01

    Anecdotal evidence from spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation clients suggests that nature experiences and outdoor pursuits are valued ingredients in a SCI rehabilitation program, in particular for those individuals who were outdoor enthusiasts pre-injury and/or who sustained their injury during outdoor pursuits. Model SCI centres in North America offer outdoor activities as components of SCI rehabilitation. A literature review on the effects and dynamics of nature experiences and outdoor pursuits in SCI rehabilitation and adjustment reveals a lacuna of empirical research in this area. Studies on leisure and recreation following SCI offer insights into how non-vocational rehabilitation activities assist functional independence, quality of life, and community re-integration. Systematic research is needed to ascertain the value and contribution of outdoor experiences in SCI rehabilitation; further, research is needed to document how contact with 'blue-green nature' may assist in the identity reconstruction process and in adjustment to life with a physical disability.

  18. Parents with a spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasul, A; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional questionnaire. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to describe the impact of parenting young children with a spinal cord injury (SCI) on various life situations (for example, personal, vocational and social). SETTING: Community; Denmark. METHODS......: A postal survey was designed to collect data in persons with SCI regarding the following: (1) socio-demographics, injury characteristics and parental status; (2) employment status; (3) environmental adjustments to support parenting roles; (4) childcare institution use and experiences; (5) network support...... for parenting; and (6) parenting advice for others. RESULTS: A total of 62 persons (58% men) responded to the survey, with 56% having paraplegia and 44% having tetraplegia. The majority of men (83%) and women (62%) were employed during the first 10 years of their child's lives. Half of the sample (50%) did...

  19. Urinary calculi following traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Bølling; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Kristensen, Jørgen Kvist

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the time aspect of the development of renal and bladder calculi in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and a possible relation between the development of calculi and the bladder-emptying method. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised a retrospective data...... calculus was highest within the first 6 months post-injury. The cumulative proportion of calculi-free participants 45 years post-injury was 62% for renal calculi and 85% for bladder calculi. For participants who did not develop renal calculi within the first 2 years post-injury, the risk of having a renal...... calculi was higher in the SCI population compared to the normal population. Bladder calculi primarily occur early post-injury and renal calculi appear both early post-injury and years later. Therefore, it is important to follow individuals with SCI regularly by means of urological investigations from...

  20. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVES: To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1......) contained original data (2) on cardiac arrhythmias (3) in humans with (4) traumatic SCI. RESULTS: In the acute phase of SCI (1-14 days after injury) more cranial as well as more severe injuries seemed to increase the incidence of bradycardia. Articles not covering the first 14 days after injury, thus...... as during procedures such as penile vibro-stimulation and tracheal suction. These episodes of bradycardia were seen more often in individuals with cervical injuries. Longitudinal studies with continuous electrocardiogram recordings are needed to uncover the true relation between cardiac arrhythmias and SCI....

  1. MRI EVALUATION OF SPINAL CORD TUMOURS WITH HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Srikar Chowdhary

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord tumours are relatively rare tumours and can present with a wide variety of symptoms. If they are not diagnosed early and treated immediately, they can lead to neurological deficits and disability. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary, which will help in directing the therapy. Nowadays, MRI is the most commonly used modality for spinal cord tumour diagnosis unless there is a contraindication. The aim of this study was to study the demographic profile of patients with spinal cord tumours to assess the distribution, features, localisation and extent of spinal cord tumours by MRI and correlate the tissue characterisation by MRI with that of histopathological examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted in the Departments of Radiodiagnosis, Neurosurgery and Pathology at SCBMCH, Cuttack, from October 2010 to October 2012. 52 patients diagnosed as having spinal cord tumours by clinical examination and MRI were followed till post-surgery discharge. RESULTS Out of the 52 patients with spinal cord tumours, 28 patients (54% were males and females made up around 46% (24 patients. Around 6% of the patients were in the paediatric age group. Our study showed that intradural extramedullary tumours 36/52 (69% were the commonest followed by intramedullary tumours 10/52 (19% and extradural tumours 6/52 (12%. Overall, schwannoma was the commonest spinal cord tumour accounting for 46.1% of the tumours. Out of 52 cases, MRI diagnosed 46 cases (88.46% correctly and misdiagnosed 6 cases. MRI was able to correctly diagnose 91.67% of the intradural extramedullary tumours, 90% of the intramedullary tumours and 66.67% of the extradural tumours. CONCLUSION MRI is the preoperative investigation of choice in the evaluation of spinal cord tumours. MRI can accurately diagnose spinal tumours and guide surgical resection.

  2. Gd-DTPA MR imaging enhancement of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, W.P.; Bolla, K.; Mark, A.S.; Tsudura, J.S.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen patients with suspected spinal cord tumors were imaged with T1- and T2-weighted sequences before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Eleven of the 19 patients had spinal cord tumors (three unproven). Eight of 11 patients had intramedullary tumors (four astrocytomas, two ependymomas) and two had extra-medullary tumors (one meningioma, one metastatic melanoma). Other lesions studied include idiopathic syringomyelia (two), spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (one), posttraumatic arachnoiditis (one), and cord infarct (one). All of the tumors enhanced after the administration of Gd-DTPA. Spinal cord enhancement was also noted in association with a spinal cord AVM, a suspected cord infarct, and in the patient with severe arachnoiditis. No enhancement was present in patients with idiopathic or posttraumatic syringomyelia or in the three normal patients. In six of the patients, enhancement was critical in confirming disease that was questionable on the precontrast MR images. Gadolinium enhancement allowed differentiation of tumor from postoperative changes in two patients with spinal cord tumors. Enhanced images localized the lesion more accurately than precontrast MR images in eight patients. In four patients a lesion could only be detected after the administration of contrast. The postcontrast images better defined the margin of tumor from surrounding edema, operative scarring, and cord cavitation. The AVM case had enhancement of slowly flowing veins with Gd-DTPA posterior to an ischemic cord segment. Gd-DTPA enhancement is extremely useful in the detection and therapeutic assessment of spinal cord tumors; however, enhancement is not specific for tumors and should be interpreted in light of the clinical setting

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  4. Women's Sex Life After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramkova, Tatana; Skrivanova, Katerina; Dolan, Igor; Zamecnik, Libor; Sramkova, Katerina; Kriz, Jiri; Muzik, Vladimir; Fajtova, Radmila

    2017-12-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), individuals are typically considered by the general public to be asexual. Handicapped women have more problems with socio-sexual adaptation, stemming from low self-confidence, low self-esteem, and the absence of spontaneity. To determine changes in the sexual lives of women after SCI. A self-constructed questionnaire was used to map sexual function after SCI. We retrospectively compared sexual function in 30 women with SCI with that in 30 without SCI who led an active sexual life. Descriptive and inductive statistics were applied using the Student paired and non-paired t-tests and the Levene test. The main variables were presence vs absence of sexual dysfunction in a group of women after SCI and a comparison of the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in women after SCI with that of a control group. A significant difference was ascertained in women with SCI in sexual desire (P negative impact of incontinence on the sexual life of women with SCI proved significant (P Negative factors for sexual activity in women with SCI were lower sensitivity in 16 (53%), spasms and mobility problems in 12 (40%), lower desire in 11 (36%), pain in 4 (13%), and a less accommodating partner in 3 (10%). Intercourse was the preferred sexual activity in women with SCI. Compared with the period before injury, there was significant lowering of sexual desire, impaired lubrication, and orgasmic ability after SCI. A comparison of the two groups showed a difference in erotogenous zones and in reaching orgasm. Sramkova T, Skrivanova K, Dolan I, et al. Women's Sex Life After Spinal Cord Injury. Sex Med 2017;5:e255-e259. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Care of post-traumatic spinal cord injury patients in India: An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spinal cord injured patients if congregated early in spinal units where better facilities and dedicated expert care exist the outcome of treatment and rehabilitation, can be improved. The objective of this study is to find out the various factors responsible for a delay in the presentation of spinal injury patients to the specialized spinal trauma units and to suggest steps to improve the quality of care of the spinal trauma patients in the Indian setup. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of traumatic spinal cord injury admitted for rehabilitation between August 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled into the study and their data was analyzed. Results: Eighty-five per cent of the spinal cord injured patients were males and the mean age was 34 years (range 13-56 years. Twenty-nine (48.33% of the spinal injuries occurred due to fall from height. There was an average of 45 days (range 0-188 days of delay in presentation to a specialized spinal unit and most of the time the cause for the delay was unawareness on the part of patients and/or doctors regarding specialized spinal units. In 38 (62.5% cases the mode of transportation of the spinal cord injured patient to the first visited hospital was by their own conveyance and the attendants of the patients did not have any idea about precautions essential to prevent neurological deterioration. Seventeen (28.33% patients were given injection solumedrol with conservative treatment, 35 (60% patients were given only conservative treatment and seven patients were operated (11.66% upon at initially visited hospital. Of the seven patients operated five were fixed with posterior Harrington instrumentation (71.42% and two (28.57% were operated by short segment posterior pedicle screw fixation. None of the patients were subjected to physiotherapy-assisted transfers or wheel chair skills or even basic postural training, proper bladder/ bowel training program and sitting balance. Conclusion: Awareness

  6. What are the Causes of Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  7. Postmortem MRI of the spinal cord in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, M.; Ogawa, M.; Yamauchi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spinal cord and the brainstem in a patient with multiple sclerosis are compared with the histopathological findings. Abnormal high signal intensity areas on T2-weighted images correspond precisely to demyelinated areas. (orig.)

  8. Restoring voluntary control of locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brand, Rubia; Heutschi, Janine; Barraud, Quentin; DiGiovanna, Jack; Bartholdi, Kay; Huerlimann, Michèle; Friedli, Lucia; Vollenweider, Isabel; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Duis, Simone; Dominici, Nadia; Micera, Silvestro; Musienko, Pavel; Courtine, Grégoire

    2012-01-01

    Half of human spinal cord injuries lead to chronic paralysis. Here, we introduce an electrochemical neuroprosthesis and a robotic postural interface designed to encourage supraspinally mediated movements in rats with paralyzing lesions. Despite the interruption of direct supraspinal pathways, the

  9. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...

  10. Sensory and Motor Responses to Spinal Cord Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yezierski, Robert P

    1999-01-01

    The goal of Dr. Yezierski's research was to gain a better understanding of the anatomical, neurochemical and functional changes that occur within the central nervous system following spinal cord injury...

  11. Neuropathic pain and spasticity: intricate consequences of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The 2016 International Spinal Cord Society Sir Ludwig Guttmann Lecture. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to identify different symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to present different methods of assessing them. The objective......', 'neuropathic', 'spasticity', 'spasms' and 'spinal cord injury'. RESULTS: This review identified different domains of neuropathic pain and spasticity after SCI and methods to assess them in preclinical and clinical research. Different factors important for pain description include location, onset, pain...... of SCI, and a careful examination and characterization of the symptoms and signs, are a prerequisite for understanding the relationship between neuropathic pain and spasticity and the intricate underlying mechanisms.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/sc.2017.70....

  12. Modeling the neuroanatomic propagation of ALS in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawert, Brian; Thakore, Nimish; Mitchell, Brian; Pioro, Erik; Ravits, John; Petzold, Linda R.

    2017-07-01

    Recent hypotheses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) progression have posited a point-source origin of motor neuron death with neuroanatomic propagation either contiguously to adjacent regions, or along networks via axonal and synaptic connections. Although the molecular mechanisms of propagation are unknown, one leading hypothesis is a "prion-like" spread of misfolded and aggregated proteins, including SOD1 and TDP-43. We have developed a mathematical model representing cellular and molecular spread of ALS in the human spinal cord. Our model is based on the stochastic reaction-diffusion master equation approach using a tetrahedral discretized space to capture the complex geometry of the spinal cord. Domain dimension and shape was obtained by reconstructing human spinal cord from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images and known gross and histological neuroanatomy. Our preliminary results qualitatively recapitulate the clinically observed pattern of spread of ALS thorough the spinal cord.

  13. MR imaging of stable posttraumatic spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, I.F.; Hoffman, J.C. Jr.; Murphy, C.; Davis, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts have been thought to be infrequent sequelae of spinal trauma. To evaluate the incidence of spinal cord abnormalities in patients who have previously sustained cord trauma, the authors studied the incidence of these changes in clinically stable patients following injury. Twenty-five patients with a history of previous cord injury and stable neurologic status volunteered for MR imaging studies. Studies performed using a 0.5-T and 1.5-T unit revealed focal kinking of the cord at the trauma site as well as intramedullary hypointense areas on T1-weighted images in most volunteers. There was close clinical correlation between MR imaging findings and experimental pathologic data, which suggests that these lesions are much more prevalent than once thought

  14. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  15. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  16. Robust, accurate and fast automatic segmentation of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Kadoury, Samuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord segmentation provides measures of atrophy and facilitates group analysis via inter-subject correspondence. Automatizing this procedure enables studies with large throughput and minimizes user bias. Although several automatic segmentation methods exist, they are often restricted in terms of image contrast and field-of-view. This paper presents a new automatic segmentation method (PropSeg) optimized for robustness, accuracy and speed. The algorithm is based on the propagation of a deformable model and is divided into three parts: firstly, an initialization step detects the spinal cord position and orientation using a circular Hough transform on multiple axial slices rostral and caudal to the starting plane and builds an initial elliptical tubular mesh. Secondly, a low-resolution deformable model is propagated along the spinal cord. To deal with highly variable contrast levels between the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid, the deformation is coupled with a local contrast-to-noise adaptation at each iteration. Thirdly, a refinement process and a global deformation are applied on the propagated mesh to provide an accurate segmentation of the spinal cord. Validation was performed in 15 healthy subjects and two patients with spinal cord injury, using T1- and T2-weighted images of the entire spinal cord and on multiecho T2*-weighted images. Our method was compared against manual segmentation and against an active surface method. Results show high precision for all the MR sequences. Dice coefficients were 0.9 for the T1- and T2-weighted cohorts and 0.86 for the T2*-weighted images. The proposed method runs in less than 1min on a normal computer and can be used to quantify morphological features such as cross-sectional area along the whole spinal cord. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spinal cord injury and male infertility: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Finger, Guilherme; Souza, Olívia Egger de; Pasqualotto, Fabio Firmbach

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries remain an important factor of morbimortality in current society, involving mainly males from adolescence to adulthood. Among the sequelae caused by spinal cord injuries, the impairment of the sexual system is highly relevant since it affects the quality of sexual life and paternity. Infertility is secondary to multiple events such as erectile dysfunction, anejaculation, seminal biochemical modification and morphology of spermatozoa. Current therapies for the infertile spi...

  18. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord...... lesions in rodents and that the fibers remain several months after injury. The findings of tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactivity in the axons suggest that descending central fibers contribute to this endogenous repair of ischemic spinal cord injury....

  19. Spinal Cord Subependymoma Surgery : A Multi-Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Woon Tak; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2018-03-01

    A spinal cord subependymoma is an uncommon, indolent, benign spinal cord tumor. It is radiologically similar to a spinal cord ependymoma, but surgical findings and outcomes differ. Gross total resection of the tumor is not always feasible. The present study was done to determine the clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of spinal cord subependymomas. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of ten spinal cord subependymoma patients (M : F=4 : 6; median 38 years; range, 21-77) from four institutions. The most common symptoms were sensory changes and/or pain in eight patients, followed by motor weakness in six. The median duration of symptoms was 9.5 months. Preoperative radiological diagnosis was ependymoma in seven and astrocytoma in three. The tumors were located eccentrically in six and were not enhanced in six. Gross total resection of the tumor was achieved in five patients, whereas subtotal or partial resection was inevitable in the other five patients due to a poor dissection plane. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed in two patients. Neurological deterioration occurred in two patients; transient weakness in one after subtotal resection and permanent weakness after gross total resection in the other. Recurrence or regrowth of the tumor was not observed during the median 31.5 months follow-up period (range, 8-89). Spinal cord subependymoma should be considered when the tumor is located eccentrically and is not dissected easily from the spinal cord. Considering the rather indolent nature of spinal cord subependymomas, subtotal removal without the risk of neurological deficit is another option.

  20. Physiological, anatomical and genetic identification of CPG neurons in the developing mammalian spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Butt, Simon J.B.

    2003-01-01

    . These latter experiments have defined EphA4 as a molecular marker for mammalian excitatory hindlimb CPG neurons. We also review genetic approaches that can be applied to the mouse spinal cord. These include methods for identifying sub-populations of neurons by genetically encoded reporters, techniques to trace...... network connectivity with cell-specific genetically encoded tracers, and ways to selectively ablate or eliminate neuron populations from the CPG. We propose that by applying a multidisciplinary approach it will be possible to understand the network structure of the mammalian locomotor CPG......The basic motor patterns underlying rhythmic limb movements during locomotion are generated by neuronal networks located within the spinal cord. These networks are called Central Pattern Generators (CPGs). Isolated spinal cord preparations from newborn rats and mice have become increasingly...

