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Sample records for basic protein bound

  1. Chloroplast protein synthesis: thylakoid bound polysomes synthesize thylakoid proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1986-04-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus the major effect of light in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus translation initiation and termination probably control the cycling of bound ribosomes. While only 3 to 6% of total RNA is in bound polysomes the incorporation of /sup 3/H-Leu into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. When Micrococcal nuclease-treated thylakoids were added to labeled runoff translation products of stroma ribosomes, less than 1% of the label adhered to the added membranes; but 37% of the labeled products made by thylakoid polysomes were bound. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid proteins.

  2. Photochemistry of triarylmethane dyes bound to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indig, Guilherme L.

    1996-04-01

    Triarylmethanes represent a class of cationic dyes whose potential as photosensitizers for use in photodynamic therapy of neoplastic diseases has never been comprehensively evaluated. Here, the laser-induced photodecomposition of three triarylmethane dyes, crystal violet, ethyl violet, and malachite green, non-covalently bound to bovine serum albumin (a model biological target) was investigated. Upon laser excitation at 532 nm, the bleaching of the corresponding dye-protein molecular complexes follows spectroscopic patterns that suggest the formation of reduced forms of the dyes as major reaction photoproducts. That implies that an electron or hydrogen atom transfer from the protein to the dye's moiety within the guest-host complex is the first step of the photobleaching process. Since the availability of dissolved molecular oxygen was not identified as a limiting factor for the phototransformations to occur, these dyes can be seen as potential phototherapeutic agents for use in hypoxic areas of tumors. These triarylmethane dyes strongly absorb at relatively long wavelengths (absorption maximum around 600 nm; (epsilon) max approximately equals 105 M-1 cm-1), and only minor changes in their absorption characteristics are observed upon binding to the protein. However the binding event leads to a remarkable increase in their fluorescence quantum yield and photoreactivity.

  3. Twisting, supercoiling and stretching in protein bound DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2018-04-01

    We have calculated theoretical results for the torque and slope of the twisted DNA, with various proteins bound on it, using the Neukirch-Marko model, in the regime where plectonemes exist. We found that the torque in the protein bound DNA decreases compared to that in the bare DNA. This is caused by the decrease in the free energy g(f) , and hence the smaller persistence lengths, in the case of protein bound DNA. We hope our results will encourage experimental investigations of supercoiling in protein bound DNA, which can provide further tests of the Neukirch-Marko model.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1640 - Protein-bound iodine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protein-bound iodine test system. 862.1640 Section... Systems § 862.1640 Protein-bound iodine test system. (a) Identification. A protein-bound iodine test system is a device intended to measure protein-bound iodine in serum. Measurements of protein-bound...

  5. CBC bound proteins and RNA fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacometti, Simone

    ) complex (CBCN), were recently shown to target capped RNA either toward export or degradation, but the mechanisms by which they can discriminate between different RNA families and route them toward different metabolic pathways still remain unclear. A major question to be answered is how and when...... analysed NEXT-component RBM7. We report that: (i) CBP20, ARS2, PHAX and ZC3H18 bind close to the cap, while RBM7 and MTR4 bind throughout the mRNA body; (ii) CBP20, ARS2, PHAX and ZC3H18 associate with a broad set of RNA polymerase II (PolII)-derived RNAs and have only mild species preferences; (iii......) binding varies with the RNA maturation stage, with the CBC being highly enriched on mature mRNA, ARS2/PHAX/ZC3H18/MTR4 less so, and RMB7 preferentially bound to pre-mRNAs; (iv) MTR4 and RBM7 show different specificities, with RBM7 being highly enriched on introns and promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs...

  6. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with [ 14 C]-galactose and [ 14 C]-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37 0 C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the [ 14 C]-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using [ 14 C]-glucose and [ 14 C]-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the [ 14 C]-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the [ 3 H]-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general

  7. Substrate-Bound Protein Gradients to Study Haptotaxis

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    Sebastien G. Ricoult

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins – including many secreted cues – are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact-printing, light patterning and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro, and focus on their application to study axon guidance. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein make possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  8. Spatial imaging of proteins bound to nanochannel-linearized DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Mei; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Reisner, Walter; Austin, Robert; Cox, Ted

    2004-03-01

    One of the main questions in post genomic era is to understand how gene-regulating proteins control gene expression. We use single molecule techniques to image transcription factor fusion-proteins (LacI-GFP) bound to DNA by linearizing the DNA-protein construct molecule in quartz nanochannels. The nanochannels (down to 40nm wide) are fabricated using focused ion beam milling. These asymmetric (off center protein binding) DNA-protein molecules exhibit unusual behaviors upon entering nano-confinement - the longer tail always enters the channel first. Analysis considering free energy variation and charge distributions along the molecule will be presented. Polymer dynamics of DNA-protein complex and DNA in nanochannels will also be discussed.

  9. Human Serum Protein-Bound iodine and Protein Fractions at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iodine profile of Nigerians at different ages in both sexes and in pregnant women, and under narcotic influence, such as alcoholism, cigarette smoking and marijuana addiction were studied. Their serum total protein, albumin and globulin concentrations were also determined. Results of the study showed that serum protein ...

  10. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  11. Computational structural analysis: multiple proteins bound to DNA.

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    Andrija Tomovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With increasing numbers of crystal structures of proteinratioDNA and proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes publically available, it is now possible to extract sufficient structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters to make general observations and predictions about their interactions. In particular, the properties of macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA have not previously been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have performed computational structural analyses on macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA using a variety of different computational tools: PISA; PROMOTIF; X3DNA; ReadOut; DDNA and DCOMPLEX. Additionally, we have developed and employed an algorithm for approximate collision detection and overlapping volume estimation of two macromolecules. An implementation of this algorithm is available at http://promoterplot.fmi.ch/Collision1/. The results obtained are compared with structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters from proteinratioprotein and single proteinratioDNA complexes. Many of interface properties of multiple proteinratioDNA complexes were found to be very similar to those observed in binary proteinratioDNA and proteinratioprotein complexes. However, the conformational change of the DNA upon protein binding is significantly higher when multiple proteins bind to it than is observed when single proteins bind. The water mediated contacts are less important (found in less quantity between the interfaces of components in ternary (proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes than in those of binary complexes (proteinratioprotein and proteinratioDNA.The thermodynamic stability of ternary complexes is also higher than in the binary interactions. Greater specificity and affinity of multiple proteins binding to DNA in comparison with binary protein-DNA interactions were observed. However, protein-protein binding affinities are stronger in

  12. Crystal structure of the tumor-promoter okadaic acid bound to protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, J T; Bateman, K S; Cherney, M M; Das, A K; Luu, H A; Holmes, C F; James, M N

    2001-11-23

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) plays a key role in dephosphorylation in numerous biological processes such as glycogen metabolism, cell cycle regulation, smooth muscle contraction, and protein synthesis. Microorganisms produce a variety of inhibitors of PP1, which include the microcystin class of inhibitors and okadaic acid, the latter being the major cause of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning and a powerful tumor promoter. We have determined the crystal structure of the molecular complex of okadaic acid bound to PP1 to a resolution of 1.9 A. This structure reveals that the acid binds in a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the protein and interacts with basic residues within the active site. Okadaic acid exhibits a cyclic structure, which is maintained via an intramolecular hydrogen bond. This is reminiscent of other macrocyclic protein phosphatase inhibitors. The inhibitor-bound enzyme shows very little conformational change when compared with two other PP1 structures, except in the inhibitor-sensitive beta12-beta13 loop region. The selectivity of okadaic acid for protein phosphatases-1 and -2A but not PP-2B (calcineurin) may be reassessed in light of this study.

  13. Microcystin-Bound Protein Patterns in Different Cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Field Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nian; Hu, Lili; Song, Lirong; Gan, Nanqin

    2016-10-12

    Micocystin (MC) exists in Microcystis cells in two different forms, free and protein-bound. We examined the dynamic change in extracellular free MCs, intracellular free MCs and protein-bound MCs in both batch cultures and semi-continuous cultures, using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blot. The results showed that the free MC per cell remained constant, while the quantity of protein-bound MCs increased with the growth of Microcystis cells in both kinds of culture. Significant changes in the dominant MC-bound proteins occurred in the late exponential growth phase of batch cultures, while the dominant MC-bound proteins in semi-continuous cultures remained the same. In field samples collected at different months in Lake Taihu, the dominant MC-bound proteins were shown to be similar, but the amount of protein-bound MC varied and correlated with the intracellular MC content. We identified MC-bound proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis immunoblots and mass spectrometry. The 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL was a prominent MC-bound protein. Three essential glycolytic enzymes and ATP synthase alpha subunit were also major targets of MC-binding, which might contribute to sustained growth in semi-continuous culture. Our results indicate that protein-bound MC may be important for sustaining growth and adaptation of Microcystis sp.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces

  15. Specific interaction of central nervous system myelin basic protein with lipids effects of basic protein on glucose leakage from liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, R.M.; London, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The leakage from liposomes preloaded with glucose was continuously monitored in a Perkin-Elmer Model 356 dual beam spectrophotometer using an enzyme-linked assay system. The central nervous system myelin basic protein (A1 protein) caused a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of leakage from liposomes

  16. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites...

  17. Comparative aspects of basic chromatin proteins in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J

    1981-01-01

    Previous work on histone-like proteins in dinoflagellates is summarized, together with some new data to give an overview of basic proteins in these algae. The first two dinoflagellates studied were both found to contain one major acid-soluble protein that migrated to the same position in acidic-urea gels. When several other genera were studied however, it became apparent that the histone-like proteins from different dinoflagellates were similar but not identical. In view of the great diversity of living dinoflagellates it is speculated that further differences in dinoflagellate basic chromatin proteins will be revealed. Electrophoretic data from the eukaryotic (endosymbiont) nucleus of Peridinium balticum showed the presence of five major components. It is speculated that two of these proteins represent an H1-like doublet and two others correspond to the highly conserved histones H3 and H4. The fifth component is a new histone that may substitute for H2A and H2B in the nucleosome. Because histones and nucleosomes are present in all higher organisms but completely lacking in procaryotes, studies on basic proteins in dinoflagellates will provides insights into the evolution of histones and eucaryotic chromatin organization.

  18. Fiber-bound nitrogen in gorilla diets: implications for estimating dietary protein intake of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Jessica M; Chapman, Colin A; Pell, Alice N

    2008-07-01

    Protein is essential for living organisms, but digestibility of crude protein is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Nitrogen is used to estimate protein content because nitrogen is a component of the amino acids that comprise protein, but a substantial portion of the nitrogen in plants may be bound to fiber in an indigestible form. To estimate the amount of crude protein that is unavailable in the diets of mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, foods routinely eaten were analyzed to determine the amount of nitrogen bound to the acid-detergent fiber residue. The amount of fiber-bound nitrogen varied among plant parts: herbaceous leaves 14.5+/-8.9% (reported as a percentage of crude protein on a dry matter (DM) basis), tree leaves (16.1+/-6.7% DM), pith/herbaceous peel (26.2+/-8.9% DM), fruit (34.7+/-17.8% DM), bark (43.8+/-15.6% DM), and decaying wood (85.2+/-14.6% DM). When crude protein and available protein intake of adult gorillas was estimated over a year, 15.1% of the dietary crude protein was indigestible. These results indicate that the proportion of fiber-bound protein in primate diets should be considered when estimating protein intake, food selection, and food/habitat quality.

  19. The impact of physiological crowding on the diffusivity of membrane bound proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Justin R; Busch, David J; Bell, David R; Li, Brian; Ren, Pengyu; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-02-21

    Diffusion of transmembrane and peripheral membrane-bound proteins within the crowded cellular membrane environment is essential to diverse biological processes including cellular signaling, endocytosis, and motility. Nonetheless we presently lack a detailed understanding of the influence of physiological levels of crowding on membrane protein diffusion. Utilizing quantitative in vitro measurements, here we demonstrate that the diffusivities of membrane bound proteins follow a single linearly decreasing trend with increasing membrane coverage by proteins. This trend holds for homogenous protein populations across a range of protein sizes and for heterogeneous mixtures of proteins of different sizes, such that protein diffusivity is controlled by the total coverage of the surrounding membrane. These results demonstrate that steric exclusion within the crowded membrane environment can fundamentally limit the diffusive rate of proteins, regardless of their size. In cells this "speed limit" could be modulated by changes in local membrane coverage, providing a mechanism for tuning the rate of molecular interaction and assembly.

  20. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy of basic dyes bound to poly(methacrylic acid in solution

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    Oliveira Hueder Paulo M. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of atactic poly(methacrylic acid, PMAA, with molecular weights in the range of (1.6 to 3.4 x 10(5 g mol-1, and labeled with the fluorescent dyes 9-aminoacridine or Nile blue were studied by photophysical measurements as a function of solvent viscosity and polarity. The conformational behavior of the PMAA chain segments around the fluorescent probe was reported by the change in the rotational diffusion of the dyes. Ethylene glycol swells the polymer chain compared with the more contracted conformation of PMAA in 50% water/ethylene glycol. The change in the rotational relaxation time of the dye bound to PMAA with the decrease of water content in the solvent mixture indicates a progressive expansion of polymer chain to a more open coil form in solution.

  1. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B

    1991-01-01

    . Crude extracts from isolated EO granules also stimulated RGC release, suggesting that a granular protein might be responsible. Three proteins derived from EO granules, EO-derived neurotoxin, EO cationic protein (ECP), and major basic protein (MBP) were separated by sequential sizing and affinity...

  2. An Analysis of Central Residues Between Ligand-Bound and Ligand-Free Protein Structures Based on Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amala, Arumugam; Emerson, Isacc Arnold

    2017-08-01

    Depiction of protein structures as networks of interacting residues has enabled us to understand the structure and function of the protein. Previous investigations on closeness centrality have identified protein functional sites from three- dimensional structures. It is well recognized that ligand binding to a receptor protein induces a wide range of structural changes. An interesting question is how central residues function during conformational changes triggered during ligand binding? The aim of this study is to comprehend at what extent central residues change during ligand binding to receptor proteins. To determine this, we examined 37 pairs of protein structures consisting of ligand-bound and ligand-free forms. These protein structures were modelled as an undirected network and significant central residues were obtained using residue centrality measures. In addition to these, the basic network parameters were also analysed. On analysing the residue centrality measures, we observed that 60% of central residues were common in both the ligand-bound and ligand-free states. The geometry of the central residues revealed that they were situated closer to the protein center of the mass. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of central residues in amino acids substitutions and in the evolution itself. The closeness centrality was also analyzed among different protein domain sizes and the values gradually declined from single-domains to multi-domain proteins suggesting that the network has potential for hierarchical organization. Betweenness centrality measure was also used to determine the central residues and 31% of these residues were common between the holo/apo states. Findings reveal that central residues play a significant role in determining the functional properties of proteins. These results have implications in predicting binding/active site residues, specifically in the context of drug designing, if additional information concerning ligand binding is

  3. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur in the pres......Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur...

  4. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OFMEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims at enhancing membrane-bound proteins that are expressed between epithelial cells so that quantitative analysis can be enabled on a cell-by-cell basis. We propose a method to detect and enhance membrane-bound protein signal from noisy images. More precisely, we build upon the tensor voting framework in order to produce an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting linear structures in images. The novelty of the proposed method is in its iterative tuning of the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. The method is shown to produce high quality enhancements of membrane-bound protein signals with combined punctate and diffused characteristics. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of using tunable tensor voting for enhancing and differentiating cell-cell adhesion mediated by integral cell membrane protein.

  5. Antibody-bound amyloid precursor protein upregulates ornithine decarboxylase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Gabrielsson, Maria

    2006-01-01

    on the protein level. APP knockdown by RNAi verified that upregulation of ODC was APP-mediated. This APP signalling event did not require gamma-secretase cleavage, as it was independent of the presence of presenilin-1 or -2. The induced ODC expression was rapid and biphasic, resembling growth-factor stimulated...

  6. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    dismutase, or catalase dependent, suggesting that inhibition is not radical mediated. These effects are suggested to be due to direct adduction of the free- or protein-bound carbonyls with the target enzyme. Such an interpretation is supported by the detection of the loss of thiol groups on GAPDH...... and the detection of cross-linked materials on protein gels. Though direct comparison of the extent of inhibition induced by free versus protein-bound carbonyls was not possible, the significantly higher concentrations of the latter materials over the former in diabetic plasma and cells lead us to suggest...

  7. Protein-bound toxins: added value in their removal with high convective volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; Reque, Javier Eduardo; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. In recent years, protein-bound toxins have become more important due to their association with increased morbidity and mortality, characterised by inadequate clearance during dialysis. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of high convective volumes on postdilution online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) on the removal of medium-sized molecules, small molecules and protein-bound molecules. In forty postdilutional OL-HDF sessions, the reduction rates of toxins of different molecular weights were measured in 13 patients, including protein-bound molecules such as p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine. Total convective volume was 28.3 (5.1) litres (range 16.3-38.0 litres). Mean reduction rate of protein-bound molecules was 44.4% (15.7%), 48.7% (14.1%) and 58.6% (8.8%) for p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine, respectively. Moreover, a statistically significant direct association was found between the reduction rates of all three molecules, the replacement volume and the Kt/V. High convective volumes during postdilution OL-HDF are associated with increased removal of protein-bound uraemic toxins. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue

  9. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, Angelita [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Marzi, Stefano [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002 CNRS, IBMC (Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology), 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, France, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Fabbretti, Attilio [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale -INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gualerzi, Claudio O. [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  10. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  11. Computational Protein Design Using AND/OR Branch-and-Bound Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yichao; Wu, Yuexin; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) is an important and challenging topic in structure-based computational protein design. In this article, we propose a new protein design algorithm based on the AND/OR branch-and-bound (AOBB) search, a variant of the traditional branch-and-bound search algorithm, to solve this combinatorial optimization problem. By integrating with a powerful heuristic function, AOBB is able to fully exploit the graph structure of the underlying residue interaction network of a backbone template to significantly accelerate the design process. Tests on real protein data show that our new protein design algorithm is able to solve many problems that were previously unsolvable by the traditional exact search algorithms, and for the problems that can be solved with traditional provable algorithms, our new method can provide a large speedup by several orders of magnitude while still guaranteeing to find the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) solution.

  12. Lysine-Derived Protein-Bound Heyns Compounds in Bakery Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibmann, Stephanie; Hellwig, Anne; Hellwig, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2017-12-06

    Fructose and dicarbonyl compounds resulting from fructose in heated foods have been linked to pathophysiological pathways of several metabolic disorders. Up to now, very little has been known about the Maillard reaction of fructose in food. Heyns rearrangement compounds (HRCs), the first stable intermediates of the Maillard reaction between amino components and fructose, have not yet been quantitated as protein-bound products in food. Therefore, the HRCs glucosyllysine and mannosyllysine were synthesized and characterized by NMR. Protein-bound HRCs in cookies containing various sugars and in commercial bakery products were quantitated after enzymatic hydrolysis by RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode through application of the standard addition method. Protein-bound HRCs were quantitated for the first time in model cookies and in commercial bakery products containing honey, banana, and invert sugar syrup. Concentrations of HRCs from 19 to 287 mg/kg were found, which were similar to or exceeded the content of other frequently analyzed Maillard reaction products, such as N-ε-carboxymethyllysine (10-76 mg/kg), N-ε-carboxyethyllysine (2.5-53 mg/kg), and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (10-218 mg/kg) in the analyzed cookies. These results show that substantial amounts of HRCs form during food processing. Analysis of protein-bound HRCs in cookies is therefore useful to evaluate the Maillard reaction of fructose.

  13. Utilization of crystalline and protein-bound amino acids by growing-finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Buxant, L.; Clausen, D.

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that diets containing crystalline AA (CAA) and protein-bound AA had a comparable nitrogen retention rate, even though the CAA-based diet is optimized as having a standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of 100% for the CAA. Two isoenergetic diets were formulated to provide...

  14. Unique Pattern of Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Rückriemen, Jana; Sandner, Daniel; Henle, Thomas

    2017-05-03

    As a unique feature, honey from the New Zealand manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium) contains substantial amounts of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). Although MGO is a reactive intermediate in the Maillard reaction, very little is known about reactions of MGO with honey proteins. We hypothesized that the abundance of MGO should result in a particular pattern of protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in manuka honey. A protein-rich high-molecular-weight fraction was isolated from 12 manuka and 8 non-manuka honeys and hydrolyzed enzymatically. By HPLC-MS/MS, 8 MRPs, namely, N-ε-fructosyllysine, N-ε-maltulosyllysine, carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine (CEL), pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1), were quantitated. Compared to non-manuka honeys, the manuka honeys were characterized by high concentrations of CEL and MG-H1, whereas the formation of N-ε-fructosyllysine was suppressed, indicating concurrence reactions of glucose and MGO at the ε-amino group of protein-bound lysine. Up to 31% of the lysine and 8% of the arginine residues, respectively, in the manuka honey protein can be modified to CEL and MG-H1, respectively. CEL and MG-H1 concentrations correlated strongly with the MGO concentration of the honeys. Manuka honey possesses a special pattern of protein-bound MRPs, which might be used to prove the reliability of labeled MGO levels in honeys and possibly enable the detection of fraudulent MGO or DHA addition to honey.

  15. Measurement of guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassom, D.L.; Loegering, D.A.; Gleich, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using 131 I-MBP. Two critical features of the assay were: (1) alkylation of the MBP with iodoacetamide prior to radioiodination and (2) inclusion of another basic protein, either protamine or histone, in the phosphate buffer. Freshly isolated non-alkylated MBP was immunologically deficient when compared to alkylated or reduced MBP, but its reactivity could be redtores by reduction with dithiothreitol and alkylation. Reduction and alkylation also restored the immunoreactivity of polymerized MBP. MBP levels were not elevated in sera from guinea pigs parasitized with Trichinella spiralis and having peripheral blood eosinophilia. Muscle extracts from Trichinella infected animals showed significantly higher levels of MBP activity than normal controls. MBP was measurable in extracts of untreated eosinophils, but reduction and alkylation of these extracts increased MBP activity several fold. The RIA permits detection of MBP in body fluids and tissues at levels as low as 2 ng./ml. The RIA is useful in assessing increased or decreased levels of MBP activity in samples from experimental animals when compared to samples from controls. (author)

  16. Speciation of protein-bound trace elements by gel electrophoresis and atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Renli; McLeod, Cameron W; Tomlinson, Kerry; Poole, Robert K

    2004-08-01

    The metabolism of trace elements, in particular their binding to proteins in biological systems is of great importance in biochemical, toxicological, and pharmacological studies. As a result there has been a sustained interest over the last two decades in the speciation of protein-bound metals. Various analytical approaches have been employed, combining efficient separation of metalloproteins by liquid chromatography or electrophoresis with high-sensitivity elemental detection. Slab-gel electrophoresis (GE) is a key platform for high-resolution protein separation, and has been combined with autoradiography and various atomic spectrometric techniques for in-gel determination of protein-bound metals. Recently, the combination of GE with state-of-the-art inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), particularly when linked to laser ablation (LA) for direct gel interrogation, has opened up new opportunities for rapid characterization of metalloproteins. The use of GE and atomic spectrometry for the speciation of protein-bound trace elements is reviewed in this paper. Technical requirements for gel electrophoresis/atomic spectrometric measurement are considered in terms of method compatibilities, detection capability and potential usefulness. The literature is also surveyed to illustrate current status and future trends. Copyright 2004 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co.

  17. Generation, Characterization, and Tunable Reactivity of Organometallic Fragments Bound to a Protein Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Hanna M; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2015-07-01

    Organotransition metal complexes catalyze important synthetic transformations, and the development of these systems has rested on the detailed understanding of the structures and elementary reactions of discrete organometallic complexes bound to organic ligands. One strategy for the creation of new organometallic systems is to exploit the intricate and highly structured ligands found in natural metalloproteins. We report the preparation and characterization of discrete rhodium and iridium fragments bound site-specifically in a κ(2)-fashion to the protein carbonic anhydrase as a ligand. The reactions of apo human carbonic anhydrase with [Rh(nbd)2]BF4 or [M(CO)2(acac)] (M=Rh, Ir) form proteins containing Rh or Ir with organometallic ligands. A colorimetric assay was developed to quantify rapidly the metal occupancy at the native metal-binding site, and (15)N-(1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to establish the amino acids to which the metal is bound. IR spectroscopy and EXAFS revealed the presence and number of carbonyl ligands and the number total ligands, while UV-vis spectroscopy provided a signature to readily identify species that had been fully characterized. Exploiting these methods, we observed fundamental stoichiometric reactions of the artificial organometallic site of this protein, including reactions that simultaneously form and cleave metal-carbon bonds. The preparation and reactivity of these artificial organometallic proteins demonstrate the potential to study a new genre of organometallic complexes for which the rates and outcomes of organometallic reactions can be controlled by genetic manipulation of the protein scaffold.

  18. Deoxygenation Affects Composition of Membrane-Bound Proteins in Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana G. Luneva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP release from erythrocyte plays a key role in hypoxia-induced elevation of blood flow in systematic circulation. We have previously shown that hemolysis contributes to erythrocyte ATP release triggered by several stimuli, including hypoxia, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-increased membrane fragility remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we compared the action of hypoxia on hemolysis, ATP release and the composition of membrane-bound proteins in human erythrocytes. Results: Twenty minutes incubation of human erythrocytes in the oxygen-free environment increased the content of extracellular hemoglobin by ∼1.5 fold. Paired measurements of hemoglobin and ATP content in the same samples, showed a positive correlation between hemolysis and ATP release. Comparative analysis of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of erythrocyte ghosts obtained under control and deoxygenated conditions revealed a ∼2-fold elevation of the content of membrane-bound protein with Mr of ∼60 kDa. Conclusion: Deoxygenation of human erythrocytes affects composition of membrane-bound proteins. Additional experiments should be performed to identify the molecular origin of 60 kDa protein and its role in the attenuation of erythrocyte integrity and ATP release in hypoxic conditions.

  19. Steric pressure between membrane-bound proteins opposes lipid phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheve, Christine S; Gonzales, Paul A; Momin, Noor; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2013-01-30

    Cellular membranes are densely crowded with a diverse population of integral and membrane-associated proteins. In this complex environment, lipid rafts, which are phase-separated membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and saturated lipids, are thought to organize the membrane surface. Specifically, rafts may help to concentrate proteins and lipids locally, enabling cellular processes such as assembly of caveolae, budding of enveloped viruses, and sorting of lipids and proteins in the Golgi. However, the ability of rafts to concentrate protein species has not been quantified experimentally. Here we show that when membrane-bound proteins become densely crowded within liquid-ordered membrane regions, steric pressure arising from collisions between proteins can destabilize lipid phase separations, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of proteins and lipids over the membrane surface. Using a reconstituted system of lipid vesicles and recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that protein-protein steric pressure creates an energetic barrier to the stability of phase-separated membrane domains that increases in significance as the molecular weight of the proteins increases. Comparison with a simple analytical model reveals that domains are destabilized when the steric pressure exceeds the approximate enthalpy of membrane mixing. These results suggest that a subtle balance of free energies governs the stability of phase-separated cellular membranes, providing a new perspective on the role of lipid rafts as concentrators of membrane proteins.

  20. Characterization of a major 31-kilodalton peptidoglycan-bound protein of Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.A.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    A 31-kilodalton (kDa) protein was solubilized from the peptidoglycan (PG) fraction of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with either N-acetylmuramidase from the fungus Chalaropsis sp. or with mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus. The protein exhibited a ladderlike banding pattern by autoradiography when radiolabeled [(35S]cysteine or [35S]methionine) PG material was extensively treated with hen lysozyme. The banding patterns ranging between 31 and 45 kDa and between 55 and 60 kDa resolved as a single 31-kDa protein when the material was subsequently treated with N-acetylmuramidase. Analysis of the purified 31-kDa protein for diaminopimelic acid by gas chromatography revealed 1 mol of diaminopimelic acid per mol of protein. When outer membrane PG material containing the major outer membrane porin protein was treated with N-acetylmuramidase or mutanolysin, both the 28.5-kDa major outer membrane protein and the 31-kDa protein were solubilized from the PG material under reducing conditions. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a high-molecular-mass complex (100 kDa) was resolved. The results of this study indicate that a 31-kDa PG-bound protein is a major component of the cell wall of L. pneumophila whose function may be to anchor the major outer membrane protein to PG. Finally, a survey of other Legionella species and other serogroups of L. pneumophila suggested that PG-bound proteins may be a common feature of this genus

  1. Protein-Bound Uremic Toxin Profiling as a Tool to Optimize Hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available We studied various hemodialysis strategies for the removal of protein-bound solutes, which are associated with cardiovascular damage.This study included 10 patients on standard (3 x 4 h/week high-flux hemodialysis. Blood was collected at the dialyzer inlet and outlet at several time points during a midweek session. Total and free concentration of several protein-bound solutes was determined as well as urea concentration. Per solute, a two-compartment kinetic model was fitted to the measured concentrations, estimating plasmatic volume (V1, total distribution volume (V tot and intercompartment clearance (K21. This calibrated model was then used to calculate which hemodialysis strategy offers optimal removal. Our own in vivo data, with the strategy variables entered into the mathematical simulations, was then validated against independent data from two other clinical studies.Dialyzer clearance K, V1 and V tot correlated inversely with percentage of protein binding. All Ks were different from each other. Of all protein-bound solutes, K21 was 2.7-5.3 times lower than that of urea. Longer and/or more frequent dialysis that processed the same amount of blood per week as standard 3 x 4 h dialysis at 300 mL/min blood flow showed no difference in removal of strongly bound solutes. However, longer and/or more frequent dialysis strategies that processed more blood per week than standard dialysis were markedly more adequate. These conclusions were successfully validated.When blood and dialysate flow per unit of time and type of hemodialyzer are kept the same, increasing the amount of processed blood per week by increasing frequency and/or duration of the sessions distinctly increases removal.

  2. Protein-Bound Uremic Toxin Profiling as a Tool to Optimize Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloot, Sunny; Schneditz, Daniel; Cornelis, Tom; Van Biesen, Wim; Glorieux, Griet; Dhondt, Annemie; Kooman, Jeroen; Vanholder, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We studied various hemodialysis strategies for the removal of protein-bound solutes, which are associated with cardiovascular damage. This study included 10 patients on standard (3 x 4 h/week) high-flux hemodialysis. Blood was collected at the dialyzer inlet and outlet at several time points during a midweek session. Total and free concentration of several protein-bound solutes was determined as well as urea concentration. Per solute, a two-compartment kinetic model was fitted to the measured concentrations, estimating plasmatic volume (V1), total distribution volume (V tot) and intercompartment clearance (K21). This calibrated model was then used to calculate which hemodialysis strategy offers optimal removal. Our own in vivo data, with the strategy variables entered into the mathematical simulations, was then validated against independent data from two other clinical studies. Dialyzer clearance K, V1 and V tot correlated inversely with percentage of protein binding. All Ks were different from each other. Of all protein-bound solutes, K21 was 2.7-5.3 times lower than that of urea. Longer and/or more frequent dialysis that processed the same amount of blood per week as standard 3 x 4 h dialysis at 300 mL/min blood flow showed no difference in removal of strongly bound solutes. However, longer and/or more frequent dialysis strategies that processed more blood per week than standard dialysis were markedly more adequate. These conclusions were successfully validated. When blood and dialysate flow per unit of time and type of hemodialyzer are kept the same, increasing the amount of processed blood per week by increasing frequency and/or duration of the sessions distinctly increases removal.

  3. Absorption and retention of free and milk protein-bound cyano- and hydroxocobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Linda Skibsted; Juul, Christian Bredgaard; Fedosov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    alone or bound to milk protein. Materials and methods We synthesized labeled OH[57Co]Cbl from commercially available CN[57Co]Cbl. Recombinant bovine transcobalamin (rbTC) was produced in yeast and skimmed milk obtained off the shelf. Male Wistar rats (250–300 g) received labeled Cbl by gastric gavage...... and CNCbl are absorbed equally well, but much more OHCbl accumulated in the liver. Benefits of oral supplementation with OHCbl compared to CNCbl should be investigated....

  4. Protein-bound homocyst(e)ine. A possible risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Cook, H Y; Norusis, M; Messer, J V

    1986-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic changes and thromboembolism are common features in homocystinurics. Hence, we postulate a positive correlation between the level of homocyst(e)ine in the blood and the occurrence of coronary artery disease. Homocysteine is found either as free homocystine, cysteine-homocysteine mixed disulfide, or protein-bound homocyst(e)ine. In nonhomocystinuric subjects, most homocysteine molecules are detectable in the protein-bound form. Thus, protein-bound homocyst(e)ine in stored plasma which reflected total plasma homocyst(e)ine was determined in 241 patients with coronary artery disease (173 males and 68 females). The mean +/- SD total plasma homocyst(e)ine was 5.41 +/- 1.62 nmol/ml in male patients, 4.37 +/- 1.09 nmol/ml in male controls, 5.66 +/- 1.93 nmol/ml in female patients, and 4.16 +/- 1.62 nmol/ml in female controls. The differences between the patients with coronary artery disease and the controls were statistically significant (P less than 0.0005). PMID:3700650

  5. Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy for monitoring protein dynamics exemplified by functional studies of Ras protein bound to a lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The first time resolved FTIR investigation of a GTPase reaction of a protein anchored at a single lipid bilayer. Display Omitted Highlights: ► FTIR difference spectroscopy monitors protein dynamics with atomic detail. ► ATR–FTIR allows the measurement of a monolayer sample. ► Membrane proteins can be investigated near physiological conditions. ► The hydrolysis reaction of Ras was investigated in this condition for the first time. - Abstract: Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy is a valuable tool for monitoring the dynamics of protein reactions and interactions. Absorbance changes can be monitored with time resolutions down to nanoseconds and followed for time periods that range over nine orders of magnitude. Membrane proteins bound to solid supported lipid bilayers can be investigated in near physiological conditions with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. Here, we review the basics of time-resolved FTIR with a focus on Ras, a GTPase that is mutated in 25% of human tumors. We show the first time-resolved measurements of membrane anchored Ras and observed the switching between its activated and its inactivated state. We compared those measurements with measurements of the truncated Ras in solution. We found that both the kinetics and the functional groups involved were very similar. This suggested that the membrane did not have a major influence on the hydrolysis reaction.

  6. Beyond Maslow's culture-bound linear theory: a preliminary statement of the double-Y model of basic human needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuo-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Maslow's theory of basic human needs is criticized with respect to two of its major aspects, unidimensional linearity and cross-cultural validity. To replace Maslow's linear theory, a revised Y model is proposed on the base of Y. Yu's original Y model. Arranged on the stem of the Y are Maslow's physiological needs (excluding sexual needs) and safety needs. Satisfaction of these needs is indispensable to genetic survival. On the left arm of the Y are interpersonal and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and the self-actualization need. The thoughts and behaviors required for the fulfillment of these needs lead to genetic expression. Lastly, on the right arm of the Y are sexual needs, childbearing needs, and parenting needs. The thoughts and behaviors entailed in the satisfaction of these needs result in genetic transmission. I contend that needs for genetic survival and transmission are universal and that needs for genetic expression are culture-bound. Two major varieties of culture-specific expression needs are distinguished for each of the three levels of needs on the left arm of the Y model. Collectivistic needs for interpersonal affiliation and belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization prevail in collectivist cultures like those found in East Asian countries. Individualistic needs are dominant in individualist cultures like those in North America and certain European nations. I construct two separate Y models, one for people in collectivist cultures and the other for those in individualist ones. In the first (the Yc model), the three levels of expression needs on the left arm are collectivistic in nature, whereas in the second (the Yi model), the three levels of needs on the left arm are individualistic in nature. Various forms of the double-Y model are formulated by conceptually combining the Yc and Yi models at the cross-cultural, crossgroup, and intra-individual levels. Research directions for testing the various aspects of the double-Y model are

  7. Microcontact printing of substrate-bound protein patterns for cell and tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Martin; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Patterned distributions of signalling molecules play fundamental roles during embryonic development. Several attempts have been made to reproduce these patterns in vitro. In order to study substrate-bound or membrane proteins, microcontact printing (μCP) is a suitable method for tethering molecules on various surfaces. Here, we describe three μCP variants to produce patterns down to feature sizes of about 300 nm, which are highly variable with respect to shape, protein spacing, and density. Briefly, the desired pattern is etched into a silicon master, which is then used as a master for the printing process. Each variant offers certain advantages and the method of choice depends on the desired protein and the biological question.

  8. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  9. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  10. Evidence that the "waxy" protein of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is not the major starch-granule-bound starch synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the starch-granule-bound starch synthase of developing pea embryos. When starch-granule-bound proteins were solubilised by digestion of granules with α-amylase and fractionated on a Mono Q anion-exchange column, activity of starch synthase eluted as three peaks. The distribution of activity in fractions from the column coincided with that of a 77-kDa protein. An antibody to this protein inhibited starch-synthase activity both in solubilised, starch-granule-bound protein and on intact starch granules. Recoveries of activity through extraction, solubilisation and chromatography indicate that this protein is the major, if not the only, form of starch synthase on the starch granule. The major, 59-kDa protein of the pea starch granule is antigenically related to the product of thewaxy locus of potato, which has previously been identified as the starch-granule-bound starch synthase of the tuber. However, the distribution of the 59-kDa protein did not coincide with that of starch-synthase activity in fractions from the Mono Q column. An antibody to the 59-kDa protein did not inhibit starch-synthase activity. The results raise questions about the relationship between "waxy" proteins and starch-granule-bound starch synthases generally.

  11. Protein-bound acrolein: a novel marker of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calingasan, N Y; Uchida, K; Gibson, G E

    1999-02-01

    Several lines of evidence support the role of oxidative stress, including increased lipid peroxidation, in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Lipid peroxidation generates various reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), which have been detected immunochemically in AD, particularly in neurofibrillary tangles, one of the major diagnostic lesions in AD brains. A recent study demonstrated that acrolein, the most reactive among the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation, could be rapidly incorporated into proteins, generating a carbonyl derivative, a marker of oxidative stress to proteins. The current studies used an antibody raised against acrolein-modified keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to test whether acrolein modification of proteins occurs in AD. Double immunofluorescence revealed strong acrolein-KLH immunoreactivity in more than half of all paired helical filament (PHF)-1-labeled neurofibrillary tangles in AD cases. Acrolein-KLH immunoreactivity was also evident in a few neurons lacking PHF-1-positive neurofibrillary tangles. Light acrolein-KLH immunoreactivity occurred in dystrophic neurites surrounding the amyloid-beta core, which itself lacked acrolein-KLH staining. The pattern of acrolein-KLH immunostaining was similar to that of HNE. Control brains did not contain any acrolein-KLH-immunoreactive structures. The current results suggest that protein-bound acrolein is a powerful marker of oxidative damage to protein and support the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to protein may play a crucial role in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and to neuronal death in AD.

  12. BASIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Schmidt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    BPP. Tilgangen består dels af den overordnede proces-model BASIC og dels af et iboende framework, ABCD, der er en model for systematisk adfærdsanalyse, udvikling, test og implementering af adfærdsrettede løsningskoncepter. Den samlede model gør det muligt for forskere såvel som offentligt ansatte...

  13. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    , including semiquinone radicals, quinones, and metal ion-DOPA complexes have also been implicated in some cases. Non-radical reactions of DOPA with suitable nucleophiles (e.g. thiol groups) can also result in modification of the target, with this process being particularly prevalent with proteins......Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur...... in the presence of molecular O(2) and redox-active metal ions (e.g. Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Cr(6+)), which are known to increase the rate of DOPA oxidation. The majority of oxidative damage appears to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and HO(.) radicals, though other DOPA oxidation products...

  14. Identification and characterization of GmPDIL7, a soybean ER membrane-bound protein disulfide isomerase family protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Aya; Matsusaki, Motonori; Masuda, Taro; Urade, Reiko

    2017-02-01

    Most proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) possess intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds, which play an important role in the conformational stability and function of proteins. Hence, eukaryotic cells contain protein disulfide bond formation pathways such as the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1) system in the ER lumen. In this study, we identified soybean PDIL7 (GmPDIL7), a novel soybean ER membrane-bound PDI family protein, and determined its enzymatic properties. GmPDIL7 has a putative N-terminal signal sequence, a thioredoxin domain with an active center motif (CGHC), and a putative C-terminal transmembrane region. Likewise, we demonstrated that GmPDIL7 is ubiquitously expressed in soybean tissues and is localized in the ER membrane. Furthermore, GmPDIL7 associated with other soybean PDI family proteins in vivo and GmPDIL7 mRNA was slightly upregulated under ER stress. The redox potential of recombinant GmPDIL7 expressed in Escherichia coli was -187 mV, indicating that GmPDIL7 could oxidize unfolded proteins. GmPDIL7 exhibited a dithiol oxidase activity level that was similar to other soybean PDI family proteins. However, the oxidative refolding activity of GmPDIL7 was lower than other soybean PDI family proteins. GmPDIL7 was well oxidized by GmERO1. Taken together, our results indicated that GmPDIL7 primarily plays a role as a supplier of disulfide bonds in nascent proteins for oxidative folding on the ER membrane. The nucleotide sequence data for the GmPDIL7 cDNA are available in the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) databases under the accession numbers LC158001. Protein disulfide isomerase: EC 5.3.4.1. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Binding of monoclonal antibody to protein antigen in fluid phase or bound to solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Rat monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to fragment D (FgD) of human fibrinogen was used to characterize the direct binding of antibody to protein in solution or bound to solid supports. Purified IgG, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' were prepared from ascites fluid of hybridoma 104-14B which is a fusion product of spleen cells from a rat immunized with FgD and the mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of radioiodinated antibody preparations demonstrated the presence of hybrid immunoglobulin molecules, but only structures having rat heavy and rat light chains had active antibody combinig sites. The affinity constant for IgG as well as F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab', 6x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, was identical when tested using fluid phase antigen (/sup 125/I-labeled FgD). Affinity constants determined for direct binding of iodinated IgG using FgD immobilized on solid supports showed a slight dependence on the antigen concentration used in the measurement. These values ranged from 0.5x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at high antigen concentrations (1.3x10/sup -7/ M) to 9x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at low antigen concentration (1.3x10/sup -10/ M). Binding constants for F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' gave similar results indicating that binding was homogeneous and univalent. The capacity of solid state antigen to bind antibody varied with the method used to bind FgD to the solid support. FgD bound directly to polystyrene plates was least efficient at binding labeled antibody; FgD bound to plates through intermediate carriers poly(L-lysine) was only slightly more efficient, while antigen bound to Sepharose beads by cyanogen bromide activation was the most active.

  16. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    dismutase, or catalase dependent, suggesting that inhibition is not radical mediated. These effects are suggested to be due to direct adduction of the free- or protein-bound carbonyls with the target enzyme. Such an interpretation is supported by the detection of the loss of thiol groups on GAPDH...... products. In this study, we have examined the effect of glucose and carbonyl compounds (methylglyoxal, glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone), and glycation products arising from reaction of these materials with model proteins, on the activity of three key cellular enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate...... dehydrogenase (GAPDH), glutathione reductase, and lactate dehydrogenase, both in isolation and in cell lysates. In contrast to glucose (1M, both fresh and aged for 8 weeks), which had no effect, marked inhibition of all three enzymes was observed with methylglyoxal and glyoxal. GAPDH was also inhibited...

  17. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  18. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; (Stanford-MED); (CH-Boston)

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  19. Surfactant-bound monolithic columns for separation of proteins in capillary high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Simmons, Robert; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2010-01-22

    A surfactant-bound monolithic stationary phase based on the co-polymerization of 11-acrylamino-undecanoic acid (AAUA) is designed for capillary high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Using D-optimal design, the effect of the polymerization mixture (concentrations of monomer, crosslinker and porogens) on the chromatographic performance (resolution and analysis time) of the AAUA-EDMA monolithic column was evaluated. The polymerization mixture was optimized using three proteins as model test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of chromatographic parameters on the concentration of porogens (1,4-butanediol and water) in the polymerization mixture. Optimized solutions for fast separation and high resolution separation, respectively, were obtained using the proposed multivariate optimization. Differences less than 6.8% between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of resolution and retention time indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. Using the optimized column, fast separation of proteins could be obtained in 2.5 min, and a tryptic digest of myoglobin was successfully separated on the high resolution column. The physical properties (i.e., morphology, porosity and permeability) of the optimized monolithic column were thoroughly investigated. It appears that this surfactant-bound monolith may have a great potential as a new generation of capillary HPLC stationary phase. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Surfactant-Bound Monolithic Columns for Separation of Proteins in Capillary High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Simmons, Robert; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2011-01-01

    A surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on the co-polymerization of 11-acrylamino-undecanoic acid (AAUA) is designed for capillary high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Using D-optimal design, the effect of the polymerization mixture (concentrations of monomer, crosslinker and porogens) on the chromatographic performance (resolution and analysis time) of the AAUA-EDMA monolithic column was evaluated. The polymerization mixture was optimized using three proteins as model test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of chromatographic parameters on the concentration of porogens (1,4-butanediol and water) in the polymerization mixture. Optimized solutions for fast separation and high resolution separation, respectively, were obtained using the proposed multivariate optimization. Differences less than 6.8% between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of resolution and retention time indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. Using the optimized column, fast separation of proteins could be obtained in 2.5 min, and a tryptic digest of myoglobin was successfully separated on the high resolution column. The physical properties (i.e. morphology, porosity and permeability) of the optimized monolithic column were thoroughly investigated. It appears that this surfactant-bound monolith may have a great potential as a new generation of capillary HPLC stationary phase. PMID:20031139

  1. Role of protein-bound carbonyl groups in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, J; Furth, A J

    1997-08-22

    Several mechanisms have been postulated for the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glycated proteins; they all feature protein-bound carbonyl intermediates. Using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), we have detected these intermediates on bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin after in vitro glycation by glucose or fructose. Carbonyls were formed in parallel with AGE-fluorophores, via oxidative Maillard reactions. Neither Amadori nor Heyns products contributed to the DNPH reaction. Fluorophore and carbonyl yields were much enhanced in lipid-associated proteins, but both groups could also be detected in lipid-free proteins. When pre-glycated proteins were incubated in the absence of free sugar, carbonyl groups were rapidly lost in a first-order reaction, while fluorescence continued to develop beyond the 21 days of incubation. Another unexpected finding was that not all carbonyl groups were blocked by aminoguanidine, although there was complete inhibition of reactions leading to AGE-fluorescence. It is suggested that carbonyls acting as fluorophore precursors react readily with aminoguanidine, while others are resistant to this hydrazine, possibly because they are involved in ring closure. Factors influencing the relative rates of acyclisation and hydrazone formation are discussed, together with possible implications for antiglycation therapy.

  2. Dietary proteins in humans: basic aspects and consumption in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigoz, Yves

    2011-03-01

    This introductory review gives an overview on protein metabolism, and discusses protein quality, sources, and requirements as well as the results from recent studies on Swiss spontaneous protein consumption. To assess protein quality in protein mixes and foods, the "protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score" (PDCAAS) is presented as a valuable tool in addition to the biological value (BV). Considering protein intake recommendations, the lower limit recommended has been defined according to the minimal amount needed to maintain short-term nitrogen balance in healthy people with moderate activity. Evaluation of intakes in Switzerland from food consumption data is about 90 g/day of protein per person. Two-thirds of proteins consumed in Switzerland are animal proteins with high biological value [meat and meat products (28 %), milk and dairy products (28 %), fish (3 %), and eggs (3 %)] and about 1/3 of proteins are of plant origin (25 % of cereals, 3 - 4 % of vegetables). Actual spontaneous protein consumption in Switzerland by specific groups of subjects is well within the actual recommendations (10 - 20 % of energy) with only the frail elderly being at risk of not covering their requirements for protein.

  3. Evolution of protein bound Maillard reaction end-products and free Amadori compounds in low lactose milk in presence of fructosamine oxidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Buonanno, Martina; Fiore, Alberto; Monti, Simona Maria; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Thermal treatments and storage influence milk quality, particularly in low lactose milk as the higher concentration of reducing sugars can lead to the increased formation of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The control of the Amadori products (APs) formation is the key step to mitigate the Maillard reaction (MR) in milk. The use of fructosamine oxidases, (Faox) provided promising results. In this paper, the effects of Faox I were evaluated by monitoring the concentration of free and bound MRPs in low lactose milk during shelf life. Results showed that the enzyme reduced the formation of protein-bound MRPs down to 79% after six days at 37°C. Faox I lowered the glycation of almost all the free amino acids resulting effective on basic and polar amino acids. Data here reported corroborate previous findings on the potentiality of Faox enzymes in controlling the early stage of the MR in foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  5. Free and protein-bound cobalamin absorption in healthy middle-aged and older subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt, D Z; van den Broek, W J; Lamers, C B; Corstens, F H; Hoefnagels, W H

    1996-08-01

    To study free- and protein-bound cobalamin absorption and the correlation with atrophic gastritis in healthy middle-aged and older subjects. A cross-sectional study. Fifty-two healthy subjects, aged 26 to 87 years, apparently free from conditions known to influence the cobalamin status. Middle-aged subjects were defined as those younger than 65 years of age (median age 57 years) and older subjects as those 65 years and older (median age 75 years). Protein-bound cobalamin absorption was assessed by 48-hour urinary excretion method following oral administration of scrambled egg yolk, labeled in vivo with 57 Co-cobalamin by injecting a hen with 57 Co-cyanocobalamin. The percentage of 57 Co-cobalamin bound to protein was 65%. Free cobalamin absorption was assessed by 48-hour urinary excretion method following oral administration of crystalline 57 Co-cyanocobalamin. Plasma cobalamin, folate and fasting plasma gastrin, and pepsinogen A and C concentrations were determined. The median urinary excretion of egg yolk 57 Co-cobalamin in middle-aged subjects was 12.3% (25th and 75th percentiles 10.5%-14.5%) compared with 11.7% (25th and 75th percentiles 9.8%-13.6%) in older subjects (P = .283). The median urinary excretion after administration of free 57 Co-cobalamin in middle-aged subjects was 25.7% (25th and 75th percentiles 20.6%-30.7%) compared with 27.9% (25th and 75th percentiles 21.4%-34.5%) in older subjects (P = .694). Neither egg yolk nor free 57 Co-cobalamin excretion correlated with age. A ratio of pepsinogen A to pepsinogen C less than 1.6, indicating atrophic gastritis, was found in 13 subjects. Within the atrophic gastritis group, 11 subjects had a pepsinogen A concentration greater than or equal to 17 micrograms/L, indicating mild to moderate atrophic gastritis, and two subjects had a pepsinogen A concentration less than 17 micrograms/L, indicating severe atrophic gastritis or gastric atrophy. All subjects had normal fasting plasma gastrin concentrations. Free

  6. A photophysical study of two fluorogen-activating proteins bound to their cognate fluorogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, Tiziano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Hau B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jung, Jaemyeong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gnanakaran, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-14

    We are exploring the feasibility of using recently developed flu orogen-activating proteins (FAPs) as reporters for single-molecule imaging. FAPs are single-chain antibodies choosen to specifically bind small chromophoric molecules termed f1uorogens. Upon binding to its cognate FAP the fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorogen can increase substantially giving rise to a fluorescent complex. Based on the seminal work of Szent-Gyorgyi et al. (Nature Biotechnology, Volume 26, Number 2, pp 235-240, 2008) we have chosen to study two fluorogen-activating single-chain antibodies, HL 1.0.1-TOI and H6-MG bound to their cognate fluorogens, thiazole orange and malachite green derivatives, respectively. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study the photophysics of these fluorescent complexes.

  7. Is Fluorescence Valid to Monitor Removal of Protein Bound Uremic Solutes in Dialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luman, Merike; Uhlin, Fredrik; Tanner, Risto; Fridolin, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution and removal dynamics of the main fluorophores during dialysis by analyzing the spent dialysate samples to prove the hypothesis whether the fluorescence of spent dialysate can be utilized for monitoring removal of any of the protein bound uremic solute. A high performance liquid chromatography system was used to separate and quantify fluorophoric solutes in the spent dialysate sampled at the start and the end of 99 dialysis sessions, including 57 hemodialysis and 42 hemodiafiltration treatments. Fluorescence was acquired at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm. The main fluorophores found in samples were identified as indole derivatives: tryptophan, indoxyl glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, indoleacetyl glutamine, and indoleacetic acid. The highest contribution (35 ± 11%) was found to arise from indoxyl sulfate. Strong correlation between contribution values at the start and end of dialysis (R2 = 0.90) indicated to the stable contribution during the course of the dialysis. The reduction ratio of indoxyl sulfate was very close to the decrease of the total fluorescence signal of the spent dialysate (49 ± 14% vs 51 ± 13% respectively, P = 0.30, N = 99) and there was strong correlation between these reduction ratio values (R2 = 0.86). On-line fluorescence measurements were carried out to illustrate the technological possibility for real-time dialysis fluorescence monitoring reflecting the removal of the main fluorophores from blood into spent dialysate. In summary, since a predominant part of the fluorescence signal at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm in the spent dialysate originates from protein bound derivatives of indoles, metabolites of tryptophan and indole, the fluorescence signal at this wavelength region has high potential to be utilized for monitoring the removal of slowly dialyzed uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. PMID:27228162

  8. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que; (UW)

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  9. Comparison of methods for determination of testosterone and non-protein bound testosterone in men with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    The serum concentrations of testosterone and of non-protein bound testosterone were determined in 28 men with alcoholic liver disease having normal to decreased serum albumin concentrations and normal to raised SHBG concentrations. Serum testosterone concentrations determined with two...... radioimmunoassays using different purification procedures and antibody batches did not differ significantly and correlated significantly (r=0.91; p less than 0.001). The median serum concentration of non-protein bound testosterone was 0.265 nmol/l (range 0.068-0.495 nmol/l) when determined by equilibrium dialysis...... and 0.232 nmol/l (range 0.042-0.610 nmol/l) when calculated according to the law of mass action. This difference is insignificant. The concentrations of non-protein bound testosterone determined by the two methods correlated significantly (r=0.83; p less than 0.001). In the calculation of non...

  10. Regeneration of Aplysia Bag Cell Neurons is Synergistically Enhanced by Substrate-Bound Hemolymph Proteins and Laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Callen; Dufrense, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated Aplysia hemolymph as a source of endogenous factors to promote regeneration of bag cell neurons. We describe a novel synergistic effect between substrate-bound hemolymph proteins and laminin. This combination increased outgrowth and branching relative to either laminin or hemolymph alone. Notably, the addition of hemolymph to laminin substrates accelerated growth cone migration rate over ten-fold. Our results indicate that the active factor is either a high molecular weight protein or protein complex and is not the respiratory protein hemocyanin. Substrate-bound factor(s) from central nervous system-conditioned media also had a synergistic effect with laminin, suggesting a possible cooperation between humoral proteins and nervous system extracellular matrix. Further molecular characterization of active factors and their cellular targets is warranted on account of the magnitude of the effects reported here and their potential relevance for nervous system repair.

  11. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    bone cofactor was identified as a lipid containing a ceramide phosphate, a single chained glycerol lipid and a linker. Tendon uses a different cofactor made up of two fatty acid chains linked directly to the phosphate yielding a molecule about half the size. Moreover, adding the tendon factor/cofactor to osteosarcoma cells causes them to stop growing, which is opposite to its role with tendon cells. Thus, the cofactor is cell type specific both in composition and in the triggered response. Further support of its proposed role came from frozen sections from 5 week old mice where an antibody to the factor stained strongly at the growing ends of the tendon as predicted. In conclusion, the molecule needed for cell density signaling is a small protein bound to a unique, tissue-specific phospholipid yielding a membrane associated but diffusible molecule. Signal transduction is postulated to occur by an increased ordering of the plasma membrane as the concentration of this protein/lipid increases with cell density.

  12. Endogenous phosphorylation of basic protein in myelin of varying degrees of compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, P.; Moscarello, M.A.; Cruz, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Fractions containing myelin of varying degrees of compaction were prepared from human white matter. Protein kinase activity in these fractions was measured by using both endogenous and exogenous myelin basic protein (MBP) as substrates. In both cases, less compact myelin fractions possessed higher levels of protein kinase activity than the compact myelin fraction. In addition, the specific activity of phosphorylated basic protein was greater in the loosely compacted fractions than in compact multilamellar myelin. When basic protein in compact myelin or the myelin fractions was phosphorylated by the endogenous kinase, approximately 70% of the [ 32 P]phosphate was incorporated at a single site, identified as Ser-102. The remaining 30% was found in three other minor sites. Electron microscopy of less compact myelin showed it was composed of fewer lamellae which correlated with a relative decrease in the proportion of cationic charge isomers (microheteromers) when MBP was subjected to gel electrophoresis at alkaline pH. The shift in charge microheterogeneity of basic protein to the less cationic isomers in the less compact myelin fractions correlated with an increase in protein kinase activity and a greater specific activity of phosphorylated basic protein

  13. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GTP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2012-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) act as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of GDP-bound form of the G protein α subunit (Gα(GDP)) and G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα(GTP)) and Gβγ. Then, Gα(GTP) and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Each family transduces the signaling from different GPCRs to the specific effectors. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gα(i3), a member of the i/o family, with a molecular weight of 41 K in complex with a GTP analogue, GTPγS.

  14. Hydrogen Bonding Geometry of a Protein-bound Carbohydrate from Water Exchange-mediated Cross-relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, Eric W.; Weaver, Jeanne L.; Prestegard, James H.

    1998-01-01

    We present heteronuclear two-dimensional methods for the analysis of the geometry of exchangeable protons on a protein-bound carbohydrate. By using a water-selective NOESY-HSQC, we observed cross-relaxation between carbohydrate hydroxyl protons and non-exchangeable ring protons in the complex of [13C6]-α-methyl-D-mannopyranoside with recombinant rat mannose binding protein. Using a simple kinetic model, we were able to explain the differences in the initial slopes of the resulting cross-relaxation buildup curves in terms of the geometry of the hydroxyl protons in the bound state. The hydroxyl rotamers consistent with our cross-relaxation data fit very well with predictions based on the crystal structure of MBP bound to a mannose-rich oligosaccharide. These methods should be applicable to other systems where both ligand exchange and water exchange are fast relative to the rate of cross-relaxation

  15. Convective transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs facilitates direct penetration into deep tissues after topical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Anissimov, Yuri G; Jepps, Owen G; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To relate the varying dermal, subcutaneous and muscle microdialysate concentrations found in man after topical application to the nature of the drug applied and to the underlying physiology. METHODS We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in which transport to deeper tissues was determined by tissue diffusion, blood, lymphatic and intersitial flow transport and drug properties. The model was applied to interpret published human microdialysis data, estimated in vitro dermal diffusion and protein binding affinity of drugs that have been previously applied topically in vivo and measured in deep cutaneous tissues over time. RESULTS Deeper tissue microdialysis concentrations for various drugs in vivo vary widely. Here, we show that carriage by the blood to the deeper tissues below topical application sites facilitates the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs that penetrate the skin, leading to rapid and significant concentrations in those tissues. Hence, the fractional concentration for the highly plasma protein bound diclofenac in deeper tissues is 0.79 times that in a probe 4.5 mm below a superficial probe whereas the corresponding fractional concentration for the poorly protein bound nicotine is 0.02. Their corresponding estimated in vivo lag times for appearance of the drugs in the deeper probes were 1.1 min for diclofenac and 30 min for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Poorly plasma protein bound drugs are mainly transported to deeper tissues after topical application by tissue diffusion whereas the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs is additionally facilitated by convective blood, lymphatic and interstitial transport to deep tissues. PMID:21999217

  16. G protein- and agonist-bound serotonin 5-HT2A receptor model activated by steered molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ísberg, Vignir; Balle, Thomas; Sander, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    A 5-HT(2A) receptor model was constructed by homology modeling based on the ß(2)-adrenergic receptor and the G protein-bound opsin crystal structures. The 5-HT(2A) receptor model was transferred into an active conformation by an agonist ligand and a G(aq) peptide in four subsequent steered...

  17. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Torben; Bork-Jensen, J.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    . subtilis and C. crescentus, the mreB gene is essential. However, in E. coli, mreB was inferred not to be essential. Using a tight, conditional gene depletion system, we systematically investigated whether the E. coli mreBCD-encoded components were essential. We found that cells depleted of mreBCD became......D. In contrast, MreB and MreD did not interact in this assay. Thus, we conclude that the E. coli MreBCD form an essential membrane-bound complex. Curiously, MreB did not form cables in cell depleted for MreC, MreD or RodA, indicating a mutual interdependency between MreB filament morphology and cell shape. Based......MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...

  18. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  19. Intraerythrocyte Non-Protein-Bound Iron in Children with Bronchopulmonary Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Vasilyeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 230 children having bronchopulmonary pathology (BPP were examined. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their intraerythrocyte non-protein- bound iron (IE-NPBI levels. We investigated the relationship of the IE-NPBI level with parameters of respiratory function (RF tests, the severity of comorbidities, and level of other free intracellular ions, such as copper, zinc, and magnesium. The pronounced increase in IE-NPBI level was typical for patients with the connective tissue dysplasia, often accompanied by mitral valve prolapse, osteopenia, and mineral metabolism violation. The severe comorbid diagnoses were typical for patients with reduced levels of IE-NPBI (chronic cor pulmonale, tuberculosis infection. The largest number of comorbidities, aggravating the underlying disease, took place in the group of patients with a significant reduction in IE-NPBI level. A significant increase in IE-NPBI level, as well as a marked reduction of IE-NPBI level, was an unfavorable factor for the underlying disease. We found a correlation between IE-NPBI level and parameters of RF-test in patients with moderate increase in IE-NPBI level.

  20. TERRA transcripts are bound by a complex array of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Stagno d'Alcontres, Martina; Blasco, Maria A

    2010-06-29

    Telomeres are transcribed from the telomeric C-rich strand, giving rise to UUAGGG repeat-containing telomeric transcripts or TERRA, which are novel structural components of telomeres. TERRA abundance is highly dependent on developmental status (including nuclear reprogramming), telomere length, cellular stresses, tumour stage and chromatin structure. However, the molecular mechanisms and factors controlling TERRA levels are still largely unknown. In this study, we identify a set of RNA-binding proteins, which endogenously bind and regulate TERRA in the context of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The identification was carried out by biotin pull-down assays followed by LC-MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Different members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family are among the ribonucleoprotein family that bind more abundantly to TERRA. Downregulation of TERRA-bound RBPs by small interfering RNA further shows that they can impact on TERRA abundance, their location and telomere lengthening. These findings anticipate an impact of TERRA-associated RBPs on telomere biology and telomeres diseases, such as cancer and aging.

  1. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Klinge Brimnes

    Full Text Available B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35 and CR2 (CD21 both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides. The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  2. Reduced protein bound uraemic toxins in vegetarian kidney failure patients treated by haemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandouz, Sakina; Mohamed, Ali Shendi; Zheng, Yishan; Sandeman, Susan; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p cresyl sulfate (PCS) are protein bound toxins which accumulate with chronic kidney disease. Haemodiafiltration (HDF) increases middle molecule clearances and has been suggested to increase IS and PCS clearance. We therefore wished to establish whether higher convective clearances with HDF would reduce IS and PCS concentrations. Methods We measured total plasma IS and PCS in a cohort of 138 CKD5d patients treated by On-line HDF (Ol-HDF), by high pressure liquid chromatography. Findings Mean patient age was 64.6 ± 16.5 years, 60.1% male, 57.3% diabetic, median dialysis vintage 25.9 months (12.4-62.0). The mean ICS concentration was 79.8 ± 56.4 umol/L and PCS 140.3 ± 101.8 umol/L. On multivariate analysis, IS was associated with serum albumin (β 4.31,P vegetarian diet(β-28.3, P = 0.048) and PCS negatively with log C reactive protein (β-75.8, P vegetarian diet (β-109, P = 0.001). Vegetarian patients had lower IS and PCS levels (median 41.5 (24.2-71.9) vs. 78.1 (49.5-107.5) and PCS (41.6 (14.2-178.3) vs. 127.3 (77.4-205.6) µmol/L, respectively, P Vegetarian patients had lower preOl-HDF serum urea, and phosphate (13.8 ±3.8 vs. 18.4 ± 5.2 mmol/L, and 1.33 ± 0.21 vs. 1.58 ± 0.45 mmol/L), and estimated urea nitrogen intake (1.25 ± 0.28 vs. 1.62 ± 0.5 g/kg/day), respectively, all P vegetarian diet had reduced IS and PCS concentrations. Although this could be due to differences in dietary protein intake, a vegetarian diet may also potentially reduce IS and PCS production by the intestinal microbiome. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  3. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of monomolecular layers of the protein streptavidin, specifically bound to biotin-functionalized lipid monolayers at aqueous surfaces, has been characterized. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity measurements allowed an assessment of the organization of these self-assembled systems...... with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...