  1. The effect of spinal osteotomies on spinal cord tension and dural buckling: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safain, Mina G; Burke, Shane M; Riesenburger, Ron I; Zerris, Vasilios; Hwang, Steven W

    2015-07-01

    The standard surgical release of a tethered cord may result in recurrent scar formation and occasionally be associated with retethering. The application of spinal shortening procedures to this challenging problem potentially can reduce tension on the retethered spinal cord while minimizing the difficulties inherent in traditional lumbosacral detethering revision. Although spinal shortening procedures have proven clinical benefit in patients with a recurrent tethered cord, it is unclear how much shortening is required to achieve adequate reduction in spinal cord tension or what impact these osteotomies have on dural buckling. The authors calculated mean values from 4 human cadavers to evaluate the effect of 3 different spinal shortening procedures--Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO), pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO), and vertebral column resection (VCR)--on spinal cord tension and dural buckling. Three cadavers were dedicated to the measurement of spinal cord tension, and 3 other cadavers were devoted to myelography to measure dural buckling parameters. The SPO was associated with a maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 16.1% from baseline and no dural buckling with any degree of closure. The PSO led to a mean maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 63.1% from baseline at 12 mm of closure and demonstrated a direct linear relationship between dural buckling and increasing osteotomy closure. Finally, VCR closure correlated with a mean maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 87.2% from baseline at 10 mm of closure and also showed a direct linear relationship between dural buckling and increases in osteotomy closure. In this cadaveric experiment, the SPO did not lead to appreciable tension reduction, while a substantial response was seen with both the PSO and VCR. The rate of tension reduction may be steeper for the VCR than the PSO. Adequate tension relief while minimizing dural buckling may be optimal with 12-16 mm of posterior osteotomy closure based on

  2. Regional differences in radiosensitivity across the rat cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study regional differences in radiosensitivity within the rat cervical spinal cord. Methods and materials: Three types of inhomogeneous dose distributions were applied to compare the radiosensitivity of the lateral and central parts of the rat cervical spinal cord. The left lateral half of the spinal cord was irradiated with two grazing proton beams, each with a different penumbra (20-80% isodoses): lateral wide (penumbra = 1.1 mm) and lateral tight (penumbra = 0.8 mm). In the third experiment, the midline of the cord was irradiated with a narrow proton beam with a penumbra of 0.8 mm. The irradiated spinal cord length (CT-2) was 20 mm in all experiments. The animals were irradiated with variable single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) with the shoot-through method, whereby the plateau of the depth-dose profile is used rather than the Bragg peak. The endpoint for estimating isoeffective dose (ED 50 ) values was paralysis of fore and/or hind limbs within 210 days after irradiation. Histology of the spinal cords was performed to assess the radiation-induced tissue damage. Results: High-precision proton irradiation of the lateral or the central part of the spinal cord resulted in a shift of dose-response curves to higher dose values compared with the homogeneously irradiated cervical cord to the same 20-mm length. The ED 50 values were 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy for the lateral wide and lateral tight irradiations, respectively, and as high as 71.9 Gy for the central beam experiment, compared with 20.4 Gy for the homogeneously irradiated 20-mm length of cervical cord. Histologic analysis of the spinal cords showed that the paralysis was due to white matter necrosis. The radiosensitivity was inhomogeneously distributed across the spinal cord, with a much more radioresistant central white matter (ED 50 = 71.9 Gy) compared with lateral white matter (ED 50 values = 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy). The gray matter did not show any noticeable lesions, such as necrosis or

  3. SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION DUE TO TUMOURS AT KENYATTA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION DUE TO TUMOURS AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL,. NAIROBI. N.J.M. MWANG'OMBE and M.B. OUMA. ABSTRACT. Objective: To determine the frequency of different types of tumours associated with cord compression, their mode of presentation and treatment ...

  4. Contrast enhancement of the irradiated spinal cord in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.; Fitz, C.R.; Chuang, S.; Armstrong, E.

    1981-01-01

    Four children are reported in whom marked contrast enhancement of the spinal cord and roots was demonstrated by computed tomography months to years after relatively low dose therapeutic irradiation of paraspinal tumors, the radiation field including the cord. This phenomenon, previously unreported, probably represents subclinical radiation injury. None of the children had any neurologic abnormalities

  5. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  6. Changes in activity after a complete spinal cord injury as measured by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II)

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth, B; van Hedel, H J A; Kometer, B; Dietz, V; Curt, A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of rehabilitation efficacy in spinal cord injury (SCI) should be based on a combination of neurological and functional outcome measures. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II) is an independence scale that was specifically developed for subjects with SCI. However, little is known about the changes in SCIM II scores during and after rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in functional recovery during the first year after...

  7. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Motor Dysfuntion in Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Motor Dysfuntion in Spinal. Cord Injury Rats. Chong Xun, Shouyu Wang, Guang Chen, Yang Hu, Jiaqi Xie and Decheng Lv*. Department of ... Purpose: To evaluate the effect of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) treatment on the motor function of spinal ... China. All the animals were housed at 25 °C in.

  8. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirshblum, S C; Biering-Sorensen, F; Betz, R

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine the levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury...

  9. How plastic are human spinal cord motor circuitries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Perez, Monica A

    2017-01-01

    Human and animal studies have documented that neural circuitries in the spinal cord show adaptive changes caused by altered supraspinal and/or afferent input to the spinal circuitry in relation to learning, immobilization, injury and neurorehabilitation. Reversible adaptations following, e...

  10. Computed tomography in the treatment of cervical spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical and thoracic spinal column was carried out in 12 patients of spinal cord tumor. There were 6 schwannomas, 2 metastatic tumors and other 4 cases of different tumors, which were studied by either a General Electric CT/T or a Toshiba TCT 60 Type A scanner. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. The usefulness of the plain spinal CT (PCT: CT without any contrast enhancement neither intravenously nor intrathecally) was to detect subtle bony changes as well as paraspinal soft tissue abnormalities, although it was hard to distinguish the spinal cord by PCT. Metrizamide CT myelography (CTM: CT with intrathecal instillation of metrizamide) was indispensable to identify the intracanalicular architecture. It provided the clue to determine the site and the size of tumor, and it was also useful after surgical procedure. CTM with intravenous contrast enhancement (CTM-CE) together with CTM distinguished the spinal tumor from the spinal cord very well, particularly in the cases of schwannoma. The author supports significant reliability of PCT, CTM and CTM-CE in identifying the presence, the extension and the bony involvement of spinal cord tumors. (author)

  11. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirshblum, S C; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Betz, R

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association...

  12. Spinal Cord Doses in Palliative Lung Radiotherapy Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ffrrcsi, F.H.; Parton, C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We aim to check the safety of the standard palliative radiotherapy techniques by using the Linear quadratic model for a careful estimation of the doses received by the spinal cord, in all standard palliative lung radiotherapy fields and fractionation. Material and Methods: All patients surveyed at this prospective audit were treated with palliative chest radio-therapy for lung cancer over a period from January to June 2005 by different clinical oncology specialists within the department. Radiotherapy field criteria were recorded and compared with the recommended limits of the MRC trial protocols for the dose and fractionation prescribed. Doses delivered to structures off the field central axis were estimated using a standard CT scan of the chest. Dose estimates were made using an SLPLAN planning system. As unexpected spinal cord toxicity has been reported after hypo fractionated chest radiotherapy, a sagittal view was used to calculate the isodoses along the length of the spinal cord that could lie within the RT field. Equivalent dose estimates are made using the Linear Quadratic Equivalent Dose formula (LQED). The relative radiation sensitivity of spinal cord for myelopathy (the a/b dose) cord has been estimated as a/b = 1 Gy. Results: 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocols have spinal cord equivalent doses (using the linear-quadratic model) that lie within the conventional safe limits of 50 Gy in 25 fractions for the 100% isodose. However when the dosimetry is modelled for a 6 MV 100 cm isocentric linac in 3 dimensions, and altered separations and air space inhomogeneity are considered, the D-Max doses consistently fall above this limit on our 3 model patients. Conclusion: The 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocol would risk spinal cord damage if the radio therapist was unaware of the potential spinal cord doses. Alterative doses are suggested below 15.5 Gy/ 2 fractions (7 days apart) would be most acceptable

  13. Promoting Gait Recovery and Limiting Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Catherine; Roosink, Meyke; Bouffard, Jason; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2017-04-01

    Most persons living with a spinal cord injury experience neuropathic pain in the months following their lesion, at the moment where they receive intensive gait rehabilitation. Based on studies using animal models, it has been proposed that central sensitization in nociceptive pathways (maladaptive plasticity) and plasticity related to motor learning (adaptive plasticity) share common neural mechanisms and compete with each other. This article aims to address the discrepancy between the growing body of basic science literature supporting this hypothesis and the general belief in rehabilitation research that pain and gait rehabilitation represent two independent problems. First, the main findings from basic research showing interactions between nociception and learning in the spinal cord will be summarized, focusing both on evidence demonstrating the impact of nociception on motor learning and of motor learning on central sensitization. Then, the generalizability of these findings in animal models to humans will be discussed. Finally, the way potential interactions between nociception and motor learning are currently taken into account in clinical research in patients with spinal cord injury will be presented. To conclude, recommendations will be proposed to better integrate findings from basic research into future clinical research in persons with spinal cord injury.

  14. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The spinal cord is engaged in a wide variety of functions including generation of motor acts, coding of sensory information and autonomic control. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of spinal neurones represent a fundamental building block of the spinal circuits executing these tasks. ....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  16. Optical monitoring of spinal cord subcellular damage after acute spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Fong, Allan; Streijger, Femke; Macnab, Andrew; Kwon, Brian K.

    2018-02-01

    Introduction: Sudden physical trauma to the spinal cord results in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), leading to spinal cord (SC) tissue destruction, acute inflammation, increased SC intraparenchymal pressure, and tissue ischemia, hypoxia, and cellular necrosis. The ability to monitor SC tissue viability at subcellular level, using a real-time noninvasive method, would be extremely valuable to clinicians for estimating acute SCI damage, and adjusting and monitoring treatment in the intensive care setting. This study examined the feasibility and sensitivity of a custommade near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor to monitor the oxidation state of SC mitochondrial cytochrome aa3 (CCO), which reflects the subcellular damage of SC tissue in an animal model of SCI. Methods: Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were studied using a custom-made multi-wavelength NIRS system with a miniaturized optical sensor applied directly on the surgically exposed SC at T9. The oxidation states of SC tissue hemoglobin and CCO were monitored before, during and after acute SCI, and during mean arterial pressure alterations. Results: Non-invasive NIRS monitoring reflected changes in SC tissue CCO, simultaneous but independent of changes in hemoglobin saturation following acute SCI. A consistent decrease in SC tissue CCO chromophore concentration (-1.98 +/- 2.1 ab, pinjury site. Elevation of mean arterial pressure can reduce SC tissue damage as suggested by different researchers and observed by significant increase in SC tissue CCO concentration (1.51 +/- 1.7 ab, p<0.05) in this study. Conclusions: This pilot study indicates that a novel miniaturized multi-wave NIRS sensor has the potential to monitor post-SCI changes of SC cytochrome aa3 oxygenation state in real time. Further development of this method may offer new options for improved SCI care.

  17. People ageing with spinal cord injury in New Zealand: a hidden population? The need for a spinal cord injury registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Richard; Schluter, Philip J; Barnett, Pauline; Keeling, Sally

    2016-07-15

    To identify and establish a research database of ageing New Zealand people who sustained a traumatic or non-traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) before 1990. All living New Zealand residents incurring a SCI before 1 January 1990 were eligible. A co-ordinated consultation with apposite New Zealand organisations was undertaken to identify and access existing SCI databases, and remove duplicate or ineligible records. 1,400 people were identified. Using the national patient information management system to determine eligibility, 1,174 people remained after exclusions; 600 (51.1%) through the Auckland Spinal Rehabilitation Unit and 574 (48.9%) through the Burwood Spinal Unit. Common to both databases were people's National Health Index number, contact details, basic demographic data, date of injury, and neurological level of SCI. An unexpectedly large SCI population was uncovered; a population largely hidden due to the uncoordinated, fragmented and inconsistently collected information held within different organisations. As life expectancy rapidly increases for those with SCI, coupled with an accelerated ageing general population, this hidden SCI population can be expected to grow. A single, well-managed and coordinated national SCI registry is urgently needed in New Zealand for planning and delivery of services, especially for those developing age-related complex interwoven secondary conditions.

  18. Effects of erythropoietin in improving function of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Meshkini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute Spinal Cord Injury (ASCI is one of the most common and important disorders in the field of neurosurgery. Progress achieved in relation to the care provided to repair spinal cord injuries have been taken from ancient times to the present day. Recently Neuroprotective therapies have attracted a lot of staff to approach the patient. Research scientists have shown that there is a possibility of recovery after spinal cord injury. Many pharmacological agents, Erythropoietin, in this field are used to reduce secondary damage after the primary insult and try to preserve nerve tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Erythropoietin on sensory and motor status of patients with acute spinal cord injury. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 60 patients with acute spinal cord injury in the Frankel classification, the category A to C, and the selection of matched Frankel class into two groups A and B (each group consisted of 30 patients was done. Group A underwent conventional treatment received methylprednisolone, were used erythropoietin and were compared after 4days,6-months intervals in terms of complete and incomplete cord injury  status with group B (that underwent only conventional treatment such as methylprednisolone. Results: In our study of two groups there were 16 patients with complete spinal cord injury and 44 patients were had incomplete SCI. In the period of 4 days after the onset of the study, patients with complete SCI in case and control group did not recover. In Patients with incomplete spinal cord injury in case group 13 of 21 patients (62% and 2 of 23 patients (9% in the control group were cured. In the period of 6 months after the study, 2 of 8 patients (25% in case group with complete cord had recovery. In the control group of patients with complete spinal cord injury didn't have any recovery. Also in incomplete SCI 12 of 19 patients (63% in case group and 5 of 21 patients (23% in the

  19. Inflammogenesis of Secondary Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. Akhtar; Al Shehabi, Tuqa S.; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal infarction lead to neurological complications and eventually to paraplegia or quadriplegia. These extremely debilitating conditions are major contributors to morbidity. Our understanding of SCI has certainly increased during the last decade, but remains far from clear. SCI consists of two defined phases: the initial impact causes primary injury, which is followed by a prolonged secondary injury consisting of evolving sub-phases that may last for years. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms driving this condition are complex. Derangement of the vasculature is a notable feature of the pathology of SCI. In particular, an important component of SCI is the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) that leads to endothelial dysfunction and changes in vascular permeability. Indeed, together with endothelial cell damage and failure in homeostasis, ischemia reperfusion injury triggers full-blown inflammatory cascades arising from activation of residential innate immune cells (microglia and astrocytes) and infiltrating leukocytes (neutrophils and macrophages). These inflammatory cells release neurotoxins (proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, free radicals, excitotoxic amino acids, nitric oxide (NO)), all of which partake in axonal and neuronal deficit. Therefore, our review considers the recent advances in SCI mechanisms, whereby it becomes clear that SCI is a heterogeneous condition. Hence, this leads towards evidence of a restorative approach based on monotherapy with multiple targets or combinatorial treatment. Moreover, from evaluation of the existing literature, it appears that there is an urgent requirement for multi-centered, randomized trials for a large patient population. These clinical studies would offer an opportunity in stratifying SCI patients at high risk and selecting appropriate, optimal therapeutic regimens for personalized medicine. PMID:27147970

  20. International bowel function extended spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, K; Perkash, I; Stiens, S A

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: International expert working group.Objective:To develop an International Bowel Function Extended Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of an extended amount of information on bowel function. SETTING: Working group...... consisting of members appointed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS). METHODS: A draft prepared by the working group was reviewed by Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets and later by the ISCoS Scientific Committee...

  1. [Spinal cord injury: potential for neurologic and functional recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Khodairy, A

    2001-06-01

    Since antiquity, spinal cord injury was recognised mortal. At the beginning of the 19th century, the situation had hardly changed and the mortality rate remained high. Since the Second World War the care of the spinal man evolved considerably. Over the last past years, promising experiments on the neurological recovery in animals were achieved. While waiting for their application to the human being, global rehabilitation in specialised centres offers to spinal cord injured patient the possibility of functional recovery with social and professional reinsertion.