  4. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  5. A Flp-nick system to study repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    recombinase recognition target site that has been integrated in the yeast genome. The genetic requirement for cells to cope with this insult is the same as for cells treated with camptothecin, which traps topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complexes genome-wide. Hence, a single protein-bound nick is enough to kill......We present the Flp-nick system, which allows introduction of a protein-bound nick at a single genomic site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and thus mimics a stabilized topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex. We took advantage of a mutant Flp recombinase that can introduce a nick at a specific Flp...... cells if functional repair pathways are lacking. The Flp-nick system can be used to dissect repair, checkpoint and replication fork management pathways activated by a single genomic insult, and it allows the study of events at the damage site, which so far has been impossible to address....

  6. Crystal Structures of SlyA Protein, a Master Virulence Regulator of Salmonella, in Free and DNA-bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Kyle T.; Duguid, Erica M.; He, Chuan (UC)

    2011-11-17

    SlyA is a master virulence regulator that controls the transcription of numerous genes in Salmonella enterica. We present here crystal structures of SlyA by itself and bound to a high-affinity DNA operator sequence in the slyA gene. SlyA interacts with DNA through direct recognition of a guanine base by Arg-65, as well as interactions between conserved Arg-86 and the minor groove and a large network of non-base-specific contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone. Our structures, together with an unpublished structure of SlyA bound to the small molecule effector salicylate (Protein Data Bank code 3DEU), reveal that, unlike many other MarR family proteins, SlyA dissociates from DNA without large conformational changes when bound to this effector. We propose that SlyA and other MarR global regulators rely more on indirect readout of DNA sequence to exert control over many genes, in contrast to proteins (such as OhrR) that recognize a single operator.

  7. A simple elution strategy for biotinylated proteins bound to streptavidin conjugated beads using excess biotin and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Joleen S; Yamada, Soichiro

    2017-12-02

    Protein-protein interactions are the molecular basis of cell signaling. Recently, proximity based biotin identification (BioID) has emerged as an alternative approach to traditional co-immunoprecipitation. In this protocol, a mutant biotin ligase promiscuously labels proximal binding partners with biotin, and resulting biotinylated proteins are purified using streptavidin conjugated beads. This approach does not require preservation of protein complexes in vitro, making it an ideal approach to identify transient or weak protein complexes. However, due to the high affinity bond between streptavidin and biotin, elution of biotinylated proteins from streptavidin conjugated beads requires harsh denaturing conditions, which are often incompatible with downstream processing. To effectively release biotinylated proteins bound to streptavidin conjugated beads, we designed a series of experiments to determine optimal binding and elution conditions. Interestingly, the concentrations of SDS and IGEPAL-CA630 during the incubation with streptavidin conjugated beads were the key to effective elution of biotinylated proteins using excess biotin and heating. This protocol provides an alternative method to isolate biotinylated proteins from streptavidin conjugated beads that is suitable for further downstream analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How to calculate clearance of highly protein-bound drugs during continuous venovenous hemofiltration demonstrated with flucloxacillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Brigitte; Ahmed el Gendy, Salwa; Delle Karth, Georg; Locker, Gottfried J; Heinz, Gottfried; Jaeger, Walter; Thalhammer, Florian

    2003-01-01

    Flucloxacillin is an important antimicrobial drug in the treatment of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and therefore is often used in staphylococcal infections. Furthermore, flucloxacillin has a high protein binding rate as for example ceftriaxone or teicoplanin--drugs which have formerly been characterized as not being dialyzable. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 4.0 g flucloxacillin every 8 h were examined in 10 intensive care patients during continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) using a polyamide capillary hemofilter. In addition, the difficulty of calculating the hemofiltration clearance of a highly protein-bound drug is described. Flucloxacillin serum levels were significantly lowered (56.9 +/- 24.0%) even though only 15% of the drug was detected in the ultrafiltrate. Elimination half-life, total body clearance and sieving coefficient were 4.9 +/- 0.7 h, 117.2 +/- 79.1 ml/min and 0.21 +/- 0.09, respectively. These discrepancies can be explained by the high protein binding of flucloxacillin, the adsorbing property of polyamide and the equation in order to calculate hemofiltration clearance. The unbound fraction of a 4.0 g flucloxacillin dosage facilitates time above the minimum inhibitory concentration (T > MIC) of 60% only for strains up to a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.5 mg/l. Based on the data of this study, we conclude that intensive care patients with staphylococcal infections on CVVH should be treated with 4.0 g flucloxacillin every 8 h which was safe and well tolerated. Moreover, further studies with highly protein-bound drugs are recommended to check the classical 'hemodialysis' equation as the standard equation in calculating the CVVH clearance of highly protein-bound drugs. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic...

  10. Ox peripheral nerve myelin membrane. Purification and partial characterization of two basic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Two basic proteins were purified from the peripheral nervous system. The isolation was achieved by (1) delipidation with chloroform-butanol mixtures, dry acetone, and dry ether, (2) acid extraction at pH 2 and then (3) dialysis against distilled water, lyophilization, and solubilization in pH-10.7

  11. Native SDS-PAGE: high resolution electrophoretic separation of proteins with retention of native properties including bound metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B; Wobig, William J; Petering, David H

    2014-05-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn(2+) bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn(2+) proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ.

  12. Effects of solution chemistry and aging time on prion protein adsorption and replication of soil-bound prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prion interactions with soil may play an important role in the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie. Prions are known to bind to a wide range of soil surfaces, but the effects of adsorption solution chemistry and long-term soil binding on prion fate and transmission risk are unknown. We investigated HY TME prion protein (PrP(Sc adsorption to soil minerals in aqueous solutions of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and deionized water using western blotting. The replication efficiency of bound prions following adsorption in these solutions was also evaluated by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Aging studies investigated PrP(Sc desorption and replication efficiency up to one year following adsorption in PBS or DI water. Results indicate that adsorption solution chemistry can affect subsequent prion replication or desorption ability, especially after incubation periods of 30 d or longer. Observed effects were minor over the short-term (7 d or less. Results of long-term aging experiments demonstrate that unbound prions or prions bound to a diverse range of soil surfaces can readily replicate after one year. Our results suggest that while prion-soil interactions can vary with solution chemistry, prions bound to soil could remain a risk for transmitting prion diseases after months in the environment.

  13. Rational Design of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Binding Profiles by Optimizing Surface Water Networks Coating Protein-Bound Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, Stefan G; Cramer, Jonathan; Betz, Michael; Fridh, Veronica; Karlsson, Robert; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2016-12-08

    A previously studied congeneric series of thermolysin inhibitors addressing the solvent-accessible S 2 ' pocket with different hydrophobic substituents showed modulations of the surface water layers coating the protein-bound inhibitors. Increasing stabilization of water molecules resulted in an enthalpically more favorable binding signature, overall enhancing affinity. Based on this observation, we optimized the series by designing tailored P 2 ' substituents to improve and further stabilize the surface water network. MD simulations were applied to predict the putative water pattern around the bound ligands. Subsequently, the inhibitors were synthesized and characterized by high-resolution crystallography, microcalorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance. One of the designed inhibitors established the most pronounced water network of all inhibitors tested so far, composed of several fused water polygons, and showed 50-fold affinity enhancement with respect to the original methylated parent ligand. Notably, the inhibitor forming the most perfect water network also showed significantly prolonged residence time compared to the other tested inhibitors.

  14. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  15. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface 125 I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with [ 35 S] methionine, 14 C-amino acids, or [ 3 H] palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11

  16. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bradley R; Drake, Eric J; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gulick, Andrew M

    2016-10-21

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M. (UMM); (HWMRI)

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  18. Free and Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Beer: Method Development and a Survey of Different Beer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2016-09-28

    The Maillard reaction is important for beer color and flavor, but little is known about the occurrence of individual glycated amino acids in beer. Therefore, seven Maillard reaction products (MRPs), namely, fructosyllysine, maltulosyllysine, pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, MG-H1, and argpyrimidine, were synthesized and quantitated in different types of beer (Pilsner, dark, bock, wheat, and nonalcoholic beers) by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode through application of the standard addition method. Free MRPs were analyzed directly. A high molecular weight fraction was isolated by dialysis and hydrolyzed enzymatically prior to analysis. Maltulosyllysine was quantitated for the first time in food. The most important free MRPs in beer are fructosyllysine (6.8-27.0 mg/L) and maltulosyllysine (3.7-21.8 mg/L). Beer contains comparatively high amounts of late-stage free MRPs such as pyrraline (0.2-1.6 mg/L) and MG-H1 (0.3-2.5 mg/L). Minor amounts of formyline (4-230 μg/L), maltosine (6-56 μg/L), and argpyrimidine (0.1-4.1 μg/L) were quantitated. Maltulosyllysine was the most significant protein-bound MRP, but both maltulosyllysine and fructosyllysine represent only 15-60% of the total protein-bound lysine-derived Amadori products. Differences in the patterns of protein-bound and free individual MRPs and the ratios between them were identified, which indicate differences in their chemical, biochemical, and microbiological stabilities during the brewing process.

  19. Structural models of intrinsically disordered and calcium-bound folded states of a protein adapted for secretion

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Darragh P.; Hernandez, Belen; Durand, Dominique; Hourdel, Véronique; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Vachette, Patrice; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Ladant, Daniel; Brier, Sébastien; Chenal, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type I secretion systems, T1SS, to secrete virulence factors that contain calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) motifs. Here, we present structural models of an RTX protein, RD, in both its intrinsically disordered calcium-free Apo-state and its folded calcium-bound Holo-state. Apo-RD behaves as a disordered polymer chain comprising several statistical elements that exhibit local rigidity with residual secondary structure. Holo-RD is a f...

  20. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic 15 N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix

  1. Protein-bound Vaccinium fruit polyphenols decrease IgE binding to peanut allergens and RBL-2H3 mast cell degranulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plundrich, Nathalie J; Bansode, Rishipal R; Foegeding, E Allen; Williams, Leonard L; Lila, Mary Ann

    2017-04-19

    Peanut allergy is a worldwide health concern. In this study, the natural binding properties of plant-derived polyphenols to proteins was leveraged to produce stable protein-polyphenol complexes comprised of peanut proteins and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) or lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) pomace polyphenols. Protein-bound and free polyphenols were characterized and quantified by multistep extraction of polyphenols from protein-polyphenol complexes. Immunoblotting was performed with peanut-allergic plasma to determine peanut protein-specific IgE binding to unmodified peanut protein, or to peanut protein-polyphenol complexes. In an allergen model system, RBL-2H3 mast cells were exposed to peanut protein-polyphenol complexes and evaluated for their inhibitory activity on ionomycin-induced degranulation (β-hexosaminidase and histamine). Among the evaluated polyphenolic compounds from protein-polyphenol complex eluates, quercetin, - in aglycone or glycosidic form - was the main phytochemical identified to be covalently bound to peanut proteins. Peanut protein-bound cranberry and blueberry polyphenols significantly decreased IgE binding to peanut proteins at p polyphenol complexes showed a significant (p polyphenols led to the formation of peanut protein-polyphenol complexes with significantly reduced allergenic potential. Future trials are warranted to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms of these protein-polyphenol complexes and the role of quercetin in their hypoallergenic potential.

  2. Theory and applications of the transferred nuclear overhauser effect to the study of the conformations of small ligands bound to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clore, G. M.; Gronenborn, A. M.

    The principles, theory, and applications of the transferred proton-proton nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) to the study of the conformations of small molecules to proteins are presented and discussed. The basis of the TRNOE involves the transfer of information concerning cross relaxation between two bound ligand nuclei from the bound to the free state by chemical exchange so that negative NOEs on the easily detectable free or observed ligand resonances may be seen following irradiation of other ligand resonances (free, bound, or observed), thus conveying information on the proximity in space of bound ligand nuclei. In the presence of protein, a negative TRNOE on either the free or observed resonance of nucleus i will be observed following irradiation of either the free, bound, or observed resonance of nucleus j, providing several conditions are met. Methods for obtaining quantitative conformational information from TRNOE measurements are discussed. The TRNOE method is applicable even when no individual proton resonances of either the protein or the bound ligand can be resolved, and is not limited by the molecular weight of the protein, extending the molecular weight range over which 1H NMR can provide useful conformational information to the very largest systems. This is illustrated by the determination of the glycosidic bond torsion angle of adenosine 5'-monophosphate bound to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

  3. Computational Methods for Protein Structure Prediction and Modeling Volume 1: Basic Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Volume one of this two volume sequence focuses on the basic characterization of known protein structures as well as structure prediction from protein sequence information. The 11 chapters provide an overview of the field, covering key topics in modeling, force fields, classification, computational methods, and struture prediction. Each chapter is a self contained review designed to cover (1) definition of the problem and an historical perspective, (2) mathematical or computational formulation of the problem, (3) computational methods and algorithms, (4) performance results, (5) existing software packages, and (6) strengths, pitfalls, challenges, and future research directions.

  4. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (Piron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (Piron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J. [MSKCC; (Rockefeller)

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  6. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  7. Systematic Discovery of Chromatin-Bound Protein Complexes from ChIP-seq Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Elemento, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing is an invaluable assay for identifying the genomic binding sites of transcription factors. However, transcription factors rarely bind chromatin alone but often bind together with other cofactors, forming protein complexes. Here, we describe a computational method that integrates multiple ChIP-seq and RNA-seq datasets to discover protein complexes and determine their role as activators or repressors. This chapter outlines a detailed computational pipeline for discovering and predicting binding partners from ChIP-seq data and inferring their role in regulating gene expression. This work aims at developing hypotheses about gene regulation via binding partners and deciphering the combinatorial nature of DNA-binding proteins.

  8. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-09

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  9. Kinesin-8 is a low-force motor protein with a weakly bound slip state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannasch, Anita; Bormuth, Volker; Storch, Marko; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2013-06-04

    During the cell cycle, kinesin-8s control the length of microtubules by interacting with their plus ends. To reach these ends, the motors have to be able to take many steps without dissociating. However, the underlying mechanism for this high processivity and how stepping is affected by force are unclear. Here, we tracked the motion of yeast (Kip3) and human (Kif18A) kinesin-8s with high precision under varying loads using optical tweezers. Surprisingly, both kinesin-8 motors were much weaker compared with other kinesins. Furthermore, we discovered a force-induced stick-slip motion: the motor frequently slipped, recovered from this state, and then resumed normal stepping motility without detaching from the microtubule. The low forces are consistent with kinesin-8s being regulators of microtubule dynamics rather than cargo transporters. The weakly bound slip state, reminiscent of a molecular safety leash, may be an adaptation for high processivity. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pressurized liquid extraction-assisted mussel cytosol preparation for the determination of metals bound to metallothionein-like proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Rivas, Sandra; Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Alonso-Rodriguez, Elia; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario

    2007-01-01

    The possibilities of pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) have been novelty tested to assist the cytosol preparation from wet mussel soft tissue before the determination of metals bound to metallothionein-like proteins (MLPs). Results obtained after PLE were compared with those obtained after a classical blending procedure for mussel cytosolic preparation. Isoforms MLP-1 (retention time of 4.1 min) and MLP-2 (retention time of 7.4 min) were separated by anion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the concentrations of Ba, Cu, Mn, Sr and Zn bound to MLP isoforms were directly measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) as a multi-element detector. The optimized PLE-assisted mussel cytosol preparation has consisted of one extraction cycle at room temperature and 1500 psi for 2 min. Since separation between the solid mussel residue and the extract (cytosol) is performed by the PLE system, the cytosol preparation method is faster than conventional cytosol preparation methods by cutting/blending using Ultraturrax or Stomacher devices

  11. Detection of isolated protein-bound metal ions by single-particle cryo-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Nadav; Bellapadrona, Giuliano; Houben, Lothar; Sagi, Irit; Elbaum, Michael

    2017-10-17

    Metal ions play essential roles in many aspects of biological chemistry. Detecting their presence and location in proteins and cells is important for understanding biological function. Conventional structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-transmission electron microscopy can identify metal atoms on protein only if the protein structure is solved to atomic resolution. We demonstrate here the detection of isolated atoms of Zn and Fe on ferritin, using cryogenic annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (cryo-STEM) coupled with single-particle 3D reconstructions. Zn atoms are found in a pattern that matches precisely their location at the ferroxidase sites determined earlier by X-ray crystallography. By contrast, the Fe distribution is smeared along an arc corresponding to the proposed path from the ferroxidase sites to the mineral nucleation sites along the twofold axes. In this case the single-particle reconstruction is interpreted as a probability distribution function based on the average of individual locations. These results establish conditions for detection of isolated metal atoms in the broader context of electron cryo-microscopy and tomography.

  12. Effect of PSK, a protein-bound polysaccharide preparation, on liver tumors of Syrian hamsters induced by Thorotrast injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Junji (Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Maruyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Hisahide; Irie, Hiroshi; Mori, Takesaburo

    1993-09-01

    The contrast medium Thorotrast, an agent well known to be carcinogenic, was injected into 400 congeneic Syrian hamsters. The resulting incidence of malignant hepatic tumors such as cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and hemangiosarcoma, was significantly higher in the male experimental group than in the control group, and the 50% survival period in the male group was shortened by about 100 days (P<0.01). However administration of the antitumor drug PSK (Polysaccharide Kureha), a protein bound-polysaccharide extracted from basidiomycete fungi, prevented this carcinogenic effect. The incidence of malignant hepatic tumors in the experimental group was 22.5% compared with 2.8% in the control group (P<0.01) and 10.5% in the PSK-treated group (P<0.01). PSK also increased the 50% survival period by 61 days (P<0.01). (author).

  13. Effect of PSK, a protein-bound polysaccharide preparation, on liver tumors of Syrian hamsters induced by Thorotrast injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, J; Maruyama, T; Takahashi, H; Irie, H; Mori, T

    1993-09-01

    The contrast medium Thorotrast, an agent well known to be carcinogenic, was injected into 400 congeneic Syrian hamsters. The resulting incidence of malignant hepatic tumors such as cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and hemangiosarcoma, was significantly higher in the male experimental group than in the control group, and the 50% survival period in the male group was shortened by about 100 days (P Kureha), a protein bound-polysaccharide extracted from basidiomycete fungi, prevented this carcinogenic effect. The incidence of malignant hepatic tumors in the experimental group was 22.5% compared with 2.8% in the control group (P < 0.01) and 10.5% in the PSK-treated group (P < 0.01). PSK also increased the 50% survival period by 61 days (P < 0.01).

  14. G protein- and agonist-bound serotonin 5-HT2A receptor model activated by steered molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isberg, Vignir; Balle, Thomas; Sander, Tommy; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Gloriam, David E

    2011-02-28

    A 5-HT(2A) receptor model was constructed by homology modeling based on the β(2)-adrenergic receptor and the G protein-bound opsin crystal structures. The 5-HT(2A) receptor model was transferred into an active conformation by an agonist ligand and a G(αq) peptide in four subsequent steered molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The driving force for the transformation was the addition of several known intermolecular and receptor interhelical hydrogen bonds enforcing the necessary helical and rotameric movements. Subsquent MD simulations without constraints confirmed the stability of the activated receptor model as well as revealed new information about stabilizing residues and bonds. The active 5-HT(2A) receptor model was further validated by retrospective ligand screening of more than 9400 compounds, whereof 182 were known ligands. The results show that the model can be used in drug discovery for virtual screening and structure-based ligand design as well as in GPCR activation studies.

  15. Structure analysis of free and bound states of an RNA aptamer against ribosomal protein S8 from Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlieva, Milya; Donarski, James; Wang, Jiachen; Shamoo, Yousif; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Several protein-targeted RNA aptamers have been identified for a variety of applications and although the affinities of numerous protein-aptamer complexes have been determined, the structural details of these complexes have not been widely explored. We examined the structural accommodation of an RNA aptamer that binds bacterial r-protein S8. The core of the primary binding site for S8 on helix 21 of 16S rRNA contains a pair of conserved base triples that mold the sugar-phosphate backbone to S8. The aptamer, which does not contain the conserved sequence motif, is specific for the rRNA binding site of S8. The protein-free RNA aptamer adopts a helical structure with multiple non-canonical base pairs. Surprisingly, binding of S8 leads to a dramatic change in the RNA conformation that restores the signature S8 recognition fold through a novel combination of nucleobase interactions. Nucleotides within the non-canonical core rearrange to create a G-(G-C) triple and a U-(A-U)-U quartet. Although native-like S8-RNA interactions are present in the aptamer-S8 complex, the topology of the aptamer RNA differs from that of the helix 21-S8 complex. This is the first example of an RNA aptamer that adopts substantially different secondary structures in the free and protein-bound states and highlights the remarkable plasticity of RNA secondary structure. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Body composition, tissue deposition, and lysine utilization for protein deposition of barrows and gilts fed crystalline or protein-bound lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina, J J; Miller, P S; Lewis, A J; Fischer, R L; Diedrichsen, R M

    2016-05-01

    An experiment with 2 trials (28 d/trial) was conducted to determine body composition, tissue deposition, and utilization of Lys for protein deposition (PD) of barrows and gilts fed -Lys·HCl (CLys) or protein-bound Lys in soybean meal (SBM). Thirty-two growing pigs (16 barrows and 16 gilts; average initial BW of 18.6 kg) were used in each of 2 trials. Four pigs (2 barrows and 2 gilts) were euthanized at the start of each trial to determine initial body composition. The remaining pigs were euthanized at the end of the trials to determine empty-body composition and deposition rates of water, protein, fat, ash, and AA. Pigs were randomly allotted to 1 of 7 dietary treatments. There were 2 replications per treatment in each trial for a total of 4 replications. Dietary treatments consisted of a corn-SBM basal diet (0.48% Lys) and diets containing 0.56%, 0.65%, and 0.74% standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys that were achieved by adding Lys to the basal diet from either SBM or CLys. Pigs fed the CLys-supplemented diets at 0.65% SID Lys had more ( Gilts had greater ( = 0.05) body Lys content in body protein than barrows (7.68 vs. 7.52 g/100 g). Empty-body ash contents were not different between pigs fed CLys or SBM-supplemented diets. Water deposition and PD increased linearly ( gilts did not differ in tissue deposition rates. Overall, empty-body contents and deposition rates of essential and nonessential AA were not different between pigs fed CLys and pigs fed SBM-bound Lys. The amount of SID Lys required for PD ranged between 0.09 and 0.13 g/g for both sources of Lys. The Lys deposition:SID Lys intake ratio was greater ( gilts than barrows (0.62 vs. 0.56). Body composition, tissue deposition, and utilization of Lys for PD and Lys deposition were not different in pigs fed diets supplemented with -Lys·HCl with respect to protein-bound Lys in SBM.

  17. Crystal Structure of Inhibitor-Bound Human 5-lipoxygenase-activating Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson,A.; McKeever, B.; Xu, S.; Wisniewski, D.; Miller, D.; Yamin, T.; Spencer, R.; Chu, L.; Ujjainwalla, F.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Leukotrienes are proinflammatory products of arachidonic acid oxidation by 5-lipoxygenase that have been shown to be involved in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The integral membrane protein FLAP is essential for leukotriene biosynthesis. We describe the x-ray crystal structures of human FLAP in complex with two leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors at 4.0 and 4.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show that inhibitors bind in membrane-embedded pockets of FLAP, which suggests how these inhibitors prevent arachidonic acid from binding to FLAP and subsequently being transferred to 5-lipoxygenase, thereby preventing leukotriene biosynthesis. This structural information provides a platform for the development of therapeutics for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Immune response of calves inoculated with proteins ofAnaplasma marginale bound to an immunostimulant complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Ribeiro Gasparini

    Full Text Available Despite our current knowledge of the immunology, pathology, and genetics of Anaplasma marginale, prevention in cattle is currently based on old standbys, including live attenuated vaccines, antibiotic treatment, and maintaining enzootic stability in cattle herds. In the present study, we evaluated the use of an immunostimulant complex (ISCOMATRIX adjuvant, associated with a pool of recombinant major surface proteins (rMSP1a, rMSP1b, rMSP4 and rMSP5 to improve the humoral immune response triggered in calves mainly by IgG2. Ten calves were divided in three groups: 4 calves were inoculated with the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs (G1; 2 calves were inoculated with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (G2; and 4 calves received saline (G3. Three inoculations were administered at 21-day intervals. In G1, the calves showed significant increases in total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 levels 21 days after the second inoculation, compared to the control group (p < 0.05, and G1 calves remained above the cut-off value 28 days after the third inoculation (p < 0.05. The post-immunized sera from calves in G1 reacted specifically for each of the rMSPs used. In conclusion, the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs induced antigen-specific seroconversion in calves. Therefore, additional testing to explore the protection induced by rMSPs, both alone and in conjunction with proteins previously identified as subdominant epitopes, is warranted.

  19. Freeze-drying of proteins in glass solids formed by basic amino acids and dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Kadoya, Saori; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce and characterize glass-state amorphous solids containing amino acids and organic acids that protect co-lyophilized proteins. Thermal analysis of frozen solutions containing a basic amino acid (e.g., L-arginine, L-lysine, L-histidine) and a hydroxy di- or tricarboxylic acid (e.g., citric acid, L-tartaric acid, DL-malic acid) showed glass transition of maximally freeze-concentrated solute at temperatures (T'g) significantly higher than those of the individual solute solutions. Mixing of the amino acid with some dicarboxylic acids (e.g., oxalic acid) also suggested an upward shift of the transition temperature. Contrarily, combinations of the amino acid with monocarboxylic acids (e.g., acetic acid) had T'gs between those of the individual solute solutions. Co-lyophilization of the basic amino acids and citric acid or L-tartaric acid resulted in amorphous solids that have glass transition temperatures (Tg) higher than the individual components. Mid- and near-infrared analysis indicated altered environment around the functional groups of the consisting molecules. Some of the glass-state excipient combinations protected an enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) from inactivation during freeze-drying. The glass-state excipient combinations formed by hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction network would be potent alternative to stabilize therapeutic proteins in freeze-dried formulations.

  20. Determination of Free-Form and Peptide Bound Pyrraline in the Commercial Drinks Enriched with Different Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyrraline, a causative factor for the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is also employed as an indicator to evaluate heat damage and formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs in foods. Peptide-enriched drinks (PEDs are broadly consumed worldwide due to rapid rate of absorption and perceived health effects. It can be hypothesized that PED is an important source of pyrraline, especially peptide bound pyrraline (Pep-Pyr. In this study we determined free-form pyrraline (Free-Pyr and Pep-Pyr in drinks enriched with whey protein hydrolysate (WPH, soy protein hydrolysate (SPH and collagen protein hydrolysate (CPH. A detection method was developed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detector coupled with tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction (SPE. The SPE led to excellent recovery rates ranging between 93.2% and 98.5% and a high reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSD of <5%. The limits of detection and quantification obtained were 30.4 and 70.3 ng/mL, respectively. Pep-Pyr was identified as the most abundant form (above 96 percent of total pyrraline, whereas Free-Pyr was present in a small proportion (less than four percent of total pyrraline. The results indicate that PED is an important extrinsic source of pyrraline, especially Pep-Pyr. As compared with CPH- and SPH-enriched drinks, WPH-enriched drinks contained high content of Pep-Pyr. The Pep-Pyr content is associated with the distribution of peptide lengths and the amino acid compositions of protein in PEDs.

  1. Determination of free and bound riboflavin in cow's milk using a novel flavin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Julia; Monschein, Stefanie; Pauline Macheroux, E; Knaus, Tanja; Macheroux, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A recently described putative protease from the gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (termed ppBat) exhibits two tryptophan residues in the interface which enable specific binding of the isoalloxazine heterocycle of riboflavin and its two cofactor forms, FMN and FAD. Recombinant ppBat was used to capture riboflavin from bovine milk directly without any prior preparation steps. The flavin-loaded protein was then re-isolated by means of affinity chromatography to identify and quantify the captured flavins. Free riboflavin concentrations were determined to 197 and 151μg/l for milk with 3.5% and 0.5% fat content, respectively. Total riboflavin concentrations were also determined after acid-treatment of milk and were 4-5 times higher than for free riboflavin. Free FMN and FAD were not detectable and only trace amounts of FMN were found in milk following acid treatment. The method appears to be amenable to develop a direct assay for free riboflavin in milk and other foods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein-bound polysaccharide activates dendritic cells and enhances OVA-specific T cell response as vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Abbi L; Sun, Guan-Cheng; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren R; Strobe, Katie; Yang, Yi; Dang, Yushe; Disis, Mary L; Lu, Hailing

    2013-12-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) is a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor mushroom. It has been used traditionally in Asian countries for its immune stimulating and anti-cancer effects. We have recently found that PSK can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). TLR2 is highly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), so the current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of PSK on DC activation and the potential of using PSK as a vaccine adjuvant. In vitro experiments using mouse bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) demonstrated that PSK induces DC maturation as shown by dose-dependent increase in the expression of CD80, CD86, MHCII, and CD40. PSK also induces the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines by DC, including IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-6, at both mRNA and protein levels. In vivo experiments using PSK as an adjuvant to OVAp323-339 vaccine showed that PSK as adjuvant leads to enlarged draining lymph nodes with higher number of activated DC. PSK also stimulates proliferation of OVA-specific T cells, and induces T cells that produce multiple cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. Altogether, these results demonstrate the ability of PSK to activate DC in vitro and in vivo and the potential of using PSK as a novel vaccine adjuvant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Yersinia pestis Ail recruitment of C4b-binding protein leads to factor I-mediated inactivation of covalently and noncovalently bound C4b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek K; Skurnik, Mikael; Blom, Anna M; Meri, Seppo

    2014-03-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail of Yersinia pestis mediates several virulence functions, including serum resistance. Here, we demonstrate that Ail binds C4b-binding protein (C4BP), the primary fluid-phase regulator of the classical and lectin pathways. Non-covalent binding of C4 and C4b to Ail was also observed. C4BP bound to Ail can act as a cofactor to the serine protease factor I (fI) in the cleavage of fluid-phase C4b. Employing a panel of C4BP alpha-chain mutants, we observed that the absence of complement control protein domain 6 and 8 reduced binding to Ail. Immunoblot analysis of normal human serum (NHS)-treated bacteria revealed minimal C4b alpha'-chain complexes with bacterial outer membrane targets. Addition of the anti-C4BP monoclonal antibody MK104 to NHS restored C4b-alpha' chain target complexes, suggesting that C4b binds covalently to targets on the Y. pestis surface. C4b bound to Ail noncovalently was also cleaved in a C4BP and fI-dependent manner, leaving the C4c fragment bound to Ail. MK104 also prevented the cleavage of noncovalently bound C4b. Collectively, these data suggest that when C4BP is bound to Ail, fI can cleave and inactivate C4b that has bound covalently to bacterial surface structures as well as C4b bound noncovalently to Ail. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Identification by affinity chromatography of boar sperm membrane-associated proteins bound to immobilized porcine zona pellucida. Mapping of the phosphorylethanolamine-binding region of spermadhesin AWN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslin, M; Calvete, J J; Thole, H H; Sierralta, W D; Adermann, K; Sanz, L; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    1995-12-01

    We have identified boar sperm membrane components recovered by affinity chromatography on a porcine zona pellucida affinity column. The major zona pellucida-bound proteins were spermadhesins AWN and AQN-3, the heparin-binding protein pAIF, and a homolog of the mouse milk fat globule membrane protein. All these proteins are phospholipid-binding proteins peripherally associated with the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that coating proteins tightly bound to the external lipid bilayer may act as major zona pellucida-binding molecules. Using a synthetic peptide approach we show that the regions of spermadhesin AWN comprising residues 6-12 and 104-108 possess affinity for phosphorylethanolamine. These two amino acid sequences are in close proximity in the predicted structural model for AWN, and in opposite location to its carbohydrate-recognition domain. Taken together, our data provide further evidence for the possible involvement of members of the porcine spermadhesin protein family in gamete interaction and suggest a model for the ultrastructural disposition of functional domains of spermadhesin AWN bound to the sperm surface.

  5. The proform of eosinophil major basic protein: a new maternal serum marker for adverse pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kasper; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Steen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the first trimester serum levels of the proform of eosinophil major basic protein (proMBP) in pregnancies with adverse outcome. Furthermore, to determine the screening performance using proMBP alone and in combination with other first trimester markers. METHODS: A case-control...... study was conducted in a primary hospital setting. The proMBP concentration was measured in cases with small-for-gestational age (SGA) (n = 150), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 88), preeclampsia (n = 40), gestational hypertension (n = 10) and in controls (n = 500). Concentrations were converted...... to multiples of the median (MoM) in controls and groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant factors for predicting adverse pregnancy outcome. Screening performance was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: The pro...

  6. The RCSB Protein Data Bank: views of structural biology for basic and applied research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F; Christie, Cole H; Dutta, Shuchismita; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Young, Jasmine; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Bourne, Philip E; Burley, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    The RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://www.rcsb.org) provides access to 3D structures of biological macromolecules and is one of the leading resources in biology and biomedicine worldwide. Our efforts over the past 2 years focused on enabling a deeper understanding of structural biology and providing new structural views of biology that support both basic and applied research and education. Herein, we describe recently introduced data annotations including integration with external biological resources, such as gene and drug databases, new visualization tools and improved support for the mobile web. We also describe access to data files, web services and open access software components to enable software developers to more effectively mine the PDB archive and related annotations. Our efforts are aimed at expanding the role of 3D structure in understanding biology and medicine. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Radioimmunoassay of the myelin basic protein in biological fluids, conditions improving sensitivity and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delassalle, A.; Jacque, C.; Raoul, M.; Legrand, J.C.; Cesselin, F.; Drouet, J.

    1980-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay (RIA) for myelin basic protein (MBP) in biological fluids was reassessed in order to improve its sensitivity and eliminate some interferences. By using the pre-incubation technique and the charcoal-dextram-horse serum mixture for the separation step, the detection limit could be lowered to 200 pg/ml for cerebrospinal fluids (CSF), amniotic fluids (AF) and nervous tissue extracts and 600 pg/ml for sera. The RIA could be used directly on CSF, AF and nervous tissue extracts. Sera, however, had to be heated in citrate buffer at 100 0 C in order to discard interfering material. The present method is 10 to 20 times more sensitive than others previously published. Moreover, it can be applied to amniotic fluid. The biological fluids had to be promptly frozen to avoid degradation of MBP

  8. Acidic and basic solutions dissolve protein plugs made of lithostathine complicating choledochal cyst/pancreaticobiliary maljunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenitiro; Ono, Yasuyuki; Tainaka, Takahisa; Sumida, Wataru; Ando, Hisami

    2009-07-01

    Symptoms of choledochal cysts are caused by protein plugs made of lithostathine, which block the long common channel and increase pancreaticobiliary ductal pressure. Agents that dissolve protein plugs can provide relief from or prevent symptoms. In the present study, drugs reportedly effective for pancreatic and biliary stones were used in dissolution tests. Protein plugs were obtained from choledochal cysts during surgery in two children (5- and 6-year-old girls). Plugs approximately 2 mm in diameter were immersed in citric acid, tartaric acid, dimethadione, bromhexine, dehydrocholic acid, sodium citrate, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide solutions under observation with a digital microscope. The pH of each solution was measured using a pH meter. Plugs dissolved in citric acid (5.2 mM; pH 2.64), tartaric acid (6.7 mM; pH 2.51), dimethadione (75 mM; pH 3.70), hydrochloric acid (0.5 mM; pH 3.13), and sodium hydroxide (75 mM; pH 12.75) solutions. Plugs did not dissolve in dimethadione (7.5 mM; pH 4.31), bromhexine (0.1%; pH 4.68), dehydrocholic acid (5%; pH 7.45), and sodium citrate (75 mM; pH 7.23) solutions. Protein plugs in choledochal cysts are dissolved in acidic and basic solutions, which may eliminate longitudinal electrostatic interactions of the lithostathine protofibrils.

  9. ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR): An R package for the statistical detection of protein-bound genomic regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino, J.M.; Kaufmann, K.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Krajewski, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background In vivo detection of protein-bound genomic regions can be achieved by combining chromatin-immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing technology (ChIP-seq). The large amount of sequence data produced by this method needs to be analyzed in a statistically proper and computationally

  10. Analysis of protein-bound metabolites of furazolidone and furaltadone in pig liver by high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, E.; Cadogan, A.; O'Keeffe, M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    1996-01-01

    Studies undertaken using radiolabelled furazolidone have demonstrated the covalent binding of residues of the drug to cellular protein in vivo. A portion of these bound residues and those formed by furaltadone, a related nitrofuran drug, possess intact side-chains, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ) and

  11. New low-flux mixed matrix membranes that offer superior removal of protein-bound toxins from human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, Denys; van Geffen, Esmée; van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Glorieux, Griet; Vanholder, Raymond; Gerritsen, Karin G. F.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    Hemodialysis is a widely available and well-established treatment for patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). However, although life-sustaining, patient mortality rates are very high. Several recent studies corroborated the link between dialysis patients’ outcomes and elevated levels of protein-bound uremic toxins (PBUT) that are poorly removed by conventional hemodialysis. Therefore, new treatments are needed to improve their removal. Recently, our group showed that the combination of dialysis and adsorption on one membrane, the mixed matrix membrane (MMM), can effectively remove those toxins from human plasma. However, these first MMMs were rather large in diameter and their mass transport characteristics needed improvement before application in the clinical setting. Therefore, in this study we developed a new generation of MMMs that have a smaller diameter and optimized characteristics offering superior ability in removing the PBUT indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) in comparison to first generation MMMs (30 and 125% respectively), as well as, a commercial dialysis membrane (more than 100% better removal).

  12. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegele, Joerg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N ε -fructoselysine (FL), N ε -carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 ± 3.81 nmol CML per μmol of free Lys (Lys free ) and 81.5 ± 87.8 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys free -1 vs. 3.72 ± 1.29 nmol FL μmol -1 Lys free -1 . In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 ± 0.08 nmol FL μmol -1 of protein-bound Lys (Lys p-b ), 0.04 ± 0.03 nmol CML μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 and 0.06 ± 0.02 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 . It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products

  13. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegele, Joerg [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)], E-mail: joerg.hegele@rdls.nestle.com; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2008-06-09

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N{sup {epsilon}}-fructoselysine (FL), N{sup {epsilon}}-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 {+-} 3.81 nmol CML per {mu}mol of free Lys (Lys{sub free}) and 81.5 {+-} 87.8 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1} vs. 3.72 {+-} 1.29 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1}. In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 {+-} 0.08 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} of protein-bound Lys (Lys{sub p-b}), 0.04 {+-} 0.03 nmol CML {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.02 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1}. It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  14. Crystal structures of protein phosphatase-1 bound to motuporin and dihydromicrocystin-LA: elucidation of the mechanism of enzyme inhibition by cyanobacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Jason T; Luu, Hue A; Cherney, Maia M; Andersen, Raymond J; Williams, David; Holmes, Charles F B; James, Michael N G

    2006-02-10

    The microcystins and nodularins are tumour promoting hepatotoxins that are responsible for global adverse human health effects and wildlife fatalities in countries where drinking water supplies contain cyanobacteria. The toxins function by inhibiting broad specificity Ser/Thr protein phosphatases in the host cells, thereby disrupting signal transduction pathways. A previous crystal structure of a microcystin bound to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1c) showed distinct changes in the active site region when compared with protein phosphatase-1 structures bound to other toxins. We have elucidated the crystal structures of the cyanotoxins, motuporin (nodularin-V) and dihydromicrocystin-LA bound to human protein phosphatase-1c (gamma isoform). The atomic structures of these complexes reveal the structural basis for inhibition of protein phosphatases by these toxins. Comparisons of the structures of the cyanobacterial toxin:phosphatase complexes explain the biochemical mechanism by which microcystins but not nodularins permanently modify their protein phosphatase targets by covalent addition to an active site cysteine residue.

  15. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma......BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally......), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs...

  16. Autoantibodies to myelin basic protein catalyze site-specific degradation of their antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Durova, Oxana M; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Kurkova, Inna N; Petrenko, Alexander G; Telegin, Georgy B; Suchkov, Sergey V; Kiselev, Sergey L; Lagarkova, Maria A; Govorun, Vadim M; Serebryakova, Marina V; Avalle, Bérangère; Tornatore, Pete; Karavanov, Alexander; Morse, Herbert C; Thomas, Daniel; Friboulet, Alain; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2006-01-10

    Autoantibody-mediated tissue destruction is among the main features of organ-specific autoimmunity. This report describes "an antibody enzyme" (abzyme) contribution to the site-specific degradation of a neural antigen. We detected proteolytic activity toward myelin basic protein (MBP) in the fraction of antibodies purified from the sera of humans with multiple sclerosis (MS) and mice with induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Chromatography and zymography data demonstrated that the proteolytic activity of this preparation was exclusively associated with the antibodies. No activity was found in the IgG fraction of healthy donors. The human and murine abzymes efficiently cleaved MBP but not other protein substrates tested. The sites of MBP cleavage determined by mass spectrometry were localized within immunodominant regions of MBP. The abzymes could also cleave recombinant substrates containing encephalytogenic MBP(85-101) peptide. An established MS therapeutic Copaxone appeared to be a specific abzyme inhibitor. Thus, the discovered epitope-specific antibody-mediated degradation of MBP suggests a mechanistic explanation of the slow development of neurodegeneration associated with MS.

  17. Milk basic protein increases ghrelin secretion and bone mineral density in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuko; Chacrabati, Rakhi; Ono-Ohmachi, Aiko; Gong, Zhi; Ikenoya, Chika; Aizawa, Sayaka; Nara, Takayuki Y; Morita, Yoshikazu; Kato, Ken; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    Milk basic protein (MBP), a mixture of proteins isolated from bovine milk, is known to increase bone formation. Ghrelin, a stomach-derived peptide hormone, also has been reported to stimulate osteoblast formation. The aim of this study was to determine whether MBP-induced bone formation is mediated via ghrelin. MBP was chronically administered to mice in their drinking water for 3 wk, and body weight, water intake, and bone mineral density were measured. Additionally, plasma bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, and ghrelin concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To examine the direct effect of MBP on ghrelin secretion, gastric tissue culture and primary mucosal cells were stimulated by MBP. The in vivo study of young, growing mice showed that chronic MBP intake for 3 wk increased the plasma ghrelin concentration and bone mineral density of the hind limb tibia. In vitro studies using minced rat gastric mucosa tissues and primary murine isolated gastric mucosal cells revealed that MBP stimulated ghrelin release in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, MBP-induced ghrelin secretion was partly inhibited by adrenergic blockers. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which MBP directly acts on ghrelin secretion. Additionally, the elevated ghrelin level induced by MBP may act as a mediator for bone formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Charge isomers of myelin basic protein: structure and interactions with membranes, nucleotide analogues, and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaozhan Wang

    Full Text Available As an essential structural protein required for tight compaction of the central nervous system myelin sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP is one of the candidate autoantigens of the human inflammatory demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis, which is characterized by the active degradation of the myelin sheath. In this work, recombinant murine analogues of the natural C1 and C8 charge components (rmC1 and rmC8, two isoforms of the classic 18.5-kDa MBP, were used as model proteins to get insights into the structure and function of the charge isomers. Various biochemical and biophysical methods such as size exclusion chromatography, calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy, and conventional as well as synchrotron radiation circular dichroism were used to investigate differences between these two isoforms, both from the structural point of view, and regarding interactions with ligands, including calmodulin (CaM, various detergents, nucleotide analogues, and lipids. Overall, our results provide further proof that rmC8 is deficient both in structure and especially in function, when compared to rmC1. While the CaM binding properties of the two forms are very similar, their interactions with membrane mimics are different. CaM can be used to remove MBP from immobilized lipid monolayers made of synthetic lipids--a phenomenon, which may be of relevance for MBP function and its regulation. Furthermore, using fluorescently labelled nucleotides, we observed binding of ATP and GTP, but not AMP, by MBP; the binding of nucleoside triphosphates was inhibited by the presence of CaM. Together, our results provide important further data on the interactions between MBP and its ligands, and on the differences in the structure and function between MBP charge isomers.

  19. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Hao Changchun; Feng Ying; Gao Feng; Lu Xiaolong; Li Junhua; Sun Runguang

    2016-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure–area ( π – A ) and pressure–time ( π – T ) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. (special topic)

  20. The effects of intracrystalline and surface-bound proteins on the attachment of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals to renal cells in undiluted human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Phulwinder K; Thurgood, Lauren A; Wang, Tingting; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2010-03-01

    To compare the binding to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)-II cells of: (i) inorganic calcium oxalate monohydrate (iCOM) crystals and COM crystals precipitated from urine containing different concentrations of protein; and (ii) urinary COM crystals containing intracrystalline and intracrystalline + surface-bound protein. Urinary COM crystals were generated in sieved (sCOM), centrifuged and filtered (cfCOM), and ultrafiltered (ufCOM) portions of a pooled human urine and their adhesion to MDCK-II cells was compared using six different ultrafiltered urine samples as the binding medium. Crystal matrix extract (CME) was prepared by demineralizing calcium oxalate crystals precipitated from human urine and used to prepare COM crystals with intracrystalline, and intracrystalline + surface-bound CME at protein concentrations of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 5.0 mg/L. The amount of protein associated with the crystals was qualitatively assessed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, using prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1) as a marker. Protein concentration was determined in sieved, centrifuged and filtered, and ultrafiltered fractions of 10 additional urine samples. The median crystal attachment in the six urine types decreased in the order iCOM > ufCOM > cfCOM = sCOM, in inverse proportion to the concentration of protein in the solution or urine from which they were precipitated. sCOM and cfCOM crystals bound approximately 23% less than iCOM crystals. The attachment of COM crystals generated in the presence of increasing concentrations of CME proteins was unaffected up to a concentration of 5 mg/L, but binding of crystals containing the same concentrations of intracrystalline + surface-bound proteins decreased proportionally at protein concentrations from 0 to 5.0 mg/L. Inorganic COM crystals bind significantly more strongly to MDCK-II cells than urinary crystals precipitated from sieved, centrifuged and filtered, and ultrafiltered urine

  1. Myelin basic protein determination in cerebro-spinal fluid of children with tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Dhalla, A.S.; Mazarello, T.

    1986-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP), an indicator of neural tissue damage in cerebro-spinal fluid, was studied in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). MBP levels were elevated in 62% of the cases of TBM, the levels being 13.3+-18.8 ng/mL, compared with control levels of 1.34+-0.55 ng/mL(p<0.001). MBP level was related to certain clinical features of the disease, such as level of consciousness, neurological characteristics associated with signs of raised intracranial tension and the presence of arteritis associated with hydrocephalus. However, its greatest significance was its correlation with the progress of disease. Persistence of high levels of MBP over a period of a few weeks was associated with little or no improvement in the clinical state of the patient or a higher mortality rate. Return to normal levels of MBP indicated a more favourable outcome of disease. Hence MBP estimation gave not only an indicator of the degree of neurological damage but also an important marker to evaluate patients' progress and response to treatment. (author)

  2. PCR typing of two short tandem repeat (STR) structures upstreams of the human myelin basic protein (MBP) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Frederiksen, J; Morling, N

    1995-01-01

    We investigated two short tandem tetranucleotide (TGGA) repeat polymorphisms upstreams of the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene. The region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the two repeat systems were separated by cutting with the restriction enzyme NlaIII. The lengths...

  3. Variation in NOD2 augments Th2- and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Enevold, Christian; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2011-01-01

    cell proliferation elicited by human myelin basic protein (MBP) in blood mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from 29 patients with MS. No polymorphism was observed at rs5743277. No associations with the rs2066842 polymorphism were found. Concerning rs5743291, none were homozygous for the minor allele...

  4. Solution NMR Structure of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Protein U (IscU) with Zinc Bound at the Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Kornhaber, Greg J.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Honig, Barry; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-19

    IscU is a highly conserved protein that serves as the scaffold for IscS-mediated assembly of iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters. We report the NMR solution structure of monomeric Haemophilus influenzae IscU with zinc bound at the [Fe-S] cluster assembly site. The compact core of the globular structure has an {alpha}-{beta} sandwich architecture with a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and four {alpha}-helices. A nascent helix is located N-terminal to the core structure. The zinc is ligated by three cysteines and one histidine that are located in and near conformationally dynamic loops at one end of the IscU structure. Removal of the zinc metal by chelation results in widespread loss of structure in the apo form. The zinc-bound IscU may be a good model for iron-loaded IscU and may demonstrate structural features found in the iron-sulfur cluster bound form. Structural and functional similarities, genomic context in operons containing other homologous genes, and distributions of conserved surface residues support the hypothesis that IscU protein domains are homologous (i.e. derived from a common ancestor) with the SufE/YgdK family of iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins.

  5. Basic Concepts in G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Homo- and Heterodimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Franco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs were considered to be expressed as monomers on the cell surface of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. It is now becoming evident that this view must be overtly changed since these receptors can form homodimers, heterodimers, and higher-order oligomers on the plasma membrane. Here we discuss some of the basics and some new concepts of receptor homo- and heteromerization. Dimers-oligomers modify pharmacology, trafficking, and signaling of receptors. First of all, GPCR dimers must be considered as the main molecules that are targeted by neurotransmitters or by drugs. Thus, binding data must be fitted to dimer-based models. In these models, it is considered that the conformational changes transmitted within the dimer molecule lead to cooperativity. Cooperativity must be taken into account in the binding of agonists-antagonists-drugs and also in the binding of the so-called allosteric modulators. Cooperativity results from the intramolecular cross-talk in the homodimer. As an intramolecular cross-talk in the heterodimer, the binding of one neurotransmitter to one receptor often affects the binding of the second neurotransmitter to the partner receptor. Coactivation of the two receptors in a heterodimer can change completely the signaling pathway triggered by the neurotransmitter as well as the trafficking of the receptors. Heterodimer-specific drugs or dual drugs able to activate the two receptors in the heterodimer simultaneously emerge as novel and promising drugs for a variety of central nervous system (CNS therapeutic applications.

  6. IgG reactivity against citrullinated myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Seze, J; Dubucquoi, S; Lefranc, D; Virecoulon, F; Nuez, I; Dutoit, V; Vermersch, P; Prin, L

    2001-07-02

    An increased level of citrullinated myelin basic protein (MBP-C8) has been reported in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the involvement of the immune response to post-translational modified MBP in the pathophysiology of MS remains speculative. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies to several MBP epitopes, before and after citrullination, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sera of MS patients using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We analyzed antibody reactivity against various MBP-peptides in the CSF and sera of 60 MS patients, and 30 patients with other neurological diseases (OND) as controls. The peptides tested were: MBP(75-98) (peptide 1), native (peptide 2) and citrullinated (peptide 3) MBP(108-126) (ARG(122)-->Cit(122)), and native (peptide 4) and citrullinated (peptide 5) MBP(151-170) (ARG(159, 170)-->Cit(159, 170)). All selected peptides could support an immune reactivity in CSF and sera of MS and OND patients. A higher reactivity against peptide 4 was found in the CSF of MS patients compared with OND patients (P<0.0001), but not against citrullinated peptides (peptides 3 and 5). However, we observed that the citrullination state of peptide 2 modified the patterns of immune reactivity more markedly in MS patients (P<0.0001) than in OND patients (P<0.02). Although some MBP epitopes could be a potential target in MS, our data did not demonstrate any difference of antibody response to MBP peptides in their citrullinated forms.

  7. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human b cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85- 99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and CR2 (CD21) both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high...

  8. The HLA-DP2 protein binds the immunodominant epitope from myelin basic protein, MBP85-99, with high affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B E; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Madsen, H O

    2011-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant epitope for T-cell responses is assigned to the amino acid sequence MBP84-102, which binds to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2a (DRB5*0101) and HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) of the HLA-DR2 haplotype...

  9. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E

    2001-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes are vulnerable to focal cerebral ischemia, remyelination of denuded or regenerating axons in the peri-infarct area has been observed in the central nervous system. We studied the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a major component of central nervous system myelin...

  10. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  11. Bounding the $\

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2003-01-01

    A bound on the nu /sup tau / magnetic moment is calculated through the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ to nu nu gamma at the Z/sub 1/-pole, and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model at LEP energies. We find that the bound is almost independent of the mixing angle phi of the model in the allowed experimental range for this parameter. (31 refs).

  12. A Study of Lipid- and Protein- Bound Sialic Acids for the Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer and Their Relationships with the Severity of Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Habibi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard for detection of bladder cancer is cystoscopy, which is an invasive and complicated procedure. Our study was conducted to find a tumor marker with high specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 58 bladder cancer patients and 60 healthy control subjects. Levels of lipid-bound sialic acid (LBSA, and protein-bound sialic acid (PBSA were measured spectrophotometrically by Aminoff’s method. Results: Mean levels of both markers were found to be significantly higher in the patients than the healthy controls. Positive correlations were observed between serum levels of lipid- (r=0.283, p<0.05 and protein- bound (r=0.56, p<0.05 sialic acids and the grade of malignancy. To differentiate patients with bladder tumors from healthy controls, cut-offpoints were determined for each of the two parameters based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis (LBSA=21.25 mg/dL, PBSA=6.15 mg/dL. The data showed good sensitivities (LBSA=89%, PBSA=79%, specificities (LBSA=70%, PBSA=70% and accuracies (LBSA=83%, PBSA=81% for both markers. Conclusion: Measuring serum LBSA and PBSA by this simple, reproducible, noninvasive, and inexpensive method can accurately discriminate cancer patients from healthy individuals.

  13. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi, E-mail: h-yokoya@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  14. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K d values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k on ) and dissociation (k off ) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein

  15. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  16. Calcium receptor expression and function in oligodendrocyte commitment and lineage progression: potential impact on reduced myelin basic protein in CaR-null mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, N.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Yano, S.

    2008-01-01

    cellular proliferation. We further observed that high Ca(2+) stimulates the mRNA levels of myelin basic protein in preoligodendrocytes, which is also CaR mediated. Finally, myelin basic protein levels were significantly reduced in the cerebellum of CaR-null mice during development. Our results show that Ca...

  17. Translation of myelin basic protein mRNA in oligodendrocytes is regulated by integrin activation and hnRNP-K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lisbeth Schmidt; Chan, Colin W; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system provides a unique example of how cells establish asymmetry. The myelinating cell, the oligodendrocyte, extends processes to and wraps multiple axons of different diameter, keeping the number of wraps proportional to the axon diameter. Local regulation...... of protein synthesis represents one mechanism used to control the different requirements for myelin sheath at each axo–glia interaction. Prior work has established that β1-integrins are involved in the axoglial interactions that initiate myelination. Here, we show that integrin activation regulates...... translation of a key sheath protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), by reversing the inhibitory effect of the mRNA 3′UTR. During oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination α6β1-integrin interacts with hnRNP-K, an mRNA-binding protein, which binds to MBP mRNA and translocates from the nucleus to the myelin...

  18. Vaccination with DNA Encoding an Immunodominant Myelin Basic Protein Peptide Targeted to Fc of Immunoglobulin G Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lobell, Anna; Weissert, Robert; Storch, Maria K.; Svanholm, Cecilia; de Graaf, Katrien L.; Lassmann, Hans; Andersson, Roland; Olsson, Tomas; Wigzell, Hans

    1998-01-01

    We explore here if vaccination with DNA encoding an autoantigenic peptide can suppress autoimmune disease. For this purpose we used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is an autoaggressive disease in the central nervous system and an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Lewis rats were vaccinated with DNA encoding an encephalitogenic T cell epitope, guinea pig myelin basic protein peptide 68–85 (MBP68–85), before induction of EAE with MBP68–85 in complete Freund's adjuvant....

  19. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  20. Membrane-bound conformation of M13 major coat protein : a structure validation through FRET-derived constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, W.L.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    M13 major coat protein, a 50-amino-acid-long protein, was incorporated into DOPC/DOPG (80/20 molar ratio) unilamellar vesicles. Over 60% of all amino acid residues was replaced with cysteine residues, and the single cysteine mutants were labeled with the fluorescent label I-AEDANS. The coat protein

  1. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  2. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Seung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin or linear (amylose. The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM. We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is

  3. An improved method for the immunological detection of mineral bound protein using hydrofluoric acid and direct capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, O E; Collins, M J

    2000-03-06

    Immunological detection of proteins adsorbed to mineral and ceramic surfaces has proved not only difficult but controversial. Unlike the immunological detection of proteins associated with carbonate or phosphate minerals (e.g. shells and bones) proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals cannot readily be removed by dissolution of the mineral phase. We have previously examined alternative extraction methodologies which claim to bring the protein into solution, but found none of these to be effective. Here we report a novel strategy for immuno-detection of proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals, the Digestion and Capture Immunoassay (DACIA). The method involves the use of cold, concentrated (4M) hydrofluoric acid (HF) with the simultaneous capture of liberated protein onto a solid phase. The combination of low temperatures and surface stabilisation enables us to detect epitopes from even partially degraded proteins. The method may have a wide application in forensic, archaeological, soil and earth sciences.

  4. Degradation of structurally characterized proteins injected into HeLa cells. Basic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.W.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five proteins of known x-ray structure were labeled by chloramine-T radioiodination or by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using red cell-mediated microinjection. Degradation rates of the injected proteins were then determined over the next 50 h by measuring the release of soluble isotope to the culture medium. Control experiments demonstrated that the measured rates were not compromised by proteolysis within RBCs, the presence of unfused RBCs, or degradation of protein released from RBCs to the medium. Degradation of some injected proteins was faster during the first 12 h after fusion than at later times, apparently a response of HeLa cells to trypsinization. However, all proteins exhibited first-order degradation rates between 24 and 48 h post injection. Except for seven proteins, stabilities measured during this interval were unaffected by the labeling procedure. Reductive methylation was used to choose among the seven discordant values, and half-lives for the 35 proteins ranged from 16 h for lysozyme to 214 h for yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Since half-lives for six of the injected proteins closely match values obtained by in vivo measurements, we consider our estimates of the metabolic stabilities of the injected proteins to be generally accurate. Therefore, the half-lives obtained by microinjection should prove useful in the search for relationships between protein structure and intracellular stability

  5. Dynamic detection of non-protein-bound strychnine and brucine in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaibo; Yan, Miao; Li, Huande; Xun, Tianrong; Deng, Yang; Zhao, Yeye; Deng, Long

    2014-04-01

    Semen Strychni, a known toxic drug in Chinese pharmacopoeia, is notable for its therapeutic effects on local muscle and joint pain. However, oral administration can be risky. Topically administered drugs accumulate in the topical muscles and knee joints without any major increase in plasma levels; only non-protein-bound drugs in the biological fluids of target tissues are effective for therapeutic effects. A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method coupled with a microdialysis technique was developed to determine the non-protein-bound strychnine (Str) and brucine (Bru) in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid microdialysate. The UPLC separation was carried out using a 1.7μm BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1 mm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol: water (29.5:70.5, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid and 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. The method was validated at concentrations ranging from 0.58 ng/ml to 467.20 ng/ml for Str and from 0.42 ng/ml to 422.40 ng/ml for Bru. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy ranged from 99.1% to 103.2% for Str and from 95.8% to 108.8% for Bru with intra-day and inter-day precision within 9.7%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine non-protein-bound Str and Bru, and the analysates concentration remained stable in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches, which indicated that total Strychnos alkaloid patches could substitute for the traditional oral administration of Semen Strychni. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of some tumor markers, acute phase proteins, sialic acid and lipid bound sialic acid before and after chemotherapy in patients with stomach cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cebi, Aysegul; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Objective:  It was aimed to compare the some tumor markers, acute phase proteins, sialic acid and lipid bound sialic acid levels in patients with stomach cancer before and after chemotherapy to the healthy controls.Material and Methods:  Forty-eight patients with stomach adenocarcinoma and 20 healthy controls, totally 68 subjects were used. Blood samples were taken from all patients before and after chemotherapy and controls to analyse the levels of tumor markers (CA 125, CA 15-3, CA 19-9, CE...

  7. The Impact of "Coat Protein-Mediated Virus Resistance" in Applied Plant Pathology and Basic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, John A; Falk, Bryce W

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide, plant viruses cause serious reductions in marketable crop yield and in some cases even plant death. In most cases, the most effective way to control virus diseases is through genetically controlled resistance. However, developing virus-resistant (VR) crops through traditional breeding can take many years, and in some cases is not even possible. Because of this, the demonstration of the first VR transgenic plants in 1985 generated much attention. This seminal report served as an inflection point for research in both basic and applied plant pathology, the results of which have dramatically changed both basic research and in a few cases, commercial crop production. The typical review article on this topic has focused on only basic or only applied research results stemming from this seminal discovery. This can make it difficult for the reader to appreciate the full impact of research on transgenic virus resistance, and the contributions from fundamental research that led to translational applications of this technology. In this review, we take a global view of this topic highlighting the significant changes to both basic and applied plant pathology research and commercial food production that have accumulated in the last 30 plus years. We present these milestones in the historical context of some of the scientific, economic, and environmental drivers for developing specific VR crops. The intent of this review is to provide a single document that adequately records the significant accomplishments of researchers in both basic and applied plant pathology research on this topic and how they relate to each other. We hope this review therefore serves as both an instructional tool for students new to the topic, as well as a source of conversation and discussion for how the technology of engineered virus resistance could be applied in the future.

  8. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat: farther delineation of active sites in guinea pig and bovine myelin basic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenson, R E; Nomura, K; Levine, S; Sowinski, R

    1977-04-01

    Highly encephalitogenic peptide (37-88), derived from the guinea pig myelin basic protein by peptic digestion, was treated chemically to destroy its tyrosyl and histidyl residues and enzymatically to remove its C-terminal sequence Val-His-Phe. Neither of the modifications resulted in loss of activity in Lewis rats. The enccephalitogenic region within peptide (37-88) was located by examination of derivative peptides obtained by selective proteolytic cleavage. The results showed that peptide (61-88), like peptide (43-88), was fully active at the level of 0.02 nmole whereas peptides (72-88) and (72-84) were fully active at levels of 0.5 and 2.5 nmole, respectively. In contrast, peptides (43-71) and (75-88) were completely inactive. These results demonstrated that the undecapeptide Gln-Lys-Ser-Gln-Arg-Ser-Gln-Asp-Glu-Asn-Pro (residues 72-84), although not as encephalitogenic as peptides (43-88) or (61-88), does contain the elements essential for the induction of disease. At the levels tested (10.8 and 2.2 nmole) only peptides (43-88) and (61-88) were capable of inhibiting the induciton of disease by passively transferred lymph node cells; this inhibition, however, was less than that achieved by the intact guinea pig basic protein. Further studies on the encephalitogenicity of the bovine basic protein in Lewis rats demonstrated that the active site in the C-terminal half of this protein is present in its entirety within residues 89 to 115.

  9. Postprandial oxidative losses of free and protein-bound amino acids in the diet: interactions and adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolles, J.A.; Verreijen, A.M.; Koopmanschap, R.E.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Postprandial oxidation of dietary free amino acids or egg white protein was studied using the [13CO2] breath test in rats, as well as in humans. Thirty-eight male rats were assigned to four dietary test groups. Two diets only differed in their protein fraction. Diet I contained 21% egg white

  10. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  11. ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR): An R package for the statistical detection of protein-bound genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiño, Jose M; Kaufmann, Kerstin; van Ham, Roeland Chj; Angenent, Gerco C; Krajewski, Pawel

    2011-05-09

    In vivo detection of protein-bound genomic regions can be achieved by combining chromatin-immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing technology (ChIP-seq). The large amount of sequence data produced by this method needs to be analyzed in a statistically proper and computationally efficient manner. The generation of high copy numbers of DNA fragments as an artifact of the PCR step in ChIP-seq is an important source of bias of this methodology. We present here an R package for the statistical analysis of ChIP-seq experiments. Taking the average size of DNA fragments subjected to sequencing into account, the software calculates single-nucleotide read-enrichment values. After normalization, sample and control are compared using a test based on the ratio test or the Poisson distribution. Test statistic thresholds to control the false discovery rate are obtained through random permutations. Computational efficiency is achieved by implementing the most time-consuming functions in C++ and integrating these in the R package. An analysis of simulated and experimental ChIP-seq data is presented to demonstrate the robustness of our method against PCR-artefacts and its adequate control of the error rate. The software ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR) enables fast and accurate detection of protein-bound genomic regions through the analysis of ChIP-seq experiments. Compared to existing methods, we found that our package shows greater robustness against PCR-artefacts and better control of the error rate.