  2. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Real-time direct measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression: relationship between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuichiro; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Hino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2007-08-15

    An in vivo study to measure rat spinal cord blood flow in real-time at the site of compression using a newly developed device. To evaluate the change in thoracic spinal cord blood flow by compression force and to clarify the association between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency after a spinal cord compression injury. Until now, no real-time measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression has been conducted. In addition, it has not been clearly determined whether blood flow recovery is related to motor function after a spinal cord injury. Our blood flow measurement system was a combination of a noncontact type laser Doppler system and a spinal cord compression device. The rat thoracic spinal cord was exposed at the 11th vertebra and spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression was continuously measured before, during, and after the compression. The functioning of the animal's hind-limbs was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scoring scale and the frequency of voluntary standing. Histologic changes such as permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier, microglia proliferation, and apoptotic cell death were examined in compressed spinal cord tissue. The spinal blood flow decreased on each increase in the compression force. After applying a 5-g weight, the blood flow decreased to compression), while no significant difference was observed between the 20-minute ischemia group and the sham group. In the 20-minute ischemia group, the rats whose spinal cord blood flow recovery was incomplete showed significant motor function loss compared with rats that completely recovered blood flow. Extensive breakdown of blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and the following microglia proliferation and apoptotic cell death were detected in the 40-minute complete ischemia group. Duration of ischemia/compression and blood flow recovery of the spinal cord are important factors in the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury.

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRS/I Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurnher, Majda M.; Bammer, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10 -3 cm 2 /s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  6. Protein composition and synthesis in the adult mouse spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stodieck, L.S.; Luttges, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Properties of spinal cord proteins were studied in adult mice subjected to unilateral crush or electrical stimulation of sciatic nerve. The protein composition of spinal tissue was determined using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with subcellular fractionation. Comparisons of mouse spinal cord and brain revealed similarities in the types but differences in the concentrations of myelin associated proteins, nuclear histones and other proteins. Comparisons with sciatic nerve proteins demonstrated differences in types of proteins but similarities in the concentration of myelin proteins and nuclear histones. The short term (less than 2 hrs.) incorporation of radioactive amino acids into spinal cord proteins revealed heterogeneous rates of incorporation. Neither nerve crush six days prior to testing nor sciatic nerve stimulation had a significant effect on the protein composition or amino acid incorporation rates of spinal cord tissue. These observations suggest that known differences in spinal cord function following alterations in nerve input may be dependent upon different mechanisms than have been found in the brain

  7. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A; George, K J; Langford, R M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  8. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  9. Development and aging of human spinal cord circuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-08-01

    The neural motor circuitries in the spinal cord receive information from our senses and the rest of the nervous system and translate it into purposeful movements, which allow us to interact with the rest of the world. In this review, we discuss how these circuitries are established during early development and the extent to which they are shaped according to the demands of the body that they control and the environment with which the body has to interact. We also discuss how aging processes and physiological changes in our body are reflected in adaptations of activity in the spinal cord motor circuitries. The complex, multifaceted connectivity of the spinal cord motor circuitries allows them to generate vastly different movements and to adapt their activity to meet new challenges imposed by bodily changes or a changing environment. There are thus plenty of possibilities for adaptive changes in the spinal motor circuitries both early and late in life. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Fukutake, Toshio; Hirayama, Keizo; Fukuda, Nobuo.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in three patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in the spinal cord and to measure their T1 relaxation time values in these disease processes. Neurological examination allowed the detection of the superior limit of the spinal cord lesions in the three patients, but did not permit detection of the inferior limit in two of the patients. With MRI, however, it was possible to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in all three patients from coronal or sagittal images using spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequences. In two patients treated with prednisolone, serial T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were measured from T1 calculated images. In one patient with transverse myelopathy, the T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were significantly increased at a stage of acute exacerbation. This is apparently in contrast with the values at the stage of remission. In the patient with localized cervical myelopathy, the increase in T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions at the acute stage was small and significantly different from the values at the remission stage. Several recent reports have indicated that MRI is extremely sensitive in the detection of MS plaques, but most efforts to use MRI in the diagnosis of MS have been concentrated on brain lesions in spite of their frequent associations with spinal cord involvements. It is concluded from our case studies that MRI coronal or sagittal image is useful in demonstrating the longitudinal distribution of MS spinal cord lesions. In addition, serial observations of T1 relaxation time values of MS plaques may be important in assessing the activity of MS plaques and evaluation of the steroid therapy in MS processes. (author)

  11. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  12. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  13. Pelvic floor electrophysiology in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankisi, H; Pugdahl, K; Rasmussen, M M; Clemmensen, D; Rawashdeh, Y F; Christensen, P; Krogh, K; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate sacral peripheral nerve function and continuity of pudendal nerve in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) using pelvic floor electrophysiological tests. Twelve patients with low cervical or thoracic SCI were prospectively included. Quantitative external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle electromyography (EMG), pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML) testing, bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing and pudendal short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) measurement were performed. In EAS muscle EMG, two patients had abnormal increased spontaneous activity and seven prolonged motor unit potential duration. PNTML was normal in 10 patients. BCR was present with normal latency in 11 patients and with prolonged latency in one. The second component of BCR could be recorded in four patients. SEPs showed absent cortical responses in 11 patients and normal latency in one. Pudendal nerve and sacral lower motor neuron involvement are significantly associated with chronic SCI, most prominently in EAS muscle EMG. The frequent finding of normal PNTML latencies supports earlier concerns on the utility of this test; however, BCR and pudendal SEPs may have clinical relevance. As intact peripheral nerves including pudendal nerve are essential for efficient supportive therapies, pelvic floor electrophysiological testing prior to these interventions is highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Depression following a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekamp, J R; Overholser, J C; Schubert, D S

    1996-01-01

    Depression is a common problem following a spinal cord injury (SCI) and can greatly interfere with the rehabilitation process because of reduced energy, negative expectations, and social withdrawal. Understanding various factors which influence a vulnerability to depression may improve the diagnosis and treatment of depressive disorders and can improve rehabilitation outcome. A thorough literature search was conducted using Medline, PsychLit, Pyschinfo, and Social Science Citation Index to identify relevant articles published between 1967 and 1995. A diathesis-stress model is proposed to explain the increased risk of depressive symptoms after a SCI. Biological changes associated with SCI and pre-existing cognitive biases may influence the individual's vulnerability to stressful life events following the injury. The nature and frequency of stressful life events following the injury can tax the individual's coping resources. Furthermore, the perceived quality of social support and the severity of conflict within the family can influence the individual's adaptation. Social support and recent stressors should be assessed to identify patients at high risk for depression. Patients are less likely to become depressed if their independence is fostered and they are encouraged to develop new sources of self-esteem. Relatives can be counseled to help maintain supportive relationships within the family.

  15. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  16. Effect the exercise program on neuropathic pain intensity in patients with paraplegia Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedghi Goyaghaj N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients with spinal cord injury suffer from continuous and persistent neuropathic pain that has a destructive impact on their quality of life. Exercise therapy is one of the non-pharmacological interventions that is recommended to control chronic pain, This study aimed to determine the effect of exercise program on neuropathic pain intensity in patients with paraplegia Spinal Cord Injury. Materials and Method: This study is a clinical trial.that population was the all of the patients with spinal cord injury, who referred to one of the educational hospitals in Tehran in 2014, 40 patient were selected based on purposive sampling and were randomly allocated into two groups of experimental and control. Exercise program for paraplegia spinal cord injury was implemented in experimental group during twelve 45-60minutes sessions, twice a week. Data collection was done before and one week after the intervention through using personal information form and, The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS19 and Fisher's exact test, Independent samples T-test Paired T-test and Chi square. Results: The mean score of neuropathic pain intensity before the intervention was 8.05 ± 1.51 in intervention group and 7.57 ± 1.21 in the control group. These amounts after the intervention were 5.55 ± 1.61 and 7.37 ± 1.05 respectively (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Results showed that the regular exercise program can reduce neuropathic pain severity in patients with spinal cord injuries and it can be recommended as a non-pharmacological method of pain control in these patients.

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of ... injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  18. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD Kristine Cichowski, MS Read Bio Founding ...

  19. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  20. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.; Yamada, T.; Ishii, K.; Saito, H.; Tanji, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Soma, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1992-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  1. A study of measurement of the spinal cord of cervical myelopathy with CT-myelography and forecast of operative result from the size of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosawa, Yoshimitsu

    1985-01-01

    The antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord were measured using CT-myelography (CT-M) in 44 patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) and 20 control subjects. The AP diameter of these canals and cord and the T diameter of the spinal canal were smaller in the CM group than in the control group. Postoperative CT-M showed that the dural canal and spinal cord had an increase in the AP diameter and T area and a decrease in the T diameter. Preoperative symptoms were well correlated with the AP diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord, and spinal cord compression. The symptoms tended to be milder with larger AT diameter and T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord and with smaller spinal cord compression and deformity. Functional damage was reversible in patients with slight spinal cord compression. Favorable operative outcome tended to be achieved when the preoperative AP diameter and T area of the spinal cord were ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 50 mm 2 , respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Early protective effects of Iloprost after experimental spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, A; Tuna, H; Sargon, M F; Yüceer, N; Türker, R K; Egemen, N

    1998-06-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study the early protective effects of Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, after spinal cord injury in rabbit. Sixteen adult male rabbits (New Zealand Albino) were injured by application of epidural aneurysm clip. Eight rabbits received an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 30 micrograms kg-1 Iloprost, and eight rabbits received an infusion of saline (SF). Treatment with Iloprost started immediately after spinal cord injury and continued for one hour. Evoked potentials were recorded for each rabbit at one, 15, and 60 minutes after the spinal cord injury. Twenty-four hours later, all the rabbits were deeply anesthetized and spinal cords were removed for histopathological examinations. There was no meaningful statistical difference between cortical somatosensorial evoked potentials (CSEP) of the saline and Iloprost group. However, light and electron microscopic studies showed that the Iloprost treated group had moderate protection of myelin and axons; and limited edema. These results suggest that intravenous Iloprost treatment after spinal cord injury has a highly protective effect without any side effects.

  3. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  4. Coping and adaptation in adults living with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Stacey Hoffman; Waters, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Biopsychosocial adaptation remains a multifaceted challenge for individuals with spinal cord injury, their families, and healthcare providers alike. The development of frequent medical complications necessitating healthcare interventions is an ongoing, debilitating, and costly problem for those living with spinal cord injuries. Although several demographic variables have been correlated with positive adaptation in individuals with spinal cord injury, the research outcome data present limitations in understanding and facilitating which coping techniques work best to augment biopsychosocial adaptation in this population. Coping facilitates adaptation and adjustment to stress and can help to increase quality of life in people living with spinal cord injury and reduce common complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics and hardiness explain coping in 243 adults living with a spinal cord injury. In addition, this study examined which predictors of coping explain biopsychosocial adaptation. A descriptive explanatory design was utilized. Standardized instruments were administered nationally to assess hardiness, coping, and physiological and psychosocial adaptation. Canonical correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that less educated, less hardy, and recently injured participants were more likely to use escape-avoidance coping and less likely to use social support, problem solving, and positive reappraisal coping behaviors (p < .05). Individuals with paraplegia had a higher level of functional ability, spent less time in rehabilitation, had a greater sense of control, and experienced less frequent complications. The control dimension of hardiness was the only dimension that significantly related to biopsychosocial adaptation within this sample.

  5. Return to work following spinal cord injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidal, Ingeborg Beate; Huynh, Tuan Khai; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2007-09-15

    To review literature on return to work (RTW) and employment in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), and present employment rates, factors influencing employment, and interventions aimed at helping people with SCI to obtain and sustain productive work. A systematic review for 2000 - 2006 was carried out in PubMed/Medline, AMED, (ISI) Web of Science, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo and Sociological abstracts database. The keywords 'spinal cord injuries', 'spinal cord disorder', 'spinal cord lesion' or 'spinal cord disease' were cross-indexed with 'employment', 'return to work', 'occupation' or 'vocational'. Out of approximately 270 hits, 110 references were used, plus 13 more found elsewhere. Among individuals with SCI working at the time of injury 21 - 67% returned to work after injury. RTW was higher in persons injured at a younger age, had less severe injuries and higher functional independence. Employment rate improved with time after SCI. Persons with SCI employed ranged from 11.5% to 74%. Individuals who sustained SCI during childhood or adolescence had higher adult employment rates. Most common reported barriers to employment were problems with transportation, health and physical limitations, lack of work experience, education or training, physical or architectural barriers, discrimination by employers, and loss of benefits. Individuals with SCI discontinue working at younger age. This review confirmed low employment rates after SCI. Future research should explore interventions aimed at helping people with SCI to obtain and sustain productive work.

  6. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  7. Age-related changes of the spinal cord: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomoya; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Nishida, Norihiro; Ichihara, Kazuhiko; Sakuramoto, Itsuo; Ohgi, Junji; Funaba, Masahiro; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Chen, Xian; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2018-03-01

    Although it is known that aging plays an important role in the incidence and progression of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the underlying mechanism is unclear. Studies that used fresh bovine cervical spinal cord report the gray matter of the cervical spinal cord as being more rigid and fragile than the white matter. However, there are no reports regarding the association between aging an tensile and Finite Element Method (FEM). Therefore, FEM was used based on the data pertaining to the mechanical features of older bovine cervical spinal cord to explain the pathogenesis of CSM in elderly patients. Tensile tests were conducted for white and gray matter separately in young and old bovine cervical spinal cords, and compared with their respective mechanical features. Based on the data obtained, FEM analysis was further performed, which included static and dynamic factors to describe the internal stress distribution changes of the spinal cord. These results demonstrated that the mechanical strength of young bovine spinal cords is different from that of old bovine spinal cords. The gray matter of the older spinal cord was significantly softer and more resistant to rupture compared with that of younger spinal cords (Pspinal cords in response to similar compression, when compared with young spinal cords. These results demonstrate that in analyzing the response of the spinal cord to compression, the age of patients is an important factor to be considered, in addition to the degree of compression, compression speed and parts of the spinal cord compression factor.

  8. How Do I Deal with Depression and Adjustment to My Spinal Cord Injury?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury is, and what it means in terms of ... thoughts. Depression is common in the spinal cord injury population -- affecting about 1 in 5 people. There ...

  9. Men with spinal cord injury have a smaller prostate than men without

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvarness, Helle; Jakobsen, Henrik; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2007-01-01

    To compare prostate volume and number of ejaculations in men with and without spinal cord injury (SCI).......To compare prostate volume and number of ejaculations in men with and without spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  10. How Do I Deal with Depression and Adjustment to My Spinal Cord Injury?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to arm yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury is, and what it means in terms ... or negative thoughts. Depression is common in the spinal cord injury population -- affecting about 1 in 5 people. ...

  11. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Mario E; Zippo, Antonio G; Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention.

  12. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  13. Spinal sonography in newborns and infants - part II: spinal dysraphism and tethered cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, K-H; Lode, H-M; Gassner, I

    2008-02-01

    Patients with cutaneous markers in the lumbo-sacral region as well as infants with bladder and bowel dysfunction, orthopedic anomalies and progressive neurological dysfunction are at risk for spinal dysraphism and tethered cord. Three types of spinal dysraphism can be distinguished: Type I - open spinal dysraphisms with a non-skin covered back mass; type II - closed spinal dysraphisms with a skin covered back mass; type III - occult spinal dysraphisms without a back mass. All spinal dysraphisms can be associated with a tethered cord, characterized by a low position of the conus medullaris below L3. Type I dysraphisms are meningomyeloceles and myeloceles, which are associated with CHIARI-II malformations characterized by the low position of the cerebellar vermis within the foramen magnum. Type II dysraphisms are lipomyeloceles, lipomyelomeningoceles, posterior meningoceles and myelocystoceles. Lipomeningoceles and lipomyelomeningoceles are characterized by a subcutaneous echogenic mass which communicates with the spinal canal and may cause tethered cord. Posterior meningoceles are, dorsal cystic space occupying lesions without internal neural tissue. Myelocystoceles are characterized by a cystic dorsal mass which communicates with a dilated central canal characteristic of syringo-hydromyelia. Type III dysraphisms without a back mass are frequently associated with cutaneous markers in the lumbo-sacral region. Sonographically dermal sinus tracts, diastematomyelia, tight filum and lipoma of the filum terminale and the caudal regression syndrome have to be distinguished. Dermal sinuses are characterized by an echogenic tract from the skin to the spinal canal, often associated with a spinal dermoid. Diastematomyelia is characterized by a complete or partial duplication of the spinal cord which can only be shown on axial images. Tight filum terminale or lipoma of the filum terminale is characterized by a thick echogenic filum with a diameter of more than 2 mm, and a conus

  14. Military gunshot wound-induced spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaca, Ridvan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Gunduz, Sukru

    2002-11-01

    Gunshot wounds are the second leading cause of spinal cord injuries in developed countries, whereas in undeveloped and developing countries, this likelihood is much more. However, the weapon and injury characteristics are very different between those two groups of countries. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gunshot wound-caused spinal cord injury during our struggle with terrorism, to examine surgical and medical complications, and to determine the difference between civilian and military gunshot wounds. One hundred five male patients (mean, 25 years of age) were examined according to completeness, spinal and nonspinal injuries, American Spinal Injury Association classification, motor and pinprick scores, surgical and nonsurgical interventions, surgical complications, and spinal cord injury-related medical complications. This study has shown that the likelihood of completeness was higher in gunshot wounds with high velocity weapons. Because of their higher wounding capacity, the difference between vertebral and neurological levels was not very different as it was on the other etiologies. Fortunately, spinal cord injury-related medical complications were less than expected.