  12. The differences in heparin binding for the C-terminal basic-sequence-rich peptides of HPV-16 and HPV-18 capsid protein L1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jian; Yu Jisheng; Yu Zhiwu; Zha Xiao; Wu Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Graphial abstract: The differences in heparin binding for the C-terminal basic-sequence-rich peptides of HPV-16 and HPV-18 capsid protein L1. Highlights: ► Several driving forces contribute to the interaction between heparin and peptides. ► C-terminal of HPV L1 is a potential candidate for the attachment to host cells. ► The C-terminal peptides of HPV-16 and -18 L1 have different heparin-binding. ► The different heparin-binding provides an explanation for the distinct prevalences. - Abstract: The high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) HPV-16 and -18 are the predominant types associated with cervical cancer. HPV-16 and -18 account for about 50% and 20%, respectively, of cervical cancers worldwide. While the reason and molecular mechanism of the distinct prevalence and distributions between them remain poorly understood, the binding affinity of cell surface receptor with capsid proteins, especially L1, may be involved. We examined heparin binding with two synthetic peptides corresponding to the 14 amino acid C-terminal peptides of HPV-16 and -18 L1 with the goal of comparing the equivalent residues in different HPV types. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and static right-angle light scattering (SLS), we determined the binding constant K, reaction enthalpy ΔH, and other thermodynamic parameters in the interaction. Especially, we assessed the role of specific residues in binding with heparin by comparing the NMR spectra of free and heparin-bound peptides.

  13. Nucleocapsid protein VP15 is the basic DNA binding protein of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveldt, J.; Vermeesch, A.M.G.; Langenhof, M.; Lang, de A.; Vlak, J.M.; Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is type species of the genus Whispovirus of the new family Nimaviridae. Despite the elucidation of its genomic sequence, very little is known about the virus as only 6% of its ORFs show homology to known genes. One of the structural virion proteins, VP15, is part of

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 and hypoxia-regulated proteins are modulated by basic fibroblast growth factor in acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Villanueva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF can be caused by injuries that induce tissue hypoxia, which in turn can trigger adaptive or inflammatory responses. We previously showed the participation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 in renal repair. Based on this, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of FGF-2 signaling pathway manipulation at hypoxia-induced protein levels, as well as in key proteins from the vasoactive systems of the kidney. We injected rat kidneys with FGF-2 recombinant protein (r-FGF or FGF-2 receptor antisense oligonucleotide (FGFR2-ASO after bilateral ischemia, and evaluated the presence of iNOS, EPO and HO-1, in representation of hypoxia-induced proteins, as well as COX-2, renin, kallikrein, and B2KR, in representation of the vasoactive systems of the kidney. A reduction in iNOS, HO-1, EPO, renin, kallikrein, B2KR, and in renal damage was observed in animals treated with r-FGF. The opposite effect was found with FGF-2 receptor down-regulation. In contrast, COX-2 protein levels were higher in kidneys treated with r-FGF and lower in those that received FGFR2-ASO, as compared to saline treated kidneys. These results suggest that the protective role of FGF-2 in the pathogenesis of ARF induced by I/R is a complex process, through which a differential regulation of metabolic pathways takes place.

  15. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a glutathione-dependent heme protein, and dithiothreitol dissociates the bound heme to produce active prostaglandin E2 synthase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusagawa, Fusao

    2013-04-05

    An x-ray study indicated that microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a heme-bound protein and catalyzes prostaglandin (PG) H2 degradation, but not PGE2 formation (Yamada, T., and Takusagawa, F. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 8414-8424). In response to the x-ray study, Watanabe et al. claimed that mPGES2 is a heme-free protein and that both the heme-free and heme-bound proteins have PGE2 synthesis activity in the presence of dithiothreitol (Watanabe, K., Ito, S., and Yamamoto, S. (2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 367, 782-786). To resolve the contradictory results, the heme-binding scheme of mPGES2 was further characterized in vivo and in vitro by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. A substantial amount of heme-bound mPGES2 was detected in cell extracts. The heme content in mPGES2 was increased along with an increase in Fe(3+) in the culture medium. Heme-free mPGES2 was converted to the heme-bound form by mixing it with pig liver extract, indicating that mPGES2 is capable of forming a complex with heme in mammalian cells. Heme binds to mPGES2 only in the presence of glutathione. The newly determined heme dissociation constant (2.9 nM) supports strongly that mPGES2 is a heme-bound protein in vivo. The bound heme was not dissociated by oxidation by H2O2 or reduction by glutathione or 2-mercaptoethanol. However, reduction by dithiothreitol (an artificial reducing compound) induced the bound heme to dissociate from mPGES2 and released heme-free mPGES2, which exhibited PGE2 synthesis activity in vitro. Imidazole bound to mPGES2 by stacking on the bound heme and inhibited heme oxidation by H2O2 and reduction by dithiothreitol.

  16. Determination of steady-state protein breakdown rate in vivo by the disappearance of protein-bound tracer-labeled amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; O'Rourke, Bruce; Ebenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the rate of protein breakdown in individual proteins was developed and tested in rats and confirmed in humans, using administration of deuterium oxide and incorporation of the deuterium into alanine that was subsequently incorporated into body proteins. Measurement of the fr...

  17. Small, acid-soluble proteins bound to DNA protect Bacillus subtilis spores from killing by dry heat.

    OpenAIRE

    Setlow, B; Setlow, P

    1995-01-01

    Dry Bacillus subtilis spores lacking their two major DNA-binding proteins (small, acid-soluble proteins [SASP] alpha and beta) were much more sensitive to dry heat than were wild-type spores. Survivors of dry heat treatment of both wild-type and mutant spores exhibited a high frequency of mutations, and the DNA from the heated spores had increased numbers of single-strand breaks. These data indicate that SASP alpha and beta provide significant protection to spore DNA against the damaging effe...

  18. Cell surface-bound heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mediates perforin-independent apoptosis by specific binding and uptake of granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Catharina; Koelch, Walter; DeMaio, Antonio; Arispe, Nelson; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2003-10-17

    Cell surface-bound heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) renders tumor cells more sensitive to the cytolytic attack mediated by natural killer (NK) cells. A 14-amino acid Hsp70 sequence, termed TKD (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, aa450-463) could be identified as the extracellular localized recognition site for NK cells. Here, we show by affinity chromatography that both, full-length Hsp70-protein and Hsp70-peptide TKD, specifically bind a 32-kDa protein derived from NK cell lysates. The serine protease granzyme B was uncovered as the 32-kDa Hsp70-interacting protein using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass peptide fingerprinting. Incubation of tumor cells with increasing concentrations of perforin-free, isolated granzyme B shows specific binding and uptake in a dose-dependent manner and results in initiation of apoptosis selectively in tumor cells presenting Hsp70 on the cell surface. Remarkably, Hsp70 cation channel activity was also determined selectively in purified phospholipid membranes of Hsp70 membrane-positive but not in membrane-negative tumor cells. The physiological role of our findings was demonstrated in primary NK cells showing elevated cytoplasmic granzyme B levels following contact with TKD. Furthermore, an increased lytic activity of Hsp70 membrane-positive tumor cells could be associated with granzyme B release by NK cells. Taken together we propose a novel perforin-independent, granzyme B-mediated apoptosis pathway for Hsp70 membrane-positive tumor cells.

  19. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  20. In Situ Proteolysis for Crystallization of Membrane Bound Cytochrome P450 17A1 and 17A2 Proteins from Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Egli, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Fish and human cytochrome P450 (P450) 17A1 catalyze both steroid 17α-hydroxylation and 17α,20-lyase reactions. Fish P450 17A2 catalyzes only 17α-hydroxylation. Both enzymes are microsomal-type P450s, integral membrane proteins that bind to the membrane through their N-terminal hydrophobic segment, the signal anchor sequence. The presence of this N-terminal region renders expression of full-length proteins challenging or impossible. For some proteins, variable truncation of the signal anchor sequence precludes expression or results in poor expression levels. To crystallize P450 17A1 and 17A2 in order to gain insight into their different activities, we used an alternative N-terminal sequence to boost expression together with in situ proteolysis. Key features of our approach to identify crystallizable P450 fragments were the use of an N-terminal leader sequence, a screen composed of 12 proteases to establish optimal cleavage, variations of protease concentration in combination with an SDS-PAGE assay, and analysis of the resulting fragments using Edman sequencing. Described in this unit are protocols for vector preparation, expression, purification, and in situ proteolytic crystallization of two membrane-bound P450 proteins. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Protein-Bound Polysaccharide from Corbicula fluminea Inhibits Cell Growth in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ningbo; Zhong, Jianjun; Zhang, Ronghua; Ye, Xingqian; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Yuexia; Chen, Shiguo; Liu, Donghong; Liu, Ruihai

    2016-01-01

    A novel protein-bound polysaccharide, CFPS-1, isolated from Corbicula fluminea, is composed predominantly of mannose (Man) and glucose (Glc) in a molar ratio of 3.1:12.7. The polysaccharide, with an average molecular weight of about 283 kDa, also contains 10.8% protein. Atomic force microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses revealed that CFPS-1 has a backbone of 1,6-linked and 1,4,6-linked-α-D-Glc, which is terminated with a 1-linked-α-D-Man residue at the O-4 position of 1,4,6-linked-α-D-Glc, in a molar ratio of 3:1:1. Preliminary in vitro bioactivity tests revealed that CFPS-1 effectively and dose-dependently inhibits human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell growth, with an IC50 of 243 ± 6.79 and 1142 ± 14.84 μg/mL, respectively. In MCF-7, CFPS-1 produced a significant up-regulation of p53, p21, Bax and cleaved caspase-7 and down-regulation of Cdk4, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and caspase-7. These effects resulted in cell cycle blockade at the S-phase and apoptosis induction. In contrast, in MDA-MB-231, with limited degree of change in cell cycle distribution, CFPS-1 increases the proportion of cells in apoptotic sub-G1 phase executed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and caspase-7 and up-regulation of Bax and cleaved caspase-7. This study extends our understanding of the anticancer mechanism of C. fluminea protein-bound polysaccharide.

  2. Protein-Bound Polysaccharide from Corbicula fluminea Inhibits Cell Growth in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningbo Liao

    Full Text Available A novel protein-bound polysaccharide, CFPS-1, isolated from Corbicula fluminea, is composed predominantly of mannose (Man and glucose (Glc in a molar ratio of 3.1:12.7. The polysaccharide, with an average molecular weight of about 283 kDa, also contains 10.8% protein. Atomic force microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses revealed that CFPS-1 has a backbone of 1,6-linked and 1,4,6-linked-α-D-Glc, which is terminated with a 1-linked-α-D-Man residue at the O-4 position of 1,4,6-linked-α-D-Glc, in a molar ratio of 3:1:1. Preliminary in vitro bioactivity tests revealed that CFPS-1 effectively and dose-dependently inhibits human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell growth, with an IC50 of 243 ± 6.79 and 1142 ± 14.84 μg/mL, respectively. In MCF-7, CFPS-1 produced a significant up-regulation of p53, p21, Bax and cleaved caspase-7 and down-regulation of Cdk4, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and caspase-7. These effects resulted in cell cycle blockade at the S-phase and apoptosis induction. In contrast, in MDA-MB-231, with limited degree of change in cell cycle distribution, CFPS-1 increases the proportion of cells in apoptotic sub-G1 phase executed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and caspase-7 and up-regulation of Bax and cleaved caspase-7. This study extends our understanding of the anticancer mechanism of C. fluminea protein-bound polysaccharide.

  3. Apo and calcium-bound crystal structures of cytoskeletal protein alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1) from the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Puja; Nguyen, Emily Tam; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Svärd, Staffan G; Luecke, Hartmut

    2009-01-30

    Alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1), a member of the alpha giardin family of annexins, has been shown to localize to the flagella of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. Alpha giardins show a common ancestry with the annexins, a family of proteins most of which bind to phospholipids and cellular membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and are implicated in numerous membrane-related processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane organization. It has been proposed that alpha-14 giardin may play a significant role during the cytoskeletal rearrangement during differentiation of Giardia. To gain a better understanding of alpha-14 giardin's mode of action and its biological role, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-14 giardin and its phospholipid-binding properties. Here, we report the apo crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin determined in two different crystal forms as well as the Ca(2+)-bound crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin, refined to 1.9, 1.6 and 1.65 A, respectively. Although the overall fold of alpha-14 giardin is similar to that of alpha-11 giardin, multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing was required to solve the alpha-14 giardin structure, indicating significant structural differences between these two members of the alpha giardin family. Unlike most annexin structures, which typically possess N-terminal domains, alpha-14 giardin is composed of only a core domain, followed by a C-terminal extension that may serve as a ligand for binding to cytoskeletal protein partners in Giardia. In the Ca(2+)-bound structure we detected five bound calcium ions, one of which is a novel, highly coordinated calcium-binding site not previously observed in annexin structures. This novel high-affinity calcium-binding site is composed of seven protein donor groups, a feature rarely observed in crystal structures. In addition, phospholipid-binding assays suggest that alpha-14 giardin exhibits calcium-dependent binding to

  4. Possible basic and specific functions of plant uncoupling proteins (pUCP)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Borecký, Jiří; Žáčková, Markéta; Costa, A. D. T.; Arruda, P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2001), s. 237-245 ISSN 0144-8463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/98/0568; GA AV ČR IAA5011106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : fatty acid-induced uncoupling * plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein * plant mitochondria Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.921, year: 2001

  5. The location of regions in guinea pig and bovine myelin basic proteins which induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenson, R E; Levine, S; Sowindki, R

    1975-02-01

    Myelin basic proteins and peptides derived from them by limited cleavage with pepsin were tested for their ability to induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats. The encephalitogenicity of the weakly active bovine protein was found to be associated with both halves of the molecule, peptides (1-88) and (89-169). Of the four smaller derivates of peptide (1-88), peptides (1-36), (43-88), (1-42), and (37-88), only the last two were active. This demonstrated that the overlap region consisting of residues 37-42 (sequence Asp-Ser-Leu-Gly-Arg-Phe) constitutes an encephalitogenic determinant. Of the two smaller derivatives of peptide (89-169), peptides (111-169) and (89-152), only the last was active. This indicated that the second encephalitogenic determinant begins between residues 88 and 111 and ends before residue 153. This region contains the sequence Leu-Ser-Leu-Ser-Arg-Phe (residues 108-113), which is strikingly similar to that of the first encephalitogenic determinant. Studies involving the extremely encephalitogenic guinea pig protein demonstrated that virtually all of the activity was recovered in the peptides corresponding to bovine peptides (37-88) and (43-88). These peptides, but not those comprising the remainder of the protein, were active in inhibiting the passive transfer of EAE with lymph node cells from donors immunized with guinea pig spinal cord.

  6. High performance aptamer affinity chromatography for single-step selective extraction and screening of basic protein lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Zhao, Chao; Yin, Junfa; Wang, Hailin

    2012-08-15

    A DNA aptamer based high-performance affinity chromatography is developed for selective extraction and screening of a basic protein lysozyme. First, a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was synthesized in situ by thermally initiated radical polymerization, and then an anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer was covalently immobilized on the surface of the monolith through a 16-atom spacer arm. The target protein lysozyme but non-target proteins can be trapped by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. In contrast, lysozyme cannot be trapped by the immobilized oligodeoxynucleotide that does not contain the sequence of the anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. The study clearly demonstrates the trapping of lysozyme by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer is mainly due to specific recognition rather than simple electrostatic interaction of positively charged protein and the negatively charged DNA. The inter-day precision was determined as 0.8% for migration time and 4.2% for peak area, respectively. By the use of aptamer affinity monolith, a screening strategy is developed to selectively extract lysozyme from chicken egg white, showing the advantages of high efficiency, low cost and ease-of-operation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel antigen-toxin chimeric protein: myelin basic protein-pseudomonas exotoxin (MBP-PE 40) for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, T; Steinberger, I; Soffer, D; Beraud, E; Ben-Nun, A; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    1999-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP), is a major component of the central nervous system (CNS) myelin. MBP can stimulate T cells that migrate into the CNS, initiating a cascade of events that result in perivascular infiltration and demyelination. EAE is an inflammatory and demyelinating autoimmune disease of the CNS that serves as a model for the human disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Taking advantage of the fact that EAE can be mediated by T cells, able to recognize MBP or its peptides, we developed a new approach to target anti-MBP T cells by fusing an MBP-sequence to a toxin. In the new chimeric protein, an oligonucleotide coding for the guinea pig MBP encephalitogenic moiety (residues 68-88) was fused to a cDNA encoding a truncated form of the PE gene (PE40). The chimeric gene termed MBP-PE was expressed in E. coli and highly purified. MBP-PE chimeric protein was cytotoxic to various anti-MBP T cells. Moreover, treatment with the novel MBP-toxin blocked the clinical signs of EAE as well as CNS inflammation and demyelination. A chimeric protein such as MBP-PE40 presents a novel prototype of chimeric proteins, composed of antigen/peptide-toxin, that could prove to be an efficient and specific immunotherapeutic agent for autoimmune diseases in which a known antigen is involved.

  8. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  9. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2005-06-14

    Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins--histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases--encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set) can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes

  10. The Three-Dimensional Solution Structure of the Src Homology Domain-2 of the Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, Mary M.; Frederick, Anne F.; Black, Stuart; Murgolo, Nicholas J.; Perkins, Louise M.; Wilson, Oswald; Snow, Mark E.; Wang Yusen

    1998-01-01

    A set of high-resolution three-dimensional solution structures of the Src homology region-2 (SH2) domain of the growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 was determined using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data used in this study were collected on a stable monomeric protein solution that was free of protein aggregates and proteolysis. The solution structure was determined based upon a total of 1439 constraints, which included 1326 nuclear Overhauser effect distance constraints, 70 hydrogen bond constraints, and 43 dihedral angle constraints. Distance geometry-simulated annealing calculations followed by energy minimization yielded a family of 18 structures that converged to a root-mean-square deviation of 1.09 A for all backbone atoms and 0.40 A for the backbone atoms of the central β-sheet. The core structure of the SH2 domain contains an antiparallel β-sheet flanked by two parallel α-helices displaying an overall architecture that is similar to other known SH2 domain structures. This family of NMR structures is compared to the X-ray structure and to another family of NMR solution structures determined under different solution conditions

  11. Distinct interaction modes of an AKAP bound to two regulatory subunit isoforms of protein kinase A revealed by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Hamuro, Lora L.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kim, Jack S.; Sigala, Paul; Fayos, Rosa; Stranz, David D.; Jennings, Patricia A.; Taylor, Susan S.; Woods, Virgil L.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of an AKAP docked to the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of the type II (RIIα) isoform of protein kinase A (PKA) has been well characterized, but there currently is no detailed structural information of an AKAP docked to the type I (RIα) isoform. Dual-specific AKAP2 (D-AKAP2) binds in the nanomolar range to both isoforms and provided us with an opportunity to characterize the isoform-selective nature of AKAP binding using a common docked ligand. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange combined with mass spectrometry (DXMS) was used to probe backbone structural changes of an α-helical A-kinase binding (AKB) motif from D-AKAP2 docked to both RIα and RIIα D/D domains. The region of protection upon complex formation and the magnitude of protection from H/D exchange were determined for both interacting partners in each complex. The backbone of the AKB ligand was more protected when bound to RIα compared to RIIα, suggesting an increased helical stabilization of the docked AKB ligand. This combined with a broader region of backbone protection induced by the AKAP on the docking surface of RIα indicated that there were more binding constraints for the AKB ligand when bound to RIα. This was in contrast to RIIα, which has a preformed, localized binding surface. These distinct modes of AKAP binding may contribute to the more discriminating nature of the RIα AKAP-docking surface. DXMS provides valuable structural information for understanding binding specificity in the absence of a high-resolution structure, and can readily be applied to other protein–ligand and protein–protein interactions. PMID:16260760

  12. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E

    2001-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes are vulnerable to focal cerebral ischemia, remyelination of denuded or regenerating axons in the peri-infarct area has been observed in the central nervous system. We studied the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a major component of central nervous system myelin...... messenger RNA (mRNA) had disappeared by 24 h, whereas myelin protein, identified by MBP and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunohistochemistry, appeared structurally intact until day 3. Peri-infarct oligodendrocytes increased their expression of MBP mRNA from 24 h to maximal levels at day 7...... showed that increased expression of GAP-43 mRNA in neurons was concomitant to MBP mRNA upregulation in oligodendrocytes. While the mechanisms regulating oligodendrocyte survival and myelination signals are not clear at this point, axonal sprouting could putatively serve as a stimulus for the upregulation...

  13. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  14. Blocking the Interactions between Calcium-Bound S100A12 Protein and the V Domain of RAGE Using Tranilast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jian Wei; Fu, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor in the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in several inflammatory processes. RAGE induces cellular signaling pathways upon binding with various ligands, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), β-amyloids, and S100 proteins. The solution structure of S100A12 and the V ligand-binding region of RAGE have been reported previously. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to conduct 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) titration experiments, we identified and mapped the binding interface between S100A12 and the V domain of RAGE. The NMR chemical shift data were used as the constraints for the High Ambiguity Driven biomolecular DOCKing (HADDOCK) calculation to generate a structural model of the S100A12–V domain complex. In addition, tranilast (an anti-allergic drug) showed strong interaction with S100A12 in the 1H–15N HSQC titration, fluorescence experiments, and WST-1 assay. The results also indicated that tranilast was located at the binding site between S100A12 and the V domain, blocking interaction between these two proteins. Our results provide the mechanistic details for a structural model and reveal a potential precursor for an inhibitor for pro-inflammatory diseases, which could be useful for the development of new drugs. PMID:27598566

  15. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  16. Exosome-bound WD repeat protein Monad inhibits breast cancer cell invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makio Saeki

    Full Text Available Increased stabilization of mRNA coding for key cancer genes can contribute to invasiveness. This is achieved by down-regulation of exosome cofactors, which bind to 3'-UTR in cancer-related genes. Here, we identified amphiregulin, an EGFR ligand, as a target of WD repeat protein Monad, a component of R2TP/prefoldin-like complex, in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Monad specifically interacted with both the 3'-UTR of amphiregulin mRNA and the RNA degrading exosome, and enhanced decay of amphiregulin transcripts. Knockdown of Monad increased invasion and this effect was abolished with anti-amphiregulin neutralizing antibody. These results suggest that Monad could prevent amphiregulin-mediated invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

  17. Towards first-principles calculation of electronic excitations in the ring of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophylls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Igor V.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Moskovsky, Alexander A.; Shabanov, Boris M.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2018-04-01

    Modeling electronic excitation of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules in light-harvesting (LH) antennae from photosynthetic centers presents a challenge for the quantum theory. We report on a quantum chemical study of the ring of 32 BChl molecules from the bacterial core complex LH1-RC. Diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the excitonic Hamiltonian matrices are estimated in quantum chemical calculations of relevant fragments using the TD-DFT and CIS approaches. The deviation of the computed excitation energy of this BChl system from the experimental data related to the Qy band maximum of this LH1-RC complex is about 0.2 eV. We demonstrate that corrections due to improvement in modeling of an individual BChl molecule and due to contributions from the protein environment are in the range of the obtained discrepancy between theory and experiment. Differences between results of the excitonic model and direct quantum chemical calculations of BChl aggregates fall in the same range.

  18. Use of mass spectrometry techniques for the characterization of metal bound to proteins (metallomics) in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Ariza, J.L.; Garcia-Barrera, T.; Lorenzo, F.; Bernal, V.; Villegas, M.J.; Oliveira, V.

    2004-01-01

    The need to determine the individual chemical species (speciation), especially when they are known to have a differential action and behavior in relation to toxicity, mobility, or bioavailability, is discussed. The analytical approaches for small mass metal species characterization, as well as sample treatment and storage, is now well established on the basis of chromatographic-atomic detector combinations. The description of a new scenario centered on endogenous and exogenous metallic species in biological systems, bioactive macromolecules, such as proteins, DNA restriction fragments, phytochelatins, metallothioneins and others is fulfilled. Many of these systems are not well known at present and require a new generation of analytical tools that substitute the traditional atomic detectors based in the use of photons (atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), flame photoionization detector (FPD), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS)) by mass detectors (mass spectrometry (MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) that characterize ions. The photonic analytical tool is now being substituted by the ionic paradigm. Many cases related to biological molecules involving proteins and multiprotein systems, in which metals frequently participate (metallomics) are described, and a generic metallomics analytical approach is proposed for the identification and quantification of metalloproteins, and other metallomacromolecules present in life systems, on the basis of three experimental focuses: (i) a separation technique - selectivity component; (ii) an element-high sensitivity detector--sensitivity component; and (iii) a molecule-specific detector, generally based on mass spectrometry-structural component. This multiplexed analytical approach brings together both elemental and molecular detectors for easy metalloproteins identification. Finally, the possibilities of the metallomics approach in

  19. Purification and characterization of elicitor protein from Phytophthora colocasiae and basic resistance in Colocasia esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Kamal; Misra, Raj Shekhar

    2009-01-01

    An elicitor was identified in the fungus Phytophthora colocasiae. The molecular weight of the purified elicitor was estimated by means of gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE and was estimated as 15kDa. Protease treatment severely reduced its activity, allowing the conclusion that the elicitor is proteinaceous. Infiltration of a few nanograms of this proteinaceous elicitor into taro leaves caused the formation of lesions that closely resemble hypersensitive response lesions. The elicitation of the cells was effective in the induction of the activity of lipoxygenase. Cellular damage, restricted to the infiltrated zone, occurred only several hours later, after the infiltration of the elicitor protein. After few days, systemic acquired resistance was also induced. Thus, taro plant cells that perceived the glycoprotein generated a cascade of signals acting at local, short, and long distances, and causing the coordinate expression of specific defence. The obtained results give important information regarding the plant-pathogen interactions, mainly as subsidy for taro improvement against Phytophthora leaf blight. 2008 Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Matriptase-2, a membrane-bound mosaic serine proteinase predominantly expressed in human liver and showing degrading activity against extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Gloria; Cal, Santiago; Quesada, Victor; Sánchez, Luis M; López-Otín, Carlos

    2002-10-04

    We have identified and cloned a fetal liver cDNA encoding a new serine proteinase that has been called matriptase-2. This protein exhibits a domain organization similar to other members of an emerging family of membrane-bound serine proteinases known as type II transmembrane serine proteinases. Matriptase-2 contains a short cytoplasmic domain, a type II transmembrane sequence, a central region with several modular structural domains including two CUB (complement factor C1s/C1r, urchin embryonic growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein) domains and three low density lipoprotein receptor tandem repeats, and finally, a C-terminal catalytic domain with all typical features of serine proteinases. The human matriptase-2 gene maps to 22q12-q13, a location that differs from all type II transmembrane serine proteinase genes mapped to date. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells transfected with the isolated cDNA confirmed that matriptase-2 is anchored to the cell surface. Matriptase-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein hydrolyzed synthetic substrates used for assaying serine proteinases and endogenous proteins such as type I collagen, fibronectin, and fibrinogen. Matriptase-2 could also activate single-chain urokinase plasminogen activator, albeit with low efficiency. These activities were abolished by inhibitors of serine proteinases but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteolytic enzymes. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that matriptase-2 transcripts are only detected at significant levels in both fetal and adult liver, suggesting that this novel serine proteinase may play a specialized role in matrix remodeling processes taking place in this tissue during development or in adult tissues.

  1. Vaccination with DNA encoding an immunodominant myelin basic protein peptide targeted to Fc of immunoglobulin G suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, A; Weissert, R; Storch, M K; Svanholm, C; de Graaf, K L; Lassmann, H; Andersson, R; Olsson, T; Wigzell, H

    1998-05-04

    We explore here if vaccination with DNA encoding an autoantigenic peptide can suppress autoimmune disease. For this purpose we used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is an autoaggressive disease in the central nervous system and an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Lewis rats were vaccinated with DNA encoding an encephalitogenic T cell epitope, guinea pig myelin basic protein peptide 68-85 (MBP68-85), before induction of EAE with MBP68-85 in complete Freund's adjuvant. Compared to vaccination with a control DNA construct, the vaccination suppressed clinical and histopathological signs of EAE, and reduced the interferon gamma production after challenge with MBP68-85. Targeting of the gene product to Fc of IgG was essential for this effect. There were no signs of a Th2 cytokine bias. Our data suggest that DNA vaccines encoding autoantigenic peptides may be useful tools in controlling autoimmune disease.

  2. Cigarette smokers develop altered erythrocyte membrane composition: an investigation unmasking the role of membrane bound integral protein GLUT 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Jyotirmoy; Seal, Paromita; Roy, Amartya; Haldar, Rajen

    2017-04-01

    Erythrocytes in cigarette smokers are prone to oxidative damage. Here, we sought to elucidate the facts behind modifications and possible defense system developed in erythrocyte of cigarette smokers. We observed significant increase in stomatocytes and spherocytes, and osmotic fragility of erythrocyte, along with reduced level of protein thiol and increased fluorescence anisotropy in isolated membrane. Denaturing gel electrophoresis indicated alterations in band 3, band 4.2 and band 4.5. Among those, Glut 1 (i.e. band 4.5), which transports glucose (insulin independent) and dehydroascorbate (DHA), was selectively chosen for its long history in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased Glut 1 level in smokers was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, smokers showed significantly higher glucose uptake in whole blood. The intracellular (Ic) ROS (as indicated by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin) was significantly higher in smokers as evidenced by flow cytometric assay. Glucose and DHA alone or together significantly reduced IcROS at higher rate in smokers. However, in presence of Glut 1 specific blocker, phloretin, neither glucose nor DHA could reduce IcROS in both non-smokers and smokers. This confirms that Glut 1 by transporting glucose or DHA attenuates IcROS. Therefore, we conclude that erythrocytes, although altered morphologically, also develop a defense system by upregulating Glut 1 to combat with enhanced Ic oxidative insult in cigarette smokers.

  3. Examination of Proteins Bound to Nascent DNA in Mammalian Cells Using BrdU-ChIP-Slot-Western Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara, Srividya

    2016-01-14

    Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1,2) localize to the sites of DNA replication. In the previous study, using a selective inhibitor and a genetic knockdown system, we showed novel functions for HDAC1,2 in replication fork progression and nascent chromatin maintenance in mammalian cells. Additionally, we used a BrdU-ChIP-Slot-Western technique that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA with slot blot and Western analyses to quantitatively measure proteins or histone modification associated with nascent DNA. Actively dividing cells were treated with HDAC1,2 selective inhibitor or transfected with siRNAs against Hdac1 and Hdac2 and then newly synthesized DNA was labeled with the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The BrdU labeling was done at a time point when there was no significant cell cycle arrest or apoptosis due to the loss of HDAC1,2 functions. Following labeling of cells with BrdU, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of histone acetylation marks or the chromatin-remodeler was performed with specific antibodies. BrdU-labeled input DNA and the immunoprecipitated (or ChIPed) DNA was then spotted onto a membrane using the slot blot technique and immobilized using UV. The amount of nascent DNA in each slot was then quantitatively assessed using Western analysis with an anti-BrdU antibody. The effect of loss of HDAC1,2 functions on the levels of newly synthesized DNA-associated histone acetylation marks and chromatin remodeler was then determined by normalizing the BrdU-ChIP signal obtained from the treated samples to the control samples.

  4. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP) 3 reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import

  5. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  6. Presentation of myelin basic protein by normal guinea-pig brain endothelial cells and its relevance to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, C E; Healey, D G; Baker, D; Willoughby, D A; Turk, J L

    1989-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that endothelial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) of normal guinea-pigs constitutively express certain MHC class II determinants, whilst the expression of other determinants is apparent during the acute phase of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE). The expression of MHC class II determinants is retained by endothelial cells derived from normal guinea-pig brain tissue and maintained in culture. This present study demonstrates that the MHC class II molecules on these cells can be recognized by allogeneic lymphocytes, resulting in a proliferative response which is enhanced by the addition of exogenous IL-2. The endothelial cells were incapable of presenting either purified protein derivative or ovalbumin, but they could present autologous myelin basic protein (MBP), an encephalitogen implicated in the pathogenesis of EAE. The resulting lymphocyte proliferative response was of the same magnitude as that obtained when a control population of macrophages was used to present MBP. These results, therefore, suggest that cerebrovascular endothelia have the potential to play a role in the pathogenesis of EAE.