  15. The current management of spinal cord cavernoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velz, Julia; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes; Regli, Luca; Bellut, David

    2018-01-04

    Spinal cavernous malformations (SCM) were once thought to be rare lesions of the spinal cord. However, with the broad use of modern imaging techniques the incidence of SCM has significantly increased over the last decades. Management of both symptomatic and incidental findings is therefore of growing importance. However, experience with treatment and follow-up is very limited. We performed a single institution retrospective review of consecutive patients with SCM treated at our Department between 2006-2016 and discuss the clinical features as well as surgical versus conservative outcomes. We further provide a systematic literature search and discuss the best management of SCM, analyzing recent publications on SCM imaging techniques, surgical approaches and natural history. From a total number of 406 consecutive patients with cavernous malformations (CM) treated at our Department between 2006-2016, 29 (7.1 %) were found to be affected by SCM. The localization was cervical in 10 (34.5 %), cervicothoracic in 3 (10.4 %) and thoracic in 16 (55.2 %) patients. In 90 % of patients (n = 26) the diagnosis was made after onset of clinical symptoms. Conservative management was performed for 8 patients, whereas 21 patients underwent surgical removal of the lesion via a posterior approach using (hemi-) laminectomy or laminoplasty. Functional status improved in 15 patients (62. 5%) and remained unchanged in 6 patients (28.5 %) in the operative group, whereas 2 patients (25 %) improved and 6 patients (75 %) remained unchanged in the conservative group during long-term follow-up. Gross-total resection is the only definitive treatment option for symptomatic SCM. Surgical extirpation of the symptomatic SCM lesion through an unilateral laminectomy ( = hemilaminectomy) approach within 3 months of presentation seems to be good treatment option with an acceptable risk of complications and good long-term outcomes. Conservative treatment should be performed in asymptomatic patients and

  16. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of patholo...

  17. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  18. Morphology of the cervical spinal cord with myelopathy on computed myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki; Asano, Masafumi; Yokota, Hidemaro

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between morphological changes in the spinal cord shown on computer-assisted myelography and symptoms was investigated in 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Flatness of the spinal cord was seen in many of the patients. Symptoms were likely to be severer with increasing the degree of flatness of the spinal cord. The length of the flat spinal cord will help to select the operative method for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  20. Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    cord injury . We also found that late-Insp interneurons are the most sensitive spinal units to GABAa and Glycine-receptor blockers (GABAzine and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0324 TITLE: Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord ...TERMS Spinal cord injury , high cervical transection, respiration, CPG, GABA, Glycine, spinal cord 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  1. Neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakipoglu-Yuzer, Guidal F; Atçı, Nermin; Ozgirgin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have described pain prevalence, risk factors, pain and medical variables in spinal cord injury (SCI) populations. In this study on traumatic SCI in Turkey, we surveyed the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation and defined the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI characteristics of patients. To survey the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation in traumatic SCI and to define the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI-related characteristics of patients. Descriptive study. Physicial Medicine and Rehabilitation inpatient clinic, Ankara, Turkey Sixty-nine SCI patients as inpatients were included in this descriptive study. All patients demographic and SCI-related characteristics were enrolled. The diagnosis of neuropathic pain was made with the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) Pain Scale. Location of pain and pain description, relation to time and severity according to McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) were enrolled. The neuropathic pain localization was below the lesion level in 67 (97.1%) and at the lesion level in 2 (2.9%) patients. The pain was at the hip and leg regions in 36 (52.2%) patients. The neuropathic pain was defined as burning in 27 (39.1%), aching in 26 (37.7%), sharp in 4 (5.8%), stinging in 3 (4.3%), and cramping in 3 (4.3%). We did not find a significant difference between demographic and SCI-related characteristics and the localization of neuropathic pain for the patients (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference according to pain description by MPQ and pain localization (P > 0.05). We found a significant relationship between the patient's lesion level and the region of pain (P neuropathic pain due to SCI to be mostly below the lesion level with a burning or aching character and we did not find a significant relationship between the demographic and SCI-related characteristics of the patient and the pain

  2. Nociceptive plasticity inhibits adaptive learning in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A R; Crown, E D; Grau, J W

    2006-08-11

    Spinal plasticity is known to play a role in central neurogenic pain. Over the last 100 years researchers have found that the spinal cord is also capable of supporting other forms of plasticity including several forms of learning. To study instrumental (response-outcome) learning in the spinal cord, we use a preparation in which spinally transected rats are given shock to the hind leg when the leg is extended. The spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position when given this controllable shock. However, if shock is independent of leg position (uncontrollable shock), subjects fail to learn. Uncontrollable shock also impairs future learning. As little as 6 min of uncontrollable shock to either the leg or the tail generates a learning deficit that lasts up to 48 h. Recent data suggest links between the learning deficit and the sensitization of pain circuits associated with inflammation or injury (central sensitization). Here, we explored whether central sensitization and the spinal learning deficit share pharmacological and behavioral features. Central sensitization enhances reactivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia) and depends on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The uncontrollable shock stimulus that generates a learning deficit produced a tactile allodynia (Exp. 1) and administration of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 blocked induction of the learning deficit (Exp. 2). Finally, a treatment known to induce central sensitization, intradermal carrageenan, produced a spinal learning deficit (Exp. 3). The findings suggest that the induction of central sensitization inhibits selective response modifications.

  3. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H......]Epibatidine in concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 nM was dissolved in Ringer's solution and administered through the dialysis membrane into the dorsal region of the cervical spinal cord. First, the outflow of [(3)H]epibatidine from the probe into the spinal cord was examined with respect to different concentrations and changes....... The administered [(3)H]epibatidine was found to be distributed to the area closest to the dialysis probe and not dispersed along the spinal cord, and the distribution was equal for all concentrations. The data presented in this investigation provide information, which is important for interpretation of data from...

  4. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  5. A Direct Comparison between Norepinephrine and Phenylephrine for Augmenting Spinal Cord Perfusion in a Porcine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streijger, Femke; So, Kitty; Manouchehri, Neda; Gheorghe, Ana; Okon, Elena B; Chan, Ryan M; Ng, Benjamin; Shortt, Katelyn; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Griesdale, Donald E; Kwon, Brian K

    2018-03-28

    Current clinical guidelines recommend elevating the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) to increase spinal cord perfusion in patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). This is typically achieved with vasopressors such as norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE). These drugs differ in their pharmacological properties and potentially have different effects on spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), oxygenation (PO 2 ), and downstream metabolism after injury. Using a porcine model of thoracic SCI, we evaluated how these vasopressors influenced intraparenchymal SCBF, PO 2 , hydrostatic pressure, and metabolism within the spinal cord adjacent to the injury site. Yorkshire pigs underwent a contusion/compression SCI at T10 and were randomized to receive either NE or PE for MAP elevation of 20 mm Hg, or no MAP augmentation. Prior to injury, a combined SCBF/PO 2 sensor, a pressure sensor, and a microdialysis probe were inserted into the spinal cord adjacent to T10 at two locations: a "proximal" site and a "distal" site, 2 mm and 22 mm from the SCI, respectively. At the proximal site, NE and PE resulted in little improvement in SCBF during cord compression. Following decompression, NE resulted in increased SCBF and PO 2 , whereas decreased levels were observed for PE. However, both NE and PE were associated with a gradual decrease in the lactate to pyruvate (L/P) ratio after decompression. PE was associated with greater hemorrhage through the injury site than that in control animals. Combined, our results suggest that NE promotes better restoration of blood flow and oxygenation than PE in the traumatically injured spinal cord, thus providing a physiological rationale for selecting NE over PE in the hemodynamic management of acute SCI.

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolter T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tilman Wolter Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. Keywords: spinal cord stimulation, neuropathic pain, neurostimulation

  7. Double-level Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Bin Ayaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard Syndrome is a type of Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury characterized by a relatively greater ipsilateral loss of proprioception and motor function, with contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensations. The residual deficits in balance produced by such injury may render a person liable to fall that may result in vertebral fracture and another injury to the spinal cord. We present here a case who initially had Brown-Séquard Syndrome due to penetrating knife injury to the neck and later on developed Cauda Equina Syndrome (another Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury due to fractured LV1 following a fall. The fracture was fixed through Pedicle Screws and the patient underwent effective rehabilitation to gain maximum achievable independence in functional activities. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 392-398

  8. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord......Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total...... length of all NF-immunolabeled axons within the lesion cavities was increased 6- to 10-fold at 5, 10, and 15 wk post-lesion compared with 1 wk post-surgery. In ultrastructural studies we found the putatively regenerating axons within the lesion to be associated either with oligodendrocytes or Schwann...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord trauma: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2006-04-15

    Assessing a patient with clinical signs of acute spinal cord trauma is an emergency. A radiological work-up is crucial in determining management, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice. It should therefore be performed immediately, preferably within 3 hours, even when plain radiography does not show an abnormality. By choosing an appropriate imaging protocol, it is possible to assess the spinal cord, joints, muscles, ligaments and bone marrow of the spine. Moreover, early MRI findings assist in determining functional prognosis. A major limitation to early MRI is that the examination is usually restricted to stable trauma patients because of the difficulties in monitoring ventilated patients during scanning. However, when an anaesthesiologist with experience in MRI and MR-compatible monitoring equipment is available, even these patients can be safely examined. MRI is also indicated for the evaluation of patients with late complications and sequelae following spinal cord trauma, since many of these chronic lesions are potentially treatable. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord trauma: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Assessing a patient with clinical signs of acute spinal cord trauma is an emergency. A radiological work-up is crucial in determining management, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice. It should therefore be performed immediately, preferably within 3 hours, even when plain radiography does not show an abnormality. By choosing an appropriate imaging protocol, it is possible to assess the spinal cord, joints, muscles, ligaments and bone marrow of the spine. Moreover, early MRI findings assist in determining functional prognosis. A major limitation to early MRI is that the examination is usually restricted to stable trauma patients because of the difficulties in monitoring ventilated patients during scanning. However, when an anaesthesiologist with experience in MRI and MR-compatible monitoring equipment is available, even these patients can be safely examined. MRI is also indicated for the evaluation of patients with late complications and sequelae following spinal cord trauma, since many of these chronic lesions are potentially treatable. (orig.)

  11. Production of dopamine by aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase cells after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Liqun; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells are widely distributed in the spinal cord and their functions are largely unknown. We have previously found that AADC cells in the spinal cord could increase their ability to produce serotonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan after spinal cord injury (SCI)...... be implicated for revealing the pathological mechanisms underlying L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease....

  12. Ultrasonic distance detection for a closed-loop spinal cord stimulation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, E.A.; Holsheimer, J.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1997-01-01

    When stimulating the spinal cord at a constant strength, the current density in the spinal cord and thus the effects on chronic, intractable pain and vascular insufficiency will change with body position, due to the varying separation of the spinal cord and the stimulating electrode. The current

  13. Spinal cord regeneration by modulating bone marrow with neurotransmitters and Citicholine: Analysis at micromolecular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheramadathukudiyil Skaria Paulose

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Thus our results suggest that the neurotransmitters combination along with bone marrow or Citicholine with bone marrow can reverse the muscarinic receptor alterations in the spinal cord of spinal cord injured rats, which is a promising step towards a better therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury because of the positive role of cholinergic system in regulation of both locomotor activity and synaptic plasticity.

  14. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  15. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulejczak, Dorota; Taraszewska, Anna; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Dziewulska, Dorota; Nakielski, Paweł; Rafałowska, Janina

    2016-01-01

    An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS) cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an 'empty' (i.e., carrying no glutamate) nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike) were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo-lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less severe in the rats

  16. Ex vivo infection of human embryonic spinal cord neurons prior to transplantation into adult mouse cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Ádám

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically modified pseudorabies virus (Prv proved suitable for the delivery of foreign genes to rodent embryonic neurons ex vivo and maintaining foreign gene expression after transplantation into spinal cord in our earlier study. The question arose of whether human embryonic neurons, which are known to be more resistant to Prv, could also be infected with a mutant Prv. Specifically, we investigated whether a mutant Prv with deleted ribonucleotide reductase and early protein 0 genes has the potential to deliver marker genes (gfp and β-gal into human embryonic spinal cord neurons and whether the infected neurons maintain expression after transplantation into adult mouse cord. Results The results revealed that the mutant Prv effectively infected human embryonic spinal cord neurons ex vivo and the grafted cells exhibited reporter gene expression for several weeks. Grafting of infected human embryonic cells into the spinal cord of immunodeficient (rnu-/rnu- mice resulted in the infection of some of the host neurons. Discussion These results suggest that Prv is suitable for the delivery of foreign genes into transplantable human cells. This delivery method may offer a new approach to use genetically modified cells for grafting in animal models where spinal cord neuronal loss or axon degeneration occurs.

  17. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  18. Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Laura S; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Lloyd, L Keith

    2015-06-01

    We estimate bladder cancer mortality in people with spinal cord injury compared to the general population. Data and statistics were retrieved from the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center and the National Center for Health Statistics. The mortality experience of the 45,486 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model System or Shriners Hospital was compared to the general population using a standardized mortality ratio. The standardized mortality ratio data were further stratified by age, gender, race, time since injury and injury severity. Our study included 566,532 person-years of followup between 1960 and 2009, identified 10,575 deaths and categorized 99 deaths from bladder cancer. The expected number of deaths from bladder cancer would have been 14.8 if patients with spinal cord injury had the same bladder cancer mortality as the general population. Thus, the standardized mortality ratio is 6.7 (95% CI 5.4-8.1). Increased mortality risk from bladder cancer was observed for various ages, races and genders, as well as for those injured for 10 or more years and with motor complete injuries. Bladder cancer mortality was not significantly increased for ventilator users, those with motor incomplete injuries or those injured less than 10 years. Individuals with a spinal cord injury can potentially live healthier and longer by reducing the incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. Study findings highlight the need to identify at risk groups and contributing factors for bladder cancer death, leading to the development of prevention, screening and management strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Brain Is Needed to Cure Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Tadashi

    2017-10-01

    Damage to corticospinal fibers in the cervical spinal cord is known to impair dexterous hand movements. However, accumulating evidence has shown that precision grip can recover considerably through rehabilitative training. Recent multidisciplinary studies have revealed that, at the spinal level, this recovery is possible due to an indirect neural pathway through propriospinal neurons (PNs), which relay cortical commands to hand motoneurons. Although this indirect spinal pathway is heavily involved in recovery, its role is dwarfed by a simultaneous large-scale network reorganization spanning motor-related cortices and mesolimbic structures. This large-scale network reorganization is key to the regulation of recovery and future therapeutic strategies will need to take into account the involvement of these supraspinal centers in addition to the known role of the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Nakamura, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, I.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury is described. The traumatized cord segment was clearly shown as a hyperintensity in a T2-weighted image whereas it appeared as an isointensity in a moderately T1-weighted image. This different sensitivity may result from parenchymal hemorrhagic tissue and edematous changes due to direct trauma. Hyperintense tissue was also seen in the retro-pharyngeal and -tracheal spaces. (orig.)

  1. Inhibitory zinc-enriched terminals in mouse spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, G; Jo, S M; Varea, E

    2001-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of zinc transporter-3, glutamate decarboxylase and zinc ions in zinc-enriched terminals in the mouse spinal cord was studied by zinc transporter-3 and glutamate decarboxylase immunohistochemistry and zinc selenium autometallography, respectively.The distribution......-enriched terminals, whereas the dorsal horn was dominated by medium-sized and small zinc-enriched terminals.The presence of boutons with flat synaptic vesicles with zinc ions and symmetric synaptic contacts suggests the presence of inhibitory zinc-enriched terminals in the mammalian spinal cord...

  2. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation.

  3. Functional electrical stimulation for incomplete spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fazio, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the early use of functional electrical stimulation on an individual with an incomplete spinal cord injury to assist with motor recovery and a return to ambulation. A 32-year-old woman sustained a C7 burst fracture after a fall, requiring anterior cervical fixation from C6 to T1 prior to transfer to acute rehabilitation. She presented as a C8 AIS B spinal cord injury, meaning she had some sensory function spared below the level of injury but not motor function. At di...

  4. Autonomic Nervous System in Paralympic Athletes with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Matthias; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2018-05-01

    Individuals sustaining a spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently suffer from sensorimotor and autonomic impairment. Damage to the autonomic nervous system results in cardiovascular, respiratory, bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunctions, as well as temperature dysregulation. These complications not only impede quality of life, but also affect athletic performance of individuals with SCI. This article summarizes existing evidence on how damage to the spinal cord affects the autonomic nervous system and impacts the performance in athletes with SCI. Also discussed are frequently used performance-enhancing strategies, with a special focus on their legal aspect and implication on the athletes' health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and aging of human spinal cord circuitries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    development and to what extent they are shaped according to the demands of the body that they control and the environment that the body has to interact with. We also discuss how ageing processes and physiological changes in our body are reflected in adaptations of activity in the spinal cord motor circuitries....... The complex, multi-facetted connectivity of the spinal cord motor circuitries allow that they can be used to generate vastly different movements and that their activity can be adapted to meet new challenges imposed by bodily changes or a changing environment. There are thus plenty of possibilities...

  6. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: case report with spinal cord involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, M F; Nascimento, F; Quintella, L; Rosso, A L; Maranhão Filho, P A; Corrêa, R B; Chimelli, L; Vincent, M; Novis, S A

    2001-12-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most common subacute transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Approximately 85% of the cases are sporadic. The remaining 15% consist of genetic and iatrogenic forms. We report a sporadic form of CJD with spinal cord involvement and a clinical manifestation characterized by dementia and cerebellar syndrome, myofasciculation with absent reflexes and seizures. The two last manifestations are rare. The clinical hypothesis was probable CJD which was confirmed with autopsy and immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CJD should always be suspected when rapidly progressive dementia occurs and the absence of pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs suggest a spinal cord and/or peripheral nerve involvement.

  7. Cardiovascular response during urodynamics in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M-W; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency and severity of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) during urodynamics among individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to investigate the possible effect of the number of years since SCI on the severity of AD...... was more severe in individuals with complete (American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) impairment scale (AIS) A) injuries, worse with greater time after SCI. CONCLUSION: Individuals with cervical SCI, DSD, poor bladder compliance or >2 years after SCI were associated with a higher possibility of developing...... AD during urodynamics. Furthermore, AD was more severe in complete (AIS A) individuals and was exacerbated with time after injury....

  8. Common data elements for spinal cord injury clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Alai, S; Anderson, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the US National...... with and cross-referenced to development of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) International SCI Data Sets. The recommendations were compiled, subjected to internal review and posted online for external public comment. The final version was reviewed by all working groups and the NINDS CDE team before...

  9. Nontraumatic spinal cord injury: etiology, demography and clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana-Gonzales, Asencio; Dirección Ejecutiva de Investigación, Docencia y Rehabilitación Integral en Funciones Motoras, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación. Callao, Perú. Médico Rehabilitador.; Sotomayor-Espichan, Rosa; Departamento de Investigación, Docencia y Rehabilitación Integral en Lesiones Medulares, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación. Callao, Perú. Médico Rehabilitado.; Martínez-Romero, María; Departamento de Investigación, Docencia y Rehabilitación Integral en Lesiones Medulares, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación. Callao, Perú. Médico Rehabilitador.; Kuroki-García, César; Departamento de Investigación, Docencia y Rehabilitación Integral en Unidad Motora y Dolor, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación. Callao, Perú. Médico Rehabilitador.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a retrospective and descriptive cross-sectional; study in 210 hospitalized patients with spinal cord injury at the National Institute of Rehabilitation (INR), Callao, Peru from 2000-2006. The goal was to describe etiology, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of non traumatic spinal cord injuries (LMNT). We found a prevalence of 27 % for LMNT, average age at onset of 32.0 years, male gender 50.5 %, and secondary education completed in 41.9 %, poverty 90.5 %. The inf...

  10. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  11. Decerebrate mouse model for studies of the spinal cord circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Mayr, Kyle A; Manuel, Marin

    2017-01-01

    The adult decerebrate mouse model (a mouse with the cerebrum removed) enables the study of sensory-motor integration and motor output from the spinal cord for several hours without compromising these functions with anesthesia. For example, the decerebrate mouse is ideal for examining locomotor...... behavior using intracellular recording approaches, which would not be possible using current anesthetized preparations. This protocol describes the steps required to achieve a low-blood-loss decerebration in the mouse and approaches for recording signals from spinal cord neurons with a focus on motoneurons...

  12. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  13. Zinc-enriched (ZEN) terminals in mouse spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, S M; Danscher, G; Schrøder, H D

    2000-01-01

    The general distribution of zinc-enriched (ZEN) terminals in mouse spinal cord was investigated at light microscopic level by means of zinc transporter-3 immunohistochemistry (ZnT3(IHC)) and zinc selenium autometallography (ZnSe(AMG)). Staining for ZnT3(IHC) corresponded closely to the Zn...... dendrites. These ZEN terminals in the ventral horn were in general larger than those in the dorsal horn. This is the first description of the pattern of ZEN terminals in mouse spinal cord....

  14. Radiation therapy for primary spinal cord tumors in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, B.; Grujicic, D.; Jovanovic, D.; Djuric, L.; Mijatovic, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of radiation therapy in management of primary spinal cord tumors in adults. Records of 21 patients with primary spinal cord tumors treated with radiation therapy after surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Histologic examination showed two diffuse and 10 localized ependymomas, six low-grade gliomas, and three malignant gliomas. Surgery consisted of gross tumor resection in six patients, subtotal resection in three patients, and biopsy in 12 patients. Three patients also received chemotherapy. Radiation dose range from 45 to 55 Cy

  15. Medication before and after a spinal cord lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E K; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2014-05-01

    To map the impact of spinal cord lesion (SCL) on medication. Registration of medication for 72 patients before SCL and at discharge from the Department for Spinal Cord Injuries. Department for Spinal Cord Injuries, East Denmark. The changes in medication for each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System group were registered for all patients, who were discharged from Department for Spinal Cord Injuries during 2010. The changes in medication per se were calculated for different parts of the population: non-traumatic, traumatic patients, men, women, paraplegia, tetraplegia, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A, B or C, AIS D, age 0-45, 46-60 and 60+. In addition, comparisons of changes in medication were made between complementary parts of the population. The overall increase in medication after SCL was 3.29 times (Ppopulation, the increase was most constantly seen for the medicine in the groups 'Alimentary tract and metabolism' and 'Nervous system'. The highest overall increases were seen in patients with AIS A, B and C compared with AIS D (P<0.05). There was no difference between traumatic and non-traumatic SCL, men and women, and younger compared with older patients. SCL elicits a general massive need for medicine. The relative increase is most pronounced for the more severely injured (AIS A, B and C). The increase in medication may have implications for side effects and for the economy of all involved.

  16. Midodrine improves ejaculation in spinal cord injured men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J M; Previnaire, J G; Plante, P; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of the alpha1-adrenergic agonist midodrine given orally for anejaculation in spinal cord injured men. A total of 185 spinal cord injured patients who reported absent ejaculation during sexual intercourse and who failed to respond to penile vibratory stimulation were treated with midodrine 30 to 120 minutes before a new stimulation. The procedure was repeated weekly, increasing doses by 7.5 mg to a maximum of 30 mg. Cardiovascular effects were monitored throughout the procedure. Antegrade or retrograde ejaculation was achieved in 102 spinal cord injured men (64.6%). A positive response was more frequent in patients with complete lesions (American Spinal Injury Association A) and upper motor neuron lesions above T10. Midodrine induced a significant but moderate increase (maximum 10 mm Hg) in mean arterial pressure in all patients. The highest systolic blood pressure (more than 200 mm Hg) was seen in patients with quadriplegia. No other significant side effect was recorded. The average dose of midodrine required for ejaculation was 18.7 mg. Midodrine is a safe and efficient adjunct to penile vibratory stimulation for anejaculation in spinal cord injured patients.

  17. Improving Urogenital Function with Step Training after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    tissue analyses, kidney vasopressin V2 receptor numbers will be quantified and ADH positive cells within the hypothalamus (supraoptic nucleus and... hypothalamus , spinal cord lesion epicenter) 19-20 12 4) Impact Impact on the development of the principal discipline(s) of the project...attributable to step training versus spon- taneous recovery after spinalization in adult cats,” Journal of Neurophysiology , vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 1329–1340

  18. Neurological Outcome in Road Traffic Accidents with Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Moslavac, Saša; Džidić, Ivan; Kejla, Zvonko

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate neurological outcome in road traffic accidents (RTA) with spinal cord injury (SCI). The study was undertaken in National Spinal Unit of Special Medical Rehabilitation Hospital, in Vara`dinske Toplice, Croatia. Hospital records of 154 inpatient RTA SCI patients, in years 1991–2001 were reviewed. Six groups of patients were formed: car drivers, co-drivers, back seat passengers, motorcycle drivers, bicycle drivers and pedestrians. Neurological ...

  19. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and m...

  20. Mechanisms of Chronic Central Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hulsebosch, Claire E.; Hains, Bryan C.; Crown, Eric D.; Carlton, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Not all spinal contusions result in mechanical allodynia, in which non-noxious stimuli become noxious. The studies presented use the NYU impactor at 12.5 mm drop or the Infinite Horizons Impactor (150 kdyne, 1 sec dwell) devices to model spinal cord injury (SCI). Both of these devices and injury parameters, if done correctly, will result in animals with above level (forelimb), at level (trunk) and below level (hindlimb) mechanical allodynia that model the changes in evoked somatosensation exp...

  1. Large-scale synchronized activity in the embryonic brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eMomose-Sato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the developing central nervous system, spontaneous activity appears well before the brain responds to external sensory inputs. One of the earliest activities is observed in the hindbrain and spinal cord, which is detected as rhythmic electrical discharges of cranial and spinal motoneurons or oscillations of Ca2+- and voltage-related optical signals. Shortly after the initial expression, the spontaneous activity appearing in the hindbrain and spinal cord exhibits a large-scale correlated wave that propagates over a wide region of the central nervous system, maximally extending to the lumbosacral cord and to the forebrain. In this review, we describe several aspects of this synchronized activity by focusing on the basic properties, development, origin, propagation pattern, pharmacological characteristics, and possible mechanisms underlying the generation of the activity. These profiles differ from those of the respiratory and locomotion pattern generators observed in the mature brainstem and spinal cord, suggesting that the wave is primordial activity that appears during a specific period of embryonic development and plays some important roles in the development of the central nervous system.

  2. Restoring tactile awareness through the rubber hand illusion in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggenhager, Bigna; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Pazzaglia, Mariella

    2013-10-01

    Bodily sensations are an important component of corporeal awareness. Spinal cord injury can leave affected body parts insentient and unmoving, leading to specific disturbances in the mental representation of one's own body and the sense of self. Here, we explored how illusions induced by multisensory stimulation influence immediate sensory signals and tactile awareness in patients with spinal cord injuries. The rubber hand illusion paradigm was applied to 2 patients with chronic and complete spinal cord injury of the sixth cervical spine, with severe somatosensory impairments in 2 of 5 fingers. Both patients experienced a strong illusion of ownership of the rubber hand during synchronous, but not asynchronous, stroking. They also, spontaneously reported basic tactile sensations in their previously numb fingers. Tactile awareness from seeing the rubber hand was enhanced by progressively increasing the stimulation duration. Multisensory illusions directly and specifically modulate the reemergence of sensory memories and enhance tactile sensation, despite (or as a result of) prior deafferentation. When sensory inputs are lost, and are later illusorily regained, the brain updates a coherent body image even several years after the body has become permanently unable to feel. This particular example of neural plasticity represents a significant opportunity to strengthen the sense of the self and the feelings of embodiment in patients with spinal cord injury.

  3. Modification of spasticity by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; McKay, William B.; Tansey, Keith E.; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut; Minassian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective To examine the effects of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) on lower-limb spasticity. Design Interventional pilot study to produce preliminary data. Setting Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Participants Three subjects with chronic motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) who could walk ≥10 m. Interventions Two interconnected stimulating skin electrodes (Ø 5 cm) were placed paraspinally at the T11/T12 vertebral levels, and two rectangular electrodes (8 × 13 cm) on the abdomen for the reference. Biphasic 2 ms-width pulses were delivered at 50 Hz for 30 minutes at intensities producing paraesthesias but no motor responses in the lower limbs. Outcome measures The Wartenberg pendulum test and neurological recordings of surface-electromyography (EMG) were used to assess effects on exaggerated reflex excitability. Non-functional co-activation during volitional movement was evaluated. The timed 10-m walk test provided measures of clinical function. Results The index of spasticity derived from the pendulum test changed from 0.8 ± 0.4 pre- to 0.9 ± 0.3 post-stimulation, with an improvement in the subject with the lowest pre-stimulation index. Exaggerated reflex responsiveness was decreased after tSCS across all subjects, with the most profound effect on passive lower-limb movement (pre- to post-tSCS EMG ratio: 0.2 ± 0.1), as was non-functional co-activation during voluntary movement. Gait speed values increased in two subjects by 39%. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that tSCS, similar to epidurally delivered stimulation, may be used for spasticity control, without negatively impacting residual motor control in incomplete SCI. Further study in a larger population is warranted. PMID:24090290

  4. Central sensitization in spinal cord injured humans assessed by reflex receptive fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biurrun Manresa, José Alberto; Finnerup, Nanna Susanne Brix; Johannesen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of central sensitization, elicited by intramuscular injection of capsaicin, by comparing the reflex receptive fields (RRF) of spinally-intact volunteers and spinal cord injured volunteers that present presensitized spinal nociceptive mechanisms. METHODS: Fift...

  5. Primary vertebral and spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukobza, M.; Mazel, C.; Touboul, E.

    1996-01-01

    We examined eight patients with primary spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting with spinal cord compression and proven histologically after laminectomy (7 cases) or biopsy (1 case) by MRI. The most common findings were an isointense or low signal relative to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Spinal cord compression, vertebral bone marrow and paravertebral extension were assessed. Contrast enhancement was intense in seven of the eight cases and homogeneous in all of them. T2WI (performed in 2 cases) may be useful to distinguish metastatic carcinomas and sarcomas. T1WI demonstrated the full extent of the epidural lesion, which was well-delineated in all cases. When the paravertebral extension is not well-defined, a study with contrast medium should be performed. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Developing a data sharing community for spinal cord injury research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Alison; Anderson, Kim D; Beattie, Michael S; Bixby, John L; Ferguson, Adam R; Fouad, Karim; Jakeman, Lyn B; Nielson, Jessica L; Popovich, Phillip G; Schwab, Jan M; Lemmon, Vance P

    2017-09-01

    The rapid growth in data sharing presents new opportunities across the spectrum of biomedical research. Global efforts are underway to develop practical guidance for implementation of data sharing and open data resources. These include the recent recommendation of 'FAIR Data Principles', which assert that if data is to have broad scientific value, then digital representations of that data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR). The spinal cord injury (SCI) research field has a long history of collaborative initiatives that include sharing of preclinical research models and outcome measures. In addition, new tools and resources are being developed by the SCI research community to enhance opportunities for data sharing and access. With this in mind, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) hosted a workshop on October 5-6, 2016 in Bethesda, MD, in collaboration with the Open Data Commons for Spinal Cord Injury (ODC-SCI) titled "Preclinical SCI Data: Creating a FAIR Share Community". Workshop invitees were nominated by the workshop steering committee (co-chairs: ARF and VPL; members: AC, KDA, MSB, KF, LBJ, PGP, JMS), to bring together junior and senior level experts including preclinical and basic SCI researchers from academia and industry, data science and bioinformatics experts, investigators with expertise in other neurological disease fields, clinical researchers, members of the SCI community, and program staff representing federal and private funding agencies. The workshop and ODC-SCI efforts were sponsored by the International Spinal Research Trust (ISRT), the Rick Hansen Institute, Wings for Life, the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and NINDS. The number of attendees was limited to ensure active participation and feedback in small groups. The goals were to examine the current landscape for data sharing in SCI research and provide a path to its future. Below are

  7. Directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure via the collateral network: correlations with changes in systemic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Yuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nagano, Takaaki; Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Yamashiro, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    During thoracoabdominal surgery in which segmental arteries are sacrificed over a large area, blood supply routes from collateral networks have received attention as a means of avoiding spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord blood supply through a collateral network by directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure experimentally. In beagle dogs (n = 8), the thoracoabdominal aorta and segmental arteries L1-L7 were exposed, and a temporary bypass was created for distal perfusion. Next, a laser blood flow meter was placed on the spinal dura mater in the L5 region to measure the spinal cord blood flow. The following were measured simultaneously when the direct blood supply from segmental arteries L2-L7 to the spinal cord was stopped: mean systemic blood pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure (blood pressure within the aortic clamp site), and spinal cord blood flow supplied via the collateral network. These variables were then investigated for evidence of correlations. Positive correlations were observed between mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord blood flow during interruption of segmental artery flow both with (r = 0.844, P flow with and without distal perfusion (r = 0.803, P network from outside the interrupted segmental arteries, and high systemic blood pressure (∼1.33-fold higher) was needed to obtain the preclamping spinal cord blood flow, whereas 1.68-fold higher systemic blood pressure was needed when distal perfusion was halted. Spinal cord blood flow is positively correlated with mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure under spinal cord ischemia caused by clamping a wide range of segmental arteries. In open and endovascular thoracic and thoracoabdominal surgery, elevating mean systemic blood pressure is a simple and effective means of increasing spinal cord blood flow, and measuring spinal cord perfusion pressure seems to be useful for monitoring

  8. Independent spinal cord atrophy measures correlate to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Skimminge, A.