  7. The importance of protein binding for the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE)-example of ibuprofen, a highly protein-bound substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, H; Di Consiglio, E; Kreutz, R; Partosch, F; Testai, E; Gundert-Remy, U

    2017-04-01

    A physiologically based human kinetic model (PBHKM) was used to predict the in vivo ibuprofen dose leading to the same concentration-time profile as measured in cultured human hepatic cells (Truisi et al. in Toxicol Lett 233(2):172-186, 2015). We parameterized the PBHKM with data from an in vivo study. Tissue partition coefficients were calculated by an algorithm and also derived from the experimental in vitro data for the liver. The predicted concentration-time profile in plasma was in excellent agreement with human experimental data when the liver partition coefficient was calculated by the algorithm (3.01) demonstrating values in line with findings obtained from human postmortem tissues. The results were less adequate when the liver partition coefficient was based on the experimental in vitro data (11.1). The in vivo doses necessary to reach the in vitro concentrations in the liver cells were 3610 mg using the best fitting model with a liver partition coefficient of 3.01 compared to 2840 mg with the in vitro liver partition coefficient of 11.1. We found that this difference is possibly attributable to the difference between protein binding in vivo (99.9 %) and in vitro (nearly zero) as the partition coefficient is highly dependent on protein binding. Hence, the fraction freely diffusible in the liver tissue is several times higher in vitro than in vivo. In consequence, when extrapolating from in vitro to in vivo liver toxicity, it is important to consider non-intended in vitro/in vivo differences in the tissue concentration which may occur due to a low protein content of the medium.

  8. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography : application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herráez-Hernández, R; van de Merbel, N C; Brinkman, U A

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of

  9. Autoantibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) in healthy individuals and in patients with multiple sclerosis: a role in regulating cytokine responses to MBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Chen, Ning; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Anti-myelin basic protein (-MBP) autoantibodies have generally been considered to be absent from sera from healthy individuals, but to be detectable in sera from some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, their pathogenic role is uncertain. We demonstrate the presence of MBP-reactive au......Anti-myelin basic protein (-MBP) autoantibodies have generally been considered to be absent from sera from healthy individuals, but to be detectable in sera from some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, their pathogenic role is uncertain. We demonstrate the presence of MBP...

  10. Industry Perspective on Contemporary Protein-Binding Methodologies: Considerations for Regulatory Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Guidelines on Highly Bound Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li; Breen, Christopher; Chambers, Rob; Eckley, Sean T; Fricke, Robert; Ghosh, Avijit; Harradine, Paul; Kalvass, J Cory; Ho, Stacy; Lee, Caroline A; Marathe, Punit; Perkins, Everett J; Qian, Mark; Tse, Susanna; Yan, Zhengyin; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2017-12-01

    Regulatory agencies have recently issued drug-drug interaction guidelines, which require determination of plasma protein binding (PPB). To err on the conservative side, the agencies recommend that a 0.01 lower limit of fraction unbound (f u ) be used for highly bound compounds (>99%), irrespective of the actual measured values. While this may avoid false negatives, the recommendation would likely result in a high rate of false positive predictions, resulting in unnecessary clinical studies and more stringent inclusion/exclusion criteria, which may add cost and time in delivery of new medicines to patients. In this perspective, we provide a review of current approaches to measure PPB, and important determinants in enabling the accuracy and precision in these measurements. The ability to measure f u is further illustrated by a cross-company data comparison of PPB for warfarin and itraconazole, demonstrating good concordance of the measured f u values. The data indicate that f u values of ≤0.01 may be determined accurately across laboratories when appropriate methods are used. These data, along with numerous other examples presented in the literature, support the use of experimentally measured f u values for drug-drug interaction predictions, rather than using the arbitrary cutoff value of 0.01 as recommended in current regulatory guidelines. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunochemotherapy of transplanted KMT-17 tumor in WKA rats by combination of cyclophosphamide and immunostimulatory protein-bound polysaccharide isolated from basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, J; Kawamura, T; Gotohda, E; Yamada, Y; Hosokawa, M; Kodama, T; Kobayashi, H

    1977-09-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide Kureha (PS-K) isolated from Basidiomycetes was used in combination with cyclophosphamide (CY) for the treatment of a 3-methylcholanthrene- induced KMT-17 fibrosarcoma in WKA/Mk rats. A single administration of PS-K exhibited no inhibitory effect on the growth of s.c.-inoculated KMT-17 tumor at any timing and dose. However, PS-K exhibited a marked antitumor effect when it was combined with CY. The effect of PS-K dependend on the combination timing of PS-K and CY; a marked antitumor effect was observed when PS-K was administered before CY but not if it was given after CY or before tumor inoculation. When PS-K was administered on Day 1 followed by CY on Day 3, the highest survival rate of 78.5% (11 of 14) was obtained. Delayed hypersensitivity response of rats to KMT-17 was investigat ed by radioisotopic footpad assay. On Day 12, the hypersensitivity response in rats treated with PS-K on Day 1 and CY on Day 3 was significantly higher than that in nontreated rats, indicating an enhanced specific immunity to KMT-17 possibly resulting in a marked antitumor effect.

  12. Effects of endurance exercise on expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein in developing rats with maternal infection-induced cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kijeong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common white matter lesion affecting the neonatal brain. PVL is closely associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and characterized by increase in the number of astrocytes, which can be detected by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Change in myelin basic protein (MBP) is an early sign of white matter abnormality. Maternal or placental infection can damage the neonatal brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill walking exercise on GFAP and MBP expressions in rats with maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PVL. Immunohistochemistry was performed for the detection of GFAP and MBP. The present results showed that intracervical maternal LPS injection during pregnancy increased GFAP expression in the striatum and decreased MBP expression in the corpus callosum of rats. The results also showed that treadmill walking exercise suppressed GFAP expression and enhanced MBP expression in the brains of rats with maternal LPS-induced PVL. The present study revealed that treadmill walking exercise is effective for the suppressing astrogliosis and hypomyelination associated with PVL. Here in this study, we showed that treadmill walking exercise may be effective therapeutic strategy for alleviating the detrimental effects of CP. PMID:24678499

  13. A fusion protein consisting of IL-16 and the encephalitogenic peptide of myelin basic protein constitutes an antigen-specific tolerogenic vaccine that inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Mark D; Abbott, Derek J

    2007-08-01

    To test a novel concept for the generation of tolerogenic vaccines, fusion proteins were constructed encompassing a tolerogenic or biasing cytokine and the major encephalitogenic peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein (GPMBP; i.e., neuroantigen or NAg). The cytokine domain was predicted to condition APC while simultaneously targeting the covalently linked encephalitogenic peptide to the MHC class II Ag processing pathway of those conditioned APC. Rats were given three s.c. injections of cytokine-NAg in saline 1-2 wk apart and then at least 1 wk later were challenged with NAg in CFA. The rank order of tolerogenic activity in the Lewis rat model of EAE was NAgIL16 > IL2NAg > IL1RA-NAg, IL13NAg >or= IL10NAg, GPMBP, GP69-88, and saline. NAgIL16 was also an effective inhibitor of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis when administered after an encephalitogenic challenge during the onset of clinical signs. Covalent linkage of the NAg and IL-16 was required for inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data identify IL-16 as an optimal cytokine partner for the generation of tolerogenic vaccines and indicate that such vaccines may serve as Ag-specific tolerogens for the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  14. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging measures of white matter compared to myelin basic protein immunofluorescence in tissue cleared intact brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Chang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide datasets from combined ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and Clear Lipid-exchanged, Anatomically Rigid, Imaging/immunostaining compatible, Tissue hYdrogel (CLARITY performed on intact mouse brains. DTI-derived measures of fractional anisotropy (FA, radial diffusivity (RD, and axial diffusivity (AD were compared to antibody-based labeling of myelin basic protein (MBP, as measured by fluorescence microscopy. We used a customized CLARITY hydrogel solution to facilitate whole brain tissue clearing and subsequent immunolabeling. We describe how CLARITY was made compatible with magnetic resonance imaging with the intention of facilitating future multimodal imaging studies that may combine noninvasive imaging with 3D immunohistochemistry. These data and methods are related to the accompanying research article entitled, ‘The role of myelination in measures of white matter integrity: Combination of diffusion tensor imaging and two-photon microscopy of CLARITY intact brains’ (E.H. Chang, M. Argyelan, M. Aggarwal, T-S. Chandon, K.H. Karlsgodt, S. Mori, A.K. Malhotra, 2016 [1].

  16. Protamine-like sperm nuclear basic proteins in the primitive frog Ascaphus truei and histone reversions among more advanced frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinsky, H E; Gutovich, L; Kulak, D; Mackay, M; Green, D M; Hunt, J; Ausio, J

    1999-12-01

    Sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs) that condense chromatin are very diverse. In animals, evolution of SNBPs has proceeded from lysine-rich histone H type in sponges to more arginine-rich protamine-like PL and protamine P types. Yet sporadic PL/P to H reversions are known to occur in both protostomes and deuterostomes. To determine why this is the case, we have examined SNBPs in eleven anuran species. We find that sperm of the primitive, internally fertilizing archeobatrachian frog A. truei (family Ascaphidae) has PL/P type (42 mol % arginine), with an electrophoretic profile similar to SNBPs in another archeobatrachian, externally fertilizing Leiopelma hochstetteri (family Leiopelmatidae). Cytochemistry of sperm nuclei in the advanced, externally fertilizing neobatrachian frogs Crinia signifera and C. deserticola (family Myobatrachidae) indicates that they have reverted to H type SNBPs. This is also known to be the case in externally fertilizing Rana (family Ranidae) and Silurana, a subgenus of Xenopus (family Pipidae). Such a trend, from PL/P type SNBPs in two archeobatrachians to sporadic reversions to H type in more advanced frogs, parallels the ultrastructural simplification from complex A. truei introsperm to neobatrachian aquasperm that Jamieson et al. (1993. Herpetologica 49:52-65) attribute as a secondary reversion to external fertilization.

  17. Catalytic activity of autoantibodies toward myelin basic protein correlates with the scores on the multiple sclerosis expanded disability status scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Durova, Oxana M; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Telegin, Georgy B; Suchkov, Sergey V; Misikov, Victor K; Morse, Herbert C; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2006-02-28

    Autoantibodies toward myelin basic protein (MBP) evidently emerge in sera and cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as in a MS rodent model, i.e., experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The studies of the last two decades have unveiled somewhat controversial data on the diagnostic applicability of anti-MBP autoantibodies as a disease' marker. Here, we present the results of new functional analysis of the anti-MBP autoantibodies isolated from MS (in patients) and EAE (in mice) sera, based on their proteolytic activity against the targeted autoantigen. The activity was shown to be the intrinsic property of the IgG molecule. No activity was found in the sera-derived antibody fraction of healthy donors and control mice. Sera of 24 patients with clinically proven MS at different stages of the disease, and 20 healthy controls were screened for the anti-MBP antibody-mediated proteolytic activity. The activity correlated with the scores on the MS expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (r(2)=0.85, P<0.001). Thus, the anti-MBP autoantibody-mediated proteolysis may be regarded as an additional marker of the disease progression.

  18. [Relationship between anti-myelin basic protein antibody and myelinoclasis in rat brain stem after brain trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Shan-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Song, Xiu-Bao; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Mei

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the relations between anti-myelin basic protein antibody (anti-MBP) variation and myelinoclasis in the brain stem following brain trauma. In rat models of brain trauma, MBP content and anti-MBP titer in the blood were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at different time points after brain trauma, and the degree of myelinoclasis in the brain stem slices was assessed with osmic acid staining. Early after brain trauma, MBP content in the blood increased followed by significant reduction 10 days later. Four days after the trauma, anti-MBP titer was markedly increased, accompanied by obvious exacerbation of myelinoclasis in the brain stem, both reaching the highest levels on day 10, at the point of which anti-MBP titer increased by 4 folds and the number of myelinoclasis by 10 folds compared with the control group. Anti-MBP titer and brain stem myelinolysis both lowered 30 days later. Correlation analysis showed an intimate positive correlation between anti-MBP titer and the degree of myelinoclasis. After brain trauma, MBP is released as a specific antigen into the blood to stimulate the immune system for anti-MBP production, and the antibody is intimately related to the brain stem myelinoclasis.

  19. p56Lck and p59Fyn Regulate CD28 Binding to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein GRB-2, and T Cell-Specific Protein-Tyrosine Kinase ITK: Implications for T-Cell Costimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Monika; Cai, Yun-Cai; Bunnell, Stephen C.; Heyeck, Stephanie D.; Berg, Leslie J.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    1995-09-01

    T-cell activation requires cooperative signals generated by the T-cell antigen receptor ξ-chain complex (TCRξ-CD3) and the costimulatory antigen CD28. CD28 interacts with three intracellular proteins-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), T cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase ITK (formerly TSK or EMT), and the complex between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 and son of sevenless guanine nucleotide exchange protein (GRB-2-SOS). PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 bind to the CD28 phosphotyrosine-based Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif by means of intrinsic Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains. The requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif for SH2 domain binding implicates an intervening protein-tyrosine kinase in the recruitment of PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 by CD28. Candidate kinases include p56Lck, p59Fyn, ξ-chain-associated 70-kDa protein (ZAP-70), and ITK. In this study, we demonstrate in coexpression studies that p56Lck and p59Fyn phosphorylate CD28 primarily at Tyr-191 of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif, inducing a 3- to 8-fold increase in p85 (subunit of PI 3-kinase) and GRB-2 SH2 binding to CD28. Phosphatase digestion of CD28 eliminated binding. In contrast to Src kinases, ZAP-70 and ITK failed to induce these events. Further, ITK binding to CD28 was dependent on the presence of p56Lck and is thus likely to act downstream of p56Lck/p59Fyn in a signaling cascade. p56Lck is therefore likely to be a central switch in T-cell activation, with the dual function of regulating CD28-mediated costimulation as well as TCR-CD3-CD4 signaling.

  20. Adsorption mechanism of myelin basic protein on model substrates and its bridging interaction between the two surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Min, Younjin; Ramachandran, Arun; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-03-17

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intrinsically disordered (unstructured) protein known to play an important role in the stability of myelin's multilamellar membrane structure in the central nervous system. The adsorption of MBP and its capacity to interact with and bridge solid substrates has been studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA) and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Adsorption experiments show that MBP molecules adsorb to the surfaces in a swollen state before undergoing a conformational change into a more compact structure with a thickness of ∼3 nm. Moreover, this compact structure is able to interact with nearby mica surfaces to form adhesive bridges. The measured adhesion force (energy) between two bridged surfaces is 1.0 ± 0.1 mN/m, (Ead = 0.21 ± 0.02 mJ/m(2)), which is slightly smaller than our previously reported adhesion force of 1.7 mN/m (Ead = 0.36 mJ/m(2)) for MBP adsorbed on two supported lipid bilayers (Lee et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, E768-E775). The saturated surface concentration of compact MBP on a single SiO2 surface reaches a stable value of 310 ± 10 ng/cm(2) regardless of the bulk MBP concentration. A kinetic three-step adsorption model was developed that accurately fits the adsorption data. The developed model is a general model, not limited to intrinsically disordered proteins, that can be extended to the adsorption of various chemical compounds that undergo chemical reactions and/or conformational changes upon adsorbing to surfaces. Taken together with our previously published data (Lee et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, E768-E775), the present results confirm that conformational changes of MBP upon adsorption are a key for strong adhesion, and that such conformational changes are strongly dependent on the nature of the surfaces.

  1. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jamie B; Daniel, Gina R; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis; Smith, Greg A; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2017-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the nucleus

  2. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence

  3. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnsen, Lars; Christensen, Jeppe Romme; Ratzer, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had...... increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic......Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used...

  4. Peripheral nerve P2 basic protein and the Guillain-Barre syndrome : In vitro demonstration of P2-specific antibody-secreting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Jong, W.A.C. de; Demel, R.A.; Heijnen, C.J.; Ballieux, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    An immune response to the peripheral nerve basic protein P2 may be operative in the pathogenesis of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A method is described for the purification of P2 of human origin. Purified P2 was used to investigate whether lymphocytes derived from peripheral blood of GBS

  5. T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2 and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Krakauer, Martin; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Autoreactive T cells are thought to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined the stimulatory effect of human myelin basic protein (MBP) on mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from 22 patients with MS and 22 sex-matched and age-matched healthy individuals, and...

  6. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software.

  7. [Enhancement of irradiation effect in carcinoma of the uterine cervix with the administration of protein-bound polysaccharide kureha (PS-K)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuta, M

    1985-09-01

    The combined effect of PS-K, a protein-bound polysaccharide, and radiation therapy has been studied in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix. Thirty cases (study group) were administered daily 3g. of PS-K throughout the course of radiation. Sixty cases (control group) were treated with external cobalt-60 irradiation alone. All cases were evaluated at the dose of 1,400 rads and 3,000 rads histologically and colposcopically. Histological evaluations were performed on the punch-biopsied specimen in view of Oboshi-Shimosato's classification and the rate at which the cancer cell population diminished in the tissues. Tumor sizes were measured on the photographs obtained from the colposcopic observations. These 3 parameters were recorded, summed up and evaluated. In the control group, there was found a good, 31.7%, response, 41.7% moderate response and 26.7% poor response in the phase of 3,000 rads. However, those figures were calculated to be 60.0%, 36.7% and 3.3% respectively in study group. Hence, the administration of PS-K rendered the enhancement of the irradiation effect statistical significant (p less than 0.01). Patients were classified into two groups: very responsive and less responsive groups. Transition of immunological reactivity was analyzed. Peripheral and tissue lymphocytes counts and immunological skin test were suppressed in both groups. This can be attributed to the immuno-suppression of irradiation exceeding the enhancing effect of PS-K. The LMIT (leucocyte migration inhibition test) of the very responsive group was maintained up to the completion of the treatment in contrast to the less responsive group where it was somewhat suppressed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Characterisation and bioactivity of protein-bound polysaccharides from submerged-culture fermentation of Coriolus versicolor Wr-74 and ATCC-20545 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Goh, Kelvin Kim Tha; Archer, Richard; Singh, Harjinder

    2007-05-01

    The protein-bound polysaccharides of Coriolus versicolor (CPS) have been reported to stimulate overall immune functions against cancers and various infectious diseases by activating specific cell functions. A New Zealand isolate (Wr-74) and a patented strain (ATCC-20545) of C. versicolor were compared in this study. The fruit bodies of both strains were grown for visual verification. Both strains were grown in submerged-culture using an airlift fermentor with milk permeate as the base medium supplemented with glucose, yeast extract and salt. Metabolic profiles of both strains obtained over 7-day fermentation showed very similar trends in terms of biomass production (8.9-10.6 mg/ml), amounts of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) from the culture medium (1150-1132 microg/ml), and intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) from the mycelium (80-100 microg/ml). Glucose was the dominant sugar in both EPS and IPS, and the polymers each consisted of three molecular weight fractions ranging from 2 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(3 )Da. Both the EPS and IPS were able to significantly induce cytokine production (interleukin 12 and gamma interferon) in murine splenocytes in vitro. Highest levels of interleukin 12 (291 pg/ml) and gamma interferon (6,159 pg/ml) were obtained from samples containing Wr-74 IPS (0.06 microg/ml) and ATCC 20545 IPS (0.1 microg/ml), respectively. The results indicated that lower levels of EPS and IPS generally resulted in higher immune responses than did higher polymer concentrations.

  9. Vulnerable Derivatives and Good Deal Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgoci, Agatha

    2013-01-01

    a new restriction in the arbitrage free model by setting upper bounds on the Sharpe ratios (SRs) of the assets. The potential prices that are eliminated represent unreasonably good deals. The constraint on the SR translates into a constraint on the stochastic discount factor. Thus, tight pricing bounds......We price vulnerable derivatives – i.e. derivatives where the counterparty may default. These are basically the derivatives traded on the over-the-counter (OTC) markets. Default is modelled in a structural framework. The technique employed for pricing is good deal bounds (GDBs). The method imposes...... in a consistent way. Finally, we numerically analyse the behaviour of the good deal pricing bounds....

  10. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  11. Perceptron Mistake Bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Mohri, Mehryar; Rostamizadeh, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    We present a brief survey of existing mistake bounds and introduce novel bounds for the Perceptron or the kernel Perceptron algorithm. Our novel bounds generalize beyond standard margin-loss type bounds, allow for any convex and Lipschitz loss function, and admit a very simple proof.

  12. Purification, partial characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of a novel cardiotoxin-like basic protein from Naja naja atra (South Anhui) venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Hui; Li, Yan; Lou, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Xio; Gao, Yong-xiang; Teng, Mai-kun, E-mail: mkteng@ustc.edu.cn; Niu, Li-wen, E-mail: mkteng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Key Laboratory of Structural Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2007-02-01

    A novel cardiotoxin-like basic protein from Naja naja atra was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.35 Å resolution. A novel cardiotoxin-like basic protein was isolated from the venom of the Chinese cobra (Naja naja atra) from the south of Anhui in China. The protein inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in human lung cancer cell line H1299 and induces the haemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes under low-lecithin conditions. After a two-step chromatographic purification, the resultant 7 kDa protein was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. A complete data set was collected to 2.35 Å resolution using an in-house X-ray diffraction system. The crystal belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.2, c = 147.9 Å. There are two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  13. The ubiquitin ligase E6-AP is induced and recruited to aggresomes in response to proteasome inhibition and may be involved in the ubiquitination of Hsp70-bound misfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amit; Godavarthi, Swetha K; Maheshwari, Megha; Goswami, Anand; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2009-04-17

    Cells are equipped with an efficient quality control system to selectively eliminate abnormally folded and damaged proteins. Initially the cell tries to refold the unfolded proteins with the help of molecular chaperones, and failure to refold leads to their degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system. But how this proteolytic machinery recognizes the abnormally folded proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report that E6-AP, a HECT domain family ubiquitin ligase implicated in Angelman syndrome, interacts with the substrate binding domain of Hsp70/Hsc70 chaperones and promotes the degradation of chaperone bound substrates. The expression of E6-AP was dramatically induced under a variety of stresses, and overexpression of E6-AP was found to protect against endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The inhibition of proteasome function not only increases the expression of E6-AP but also causes its redistribution around microtubule-organizing center, a subcellular structure for the degradation of the cytoplasmic misfolded proteins. E6-AP is also recruited to aggresomes containing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that E6-AP ubiquitinates misfolded luciferase that is bound by Hsp70. Our results suggest that E6-AP functions as a cellular quality control ubiquitin ligase and, therefore, can be implicated not only in the pathogenesis of Angelman syndrome but also in the biology of neurodegenerative disorders involving protein aggregation.

  14. Circuit lower bounds in bounded arithmetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pich, Ján

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 1 (2015), s. 29-45 ISSN 0168-0072 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Keywords : bounded arithmetic * circuit lower bounds Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.582, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007214000888

  15. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Junya [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Hirano, Hidemi [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  16. The effect of bound to dialdehudecellulose protein concentration on the activity of immobilized trypsin after γ-irradiation and in process of storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Ryl'tsev, V.V.; Ignatyuk, T.E.; Filatov, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    It is found the complex effect of the bound enzyme concentration on the proteolytic activity of trypsin immobilized to dialdehydecellulose (preriodate oxidation) after γ-irradiation and in process of storage. It is shown the occurance of three stages of immobilized enzyme inactivation in process of immobilization and storage. The velocity of inactivation did not depend on bound trypsin concentration. The ratio of proteolytic activity of samples before and after γ-irradiation was increased with the increase of immobilized to carrier enzyme concentration and was not change (in range of experiment error) in process of storage. The results were compared with that of cryctlline trypsin

  17. In-capillary enrichment, proteolysis and separation using capillary electrophoresis with discontinuous buffers: application on proteins with moderately acidic and basic isoelectric points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Chandra A; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2009-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry and capillary-format separation continue to improve the sensitivity of protein analysis. Of equal importance is the miniaturization of sample pretreatment such as enrichment and proteolysis. In a previous report (Nesbitt et al., Electrophoresis, 2008, 29, 466-474), nanoliter-volume protein enrichment, tryptic digestion, and partial separation was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis followed by MALDI mass spectral analysis. A discontinuous buffer system, consisting of ammonium (pH 10) and acetate (pH 4), was used to create a pH junction inside the capillary, trapping a protein with a neutral isoelectric point, myoglobin (pI 7.2). Moreover, co-enrichment of myoglobin with trypsin led to an in-capillary digestion. In this paper, the ability of this discontinuous buffer system to perform similar in-capillary sample pretreatment on proteins with moderately acidic and basic pI was studied and reported. Lentil lectin (pI 8.6) and a multi-phosphorylated protein, beta-casein (pI 5.1), were selected as model proteins. In addition to the previously shown tryptic digestion, proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N was also performed. Digestion of these acidic and basic pI proteins produced a few peptides with extreme pI values lying outside the trapping range of the discontinuous buffer. An alteration in the peptide trapping procedure was made to accommodate these analytes. Offline MALDI mass spectral analysis confirmed the presence of the expected peptides. The presented miniaturized sample pretreatment methodology was proven to be applicable on proteins with a moderately wide range of pI. Flexibility in the choice of protease was also evident.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  20. Passage of stable isotope-labeled grass silage fiber and fiber-bound protein through the gastroinstestinal tract of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Dijkstra, J.; Hendriks, W.H.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional passage rates are required to predict nutrient absorption in ruminants but data on nutrient-specific passage kinetics are largely lacking. With the use of the stable isotope ratio (d) as an internal marker, we assessed passage kinetics of fiber and fiber-bound nitrogen (N) of

  1. Possible intermediates in the biosynthesis of proteins. I. Evidence for the presence of nucleotide-bound carboxyl-activated peptides in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, V.V.; Grinten, Chr.O. van der; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1957-01-01

    1. 1. In this paper evidence is presented for the occurrence of dialysable nucleotide-bound carboxyl-activated peptide compounds in extracts of ether-CO2-frozen fresh pressed baker's yeast. 2. 2. Furthermore, some data are given indicating the presence of carboxyl-activated peptides in “80S”

  2. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals the ATP-bound monomeric state of the ATPase domain from the homodimeric MutL endonuclease, a GHKL phosphotransferase superfamily protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishida, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Fukui, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    DNA mismatch repair is an excision system that removes mismatched bases chiefly generated by replication errors. In this system, MutL endonucleases direct the excision reaction to the error-containing strand of the duplex by specifically incising the newly synthesized strand. Both bacterial homodimeric and eukaryotic heterodimeric MutL proteins belong to the GHKL ATPase/kinase superfamily that comprises the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal dimerization regions. Generally, the GHKL proteins show large ATPase cycle-dependent conformational changes, including dimerization-coupled ATP binding of the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, the ATPase domain of human PMS2, a subunit of the MutL heterodimer, binds ATP without dimerization. The monomeric ATP-bound state of the domain has been thought to be characteristic of heterodimeric GHKL proteins. In this study, we characterized the ATP-bound state of the ATPase domain from the Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease, which is a homodimeric GHKL protein unlike the eukaryotic MutL. Gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses clearly showed that the domain binds ATP in a monomeric form despite its homodimeric nature. This indicates that the uncoupling of dimerization and ATP binding is a common feature among bacterial and eukaryotic MutL endonucleases, which we suggest is closely related to the molecular mechanisms underlying mismatch repair.

  3. Comparative immunogenicity of conjugates composed of the Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide bound to carrier proteins by adipic acid dihydrazide or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattom, A; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D; Fitzgerald, D; Pastan, I; Karakawa, W W; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1992-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus type 8 capsular polysaccharide (CP) was conjugated either to diphtheria toxoid or to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A by using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) or N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as the joining reagent. The polysaccharide/protein ratios of these two pairs of conjugates were similar. The two synthetic schemes bound the linker to the carboxyls of the type 8 CP by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. ADH was bound to the carboxyls of the protein, whereas SPDP reacted with the amino groups of the protein. Intermolecular linking of the carrier protein, caused by the carbodiimide during the conjugation reaction with the type 8 CP derivative, probably accounts for the larger size of the conjugates formed with ADH compared with those formed with SPDP. Both conjugates synthesized with ADH elicited higher levels of CP antibodies, especially after the first immunization, than did those prepared with SPDP. Similar levels of exoprotein A antibodies were elicited by both conjugates. Higher levels of diphtheria toxoid antibodies were elicited by the conjugate prepared with SPDP than by the one prepared with ADH. The basis for the differences in the immunogenicities of these two pairs of S. aureus type 8 CP conjugates is discussed. PMID:1730492

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ...

  5. A matrix lower bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  6. Mutations in the basic region of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus nucleocapsid protein affect reverse transcription, gRNA packaging and the site of viral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálková, Alžběta; Kaufman, Filip; Křížová, Ivana; Kultová, Anna; Strohalmová, Karolína; Hadravová, Romana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2018-02-28

    In addition to specific RNA-binding zinc finger domains, retroviral Gag polyprotein contains clusters of basic amino acid residues thought to support Gag-viral genomic RNA (gRNA) interactions. One of these clusters is the basic K 16 NK 18 EK 20 region, located upstream of the first zinc finger of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) nucleocapsid protein (NC). To investigate the role of this basic region in the M-PMV life cycle, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods to study a series of mutants in which the overall charge of this region was more positive (RNRER), more negative (AEAEA), or neutral (AAAAA). The mutations markedly affected gRNA incorporation and the onset of reverse transcription. Introducing a more negative charge (AEAEA) significantly reduced the incorporation of M-PMV gRNA into nascent particles. Moreover, the assembly of immature particles of the AEAEA Gag mutant was relocated from the perinuclear region to the plasma membrane. In contrast, enhancing the basicity of this region of M-PMV NC (RNRER) caused substantially more efficient incorporation of gRNA, subsequently resulting in an increase in M-PMV RNRER infectivity. Nevertheless, despite the higher amount of gRNA packaged by the RNRER mutant, the onset of reverse transcription was delayed in comparison to that of the wild type. Our data clearly show the requirement for certain positively charged amino acid residues upstream of the first zinc finger for proper gRNA incorporation, assembly of immature particles and proceeding of reverse transcription. Importance: We identified a short sequence within Gag polyprotein that, together with the zinc finger domains and previously identified RKK motif, contributes to packaging of genomic RNA (gRNA) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV). Importantly, in addition to gRNA incorporation this basic region (KNKEK) at the N-terminus of nucleocapsid protein is crucial for an onset of reverse transcription. The mutations changing the positive

  7. Cloning of human basic A1, a distinct 59-kDa dystrophin-associated protein encoded on chromosome 8q23-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, A.H. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshida, Mikiharu; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ozawa, Eijiro [National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawa Higashi, Kodaira (Japan); Anderson, M.S.; Feener, C.A.; Selig, S. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kunkel, L.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]|[Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children`s Hosptial, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-05-10

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by defects of dystrophin, which forms a part of the membrane cytoskeleton of specialized cells such as muscle. It has been previously shown that the dystrophin-associated protein A1 (59-kDa DAP) is actually a heterogeneous group of phosphorylated proteins consisting of an acidic ({alpha}-A1) and a distinct basic ({beta}-A1) component. Partial peptide sequence of the A1 complex purified from rabbit muscle permitted the design of oligonucleotide probes that were used to isolate a cDNA for one human isoform of A1. This cDNA encodes a basic A1 isoform that is distinct from the recently described syntrophins in Torpedo and mouse and is expressed in many tissues with at least five distinct mRNA species of 5.9, 4.8, 4.3, 3.1, and 1.5 kb. A comparison of the human cDNA sequence with the GenBank expressed sequence tag (EST) data base has identified a relative from human skeletal muscle, EST25263, which is probably a human homologue of the published mouse syntrophin 2. The authors have mapped the human basic component of A1 and EST25263 genes to chromosomes 8q23-24 and 16, respectively.

  8. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  9. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  10. The effect of beta-interferon therapy on myelin basic protein-elicited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Krakauer, Martin; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-beta therapy has well-established clinical benefits in multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying modulation of cytokine responses to myelin self-antigens remains poorly understood. We analysed the CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine responses elicited by myelin basic protein...... (MBP) and a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), in mononuclear cell cultures from fourteen MS patients undergoing IFN-beta therapy. The MBP-elicited IFN-gamma-, TNF-alpha- and IL-10 production decreased during therapy (p...

  11. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    to selectively redirect therapeutic T cells against myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T lymphocytes implicated in MS. We generated two heterodimeric receptors that genetically link the human MBP(84-102) epitope to HLA-DR2 and either incorporate or lack a TCRzeta signaling domain. The Ag-MHC domain serves...... mouse model system. Finally, the chimeric receptor-modified CTL ameliorated or blocked experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease mediated by MBP(84-102)/DR2-specific T lymphocytes. These results provide support for the further development of redirected therapeutic T cells able to counteract...