    2011-01-01

    Study design:Cross-sectional descriptive analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical outcome.Objectives:The aim of this study was to present anatomically consistent and independent spinal cord atrophy measures based on standard MRI material and analyze their specific relations to se...... can be used to assess sensory and motor function independently. The finding is corresponding well with the respective locations of the main sensory and motor pathways.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 10 August 2010; doi:10.1038/sc.2010.87....

  9. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... chronic SCI individuals and 7 age-comparable controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing rhythmic dorsiflexion of the ankle. A significant negative correlation was found between the activation in the ipsilateral motor (M1) and bilateral premotor cortex (PMC) on one...

  10. Frequency of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.H.; Ahmed, K.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury. To compare frequency of pressure ulcers in complete and incomplete spinal cord injury using ASIA impairment scale.Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi, from Jun 2013 to Jan 2014. Material and Methods: After permission from the hospital ethical committee and informed consent, spinal cord injury (SCI) patients were included from the outdoor and the indoor departments of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi from June 2013 to January 2014. Patients were divided in two groups of complete SCI and incomplete SCI on the basis of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis. Results: Total 62 SCI patients were included. Mean age of patients was 36 +- 0.93 SD. Males were more in number 79% (49). On ASIA scoring 51.6% (32) were in ASIA 'A' followed by 19.4% (12), 17.7% (11) and 11.3% (7) patients in ASIA 'B', 'C' and 'D' respectively. SCI was complete in 51.6% (32) and incomplete in 48.4% (30). PU were present in 32.3% (20) patients. PU were in stage 4 in 30% (6) patients. PU were more frequent in ASIA 'A' injuries followed by 'B', 'C' and 'D' involving 43.8%, 25%,18.2% and 14.3% of patients respectively. Pressure ulcers (PU) were common in complete injuries involving 43.8% (14) than in incomplete injuries 20% (6) (p=0.041). Conclusions: Pressure ulsers were more common complication detected after spinal cord injury with more frequency in complete spinal cord injury. (author)

  11. Autoregulation of spinal cord blood flow: is the cord a microcosm of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, R.; Albin, M.S.; Bunegin, L.; Gelineau, J.

    1986-11-01

    The autoregulatory capability of regional areas of the brain and spinal cord was demonstrated in 18 rats anesthetized with a continuous infusion of intravenous pentothal. Blood flow was measured by the injection of radioactive microspheres (Co57, Sn113, Ru103, Sc46). Blood flow measurements were made at varying levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) which was altered by neosynephrine to raise MAP or trimethaphan to lower MAP. Autoregulation of the spinal cord mirrored that of the brain, with an autoregulatory range of 60 to 120 mm Hg for both tissues. Within this range, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 59.2 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min (SEM) and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was 61.1 +/- 3.6. There was no significant difference in CBF and SCBF in the autoregulatory range. Autoregulation was also demonstrated regionally in the left cortex, right cortex, brainstem, thalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and cervical, thoracic and lumbar cord. This data provides a coherent reference point in establishing autoregulatory curves under barbiturate anesthesia. Further investigation of the effects of other anesthetic agents on autoregulation of the spinal cord is needed. It is possible that intraspinal cord compliance, like intracranial compliance, might be adversely affected by the effects of anesthetics on autoregulation.

  12. Metabolite Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Predict High Neuropathic Pain Impact After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1Present address: Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry , University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. None...most common reasons for reduced quality of life after spinal cord injury (SCI) [8,59]. The most rational approach for managing these refractory pain... diabetes [45] and after SCI [34]. Basic research suggests that glial activation is an important mechanism underlying neuropathic pain after SCI [22,23

  13. Spinal cord regeneration by modulating bone marrow with neurotransmitters and Citicholine: Analysis at micromolecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Cheramadathukudiyil Skaria; John, Ponnezhathu Sebastian; Chinthu, Romeo; Akhilraj, Puthenveetil Raju; Anju, Thoppil Raveendran

    2017-04-01

    Spinal cord injury results in disruption of brain-spinal cord fibre connectivity, leading to progressive tissue damage at the site of injury and resultant paralysis of varying degrees. The current study investigated the role of autologous bone marrow modulated with neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter stimulating agent, Citicholine, in spinal cord of spinal cord injured rats. Radioreceptor assay using [3H] ligand was carried out to quantify muscarinic receptor. Gene expression studies were done using Real Time PCR analysis. Scatchard analysis of muscarinic M1 receptor showed significantly decreased B max (p spinal cord injury treated with 5HT and GABA, and spinal cord injury treated with Citicholine). Muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in spinal cord injured group showed significant down regulation (p spinal cord injured group. The confocal microscopic study using specific antibody of muscarinic M1 confirmed the gene expression studies. Thus our results suggest that the neurotransmitters combination along with bone marrow or Citicholine with bone marrow can reverse the muscarinic receptor alterations in the spinal cord of spinal cord injured rats, which is a promising step towards a better therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury because of the positive role of cholinergic system in regulation of both locomotor activity and synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pretreatment with AQP4 and NKCC1 Inhibitors Concurrently Attenuated Spinal Cord Edema and Tissue Damage after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Wang, Xiji; Li, Wenhao; Chen, Jingyuan; Sun, Honghui

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Spinal cord edema plays critical roles in the pathological progression of SCI. This study aimed to delineate the roles of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Na + -K + -Cl - cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in acute phase edema and tissue destruction after SCI and to explore whether inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 could improve SCI-induced spinal edema and damage. Rat SCI model was established by modified Allen's method. Spinal cord water content, cerebrospinal fluid lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, AQP4 and NKCC1 expression, and spinal cord pathology from 30 min to 7 days after SCI were monitored. Additionally, aforementioned parameters in rats treated with AQP4 and/or NKCC1 inhibitors were assessed 2 days after SCI. Spinal cord water content was significantly increased 1 h after SCI while AQP4 and NKCC1 expression and spinal fluid LDH activity elevated 6 h after SCI. Spinal cord edema and spinal cord destruction peaked around 24 h after SCI and maintained at high levels thereafter. Treating rats with AQP4 inhibitor TGN-020 and NKCC1 antagonist bumetanide significantly reduced spinal cord edema, tissue destruction, and AQP4 and NKCC1 expression after SCI in an additive manner. These results demonstrated the benefits of simultaneously inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 after SCI.

  15. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Nakae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  16. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models. PMID:21436995

  17. Pressure sores in spinal cord injury: Active intervention saves costs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Pressure sores are a predictable consequence of poorly managed spinal cord-injured patients. Not only do pressure sores contribute to the morbidity, but also add significantly to the medical/nursing management, cost and admission stay, limiting optimal bed utilisation. This intervention study assesses the impact ...

  18. Spinal cord stimulation and modulation of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the opportunities of several new applications of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our pilot study and consecutively performed international randomised controlled trial on effects of SCS in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy showed

  19. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from prostate carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberson Robert E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although vertebral and epidural metastases are common, intradural metastases and intramedullary spinal cord metastases are rare. The indications for the treatment of intramedullary spinal cord metastases remain controversial. We present the first biopsy-proven case of an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Case presentation Our patient was a 68-year-old right-handed Caucasian man with a Gleason grade 4 + 3 prostate adenocarcinoma who had previously undergone a prostatectomy, androgen blockade and transurethral debulking. He presented with new-onset saddle anesthesia and fecal incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a spindle-shaped intramedullary lesion of the conus medullaris. Our patient underwent decompression and an excisional biopsy; the lesion’s pathology was consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Postoperatively, our patient received CyberKnife® radiosurgery to the resection cavity at a marginal dose of 27Gy to the 85% isodose line. At three months follow-up, our patient remains neurologically stable with no new deficits or lesions. Conclusions We review the literature and discuss the indications for surgery and radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal cord metastases. We also report the novel use of stereotactic radiosurgery to sterilize the resection cavity following an excisional biopsy of the metastasis.

  20. Human spinal cord injury : motor unit properties and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, C. K.; Bakels, R.; Klein, C. S.; Zijdewind, I.

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in widespread variation in muscle function. Review of motor unit data shows that changes in the amount and balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs after SCI alter management of motoneurons. Not only are units recruited up to higher than usual relative forces when

  1. medical management of suspected serious acute spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraplegia – complete loss of motor (power) function in the lower limbs, i.e. ... per and lower limbs. • Thoracic – torso. CLINICAL REVIEW. BokSmart: medical management of suspected serious acute spinal cord injuries in rugby players. Abstract ..... a double-strength mixture, i.e. 8 amps adrenalin in 200 ml normal saline at ...

  2. Spinal cord injuries in South African Rugby Union (1980 - 2007 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in South Africa, a retrospective case-series study was conducted on injuries that occurred between 1980 and 2007. We aimed to identify preventable causes to reduce the overall rate of SCIs in South African ...

  3. Mirror neurons: reflecting on the motor cortex and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Marc H

    2013-02-18

    Neurons in the monkey motor cortex that project to the spinal cord to control particular muscle contractions and movements have been found to discharge again while the monkey simply watches another primate make similar movements: monkey see; monkey not do. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexual health of women with spinal cord injury in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, N.P.M; Nuri, R.P; van Brakel, W.H.; Cornielje, H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors influencing the sexual health of women with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Bangladesh. Methods: This study used both qualitative and quantitative methods. The quantitative part used a case-control design. Cases were women with SCI and controls were age-matched women without

  5. Gender differences in psychological adjustment among spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study gender differences in psychological adjustment of Spinal Cord Injured (SCI) patients was studied. The sample of 70 SCI patients (35 male and 35 female) was selected from the National Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (NIRM) Islamabad, Bagh and Muzafrabad, (Azad & Jammu Kashmir AJK).

  6. Spinal cord stimulation: modeling results and clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Struijk, J.J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    The potential distribution in volume couductor models of the spinal cord at cervical, midthoracic and lowthoracic levels, due to epidural stimulation, was calculated. Treshold stimuli of modeled myelhated dorsal column and dorsal root fibers were calculated and were compared with perception

  7. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Motor Dysfuntion in Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) treatment on the motor function of spinal cord injury (SCI) rat. Methods: SCI rats were modelled by contusion, and then received 10 mg/kg Sal B, or methylprednisolone, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally daily for 4 weeks, two hours after the ...

  8. Induction of spinal cord paralysis by negative pi-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amols, H.I.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    As part of an investigation on late non-neoplastic injury induced by negative pi-mesons (pions), a series of studies have been performed using pion beams for the induction of spinal cord paralysis in the Fisher 344 rat. Groups of rats were exposed to 1, 5 or 15 daily doses of peak pions or X rays. Paralysis appeared earlier after treatment with pions than after X-rays even in a comparison of groups with similar final incidences. A single dose RBE for spinal cord paralysis of 1.3 was found. The RBE rises to a value of 3.2 if the total dose is given as a series of 15 daily exposures. These RBEs are far larger than those observed using other late injury end-points, such as tubular degeneration in the kidney or fibrosis and sclerosis in the support structures of the colon for which the single dose RBE is less than 1.2. The biological and/or physical basis for the high sensitivity of the spinal cord to peak pions has not yet been resolved, but these data have suggested caution in exposing the spinal cord to peak pions in clinical trials. (author)

  9. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  10. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  11. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide in spinal cord injury neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven R; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke M

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) represent significant problems. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a fatty acid amide that is produced in many cells in the body, is thought to potentiate the action of endocannabinoids and to reduce pain and inflammation. This randomized...

  12. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS; Toxoplasmose medullaire et sida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J. [Hopital Saint-Joseph, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1995-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Work related spinal cord injury, Australia 1986–97

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—Little has been published before on the epidemiology and prevention of work related spinal cord injury (SCI). This study is the first national population based epidemiological analysis of this type of injury. It presents that largest case series ever reported.

  14. Perceptions of Positive Attitudes toward People with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lys, K.; Pernice, R.

    1995-01-01

    This New Zealand study examined attitudes toward persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) via a survey of 35 people with SCI, 27 SCI rehabilitation workers, 16 outpatient hospital rehabilitation workers, and 37 people from the general population. Results were analyzed in terms of age, ethnic identity, gender, professional training, and amount of…

  15. Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury patients in Gombe, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... or units with trained manpower and adequate equipment will go a long way to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers among SCI patients. Key Words: Spinal cord injury, neurological impairment, pressure ulcer, prevention, pressure relieving devices. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma Vol.3(1) 2004: 57-60 ...

  16. Spinal cord hydrolysate ameliorate immunological reaction in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska-Patzer, Barbara; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Zielińska, Joanna; Kasarello, Kaja; Kurzepa, Katarzyna; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins to induce oral tolerance in the animal model of sclerosis multiplex - experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. The female Lewis rats were fed with hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins in two doses for one week before immunization, which was induced by injection of guinea pig spinal cord homogenate. At the peak of clinical symptoms (the 13th day post immunization) the rats were sacrificed and the spleen removed. Splenocytes were suspended in a culture medium and placed in microculture plates. The cells were stimulated with homogenate. The cells were cultured for seven days. Proliferation of splenocytes was estimated by means of methyl-3H thymidine incorporation. In supernatants of cultures of splenocytes the level of cytokines INF-gamma, IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-gamma was measured. It was demonstrated that homogenate-induced splenocytes of hydrolysate-fed rats gave rise to low proliferation as compared to the controls used. The IFN-gamma was inhibited in hydrolysate-fed animals. The hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins has a modulatory effect on the immune reaction, particularly on the orally-induced antigen-specific modulation of autoimmune response.

  17. Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured patients. ... Trauma was the etiology in 87.5% of the cases (44% were road accidents). 12/16 patients were paraplegics (10 above ... in SCI patients. This approach is compatible with the efforts to improve the quality of life and rehabilitation of these patients.

  18. Spinal cord stimulation for the management of pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an accepted method of pain control. SCS has been used for many years and is supported by a substantial evidence base. A multidisciplinary consensus group has been convened to create a guideline for the implementation and execution of an SCS programme for South Africa (SA).

  19. Zinc-enriched boutons in rat spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Danscher, G; Jo, S M

    2000-01-01

    The rat spinal cord reveals a complex pattern of zinc-enriched (ZEN) boutons. As a result of in vivo exposure to selenide ions, nanosized clusters of zinc selenide are created in places where zinc ions are present, including the zinc-containing synaptic vesicles of ZEN boutons. The clusters can...

  20. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. The data

  1. Spinal cord damage in Zalcitabine maternally treated mice foetuses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present article explores the impacts of the anti-Aids drug (Zalcitabine) on the histological structure and morphometric analysis of the spinal cord of 14-day old mice fetuses. Pregnant mice received two oral concentrations of Zalcitabine (600 and 1000 mg/kg) for five consecutive days (from day 9 to day 13 of gestation).

  2. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  3. Activated microglia in the spinal cord underlies diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Couture, Réjean; Hong, Yanguo

    2014-04-05

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common chronic medical condition. Approximately 30% of diabetic patients develop neuropathic pain, manifested as spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperglycemia induces metabolic changes in peripheral tissues and enhances oxidative stress in nerve fibers. The damages and subsequent reactive inflammation affect structural properties of Schwann cells and axons leading to the release of neuropoietic mediators, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-nociceptive mediators. Therefore, diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) shares some histological features and underlying mechanisms with traumatic neuropathy. DNP displays, however, other distinct features; for instance, sensory input to the spinal cord decreases rather than increasing in diabetic patients. Consequently, development of central sensitization in DNP involves mechanisms that are distinct from traumatic neuropathic pain. In DNP, the contribution of spinal cord microglia activation to central sensitization and pain processes is emerging as a new concept. Besides inflammation in the periphery, hyperglycemia and the resulting production of reactive oxygen species affect the local microenvironment in the spinal cord. All these alterations could trigger resting and sessile microglia to the activated phenotype. In turn, microglia synthesize and release pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroactive molecules capable of inducing hyperactivity of spinal nociceptive neurons. Hence, it is imperative to elucidate glial mechanisms underlying DNP for the development of effective therapeutic agents. The present review highlights the recent developments regarding the contribution of spinal microglia as compelling target for the treatment of DNP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological outcome in road traffic accidents with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslavac, Sasa; Dzidić, Ivan; Kejla, Zvonko

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate neurological outcome in road traffic accidents (RTA) with spinal cord injury (SCI). The study was undertaken in National Spinal Unit of Special Medical Rehabilitation Hospital, in Varazdinske Toplice, Croatia. Hospital records of 154 inpatient RTA SCI patients, in years 1991-2001 were reviewed. Six groups of patients were formed: car drivers, co-drivers, back seat passengers, motorcycle drivers, bicycle drivers and pedestrians. Neurological assessments at admission to rehabilitation and before discharge were done according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Methods of descriptive statistics were used. Overall 49% of RTA SCI patients presented with complete injury (ASIA A) at admission to rehabilitation, 93% of initially complete spinal cord injured patients remained complete at discharge and 72% previously non-ambulatory incomplete (ASIA B-E) patients achieved ambulation. Complete injury was acquired more often in motorcycle drivers and car drivers group (67% and 54%, respectively). Road traffic spinal cord injuries are, and will remain the leading cause of traumatic SCI, with high proportion of complete injury at rehabilitation onset, especially in motorcycle drivers and car drivers groups.

  5. Diagnosis of cervical spinal cord disorders with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Naohito; Iizuka, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 through May 1989, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been performed in 58 patients with myelopathy and 9 patients with spinal cord injuries. This study was designed to determine the rate of spinal cord stricture and changes of signal intensities. Increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was more frequently observed than decreased intensity on T1-weighted images in the group of myelopathy (19/58 vs 10/58). In the group of spinal cord injuries, however, there was no significant difference in the incidence between increased intensity on T2-weighted images (4/9) and decreased intensity on T1-weighted images (7/9). Twelve patients with chronic compressive spinal myelopathy tended to have an increased intensity on T2-weighted images. In such cases, although JOA scores were low before surgery, signal intensity returned to that without marked signal changes. In chronic compressive cervical myelopathy, the degree of preoperative compression was the same as the postoperative JOA scores. Regarding cervical spinal injury, there was a good correlation between the size of low signal area and the degree of paralysis. (N.K.)

  6. Changes in galanin immunoreactivity in rat lumbosacral spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvarova, K; Murray, E; Vizzard, M A

    2004-08-02

    Alterations in the expression of the neuropeptide galanin were examined in micturition reflex pathways 6 weeks after complete spinal cord transection (T8). In control animals, galanin expression was present in specific regions of the gray matter in the rostral lumbar and caudal lumbosacral spinal cord, including: (1) the dorsal commissure; (2) the superficial dorsal horn; (3) the regions of the intermediolateral cell column (L1-L2) and the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (L6-S1); and (4) the lateral collateral pathway in lumbosacral spinal segments. Densitometry analysis demonstrated significant increases (P < or = 0.001) in galanin immunoreactivity (IR) in these regions of the S1 spinal cord after spinal cord injury (SCI). Changes in galanin-IR were not observed at the L4-L6 segments except for an increase in galanin-IR in the dorsal commissure in the L4 segment. In contrast, decreases in galanin-IR were observed in the L1 segment. The number of galanin-IR cells increased (P < or = 0.001) in the L1 and S1 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after SCI. In all DRG examined (L1, L2, L6, and S1), the percentage of bladder afferent cells expressing galanin-IR significantly increased (4-19-fold) after chronic SCI. In contrast, galanin expression in nerve fibers in the urinary bladder detrusor and urothelium was decreased or eliminated after SCI. Expression of the neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was altered in the spinal cord after SCI. A significant increase in BDNF expression was present in spinal cord segments after SCI. In contrast, NGF expression was only increased in the spinal segments adjacent and rostral to the transection site (T7-T8), whereas spinal segments (T13-L1; L6-S1), distal to the transection site exhibited decreased NGF expression. Changes in galanin expression in micturition pathways after SCI may be mediated by changing neurotrophic factor expression, particularly BDNF. These changes may contribute to

  7. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute trauma of the spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.; Jankowski, R.; Nowak, S.

    1993-01-01

    30 patients with acute neurologic deficits following spine trauma were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. 15 patients had hemorrhagic necrosis of spinal cord and 9 patients had contusion and/or oedema of spinal cord. 21 patients had compression of spinal cord. MRI appears to be useful in the diagnosis of acute cord injury. MRI in acute phase of spine injury can be predictive of the eventual motor recovery of the patient. (author)

  9. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire...... to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort.Results:Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women....../discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured....

  10. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients

  11. Trauma of the spine and spinal cord: imaging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizel, P M; van der Zijden, T; Gaudino, S; Spaepen, M; Voormolen, M H J; Venstermans, C; De Belder, F; van den Hauwe, L; Van Goethem, J

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spine and spinal cord are common and potentially devastating lesions. We present a comprehensive overview of the classification of vertebral fractures, based on morphology (e.g., wedge, (bi)concave, or crush fractures) or on the mechanism of injury (flexion-compression, axial compression, flexion-distraction, or rotational fracture-dislocation lesions). The merits and limitations of different imaging techniques are discussed, including plain X-ray films, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection. There is growing evidence that state-of-the-art imaging techniques provide answers to some of the key questions in the management of patients with spine and spinal cord trauma: is the fracture stable or unstable? Is the fracture recent or old? Is the fracture benign or malignant? In summary, we show that high-quality radiological investigations are essential in the diagnosis and management of patients with spinal trauma.

  12. Gastrocnemius muscle contracture after spinal cord injury: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diong, Joanna; Harvey, Lisa A; Kwah, Li Khim; Clarke, Jillian L; Bilston, Lynne E; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in passive length and stiffness of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit in people after spinal cord injury. In a prospective longitudinal study, eight wheelchair-dependent participants with severe paralysis were assessed 3 and 12 mos after spinal cord injury. Passive torque-angle data were obtained as the ankle was slowly rotated through range at six knee angles. Differences in passive ankle torque-angle data recorded at different knee angles were used to derive passive length-tension curves of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit. Ultrasound imaging was used to determine fascicle and tendon contributions to the muscle-tendon unit length-tension curves. The participants had ankle contractures (mean [SD] maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion angle, 88 [9] degrees) 3 mos after spinal cord injury. Ankle range did not worsen significantly during the subsequent 9 mos (mean change, -5 degrees; 95% confidence interval, -16 to 6 degrees). There were no changes in the mean slack length or the stiffness of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit or in the slack lengths of the fascicles or the tendon between 3 and 12 mos after spinal cord injury. There were no consistent patterns of the change in slack length or stiffness with the changes in ankle range in the data from the individual participants. This study, the first longitudinal study of muscle length and stiffness after spinal cord injury, showed that the length and the stiffness of the gastrocnemius did not change substantially between 3 and 12 mos after injury.

  13. Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    1991). Review of the secondary injury theory of acute spinal cord trauma with emphasis on vascular mechanisms. J. Neurosurg 75, 15-26. 2...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0194 TITLE: Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...individuals who sustain an acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment options include urgent surgical decompression to relieve pressure on the spinal

  14. The Blood Testis Barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    privileged”. Our focus has been on the blood- spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and how trauma collapses this important spinal vascular specialization...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0481 TITLE: The Blood-Testis Barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction following Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...21702-5012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Nearly 70% of males exhibit a profound loss of fertility following spinal cord injury

  15. Injectable hydrogel materials for spinal cord regeneration: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macaya, D; Spector, M

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) presents a complex regenerative problem due to the multiple facets of growth inhibition that occur following trauma to the cord parenchyma and stroma. Clinically, SCI is further complicated by the heterogeneity in the size, shape and extent of human injuries. Many of these injuries do not breach the dura mater and have continuous viable axons through the injury site that can later lead to some degree of functional recovery. In these cases, surgical manipulation of the spinal cord by implanting a preformed scaffold or drug delivery device may lead to further damage. Given these circumstances, in situ-forming scaffolds are an attractive approach for SCI regeneration. These synthetic and natural polymers undergo a rapid transformation from liquid to gel upon injection into the cord tissue, conforming to the individual lesion site and directly integrating with the host tissue. Injectable materials can be formulated to have mechanical properties that closely match the native spinal cord extracellular matrix, and this may enhance axonal ingrowth. Such materials can also be loaded with cellular and molecular therapeutics to modulate the wound environment and enhance regeneration. This review will focus on the current status of in situ-forming materials for spinal cord repair. The advantages of, and requirements for, such polymers will be presented, and examples of the behavior of such systems in vitro and in vivo will be presented. There are helpful lessons to be learned from the investigations of injectable hydrogels for the treatment of SCI that apply to the use of these biomaterials for the treatment of lesions in other central nervous system tissues and in organs comprising other tissue types. (topical review)

  16. Emergence of Serotonergic Neurons After Spinal Cord Injury in Turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Fabbiani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity of neural circuits takes many forms and plays a fundamental role in regulating behavior to changing demands while maintaining stability. For example, during spinal cord development neurotransmitter identity in neurons is dynamically adjusted in response to changes in the activity of spinal networks. It is reasonable to speculate that this type of plasticity might occur also in mature spinal circuits in response to injury. Because serotonergic signaling has a central role in spinal cord functions, we hypothesized that spinal cord injury (SCI in the fresh water turtle Trachemys scripta elegans may trigger homeostatic changes in serotonergic innervation. To test this possibility we performed immunohistochemistry for serotonin (5-HT and key molecules involved in the determination of the serotonergic phenotype before and after SCI. We found that as expected, in the acute phase after injury the dense serotonergic innervation was strongly reduced. However, 30 days after SCI the population of serotonergic cells (5-HT+ increased in segments caudal to the lesion site. These cells expressed the neuronal marker HuC/D and the transcription factor Nkx6.1. The new serotonergic neurons did not incorporate the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU and did not express the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA indicating that novel serotonergic neurons were not newborn but post-mitotic cells that have changed their neurochemical identity. Switching towards a serotonergic neurotransmitter phenotype may be a spinal cord homeostatic mechanism to compensate for the loss of descending serotonergic neuromodulation, thereby helping the outstanding functional recovery displayed by turtles. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist (±-8-Hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT blocked the increase in 5-HT+ cells suggesting 5-HT1A receptors may trigger the respecification process.

  17. Development of an instrumented spinal cord surrogate using optical fibers: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinello, Yann; Wagnac, Éric; Ung, Bora; Petit, Yvan; Pradhan, Prabin; Peyrache, Louis-Marie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    In vitro replication of traumatic spinal cord injury is necessary to understand its biomechanics and to improve animal models. During a traumatic spinal cord injury, the spinal cord withstands an impaction at high velocity. In order to fully assess the impaction, the use of spinal canal occlusion sensor is necessary. A physical spinal cord surrogate is also often used to simulate the presence of the spinal cord and its surrounding structures. In this study, an instrumented physical spinal cord surrogate is presented and validated. The sensing is based on light transmission loss observed in embedded bare optical fibers subjected to bending. The instrumented surrogate exhibits similar mechanical properties under static compression compared to fresh porcine spinal cords. The instrumented surrogate has a compression sensing threshold of 40% that matches the smallest compression values leading to neurological injuries. The signal obtained from the sensor allows calculating the compression of the spinal cord surrogate with a maximum of 5% deviation. Excellent repeatability was also observed under repetitive loading. The proposed instrumented spinal cord surrogate is promising with satisfying mechanical properties and good sensing capability. It is the first attempt at proposing a method to assess the internal loads sustained by the spinal cord during a traumatic injury. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An intermediate animal model of spinal cord stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Guiho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries (SCI result in the loss of movement and sensory feedback as well as organs dysfunctions. For example, nearly all SCI subjects loose their bladder control and are prone to kidney failure if they do not proceed to intermittent (self- catheterization. Electrical stimulation of the sacral spinal roots with an implantable neuroprosthesis is a promising approach, with commercialized products, to restore continence and control micturition. However, many persons do not ask for this intervention since a surgical deafferentation is needed and the loss of sensory functions and reflexes become serious side effects of this procedure. Recent results renewed interest in spinal cord stimulation. Stimulation of existing pre-cabled neural networks involved in physiological processes regulation is suspected to enable synergic recruitment of spinal fibers. The development of direct spinal stimulation strategies aiming at bladder and bowel functions restoration would therefore appear as a credible alternative to existent solutions. However, a lack of suitable large animal model complicates these kinds of studies. In this article, we propose a new animal model of spinal stimulation -pig- and will briefly introduce results from one first acute experimental validation session.

  19. Management of Sexual Disorders in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Vaccaro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injured (SCI patients have sexual disorders including erectile dysfunction (ED, impotence, priapism, ejaculatory dysfunction and infertility. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include four steps. Step 1 involves smoking cessation, weight loss, and increasing physical activity. Step 2 is phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I such as Sildenafil (Viagra, intracavernous injections of Papaverine or prostaglandins, and vacuum constriction devices. Step 3 is a penile prosthesis, and Step 4 is sacral neuromodulation (SNM. Priapism can be resolved spontaneously if there is no ischemia found on blood gas measurement or by Phenylephrine. For anejaculatory dysfunction, massage, vibrator, electrical stimulation and direct surgical biopsy can be used to obtain sperm which can then be used for intra-uterine or in-vitro fertilization. Infertility treatment in male SCI patients involves a combination of the above treatments for erectile and anejaculatory dysfunctions. The basic approach to and management of sexual dysfunction in female SCI patients are similar as for men but do not require treatment for erectile or ejaculatory problems.

  20. Sexual concerns after Spinal Cord Injury: An update on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marcalee Sipski; Aisen, Carrie Mlynarczyk; Alexander, Sterling Morrison; Aisen, Mindy Lipson

    2017-01-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) causes neurological impairment with resultant neurogenic sexual dysfunction which can compound preexisting psychological and medical sexual concerns. Understanding these concerns is important in managing the lifelong needs of persons with SCIs. To provide an overview of the impact of SCI on sexuality along with a framework for treatment of sexual concerns. To briefly review male infertility and its treatments and pregnancy in females after SCI. Interdisciplinary literature review and synthesis of information. The average age at SCI is increased, thus persons with SCIs may have preexisting sexual concerns. Sexual activity and satisfaction are decreased after SCI. Psychogenic sexual arousal is related to remaining sensation in the T11-L2 dermatomes. Orgasm occurs in approximately 50% of persons with SCIs with all injuries except subjects with complete lower motor neuron (LMN) injuries affecting the lowest sacral segments A structured approach to treatment including assessing preinjury function, determining the impact of injury, education, assessing and treating iatrogenic sexual dysfunction and treatment of concomitant problems is recommended. Basic and advanced methods to improve sexual arousal and orgasm are discussed and treatment of anejaculation and issues associated with pregnancy and SCI are reviewed. Sexual satisfaction is impaired after SCI; however, education and new therapies can improve responsiveness. Future research is warranted to improve sexual function and fertility potential in persons with SCIs.

  1. Application of Color Transformation Techniques in Pediatric Spinal Cord MR Images: Typically Developing and Spinal Cord Injury Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Mahdi; Shah, Pallav; Conklin, Chris J; Middleton, Devon M; Saksena, Sona; Flanders, Adam E; Krisa, Laura; Mulcahey, M J; Faro, Scott H; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2018-01-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an improved and reliable visualization method for pediatric spinal cord MR images in healthy subjects and patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 15 pediatric volunteers (10 healthy subjects and 5 subjects with cervical SCI) with a mean age of 11.41 years (range 8-16 years) were recruited and scanned using a 3.0T Siemens Verio MR scanner. T2-weighted axial images were acquired covering entire cervical spinal cord level C1 to C7. These gray-scale images were then converted to color images by using five different techniques including hue-saturation-value (HSV), rainbow, red-green-blue (RGB), and two enhanced RGB techniques using automated contrast stretching and intensity inhomogeneity correction. Performance of these techniques was scored visually by two neuroradiologists within three selected cervical spinal cord intervertebral disk levels (C2-C3, C4-C5, and C6-C7) and quantified using signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the color images shows consistent improvement across all the healthy and SCI subjects over conventional gray-scale T2-weighted gradient echo (GRE) images. Inter-observer reliability test showed moderate to strong intra-class correlation (ICC) coefficients in the proposed techniques (ICC > 0.73). The results suggest that the color images could be used for quantification and enhanced visualization of the spinal cord structures in addition to the conventional gray-scale images. This would immensely help towards improved delineation of the gray/white and CSF structures and further aid towards accurate manual or automatic drawings of region of interests (ROIs).