  12. Myelin basic protein-reactive T cells persist in an inactive state in the bone marrow of Lewis rats that have recovered from autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Taba; Wolf, Norbert A; Swanborg, Robert H

    2009-04-30

    Lewis rats immunized with guinea pig myelin basic protein residues 68-86 develop acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and recover. The predominant T cell receptor expressed by the encephalitogenic T cells is TCRBV8S2. They persist in bone marrow many weeks after recovery. CD3 is down-regulated, but >90% express CD4. They fail to proliferate to GPMBP68-86 unless a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor is added to the cultures. Perhaps these are memory T cells that are maintained in a suppressed state in BM by a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism.

  13. Protection from experimental allergic encephalomyelitis conferred by a monoclonal antibody directed against a shared idiotype on rat T cell receptors specific for myelin basic protein

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Immunizing Lewis rats with guinea pig myelin basic protein (MBP) yielded an encephalitogen specific, Ia-restricted, rat-mouse T cell hybridoma 5.10, which was used to establish a clonotypic mAb (10.18) that binds to and precipitates the rat TCR. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the rat TCR was shown to consist of two disulfide- linked peptide chains with mol wt of 48,000 and 39,000. 10.18 binds the majority of cells in MBP-specific T cell lines that are capable of transferring experime...

  14. Myelin Basic Protein-Reactive T Cells Persist in an Inactive State in the Bone Marrow of Lewis Rats that have Recovered from Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kheradmand, Taba; Wolf, Norbert A.; Swanborg, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Lewis rats immunized with guinea pig myelin basic protein residues 68-86 develop acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and recover. The predominant T cell receptor expressed by the encephalitogenic T cells is TCRBV8S2. They persist in bone marrow many weeks after recovery. CD3 is down-regulated, but > 90% express CD4. They fail to proliferate to GPMBP68-86 unless a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor is added to the cultures. Perhaps these are memory T cells that are maintained in a sup...

  15. Treatment of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) by a rationally designed cyclic analogue of myelin basic protein (MBP) epitope 72-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, T; Daliani, I; Deraos, S; Thymianou, S; Matsoukas, E; Troganis, A; Gerothanassis, I; Mouzaki, A; Mavromoustakos, T; Probert, L; Matsoukas, J

    2000-12-18

    In this report the rational design, synthesis and pharmacological properties of an amide-linked cyclic antagonist analogue of the guinea pig myelin basic protein epitope MBP(72-85) are described. Design of the potent cyclic analogue was based on 2D NOESY nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics studies carried out in the linear antagonist Ala81MBP(72-85). The cyclic antagonist completely prevented the induction of experimental allergic/autoimmune encephalomyelitis when coinjected with linear and cyclic agonist analogues MBP(72-85) and cyclo(2-9)MBP(72-85).

  16. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  19. Basic domains target protein subunits of the RNase MRP complex to the nucleolus independently of complex association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Heijden, A.G. van der; Janssen, R.J.T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The RNase MRP and RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles both function as endoribonucleases, have a similar RNA component, and share several protein subunits. RNase MRP has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing and mitochondrial DNA replication, whereas RNase P functions in pre-tRNA processing. Both

  20. Cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: Separation of highly basic proteins using volatile acidic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Oostwaard, Th.M.J.; Laat, S.W. de; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1987-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of a number of globular proteins was studied on a Bio-Sil TSK CM-2-SW weak cation exchange HPLC column under acidic conditions. A linear gradient of O-I M NH₄Ac in I M HOAc, inducing a convex pH gradient from 2.4-4.8, resulted in an excellent separation of highly

  1. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  2. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of an autoimmune myelin basic protein peptide and its antagonist : structural implications for the MHC II (I-Au)–peptide complex from docking calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzakos, A.G.; Fuchs, P.; van Nuland, N.A.J.; Troganis, A.; Tselios, T.; Deraos, S.; Gerothanassis, I.P.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis can be induced in susceptible animals by immunodominant determinants of myelin basic protein (MBP). To characterize the molecular features of antigenic sites important for designing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis suppressing molecules, we report

  4. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we derive aggregate separation bounds, named after Davenport-Mahler-Mignotte (DMM), on the isolated roots of polynomial systems, specifically on the minimum distance between any two such roots. The bounds exploit the structure of the system and the height of the sparse (or toric) re...

  5. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...

  6. Uniqueness of bounded observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navara, M. [Czech Technical Univ., Praha (Czech Republic). Dept. of Math.

    1995-09-01

    By an application of a new construction technique we construct a {sigma}-orthomodular lattice with a strongly order-determining set of states and two bounded observables whose expectations are equal at each state. This answers negatively the uniqueness problem for bounded observables, formulated by S. Gudder. (orig.).

  7. Quantum Bounded Symmetric Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Vaksman, L. L.

    2008-01-01

    This is Leonid Vaksman's monograph "Quantum bounded symmetric domains" (in Russian), preceded with an English translation of the table of contents and (a part) of the introduction. Quantum bounded symmetric domains are interesting from several points of view. In particular, they provide interesting examples for noncommutative complex analysis (i.e., the theory of subalgebras of C^*-algebars) initiated by W. Arveson.

  8. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: from understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Pedro M; Baek, Sung Hee; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Dutta, Anindya; Houry, Walid A; Llorca, Oscar; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10-12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models.

  9. Spermiogenesis and biflagellate spermatozoon of the teleost fish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae): ultrastructure and characterisation of its sperm basic nuclear proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes, E; Cheema, M; González-Romero, R; Lloris, D; Ausió, J; Saperas, N

    2015-08-01

    We undertook an ultrastructural study of the spermiogenesis of the lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae) with special emphasis on the condensation of chromatin and the biochemical characterisation of its sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs). The round head of the early spermatid of L. crocodilus develops into a curved conical-shaped head in the spermatozoon. Two flagella, present even in the spermatid, are inserted laterally at the convex side of the sperm head. Both flagella possess an axoneme with a 9 + 0 instead of the typical 9 + 2 axonemal structure. Mitochondria undergo a characteristic redistribution during spermiogenesis. A reduced number of them are present lying away from the centrioles at both ends of the concave side of the sperm head. During the chromatin condensation stages in spermiogenesis, fibrogranular structures with granules of 25 ± 5 and 50 ± 5 nm can be observed in the early spermatid and develop into larger granules of about 150 ± 50 nm in the middle spermatid. The latter granules coalesce during the transition to the advanced spermatid and spermatozoon giving rise to highly condensed chromatin in the sperm cell. Protamines are the main SNBPs associated with this chromatin; however, they are unusually large and correspond to the largest protamines described in fish to date. Small stoichiometric amounts of histones and other basic proteins coexist with these protamines in the spermatozoon.

  10. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  11. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  12. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  13. Phosphorylation and activation of protamine kinase by two forms of a myelin basic protein kinase from extracts of bovine kidney cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S A; Guo, H; Tarun, S Z; Damuni, Z

    1993-07-15

    Two myelin basic protein kinases designated MBPK-1 and MBPK-2 were purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney cortex. The purified preparations exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 40,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and approximately 42,000 (MBPK-1) and 45,000 (MBPK-2) by gel permeation chromatography. Up to 0.4 and 1.8 mol of phosphoryl groups were incorporated per mol of MBPK-1 and MBPK-2, respectively, on threonines following incubation with ATP. Autophosphorylation, incubation with protein phosphatase 2A2 (PP2A2), CD45, or T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase did not affect MBPK-1 activity. Autophosphorylation increased by about 3-fold MBPK-2 activity. This autophosphorylation and activation was reversed by PP2A2 but not by CD45 or T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase. MBPK-1 and MBPK-2 displayed a positive reaction with an antibody to mitogen-activated protein kinase. Purified preparations of protamine kinase were activated by about 1.5-6-fold and, after inactivation with PP2A2, were reactivated by about 30% by MBPK-1 and MBPK-2. Activation and reactivation correlated with the incorporation, respectively, of 0.1-0.5 and 0.5 mol of phosphoryl groups/mol of the protamine kinase on serines. The results show that MBPK-1 and MBPK-2 are protamine kinase-activating kinases and suggest that MBPK-1 and MBPK-2 may be related to mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  14. The cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 is a membrane-bound protein requiring homooligomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum for its cellular activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, M.C.E.; Weber, H.; Hluska, T.; Leonte, G.; Anderson, S. P.; Novák, Ondřej; Senes, A.; Werner, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 3 (2018), s. 2024-2039 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : HELIX-HELIX ASSOCIATION * VIRUS MOVEMENT PROTEIN * RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEINS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  15. Bone morphogenetic proteins in tissue engineering: the road from the laboratory to the clinic, part I (basic concepts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, P C; Casal, M; Reis, R L

    2008-01-01

    Discovered in 1965, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of cytokines from the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily with significant roles in bone and cartilage formation. BMPs are used as powerful osteoinductive components of diverse tissue-engineering products for the healing of bone. Several BMPs with different physiological roles have been identified in humans. The purpose of this review is to cover the biological function of the main members of BMP family, the latest research on BMPs signalling pathways and advances in the production of recombinant BMPs for tissue engineering purposes. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  17. The 21.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein has a non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham S.T.; Seymour, Lauren V. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Boggs, Joan M. [Molecular Structure and Function, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harauz, George, E-mail: gharauz@uoguelph.ca [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform is translocated to the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesized that the exon-II-encoded sequence contained the NLS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We mutated this sequence in RFP-tagged constructs and transfected N19-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Abolition of two key positively-charged residues resulted in loss of nuclear-trafficking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 21.5-kDa isoform of classic MBP contains a non-traditional PY-NLS. -- Abstract: The predominant 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is mainly responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system, but is multifunctional, having numerous interactions with Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and SH3-domains, and can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. The full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform has an additional 26 residues encoded by exon-II of the classic gene, which causes it to be trafficked to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes (OLGs). We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues within this segment in red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged constructs, which were then transfected into the immortalized N19-OLG cell line to view protein localization using epifluorescence microscopy. We found that 21.5-kDa MBP contains two non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signals, and that arginine and lysine residues within these motifs were involved in subcellular trafficking of this protein to the nucleus, where it may have functional roles during myelinogenesis.

  18. Basic Equations in Statics and Kinetics of Protein Polymerization and the Mechanism of the Formation and Dissociation of Amyloid Fibrils Revealed by Pressure Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the pressure-dissociation of several amyloid or amyloid-like fibrils have shown that the fibril state is considerably voluminous. Quantitative characterization of the protein fibrillation reaction with respect to volumetric parameters is necessary to elucidate mechanisms of amyloid fibrillation in molecular terms such as protein cavity and hydration. Here we discuss, firstly, basic equations in statics and kinetics of protein polymerization as employed to obtain thermodynamic, volumetric, and kinetic parameters. Equilibrium treatment of the reactions with the scheme such as one-step polymerization, linear-association polymerization, or nucleation-dependent polymerization, and kinetic treatment of seeded linear-polymerization or spontaneous nucleation-elongation polymerization are described. In particular we will detail kinetics of the dissociation of fibrils which have been produced under the linear-association mechanism and therefore the length-distribution of which conforms to a geometric sequence in the degree of polymerization with a common ratio r, which is less than, and usually very close to, unity. In this case, an observed macroscopic rate of dissociation is shown to be a product of the microscopic elementary dissociation rate constant and a factor (1-r), extremely reduced compared with the intrinsic elementary rate. Secondly, we discuss protein conformational states in fibrillogenesis with molecular and volumetric observations reported, such as the unfolded state responsible for the association with seeds and the extension of amyloid fibrils, the transition state in which protein cavity formation and dehydration occur to intermediate levels, and the fibril state in which they occur to final respective levels which, in some cases, depend on the maturity of the fibril.

  19. Responsiveness to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP is associated with salivary levels of two specific basic proline-rich proteins in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Cabras

    Full Text Available Thiourea tasting can be predictive of individual differences in bitter taste responses, general food preferences and eating behavior, and could be correlated with saliva chemical composition. We investigated the possible relationship between PROP bitter taste responsiveness and the salivary proteome in subjects genotyped for TAS2R38 and gustin gene polymorphisms. Taste perception intensity evoked by PROP and NaCl solutions was measured in sixty-three volunteers (21 males, 42 females, age 25±3 y to establish their PROP taster status, and 24 PROP super-tasters and 21 nontasters were selected to participate in the study. TAS2R38 and gustin gene molecular analysis were performed using PCR techniques. Qualitative and quantitative determination of salivary proteins was performed by HPLC-ESI-MS before and after PROP taste stimulation. PROP super-tastings was strongly associated with the 'taster' variant (PAV haplotype of TAS2R38 and the A allele of rs2274333 polymorphism in the gustin gene and nontasting was associated with the minor alleles at both loci. ANOVA revealed that basal levels of II-2 and Ps-1 proteins, belonging to the basic proline-rich protein (bPRPs family, were significantly higher in PROP super-taster than in nontaster un-stimulated saliva, and that PROP stimulation elicited a rapid increase in the levels of these same proteins only in PROP super-taster saliva. These data show for the first time that responsiveness to PROP is associated with salivary levels of II-2 peptide and Ps-1 protein, which are products of the PRB1 gene. These findings suggest that PRB1, in addition to TAS2R38 and gustin, could contribute to individual differences in thiourea sensitivity, and the expression of the PROP phenotype as a complex genetic trait.

  20. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP) or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrapers, Peer; Mebs, Stefan; Goetzl, Sebastian; Hennig, Sandra E; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP) is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv) electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb) base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmb)CoIII(OH2), (dmb)CoII(OH2), and (dmb)CoIII(CH3) sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2), CoII(OH2), and CoIII(CH3) sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo) of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II). The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  1. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Schrapers

    Full Text Available A cobalamin (Cbl cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmbCoIII(OH2, (dmbCoII(OH2, and (dmbCoIII(CH3 sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2, CoII(OH2, and CoIII(CH3 sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II. The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  2. Membrane-bound and cytosolic forms of heterotrimeric G proteins in young and adult rat myocardium: influence of neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Jiří; Bouřová, Lenka; Kolář, František; Svoboda, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2001), s. 215-224 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1660; GA MŠk VS97099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : development * G proteins * young and adult rat myocardium Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2001

  3. Towards an abstract parallel branch and bound machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Bruin (Arie); G.A.P. Kindervater (Gerard); H.W.J.M. Trienekens

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMany (parallel) branch and bound algorithms look very different from each other at first glance. They exploit, however, the same underlying computational model. This phenomenon can be used to define branch and bound algorithms in terms of a set of basic rules that are applied in a

  4. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  6. T-helper lymphocytes specific for myelin basic protein: low-density activation prolongs a postactivation refractory phase marked by decreased pathogenicity and enhanced sensitivity to anergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, M D; White, G A; Lake, K R; Nardella, J P; Marinakis, C A; McConnell, T J

    1996-08-25

    Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats may involve activation-dependent negative feedback pathways of T-helper cells. Previous studies have shown that T-helper cells specific for myelin basic protein exhibit a postactivation refractory phase during which antigenic restimulation elicits proliferation without production of IL-2. Herein, we show that postactivation refractoriness inhibits regeneration of EAE transfer activity and is manifest by a lack of IL-2 mRNA accumulation despite induction of normal levels of IL-4 mRNA. Preactivated refractory T cells were substantially more susceptible than resting T cells to the induction of anergy. Low-density T cell activation or subcloning prolonged the duration of the refractory phase and engendered long-term desensitization of T cells marked by a blockade of IL-2 production and by enhanced susceptibility to anergy. Overall, these results support the concept that postactivation refractoriness controls the pathogenicity and differentiation of T-helper cells.

  7. Structural insight into the function of myelin basic protein as a ligand for integrin αMβ2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapulionis, Romualdas; Oliveira, Cristiano; Gjelstrup, Mikkel Carstensen

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease where phagocytic cells infiltrate the nerve tissue and act as terminal agents in destruction of the myelin sheath. However, the mechanism that triggers the ability of these cells to recognize myelin remains obscure. We show that myelin basic...... protein (MBP), a major autoantigen in MS, is a potent and specific ligand for the integrin αMβ2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) expressed mainly on phagocytic cells. MBP undergoes a dramatic conformational change when liberated from the lipid-rich environment of the myelin sheath. The MS drug glatiramer acetate...... mimics the conformationally labile regions of MBP, interacts in the unfolded state strongly with αMβ2, and inhibits the MBP binding to αMβ2. Our study reveals a link between MBP, glatiramer acetate, and the αMβ2 integrin, and suggests a new model for MS pathogenesis based on the recognition of unfolded...

  8. Stabilization of peptide guinea pig myelin basic protein 72-85 by N-terminal acetylation-implications for immunological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Ellen C; Wauben, Marca H M; Wagenaar-Hilbers, Josée P A; Grosfeld-Stulemeyer, Mayken C; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Moret, Ed E; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2004-02-01

    Peptide gpMBP72-85, containing amino acids 72-85 of guinea pig myelin basic protein is commonly used to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats. The N-terminal glutamine in this peptide can cyclize to pyroglutamic acid, leading to loss of the first MHC anchor for binding to MHC class II. Acetylation of the peptide N-terminus prevents pyroglutamic acid formation and ensures a constant quality. An increased MHC binding affinity after N-terminal acetylation was observed. This modification also enhanced T cell proliferation of a gpMBP reactive T cell clone. The encephalitogenicity of peptide gpMBP72-85 was unaffected by acetylation. It is concluded that acetylation improves the chemical stability of gpMBP72-85, and is not detrimental but rather favorable for its biochemical and immunological, in vitro, and in vivo behavior.

  9. Crystallographic and single-particle analyses of native- and nucleotide-bound forms of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awayn, N H; Rosenberg, M F; Kamis, A B; Aleksandrov, L A; Riordan, J R; Ford, R C

    2005-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis, one of the major human inherited diseases, is caused by defects in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a cell-membrane protein. CFTR acts as a chloride channel which can be opened by ATP. Low-resolution structural studies of purified recombinant human CFTR are described in the present paper. Localization of the C-terminal decahistidine tag in CFTR was achieved by Ni2+-nitriloacetate nanogold labelling, followed by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The presence of the gold label appears to improve the single-particle-alignment procedure. Projection structures of CFTR from two-dimensional crystals analysed by electron crystallography displayed two alternative conformational states in the presence of nucleotide and nanogold, but only one form of the protein was observed in the quiescent (nucleotide-free) state.

  10. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a 35...... kDa protein salt-washed from membranes (referred as TIP 91-M and TIP 35-M) were found to interact with the cytoplasmic receptor tail as assayed by cross-linkage with recombinant [32P] labeled MPR 300-CT. Subcellular fractionation revealed a distinct pattern of distribution of TIP 35-M and TIP 91-M...

  11. Crystal Structure of Mn2+-bound Escherichia coli L-arabinose Isomerase (ECAI) and Implications in Protein Catalytic Mechanism and Thermo-Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W.; Manjasetty, B.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    The functional properties of proteins depend on their three-dimensional shapes. Protein structures can be determined by X-ray crystallography as a tool. The three-dimensional structure of the apo form of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase (ECAI) has recently been determined. ECAI is responsible for the initial stage of L-arabinose catabolism, converting arabinose into ribulose in vivo. This enzyme also plays a crucial role in catalyzing the conversion of galactose into tagatose (low calorie natural sugar) in vitro. ECAI utilizes Mn 2+ for its catalytic activity. Crystals of the ECAI + Mn 2+ complex helps to investigate the catalytic properties of the enzyme. Therefore, crystals of ECAI + Mn 2+ complex were grown using hanging drop vapor diffusion method at room temperature. Diffraction data were collected at X4C beamline, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure was solved by the molecular replacement technique and has been refined to Rwork of 0.23 at 2.8 (angstrom) resolution using X3A beamline computational facility. The structure was deposited to Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2HXG). Mn 2+ ion was localized to the previously identified putative active site with octahedral coordination. Comparison of apo and holo form of ECAI structures permits the identification of structural features that are of importance to the intrinsic activity and heat stability of AI

  12. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  13. Morphological development and cytochrome c oxidase activity in Streptomyces lividans are dependent on the action of a copper bound Sco protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katie L. I. M.; Wilson, Michael T.; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Copper has an important role in the life cycle of many streptomycetes, stimulating the developmental switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae concomitant with the production of antibiotics. In streptomycetes, a gene encoding for a putative Sco-like protein has been identified and is part of an operon that contains two other genes predicted to handle cellular copper. We report on the Sco-like protein from Streptomyces lividans (ScoSl) and present a series of experiments that firmly establish a role for ScoSl as a copper metallochaperone as opposed to a role as a thiol-disulphide reductase that has been assigned to other bacterial Sco proteins. Under low copper concentrations, a Δsco mutant in S. lividans displays two phenotypes; the development switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae stalls and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity is significantly decreased. At elevated copper levels, the development and CcO activity in the Δsco mutant are restored to wild-type levels and are thus independent of ScoSl. A CcO knockout reveals that morphological development is independent of CcO activity leading us to suggest that ScoSl has at least two targets in S. lividans. We establish that one ScoSl target is the dinuclear CuA domain of CcO and it is the cupric form of ScoSl that is functionally active. The mechanism of cupric ion capture by ScoSl has been investigated, and an important role for a conserved His residue is identified. PMID:23345541

  14. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transac...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ... messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell organelles. ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  8. The cryo-EM structure of YjeQ bound to the 30S subunit suggests a fidelity checkpoint function for this protein in ribosome assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi, Aida; Guarné, Alba; Ortega, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Recent work suggests that bacterial YjeQ (RsgA) participates in the late stages of assembly of the 30S subunit and aids the assembly of the decoding center but also binds the mature 30S subunit with high affinity. To determine the function and mechanisms of YjeQ in the context of the mature subunit, we determined the cryo-EM structure of the fully assembled 30S subunit in complex with YjeQ at 5.8-Å resolution. We found that binding of YjeQ stabilizes helix 44 into a conformation similar to that adopted by the subunit during proofreading. This finding indicates that, along with acting as an assembly factor, YjeQ has a role as a checkpoint protein, consisting of testing the proofreading ability of the 30S subunit. The structure also informs the mechanism by which YjeQ implements the release from the 30S subunit of a second assembly factor, called RbfA. Finally, it reveals how the 30S subunit stimulates YjeQ GTPase activity and leads to release of the protein. Checkpoint functions have been described for eukaryotic ribosome assembly factors; however, this work describes an example of a bacterial assembly factor that tests a specific translation mechanism of the 30S subunit. PMID:28396444

  9. The flexible structure of the K24S28 region of Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP bound to apatites as a function of surface type, calcium, mutation, and ionic strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia eLu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP is a member of the amelogenin family of biomineralization proteins, proteins which play a critical role in enamel formation. Recent studies have revealed the structure and orientation of the N- and C-terminus of LRAP bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP, a surface used as an analog of enamel. The structure of one region, K24 to S28, was found to be sensitive to phosphorylation of S16, the only naturally observed site of serine phosphorylation in LRAP, suggesting that K24S28 may sit at a key region of structural flexibility and play a role in the protein’s function. In this work, we investigated the sensitivity of the structure and orientation of this region when bound to HAP as a function of several factors which may vary during enamel formation to influence structure: the ionic strength (0.05 M, 0.15 M, 0.2 M, the calcium concentration (0.07 mM and 0.4 mM, and the surface to which it is binding (HAP and carbonated apatite (CAP, a more direct mimic of enamel. A naturally occurring mutation found in amelogenin (T21I was also investigated. The structure in the K24S28 region of the protein was found to be sensitive to these conditions, with the CAP surface and excess Ca2+ (8:1 [Ca2+]:[LRAP-K24S28(+P] resulting in a tighter helix, while low ionic strength relaxed the helical structure. Higher ionic strength and the point mutation did not result in any structural change in this region. The distance of the backbone of K24 from the surface was most sensitive to excess Ca2+ and in the T21I-mutation. Collectively, these data suggest that phosphorylated LRAP is able to accommodate structural changes while maintaining its interaction with the surface, and provides further evidence of the structural sensitivity of the K24S28 region, a sensitivity that may contribute to function in biomineralization.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... segment of DNA that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes ... the gene to code for a slightly different protein. Some mutations are harmless, some can be helpful, ...

  11. Validation of EMP bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derr, W. [Derr Enterprises, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  12. Massive Galileon positivity bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Melville, Scott; Tolley, Andrew J.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The EFT coefficients in any gapped, scalar, Lorentz invariant field theory must satisfy positivity requirements if there is to exist a local, analytic Wilsonian UV completion. We apply these bounds to the tree level scattering amplitudes for a massive Galileon. The addition of a mass term, which does not spoil the non-renormalization theorem of the Galileon and preserves the Galileon symmetry at loop level, is necessary to satisfy the lowest order positivity bound. We further show that a careful choice of successively higher derivative corrections are necessary to satisfy the higher order positivity bounds. There is then no obstruction to a local UV completion from considerations of tree level 2-to-2 scattering alone. To demonstrate this we give an explicit example of such a UV completion.

  13. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2007-11-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  14. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  15. The Arabidopsis GAGA-Binding Factor BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 Recruits the POLYCOMB-REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Component LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 to GAGA DNA Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Andreas; Brand, Luise H; Peter, Sébastien; Simoncello, Nathalie; Kilian, Joachim; Harter, Klaus; Gaudin, Valérie; Wanke, Dierk

    2015-07-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) play key roles in development by repressing a large number of genes involved in various functions. Much, however, remains to be discovered about PRC-silencing mechanisms as well as their targeting to specific genomic regions. Besides other mechanisms, GAGA-binding factors in animals can guide PRC members in a sequence-specific manner to Polycomb-responsive DNA elements. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GAGA-motif binding factor protein basic pentacysteine6 (BPC6) interacts with like heterochromatin protein1 (LHP1), a PRC1 component, and associates with vernalization2 (VRN2), a PRC2 component, in vivo. By using a modified DNA-protein interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, we could show that BPC6 was required and sufficient to recruit LHP1 to GAGA motif-containing DNA probes in vitro. We also found that LHP1 interacts with VRN2 and, therefore, can function as a possible scaffold between BPC6 and VRN2. The lhp1-4 bpc4 bpc6 triple mutant displayed a pleiotropic phenotype, extreme dwarfism and early flowering, which disclosed synergistic functions of LHP1 and group II plant BPC members. Transcriptome analyses supported this synergy and suggested a possible function in the concerted repression of homeotic genes, probably through histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Hence, our findings suggest striking similarities between animal and plant GAGA-binding factors in the recruitment of PRC1 and PRC2 components to Polycomb-responsive DNA element-like GAGA motifs, which must have evolved through convergent evolution. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Studies on an acetylcholine binding protein identify a basic residue in loop G on the β1 strand as a new structural determinant of neonicotinoid actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Okajima, Toshihide; Yamashita, Atsuko; Oda, Takuma; Asano, Takuya; Matsui, Mikana; Sattelle, David B; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2014-12-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides target insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Their widespread use and possible risks to pollinators make it extremely urgent to understand the mechanisms underlying their actions on insect nAChRs. We therefore elucidated X-ray crystal structures of the Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (Ls-AChBP) and its Gln55Arg mutant, more closely resembling insect nAChRs, in complex with a nitromethylene imidacloprid analog (CH-IMI) and desnitro-imidacloprid metabolite (DN-IMI) as well as commercial neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin, and thiacloprid. Unlike imidacloprid, clothianidin, and CH-IMI, thiacloprid did not stack with Tyr185 in the wild-type Ls-AChBP, but did in the Gln55Arg mutant, interacting electrostatically with Arg55. In contrast, DN-IMI lacking the NO2 group was directed away from Lys34 and Arg55 to form hydrogen bonds with Tyr89 in loop A and the main chain carbonyl of Trp143 in loop B. Unexpectedly, we found that several neonicotinoids interacted with Lys34 in loop G on the β1 strand in the crystal structure of the Gln55Arg mutant. Basic residues introduced into the α7 nAChR at positions equivalent to AChBP Lys34 and Arg55 enhanced agonist actions of neonicotinoids, while reducing the actions of acetylcholine, (-)-nicotine, and DN-IMI. Thus, not only the basic residues in loop D, but also those in loop G determine the actions of neonicotinoids. These novel findings provide new insights into the modes of action of neonicotinoids and emerging derivatives. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  18. Born Level Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  19. Bounded Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Carr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffusions are widely used in finance due to their tractability. Driftless diffusions are needed to describe ratios of asset prices under a martingale measure. We provide a simple example of a tractable driftless diffusion which also has a bounded state space.

  20. Isoperimetric upper bounds for the first eigenvalue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eigenvalue of M was given in terms of the integral of the first eigenvalue of the geodesic spheres centred at the centre of gravity of M. For precious statements, see [10]. In this paper, we obtain isoperimetric upper bounds for the first eigenvalue λ1(M) of a hypersurface M in M(κ). We refer to [2] and [8] for the basic Riemannian ...

  1. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  2. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentchikou, Esma; Chagneau, Carine; Long, Emilie; Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion.

  3. Basic conceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    In this part of book author presents the basic conceptions of minerals studying. The course of minerals deposits is the most important branch of geology science and studying the geology, material constitution, formation conditions and regularity of distribution in earth crust different types of mineral raw materials

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at ... Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by which the cell sends information to receiving neurons. cell body —Contains the nucleus and cytoplasm of a ... circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  8. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  9. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of Recombinant Human Myelin Basic Protein Nano Therapeutic Vaccine in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A.; Elmeshad, Aliaa N.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad; Laible, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant human myelin basic protein (rhMBP) was previously produced in the milk of transgenic cows. Differences in molecular recognition of either hMBP or rhMBP by surface-immobilized anti-hMBP antibodies were demonstrated. This indicated differences in immunological response between rhMBP and hMBP. Here, the activity of free and controlled release rhMBP poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles (NPs), as a therapeutic vaccine against multiple sclerosis (MS) was demonstrated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model. Following optimization of nanoformulation, discrete spherical, rough-surfaced rhMBP NPs with high entrapment efficiency and controlled release pattern were obtained. Results indicated that rhMBP was loaded into and electrostatically adsorbed onto the surface of NPs. Subcutaneous administration of free or rhMBP NPs before EAE-induction reduced the average behavioral score in EAE mice and showed only mild histological alterations and preservation of myelin sheath, with rhMBP NPs showing increased protection. Moreover, analysis of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10) in mice brains revealed that pretreatment with free or rhMBP NPs significantly protected against induced inflammation. In conclusion: i) rhMBP ameliorated EAE symptoms in EAE animal model, ii) nanoformulation significantly enhanced efficacy of rhMBP as a therapeutic vaccine and iii) clinical investigations are required to demonstrate the activity of rhMBP NPs as a therapeutic vaccine for MS.

  10. T cell recognition of rat myelin basic protein as a TCR antagonist inhibits reciprocal activation of antigen-presenting cells and engenders resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M R; Mannie, M D

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether T cell recognition of myelin basic protein (MBP) as a partially antagonistic self antigen regulates the reciprocal activation of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This study focused on the rat 3H3 T cell clone that recognized guinea pig (GP) MBP as a full agonist and self rat (R) MBP as a partial agonist. In cultures of 3H3 T cells and splenic APC, the agonist GPMBP elicited several responses by splenic APC, including production of nitric oxide, down-regulation of I-A, induction of B7.1 and B7.2, and prolongation of APC survival. RMBP stimulated a partial increase in production of nitric oxide, partially promoted survival of splenic APC, but did not alter expression of I-A, B7.1, or B7.2 on splenic APC. In the presence ofGPMBP, RMBP antagonized agonist-stimulated induction of B7 molecules, reversed the loss of I-A, and promoted the generation of I-A(+), costimulus-deficient APC. Furthermore, 3H3 T cells cultured with RMBP and irradiated splenocytes reduced the severity of EAE upon adoptive transfer into naive rat recipients subsequently challenged with an encephalitogenic dose of GPMBP/CFA. Overall, this study indicates that T cell receptor antagonism blocks T cell activation, inhibits feedback activation of splenic APC, and promotes T cell-dependent regulatory activities in EAE.

  11. Fine T cell receptor repertoire analysis of spinal cord T cells responding to the major and minor epitopes of myelin basic protein during rat autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Jee, Y; Sugisaki, M; Kim, G; Tanuma, N

    2000-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a disease induced by neuroantigen-reactive T cells bearing particular types of T cell receptor (TCR). Although the nature of TCRs of encephalitogenic T cells has been partially delineated using encephalitogenic T cell clones established in vitro, the entire TCR repertoire formed in situ after immunization with neuroantigen remains unclear. In the present study, we immunized Lewis rats with myelin basic protein (MBP) and its fragment peptides and determined the TCR repertoire of spinal cord T cells formed after the immunization by CDR3 spectra-typing. It was revealed that the oligoclonal expansion of Vbeta2, Vbeta8.2, and Vbeta17 spectratypes was detectable after immunization with guinea pig MBP and its immunodominant epitope, the 68-88 sequence, whereas immunization with a peptide containing a minor epitope induced Vbeta10 expansion. Immunization with rat MBP induced much broader TCR Vbeta expansion (all of the above Vbetas plus Vbeta3). These findings suggest that TCRs activated by immunization with guinea pig MBP used as heteroclitic immunogen recognize autoantigen, rat MBP. Furthermore, the strategy used in this study gives insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and provides useful information for designing TCR-based immunotherapy.