  2. Mutiple sclerosios of the spinal cord: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo; Park, Byung Kwan; Seong, Chang Kyu; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Yong Jin; Jeon, Beom Seok

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the MR appearance of multiple sclerosis in the spinal cord. Between January 1990 and December 1996, we retrospectively analyzed 27 spinal MR images of 18 patients in whom-on the basis of Poser's diagnostic critera-multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord had been diagnosed. Eleven patients were men and seven were women, and they were aged between 18 and 58(mean, 37) years. Using T1-weighted sagittal(n=3D27), T2-weighted axial(n=3D26) and sagittal(n=3D27), and contrast enhanced T1-weighted(n=3D14) images, lesions were analyzed for multiplicity, location, length, cross-sectional area and location, cord size, and enhancement pattern. Brain MR images(n=3D15) were also evaluated. In 14 of 18 patients, a solitary lesion was seen on initial MR imaging. Four of the 14 had double lesions, and on follow-up MR imaging at 2-5 months, five were seen to have double lesions. Eleven lesions were found in the cervical cord, and 12 in the thoracic cord, two were in the cervicothoracic and two in the thoracolumbar region. The length of 12 lesions was less than two vertebral heights, while 15 extended for more than two vertebral heights. Six lesions occupied less than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the cord and the other 20 occupied more than 50% of this area. Cord size was enlarged in 17 cases, unchanged in eight, and atrophic in two. Eight lesions in 14 patients who underwent enhanced MR imaging showed focal contrast enhancement; there was patchy enhacement in two, nodular enhancement in two, and linear enhancement in four. Among 15 MR images of the brain, high-signal intensity lesions, compatible with multiple sclerosis, were demonstrated in seven cases. Multiple sclerosis plaques in the spinal cord frequently extend for more than two vertebral body heights of either the cervical or thoracic level, occupy more than 50% of the cross-sectional area and manifest as enlarged cord. But the MR imaging findings, however, are nonspecific. Abnormalities were seen in

  3. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of terminal syringomyelia within spinal cord combined with tethered cord syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-cheng XIE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and experience of surgical treatment of spinal cord terminal syringomyelia with tethered cord syndrome (TCS.  Methods and Results Clinical data of 10 patients with spinal cord syringomyelia combined with TCS surgically treated under microscope from January 1999 to March 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 males and 7 females with average age of 15.06 years old (ranged from 2 to 35 years old. The course of disease ranged from 3 months to 20 years (average 42.17 months. Among those patients, one patient presented hydromyelia, 8 patients suffered from meningeal cyst within the sacral canal, and one patient were concurrent with sacral dermal sinus. The weakness of lower extremities, especially distal limbs, was the main clinical manifestation. Five patients were accompanied with bowel and bladder dysfunction and 5 patients with sensory disturbance below the level of syringomyelia, especially hypesthesia. Preoperative MRI showed conus medullaris disappeared at the end of spinal cord, and there was fluid signal in the lower spinal cord with hypo-intensity signal in T1WI and hyper-intensity signal in T2WI without enhancement. All patients underwent surgical procedures. Under microscope, filum terminale was cut off, drainage was performed, meningeal cyst within the sacral canal was removed, and tethered cord was released. The success rate of operations was 100%. The duration of surgery ranged from 1.52 to 3.07 h (average 2.15 h, with average intraoperative blood loss 220 ml (ranged from 100 to 410 ml. The tethering filum had been totally resected and histological examination showed typical filum tissue in all cases. No operative complication was found. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score was decreased, and the lower limbs weakness as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction was gradually relieved after operation. The period of follow-up was ranged from 6

  4. Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka eSakamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.

  5. Tolerance of rat spinal cord to continuous interstitial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Lucas A.M.; Plas, Mirjam van der; Ruifrok, Arnout C.C.; Schalkwijk, Lia J.M.; Hanssen, Alex E.J.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the kinetics of repair in rat spinal cord during continuous interstitial irradiation at different dose rates and to investigate the impact of a rapid dose fall off over the spinal cord thickness. Material and Methods: Two parallel catheters were inserted on each side of the vertebral bodies from the level of T 10 to L 4 . These catheters were afterloaded with two 192 Ir- wires of 4 cm length each (activity 1 - 10 mCi/cm) or connected to the HDR- microSelectron. Experiments have been carried out to obtain complete dose response curves at 7 different dose rates: 0.53, 0.90, 1.64, 2.56, 4.4, 9.9 and 120 Gy/h. Paralysis of the hindlegs after 5 - 6 months and histopathological examination of the spinal cord of each animal were used as experimental endpoints. Results: The distribution of the histological damage was a good reflection of the rapid dose fall - off over the spinal cord, with white matter necrosis or demyelination predominantly seen in the dorsal tracts of the spinal cord or dorsal roots. With each reduction of the dose rate, spinal cord tolerance was significantly increased, with a maximum dose rate factor of 4.3 if the dose rate was reduced from 120 Gy/h to 0.53 Gy/h (ED 50 of 17.3 Gy and 75.0 Gy, respectively). Estimates of the repair parameters using different types of analysis are presented. For the direct analysis the best fit of the data was obtained if a biexponential function for repair was used. For the 100% dose prescribed at the ventral side of the spinal cord the (α(β)) ratio is 1.8 Gy (0.8 - 2.8) and two components of repair are observed: a slow component of repair of 2.44 h (1.18 - ∞) and a fast component of 0.15 h (0.02 - ∞). The proportion of the damage repaired with the slow component is 0.59 (0.18 - 1). For the maximum of 150% of the prescribed dose at the dorsal side of the spinal cord the (α(β)) ratio is 2.7 Gy (1.5 - 4.4); the two components for the kinetics of repair remain the same. Conclusions: Spinal cord

  6. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  7. Transcutaneous spinal stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecco LH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro H Grecco,1,3,4,* Shasha Li,1,5,* Sarah Michel,1,6,* Laura Castillo-Saavedra,1 Andoni Mourdoukoutas,7 Marom Bikson,7 Felipe Fregni1,21Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA; 3Special Laboratory of Pain and Signaling, Butantan Institute, 4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Namur, Belgium; 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI still have limited effects. Electrical stimulation might facilitate plastic changes in affected spinal circuitries that may be beneficial in improving motor function and spasticity or SCI-related neuropathic pain. Based on available animal and clinical evidence, we critically reviewed the physiological basis and therapeutic action of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in SCI. We analyzed the literature published on PubMed to date, looking for the role of three main noninvasive stimulation techniques in the recovery process of SCI and focusing mainly on transcutaneous spinal stimulation. This review discusses the main clinical applications, latest advances, and limitations of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Although most recent research in this topic has focused on transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS, we also reviewed the technique of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES as potential methods to modulate spinal cord

  8. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis.

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation: An Alternative Concept of Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugno, Antonella; Gulì, Carlo; Basile, Luigi; Graziano, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low back and leg pain is a disabling condition, affecting, in most cases, older patients with congenital or acquired spinal stenosis or patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Spinal cord stimulation has been introduced as an effective therapeutic option for those patients who have previously been operated without significant clinical benefits, or for all those patients who are ineligible for traditional surgery. We report our experience with ten patients treated with spinal cord stimulation plus medication and physical therapy between November 2014 and September 2015. Inclusion criteria were: previous surgical treatments for lumbar stenosis and metameric instability and persistent or ingravescent disabling low back and leg pain, with a mean duration of symptoms of at least 18 months. A visual analog scale (VAS) was employed for back and leg pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score was determined, and findings were analyzed after 6 months. No intra- or postoperative complication was recorded. The mean VAS score for back pain decreased from 7.5 to 2.9, while leg VAS decreased from 8.2 to 3.0. Analysis of ODI values showed evident improvement in daily life activities, ranging from a median value of 75.7% to 32.7 % after the stimulation. Spinal cord stimulation has a recognized impact on the pain and on the quality of life of patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

  10. Diseases of the spine, spinal cord, and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper covers the following topics: acupuncture needle in the spinal canal of the neck; thoracic tuberculous spondylitis: cold abscess; comminuted fracture of the fifth cervical vertebra; lumbar spondylolysis; lumbar spondylosis; ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; disk herniation of the cervical spine: narrowing of the root tunnel; ankylosing spondylitis: narrowing of the root tunnel; ossification of the ligamentum flavum; narrow spinal canal syndrome; syringomyelia; epidural neurinoma of the cervical spine; neurofibromatosis; spinal arteriovenous malformation; atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the rib; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the left femur; chronic osteomyelitis of the left humerus; malignant giant cell tumor of the left femur; rheumatoid arthritis of the left hip joint; arthrosis deformans of the left hip joint; and enchondroma of the left index finger: Proximal Phalanx

  11. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  12. The regenerative effects of electromagnetic field on spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Syed, Ishaq; Smith, Thomas L; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is typically the result of direct mechanical impact to the spine, leading to fracture and/or dislocation of the vertebrae along with damage to the surrounding soft tissues. Injury to the spinal cord results in disruption of axonal transmission of signals. This primary trauma causes secondary injuries that produce immunological responses such as neuroinflammation, which perpetuates neurodegeneration and cytotoxicity within the injured spinal cord. To date there is no FDA-approved pharmacological agent to prevent the development of secondary SCI and induce regenerative processes aimed at healing the spinal cord and restoring neurological function. An alternative method to electrically activate spinal circuits is the application of a noninvasive electromagnetic field (EMF) over intact vertebrae. The EMF method of modulating molecular signaling of inflammatory cells emitted in the extra-low frequency range of <100 Hz, and field strengths of <5 mT, has been reported to decrease inflammatory markers in macrophages, and increase endogenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation rates. EMF has been reported to promote osteogenesis by improving the effects of osteogenic media, and increasing the proliferation of osteoblasts, while inhibiting osteoclast formation and increasing bone matrix in vitro. EMF has also been shown to increase chondrogenic markers and collagen and induce neural differentiation, while increasing cell viability by over 50%. As advances are made in stem cell technologies, stabilizing the cell line after differentiation is crucial to SCI repair. Once cell-seeded scaffolds are implanted, EMF may be applied outside the wound for potential continued adjunct treatment during recovery.

  13. Protection of rats from experimental allergic encephalomyelitis with antiserum to guinea-pig spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. A. C.

    1974-01-01

    Inbred AS rats were immunized with guinea-pig spinal cord. The severity of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in groups treated with antiserum to guinea-pig spinal cord and control groups treated with antiserum to other guinea-pig tissue. Prolonged treatment throughout the experiment strikingly reduced the severity of the clinical disease. Early treatment for the first 8 days after immunization had a similar protective effect. Late treatment starting on the 10th day after immunization did not produce significant protection. Protection was produced by antiserum from both EAE-resistant and EAE-susceptible strains. The protective effect of the serum did not correlate with the presence of haemagglutinating antibodies to basic protein or the titre of complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside. These results suggest that antiserum to undefined central nervous system antigens contains an `enhancing' antibody which inhibits a relatively early stage of the immune response causing EAE. PMID:4212280

  14. International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Classification: part I. Background and description

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryce, T N; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2012-01-01

    Study design:Discussion of issues and development of consensus.Objective:Present the background, purpose, development process, format and definitions of the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain (ISCIP) Classification.Methods:An international group of spinal cord injury (SCI) and pain experts...... deliberated over 2 days, and then via e-mail communication developed a consensus classification of pain after SCI. The classification was reviewed by members of several professional organizations and their feedback was incorporated. The classification then underwent validation by an international group...... on previously published SCI pain classifications, combined with basic definitions proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain and pain characteristics described in published empiric studies of pain. The classification is designed to be comprehensive and to include pains that are directly...

  15. What to call spinal cord damage not due to trauma? Implications for literature searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Peter W; Delafosse, Veronica

    2012-03-01

    To illustrate the importance of multiple search terms and databases when searching publications on spinal cord damage not due to trauma. To develop comprehensive search filter for this subject, compare the results for 2000-2009 with the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and Emtree term 'spinal cord diseases' and determine changes in the number of articles over this period. Literature searches and search filter development. Australia. Titles and abstracts searched in MEDLINE and EMBASE (2000-2009) for articles involving humans using search terms 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' and 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' (concise search). Develop comprehensive search filter for 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma' and compare the results with the MeSH term 'spinal cord diseases.' Annual publications (2000-2009) identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE literature searches. Concise search identified 35 articles published during 2000-2009. More publications were identified using the term 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' (n = 20) than 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' (n = 16). Publications increased for both terms 'spinal cord diseases' (2000 = 279; 2009 = 415) and 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma' identified by the comprehensive search filter (2000 = 1251; 2009 = 1921). Concise searches using terms 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' and 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' fail to identify relevant articles unless combinations of terms and databases are used. These are inadequate search terms for a comprehensive search. Further research is needed to validate our comprehensive search filter. An international consensus process is required to establish an agreed term for 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma.'

  16. The natural history of transdural herniation of the spinal cord: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.F.; Anslow, P. [Neuroradiology Department, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2001-05-01

    We report a patient with a Brown-Sequard syndrome who developed ventral transdural spinal cord herniation, showing the imaging findings changing over time from two thoracic disc protrusions with a normal spinal cord to a cord trapped within a bony defect in a thoracic vertebra. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging features in spinal cord infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingsong; Huan Yi; Sun Lijun; Chang Yingjuan; Zhao Haitao; Yang Chunmin; Zhang Guangyun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in ischemic spinal cord lesions and discuss the value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiating diagnosis with inflammatory diseases and tumors. Methods: Six patients (2 male, 4 female) with typical sudden onset of neurological deficits caused by spinal cord ischemia were evaluated. There were no definite etiologies in all patients. DW imaging was performed within 1 to 30 days after the initial neurological symptoms using a Philips Gyroscan 1.5 TMR system. Four patients had other scans including contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) and/or FLAIR scans. Two of them followed up with MR images in three months. All six patients were imaged using a multi-shot, navigator-corrected, echo-planar pulse sequence, and ADC values were calculated in sagittal-oriented plane. Results: MR abnormalities were demonstrated on sagittal T 2 -weighted images with 'patch-like' or 'strip-like' hyperintensities (6/6) and cord enlargement (5/6). Axial T 2 -weighted images showed bilateral (6/6) hyperintensities. In one patient only the posterior spinal artery (PSA) territory was involved. Spinal cord was mainly affected at the cervical (2/6) and thoracolumbar (4/6) region, two of them included the conus medullaris (T10-L1). DW images showed high signals in all infarct lesions, degree of intensity depended on scanning time from ill-onset and progress of illness and whether companied with hemorrhage. In this group, except one case with closely normal ADC value due to one month course of illness, the five others ADC values of lesions calculated from ADC maps arranged from 0.23 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s to 0.47 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s [average value (0.37 ± 0.10) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s], markedly lower than normal parts [ average value (0.89 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s]. There were marked difference between lesions and normal regions (t=4.71, P 2 W images. Meanwhile, lesions could be displayed much better in DW images than in T 2 W images because

  18. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bo; Wang, He; Sun, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ai, Chun-Yu; Tan, Wen-Fei; White, Paul F; Ma, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Intrathecal administration of bone marrow stromal cells has been found to produce beneficial effects on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord. The blood-spinal cord barrier is critical to maintain spinal cord homeostasis and neurologic function. However, the effects of bone marrow stromal cells on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury are not well understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of bone marrow stromal cells on blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. This was a prospective animal study conducted at the Central Laboratory of the First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University. The study used 81 Japanese white rabbits (weight, 1.8-2.6 kg). Spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Two days before the injury was induced, bone marrow stromal cells (1 × 10(8) in 0.2-mL phosphate-buffered saline) were transplanted by intrathecal injection. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histologic examination. The permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier was examined using Evans blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The expression and localization of tight junction protein occludin were assessed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression were also measured. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathologic deficits (P spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, bone marrow stromal cells treatment suppressed spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury-induced decreases in occludin (P bone marrow stromal cells reduced the excessive expression of MMP-9 and TNF-α (P bone marrow

  19. Spine and spinal cord vascular malformations: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariepy, J.-L.; Houdart, E.; Boukobza, M.; Chapot, R.; Cambra, R.; Merland, J.-J. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Neuroradiologie Therapeutique et Interventionalle, Paris (France)

    1999-12-01

    Spine and spinal cord vascular malformations are an uncommon cause of acute, subacute, episodic or progressive myelopathy. They affect all age groups and constitute important clinical entities because of the high morbidity and even mortality associated with them if they are left untreated. These malformations are classified according to their anatomic location and angioarchitecture (Table 1). Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the initial radiologic screening procedure of choice for acute or progressive myelopathy. This pictorial essay reviews the radiologic work-up and the imaging features of spinal vascular malformations, as well as the clinical presentation, the probable pathophysiology and the different treatment modalities. (author)

  20. Changes in activity after a complete spinal cord injury as measured by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Brigitte; van Hedel, Hubertus J A; Kometer, Barbara; Dietz, Volker; Curt, Armin

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of rehabilitation efficacy in spinal cord injury (SCI) should be based on a combination of neurological and functional outcome measures. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II) is an independence scale that was specifically developed for subjects with SCI. However, little is know about the changes in SCIM II scores during and after rehabilitation. The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in functional recovery during the first year after a complete SCI as measured by the SCIM II compared with neurological recovery (motor scores according to the American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA]). SCIM II data and ASIA motor scores 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after injury (derived from the database of the European Multicenter Study of Human Spinal Cord Injury) of 64 patients with complete paraplegia and 36 patients with complete quadriplegia were analyzed. In patients with complete paraplegia, the SCIM II total score improved significantly during the 1-year follow-up, even after discharge from rehabilitation. In contrast, the ASIA motor scores showed little recovery. In patients with quadriplegia, functional and motor recovery developed in parallel during rehabilitation and after discharge. The SCIM II is responsive to functional changes in patients with a persistent motor complete SCI. It is clinically useful for monitoring functional improvement during rehabilitation and after discharge. The SCIM II and the clinical examination based on the ASIA protocol are of complementary value and separately describe changes in independence and sensorimotor deficits in SCI patients.