  12. Glutamine rich and basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domains stabilize cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Bernhard M; Guzman, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2005-04-15

    We have examined the dynamics of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). CREB was found to bind to target sites with a residence time of 100 s, and exposure to a cAMP agonist had no effect on these kinetics. In addition to the basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, a glutamine-rich trans-activation domain in CREB called Q2 also appeared to be critical for promoter occupancy. Indeed, mutations in Q2 that reduced residence time by FRAP assay disrupted target gene activation via CREB in cells exposed to a cAMP agonist. Notably, insertion of the glutamine-rich B trans-activation domain of SP1 into a mutant CREB polypeptide lacking Q2 stabilized CREB occupancy and rescued target gene activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which the family of glutamine-rich activators promotes cellular gene expression.

  13. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    -free information) which can be used to refresh the secret key. We believe that bounded tampering is a meaningful and interesting alternative to avoid known impossibility results and can provide important insights into the security of existing standard cryptographic schemes.......Related key attacks (RKAs) are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an adversary can change the secret key and observe the effect of such changes at the output. The state of the art in RKA security protects against an a-priori unbounded number of certain algebraic induced key relations, e.......g., affine functions or polynomials of bounded degree. In this work, we show that it is possible to go beyond the algebraic barrier and achieve security against arbitrary key relations, by restricting the number of tampering queries the adversary is allowed to ask for. The latter restriction is necessary...

  14. Bound Exciton Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B. K.

    In the preceding chapter, we concentrated on the properties of free excitons. These free excitons may move through the sample and hit a trap, a nonradiative or a radiative recombination center. At low temperatures, the latter case gives rise to either deep center luminescence, mentioned in Sect. 7.1 and discussed in detail in Chap. 9, or to the luminescence of bound exciton complexes (BE or BEC). The chapter continues with the most prominent of these BECs, namely A-excitons bound to neutral donors. The next aspects are the more weakly BEs at ionized donors. The Sect. 7.4 treats the binding or localization energies of BEC from a theoretical point of view, while Sect. 7.5 is dedicated to excited states of BECs, which contain either holes from deeper valence bands or an envelope function with higher quantum numbers. The last section is devoted to donor-acceptor pair transitions. There is no section devoted specifically to excitons bound to neutral acceptors, because this topic is still partly controversially discussed. Instead, information on these A0X complexes is scattered over the whole chapter, however, with some special emphasis seen in Sects. 7.1, 7.4, and 7.5.

  15. Wavelet basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Since the study of wavelets is a relatively new area, much of the research coming from mathematicians, most of the literature uses terminology, concepts and proofs that may, at times, be difficult and intimidating for the engineer. Wavelet Basics has therefore been written as an introductory book for scientists and engineers. The mathematical presentation has been kept simple, the concepts being presented in elaborate detail in a terminology that engineers will find familiar. Difficult ideas are illustrated with examples which will also aid in the development of an intuitive insight. Chapter 1 reviews the basics of signal transformation and discusses the concepts of duals and frames. Chapter 2 introduces the wavelet transform, contrasts it with the short-time Fourier transform and clarifies the names of the different types of wavelet transforms. Chapter 3 links multiresolution analysis, orthonormal wavelets and the design of digital filters. Chapter 4 gives a tour d'horizon of topics of current interest: wave...

  16. BION web server: predicting non-specifically bound surface ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Kimmet, Taylor; Alexov, Emil

    2013-03-15

    Ions are essential component of the cell and frequently are found bound to various macromolecules, in particular to proteins. A binding of an ion to a protein greatly affects protein's biophysical characteristics and needs to be taken into account in any modeling approach. However, ion's bounded positions cannot be easily revealed experimentally, especially if they are loosely bound to macromolecular surface. Here, we report a web server, the BION web server, which addresses the demand for tools of predicting surface bound ions, for which specific interactions are not crucial; thus, they are difficult to predict. The BION is easy to use web server that requires only coordinate file to be inputted, and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The coordinate file with predicted bound ions is displayed on the output and is available for download.

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce a specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the effects of medications. ... feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene to code for a slightly different protein. Some mutations are harmless, some can be helpful, and others ...

  20. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  1. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Some basic explanations are given of the principles underlying the nuclear fuel cycle, starting with the physics of atomic and nuclear structure and continuing with nuclear energy and reactors, fuel and waste management and finally a discussion of economics and the future. An important aspect of the fuel cycle concerns the possibility of ''closing the back end'' i.e. reprocessing the waste or unused fuel in order to re-use it in reactors of various kinds. The alternative, the ''oncethrough'' cycle, discards the discharged fuel completely. An interim measure involves the prolonged storage of highly radioactive waste fuel. (UK)

  2. Detect changes in protein structure of carinata meal during rumen fermentation in relation to basic chemical profile and comparison with canola meal using ATR-FT/IR molecular spectroscopy with chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-08-01

    As far as we know, no study has been carried out on whether protein structure changes in the feed during rumen fermentation from other research team. This study was conducted to characterize protein structure spectral changes in carinata meal during ruminal fermentation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with ATR. The objectives were to find out whether (1) protein internal structure (in terms of protein amide profile and protein secondary structure profile) changed after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h in carinata meal and conventional canola meal was used as a reference; (2) there was any correlation between protein spectral parameters and basic chemical profile in in situ rumen residue samples; and (3) the protein structural chemical make-up of carinata meal differed from canola meal during 48 h rumen incubation. The results showed that protein structure features in both carinata meal and canola meal were altered as incubation time increased (P canola meal, suggesting some relationship in structural make-up exhibited between them within protein region during 48 h rumen fermentation. Further studies are still needed to investigate detailed information on structural changes in protein of various feedstuffs in order to fully and deeply understand protein degradation during rumen fermentation on both metabolic basis and molecular biological basis.

  3. The effect of cytosolic extract of Alternaria aternata fungus on Monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and T-lymphocyte polarization in the presence of myelin basic protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loghmanni A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease with impairment in function of central nervous system. Macrophages and dendritic cells play important roles in alleviating or progression of the disease. These cells can cause inflammation and damage to the myelin of nerve cells by realizing of harmful substances when these cells get matured. We studied the effect of Alternaria alternata extract on maturation of monocyte- derived dendritic cell (modc and T-cell responses in the presence of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP as a laboratory model of multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of this study is suitable dendritic cells production for usage in MS immunotherapy.Methods: For this study plastic adherent monocytes were cultured with granulocyte/ macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin -4 for converting these cells to modc and pulsed with MBP and matured in the presence of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM in control group and MCM + Alternaria alternata extract in treatment groups. Anti-CD14, anti-CD83, anti-human leukocyte antigen-DR (anti HLA-DR monoclonal antibody were carried out for phenotyping. Autologos T cell responses and cytokine production were evaluated.Results: The results showed that the expression of CD14 decreased and CD83, HLA-DR increased in treatment groups in comparison with control groups. The production amount of IL-10 overcame IL-12 and in T cell the production of cytokines, IL-17 and Interferon-γ (IFN-γ decreased and IL-4 was increased (P<0.05. These effects escalated with increasing of dosage from 50 to 100 (mg/ml (P<0.001.Conclusion: Alternaria alternata extract can cause maturation of MBP-pulsed modc and skewing of T- lymphocyte toward Th2 and thereby can evolve into a new strategy in immunotherapy of MS.

  4. Distinct accessory cell requirements define two types of rat T cell hybridomas specific for unique determinants in the encephalitogenic 68-86 region of myelin basic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannie, M.D.; Paterson, P.Y.; Thomas, D.W.; Nairn, R.

    1990-01-01

    Six clonotypically unique T cell hybridomas from Lewis rats were used to study accessory cell activities required for class II MHC restricted T cell responses to the 68-86 encephalitogenic sequence of myelin basic protein (MBP). T cell hybrids which were cultured with GP68-86 68-86 sequence of guinea pig MBP (GPMBP) and naive splenocytes (SPL) were induced to produce IL-2 as measured by the CTLL indicator cell line. The hybrids were categorized into two subsets (designated THYB-1 and THYB-2), because two distinct subset-specific pathways of communication between accessory cells and T cells were involved in GPMBP-induced IL-2 production. These pathways were distinguished by the following six observations. First, when the duration of a pulse of SPL with GPMBP was lengthened from 1 to 4 h, these SPL lost their ability to induce IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet nevertheless retained full stimulatory activity for THYB-1 hybrids. Second, paraformaldehyde fixation of GPMBP-pulsed SPL abrogated an activity necessary for Ag-induced IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids. These fixed SPL were nevertheless able to stimulate THYB-1 hybrids, albeit to a lesser extent than viable unfixed SPL. Third, the addition of either cycloheximide, cytochalasin B, or 2-deoxyglucose to an Ag pulse of SPL with GPMBP dramatically inhibited the subsequent responses of THYB-2 hybrids yet had little or no effect upon the reactivity of THYB-1 hybrids. Fourth, thymocytes lacked necessary activities for GPMBP evoked IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet strongly promoted THYB-1 hybrid responses. Fifth, exposure of SPL to as little as 500 rad of gamma-irradiation markedly attenuated THYB-2 hybrid response to GPMBP but did not affect THYB-1 responses. Sixth, anti-GPMBP responses by THYB-2 hybrids were observed only in the presence of both radioresistant adherent SPL and a distinct population of radiosensitive nonadherent SPL

  5. A Cyclic Altered Peptide Analogue Based on Myelin Basic Protein 87–99 Provides Lasting Prophylactic and Therapeutic Protection Against Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Emmanouil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, amide-linked cyclic peptide analogues of the 87–99 myelin basic protein (MBP epitope, a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS, are tested for therapeutic efficacy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Cyclic altered peptide analogues of MBP87–99 with substitutions at positions 91 and/or 96 were tested for protective effects when administered using prophylactic or early therapeutic protocols in MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats. The Lys91 and Pro96 of MBP87–99 are crucial T-cell receptor (TCR anchors and participate in the formation of trimolecular complex between the TCR-antigen (peptide-MHC (major histocompability complex for the stimulation of encephalitogenic T cells that are necessary for EAE induction and are implicated in MS. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS applied on the 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarboxyl/tert-butyl Fmoc/tBu methodology and combined with the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl. Cyclo(91–99[Ala96]MBP87–99, cyclo(87–99[Ala91,96]MBP87–99 and cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99, but not wild-type linear MBP87–99, strongly inhibited MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats when administered using prophylactic and early therapeutic vaccination protocols. In particular, cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99 was highly effective in preventing the onset and development of clinical symptoms and spinal cord pathology and providing lasting protection against EAE induction.

  6. Differential expression of neurotrophic factors and inflammatory cytokines by myelin basic protein-specific and other recruited T cells infiltrating the central nervous system during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhallab, S; Lundberg, C; Gielen, A W; Lidman, O; Svenningsson, A; Piehl, F; Olsson, T

    2002-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autoimmune reactions in the central nervous system (CNS) not only have detrimental consequences but can also be neuroprotective, and that this effect is mediated by the expression of neuronal growth factors by infiltrating leucocytes. Here we dissect these two phenomena in guinea pig myelin basic protein peptide (gpMBP 63-88)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. Real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure mRNA for the nerve growth factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3. As reference, the well-known proinflammatory mediator molecules interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were quantified. In whole lumbar cord tissue, both the nerve growth factors and the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, displayed similar expression patterns, peaking at the height of the disease. Among the infiltrating inflammatory cells isolated and sorted from the CNS, alphabeta+/T-cell receptor (TCR)BV8S2+, but not alphabeta+/TCRBV8S2-, recognized the encephalitogenic MBP peptide. Interestingly, these two populations displayed contrasting expression patterns of nerve growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines with higher inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels in alphabeta+/TCRBV8S2+ cells at all time intervals, whereas the levels of BDNF and NT3 were higher in alphabeta+/TCRBV8S2- cells. We conclude that a potentially important neuroprotective facet of CNS inflammation dominantly prevails within other non-MBP peptide-specific lymphoid cells and that there are independent regulatory mechanisms for neurotrophin and inflammatory cytokine expression during EAE.

  7. Blog life: Entropy Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Who is the blog written by? Peter Steinberg is a nuclear physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, US. He is acting project manager of the PHOBOS experiment, which used Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for unusual events produced during collisions between gold nuclei. He is also involved with the PHENIX experiment, which seeks to discover a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma. In addition to his own blog Entropy Bound, Steinberg is currently blogging on a website that was set up last year to publicize the involvement of US scientists with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  8. Regularity of Bound States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faupin, Jeremy; Møller, Jacob Schach; Skibsted, Erik

    2011-01-01

    We study regularity of bound states pertaining to embedded eigenvalues of a self-adjoint operator H, with respect to an auxiliary operator A that is conjugate to H in the sense of Mourre. We work within the framework of singular Mourre theory which enables us to deal with confined massless Pauli–......–Fierz models, our primary example, and many-body AC-Stark Hamiltonians. In the simpler context of regular Mourre theory, our results boil down to an improvement of results obtained recently in [8, 9]....

  9. Identification of Bound Nitro Musk-Protein Adduct in Fish Liver By Gas Chromatography-Mass Sectrometry: Biotransformation, Dose-Response and Toxicokinetics of Nitro Musk Metabolites Protein Adducts in Trout Liver as Biomarker of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The In vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) - protein adducts in trout liver have been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Bio...

  10. The conserved basic residues and the charged amino acid residues at the α-helix of the zinc finger motif regulate the nuclear transport activity of triple C2H2 zinc finger proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) motifs on proteins are frequently recognized as a structure for DNA binding. Accumulated reports indicate that ZF motifs contain nuclear localization signal (NLS) to facilitate the transport of ZF proteins into nucleus. We investigated the critical factors that facilitate the nuclear transport of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. Three conserved basic residues (hot spots) were identified among the ZF sequences of triple C2H2 ZF proteins that reportedly have NLS function. Additional basic residues can be found on the α-helix of the ZFs. Using the ZF domain (ZFD) of Egr-1 as a template, various mutants were constructed and expressed in cells. The nuclear transport activity of various mutants was estimated by analyzing the proportion of protein localized in the nucleus. Mutation at any hot spot of the Egr-1 ZFs reduced the nuclear transport activity. Changes of the basic residues at the α-helical region of the second ZF (ZF2) of the Egr-1 ZFD abolished the NLS activity. However, this activity can be restored by substituting the acidic residues at the homologous positions of ZF1 or ZF3 with basic residues. The restored activity dropped again when the hot spots at ZF1 or the basic residues in the α-helix of ZF3 were mutated. The variations in nuclear transport activity are linked directly to the binding activity of the ZF proteins with importins. This study was extended to other triple C2H2 ZF proteins. SP1 and KLF families, similar to Egr-1, have charged amino acid residues at the second (α2) and the third (α3) positions of the α-helix. Replacing the amino acids at α2 and α3 with acidic residues reduced the NLS activity of the SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The reduced activity can be restored by substituting the α3 with histidine at any SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The results show again the interchangeable role of ZFs and charge residues in the α-helix in regulating the NLS activity of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. PMID:29381770

  11. The conserved basic residues and the charged amino acid residues at the α-helix of the zinc finger motif regulate the nuclear transport activity of triple C2H2 zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ying; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) motifs on proteins are frequently recognized as a structure for DNA binding. Accumulated reports indicate that ZF motifs contain nuclear localization signal (NLS) to facilitate the transport of ZF proteins into nucleus. We investigated the critical factors that facilitate the nuclear transport of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. Three conserved basic residues (hot spots) were identified among the ZF sequences of triple C2H2 ZF proteins that reportedly have NLS function. Additional basic residues can be found on the α-helix of the ZFs. Using the ZF domain (ZFD) of Egr-1 as a template, various mutants were constructed and expressed in cells. The nuclear transport activity of various mutants was estimated by analyzing the proportion of protein localized in the nucleus. Mutation at any hot spot of the Egr-1 ZFs reduced the nuclear transport activity. Changes of the basic residues at the α-helical region of the second ZF (ZF2) of the Egr-1 ZFD abolished the NLS activity. However, this activity can be restored by substituting the acidic residues at the homologous positions of ZF1 or ZF3 with basic residues. The restored activity dropped again when the hot spots at ZF1 or the basic residues in the α-helix of ZF3 were mutated. The variations in nuclear transport activity are linked directly to the binding activity of the ZF proteins with importins. This study was extended to other triple C2H2 ZF proteins. SP1 and KLF families, similar to Egr-1, have charged amino acid residues at the second (α2) and the third (α3) positions of the α-helix. Replacing the amino acids at α2 and α3 with acidic residues reduced the NLS activity of the SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The reduced activity can be restored by substituting the α3 with histidine at any SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The results show again the interchangeable role of ZFs and charge residues in the α-helix in regulating the NLS activity of triple C2H2 ZF proteins.

  12. Design, synthesis and evaluation of an anthraquinone derivative conjugated to myelin basic protein immunodominant (MBP85-99) epitope: Towards selective immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapeinou, Anthi; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Simal, Carmen; Hansen, Bjarke E; Kalofonos, Haralabos; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Tselios, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    Anthraquinone type compounds, especially di-substituted amino alkylamino anthraquinones have been widely studied as immunosuppressants. The anthraquinone ring is part of mitoxandrone that has been used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and several types of tumors. A desired approach for the treatment of MS would be the immunosuppression and elimination of specific T cells that are responsible for the induction of the disease. Herein, the development of a peptide compound bearing an anthraquinone derivative with the potential to specifically destroy the encephalitogenic T cells responsible for the onset of MS is described. The compound consists of the myelin basic protein (MBP) 85-99 immunodominant epitope (MBP 85-99 ) coupled to an anthraquinone type molecule (AQ) via a disulfide (S-S) and 6 amino hexanoic acid (Ahx) residues (AQ-S-S-(Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 ). AQ-S-S-(Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 could bind to HLA II DRB1*-1501 antigen with reasonable affinity (IC 50 of 56 nM) The compound was localized to the nucleus of Jurkat cells (an immortalized line of human T lymphocytes) 10 min after its addition to the medium and resulted in lowered Bcl-2 levels (apoptosis). Entrance of the compound was abolished when cells were pre-treated with cisplatin, an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase. Accordingly, levels of free thiols were elevated in the culture supernatants of Jurkat cells exposed to N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate coupled to (Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 via a disulphide (SPDP-S-S-(Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 ) but returned to normal after exposure to cisplatin. These results raise the possibility of AQ-S-S-(Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 being used as an eliminator of encephalitogenic T cells via implication of the thioredoxin system for the generation of the toxic, thiol-containing moiety (AQ-SH). Future experiments would ideally determine whether SPDP-S-S-(Ahx) 6 MBP 85-99 could incorporate into HLA II DRB1*-1501 tetramers and neutralize encephalitogenic T cell lines sensitized to

  13. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  14. A single amino acid substitution in IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AtMYC1 leads to trichome and root hair patterning defects by abolishing its interaction with partner proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-04-20

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein transparent TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or werewolf (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or enhancer of GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors.

  15. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in IIIf Subfamily of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor AtMYC1 Leads to Trichome and Root Hair Patterning Defects by Abolishing Its Interaction with Partner Proteins in Arabidopsis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or WEREWOLF (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors. PMID:22334670

  16. Activation by the protein-bound polysaccharide PSK (krestin) of cytotoxic lymphocytes that act on fresh autologous tumor cells and T24 human urinary bladder transitional carcinoma cell line in patients with urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Y; Yoshida, O

    1991-05-01

    PSK, a protein-bound polysaccharide Kureha, was tested for its ability to modulate the cytotoxicity of lymphocytes that act on autologous tumor cells and T24 human urinary bladder tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer patients in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. In vitro treatment of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with PSK for 18 hours resulted in an augmentation or induction of cytotoxicity against relatively resistant T24 cells in previously reactive and nonreactive cases, respectively. The PSK-treated PBL were able to kill more effectively tumor cells that were freshly isolated from the same cancer patients than non-treated PBL. The effects of PSK were noted with PBL as well as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and with PSK at concentrations of 10 to 100 micrograms./ml., while PSK at higher doses reduced their lytic activities. The addition of PSK to the assay at the same concentrations also enhanced the cytotoxicities. Autologous tumor killing (ATK) activities of both large granular lymphocytes (LGL) and T lymphocytes were enhanced by PSK. Treatment of PBL with PSK did not effect on the proportion of PBL binding to the tumor cells, while it augmented the cytotoxic activity. Cell-free supernatant of PSK-stimulated lymphocyte culture did not contain any detectable amounts of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). In addition, anti-IFN-alpha monoclonal antibody (MAb), anti-IFN-gamma MAb and anti-IL-2 MAb did not inhibit PSK-induced augmentation of cytotoxicity against T24. Oral administration of PSK (three gm./day) to patients with urinary bladder cancer daily for seven days before operation resulted in an augmentation of the cytotoxicity against T24 cells in five out of 10 patients and no change of the cytotoxicity in the other five patients. ATK activity was also enhanced by oral administration of PSK in three out of five patients. These results indicate that the antitumor activity of PSK may be in part mediated

  17. Low upper bounds of ideals

    OpenAIRE

    Kucera, Antonin; Slaman, Theodore A.

    2007-01-01

    We show that there is a low T-upper bound for the class of K-trivial sets, namely those which are weak from the point of view of algorithmic randomness. This result is a special case of a more general characterization of ideals in Δ02 T-degrees for which there is a low T-upper bound.

  18. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  19. Tight bounds for break minimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Andries E.; Post, Gerhard F.; Woeginger, Gerhard

    We consider round-robin sports tournaments with n teams and n − 1 rounds. We construct an infinite family of opponent schedules for which every home-away assignment induces at least 1/4 n(n−2) breaks. This construction establishes a matching lower bound for a corresponding upper bound from the

  20. Phactr3/scapinin, a member of protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family, interacts with the plasma membrane via basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Itoh

    Full Text Available Proteins that belong to the protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family are involved in cell motility and morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms that regulate the actin cytoskeleton are poorly understood. We have previously shown that phactr3, also known as scapinin, localizes to the plasma membrane, including lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. In the present study, experiments using deletion and point mutants showed that the basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus play crucial roles in the localization to the plasma membrane. A BH analysis (http://helixweb.nih.gov/bhsearch is a program developed to identify membrane-binding domains that comprise basic and hydrophobic residues in membrane proteins. We applied this program to phactr3. The results of the BH plot analysis agreed with the experimentally determined region that is responsible for the localization of phactr3 to the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the N-terminal itself binds to liposomes and acidic phospholipids. In addition, we showed that the interaction with the plasma membrane via the N-terminal membrane-binding sequence is required for phactr3-induced morphological changes in Cos7 cells. The membrane-binding sequence in the N-terminus is highly conserved in all members of the phactr family. Our findings may provide a molecular basis for understanding the mechanisms that allow phactr proteins to regulate cell morphogenesis.

  1. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and long......WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...

  2. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  3. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  4. UV?Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    Antosiewicz, Jan M.; Shugar, David

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV?Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  5. Broadening Horizons and Teaching Basic Biology through Cell-Free Synthesis of Green Fluorescent Protein in a High School Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Cem; Jones, K. C.; Swartz, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a practical method for producing a broad variety of proteins. In addition, the direct accessibility to the reaction environment makes CFPS particularly suitable as a learning vehicle for fundamental biological concepts. Here, we describe its implementation as a teaching tool for a high school…

  6. Primary structure of a 14 kDa basic structural protein (Lm-76) from the cuticle of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Andersen, S O; Højrup, P

    1993-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a 14 kDa structural protein (LM-76) isolated from pharate cuticle of the locust, Locusta migratoria, was determined by Edman degradation of the intact protein and enzymatically derived peptides. Plasma desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry was used as a...

  7. Interactions between macromolecule-bound antioxidants and Trolox during liposome autoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Ecem Evrim; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Andersen, Mogens Larsen

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between free and macromolecule-bound antioxidants were investigated in order to evaluate their combined effects on the antioxidant environment. Dietary fiber (DF), protein and lipid-bound antioxidants, obtained from whole wheat, soybean and olive oil products, respectively...... of the simple addition effects of Trolox and bound antioxidants with measured values on lipid oxidation revealed synergetic interactions for DF and refined olive oil-bound antioxidants, and antagonistic interactions for protein and extra virgin olive oil-bound antioxidants with Trolox. A generalized version...

  8. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  9. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  10. On functions of bounded semivariation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2015), s. 233-276 ISSN 0147-1937 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : semivariation * functions of bounded variation * regulated functions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://projecteuclid.org/euclid. rae /1491271216

  11. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  12. Investigating EFL Prospective Teachers' Ability to Translate Culture-Bound Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Mohamed Farrag

    2008-01-01

    The basic objective of the present study is to investigate EFL Saudi prospective teachers' ability to translate culture-bound expressions and their translation strategy awareness. The study attempted to answer two questions: (1) To what extent are EFL Saudi prospective teachers able to translate culture-bound expressions? (2) To what extent are…

  13. The bound state S-matrix for AdS5×S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; de Leeuw, M.; Torrielli, A.

    2009-01-01

    We determine the S-matrix that describes scattering of arbitrary bound states in the light-cone string theory in AdS5×S5. The corresponding construction relies on the Yangian symmetry and the superspace formalism for the bound state representations. The basic analytic structure supporting the

  14. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  15. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-01-01

    -HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method......A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral...... was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng...

  16. Correlation of acidic and basic carrier ampholyte and immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns based on mass spectrometric protein identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrocki, A; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Podtelejnikov, A V

    1998-01-01

    Separation of proteins on either carrier ampholyte-based or immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional (2-D) gels gives rise to electrophoretic patterns that are difficult to compare visually. In this paper we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI...

  17. Vulnerable Derivatives and Good Deal Bounds: A Structural Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgoci, Agatha

    2013-01-01

    We price vulnerable derivatives -- i.e. derivatives where the counterparty may default. These are basically the derivatives traded on the over-the-counter (OTC) markets. Default is modeled in a structural framework. The technique employed for pricing is good deal bounds (GDBs). The method imposes...... can be obtained. We provide a link between the objective probability measure and the range of potential risk-neutral measures, which has an intuitive economic meaning. We also provide tight pricing bounds for European calls and show how to extend the call formula to pricing other financial products...

  18. Getting Back to Basics (& Acidics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Sam

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a few novel acid-base experiments intended to introduce students to the basic concepts of acid-base chemistry and provide practical examples that apply directly to the study of biology and the human body. Important concepts such as the reaction between carbon dioxide and water, buffers and protein denaturation, are covered.…

  19. On the minimum of a polynomial function on a basic closed semialgebraic set and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeronimo, Gabriela; Perrucci, Daniel; Tsigaridas, Elias

    We give an explicit upper bound for the algebraic degree and an explicit lower bound for the absolute value of the minimum of a polynomial function on a compact connected component of a basic closed semialgebraic set when this minimum is not zero. As an application, we obtain a lower bound...

  20. On the minimum of a polynomial function on a basic closed semialgebraic set and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeronimo, Gabriela; Perrucci, Daniel; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2013-01-01

    We give an explicit upper bound for the algebraic degree and an explicit lower bound for the absolute value of the minimum of a polynomial function on a compact connected component of a basic closed semialgebraic set when this minimum is not zero. As an application, we obtain a lower bound...

  1. Opinion formation with time-varying bounded confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YunHong; Liu, QiPeng; Zhang, SiYing

    2017-01-01

    When individuals in social groups communicate with one another and are under the influence of neighbors' opinions, they typically revise their own opinions to adapt to such peer opinions. The individual threshold of bounded confidence will thus be affected by both a change in individual confidence and by neighbor influence. Individuals thus update their own opinions with new bounded confidence, while their updated opinions also influence their neighbors' opinions. Based on this reasoned factual assumption, we propose an opinion dynamics model with time-varying bounded confidence. A directed network is formed by the rule of the individual bounded confidence threshold. The threshold of individual bounded confidence involves both confidence variation and the in/out degree of the individual node. When the confidence variation is greater, an individual's confidence in persisting in his own opinion in interactions is weaker, and the individual is more likely to adopt neighbors' opinions. In networks, the in/out degree is determined by individual neighbors. Our main research involves the process of opinion evolution and the basic laws of opinion cluster formation. Group opinions converge exponentially to consensus with stable neighbors. An individual opinion evolution is determined by the average neighbor opinion effect strength. We also explore the conditions involved in forming a stable neighbor relationship and the influence of the confidence variation in the convergence of the threshold of bounded confidence. The results show that the influence on opinion evolution is greater with increased confidence variation.

  2. Broadening Horizons and Teaching Basic Biology Through Cell-Free Synthesis of Green Fluorescent Protein in a High School Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Cem; Jones, K. C.; Swartz, James R.

    2013-12-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a practical method for producing a broad variety of proteins. In addition, the direct accessibility to the reaction environment makes CFPS particularly suitable as a learning vehicle for fundamental biological concepts. Here, we describe its implementation as a teaching tool for a high school laboratory course. Ninety students in a biotechnology class used CFPS to study the effects of the concentrations of amino acids, cell extract, DNA, and the energy source on accumulation of active super-folder green fluorescent protein. Students estimated product concentrations simply by comparing solution colors to a printed green color gradient. This simple and inexpensive method allows for immediate measurements, and 26 of the 30 groups observed measurable product concentrations within 60 min. These student-generated data were then discussed to illustrate concepts of data analysis such as outliers and standard deviation. We also combined the laboratory experience with a visit to a university campus that included a laboratory tour and a college-style lecture. Our overall objective was to excite the students about the scientific enterprise and to instill a sense of personal relevance and attainability so that these students could realistically consider technical careers.

  3. Simulation bounds for system availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietjen, G.L.; Waller, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    System availability is a dominant factor in the practicality of nuclear power electrical generating plants. A proposed model for obtaining either lower bounds or interval estimates on availability uses observed data on ''n'' failure-to-repair cycles of the system to estimate the parameters in the time-to-failure and time-to-repair models. These estimates are then used in simulating failure/repair cycles of the system. The availability estimate is obtained for each of 5000 samples of ''n'' failure/repair cycles to form a distribution of estimates. Specific percentile points of those simulated distributions are selected as lower simulation bounds or simulation interval bounds for the system availability. The method is illustrated with operational data from two nuclear plants for which an exponential time-to-failure and a lognormal time-to-repair are assumed

  4. Unitarity bound for gluon shadowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Levin, E.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Although at small Bjorken x gluons originated from different nucleons in a nucleus overlap in the longitudinal direction, most of them are still well separated in the transverse plane and therefore cannot fuse. For this reason the gluon density in nuclei cannot drop at small x below a certain bottom bound, which we evaluated in a model independent manner assuming the maximal strength of gluon fusion. We also calculated gluon shadowing in the saturated regime using the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation and found the nuclear ratio to be well above the unitarity bound. The recently updated analysis of parton distributions in nuclei, including BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) data on high-p T hadron production at forward rapidities, led to strong gluon shadowing. Such strong shadowing and therefore the interpretation of the nuclear modification of the p T spectra in dA collisions at RHIC seem to be inconsistent with this unitarity bound.

  5. Bounds for nonlocality distillation protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Nonlocality can be quantified by the violation of a Bell inequality. Since this violation may be amplified by local operations, an alternative measure has been proposed--distillable nonlocality. The alternative measure is difficult to calculate exactly due to the double exponential growth of the parameter space. In this paper, we give a way to bound the distillable nonlocality of a resource by the solutions to a related optimization problem. Our upper bounds are exponentially easier to compute than the exact value and are shown to be meaningful in general and tight in some cases.

  6. Space-bounded communication complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brody, Joshua Eric; Chen, Shiteng; Papakonstantinou, Periklis A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past thirty years, Communication Complexity has emerged as a foundational tool to proving lower bounds in many areas of computer science. Its power comes from its generality, but this generality comes at a price---no superlinear communication lower bound is possible, since a player may...... communicate his entire input. However, what if the players are limited in their ability to recall parts of their interaction? We introduce memory models for 2-party communication complexity. Our general model is as follows: two computationally unrestricted players, Alice and Bob, each have s(n) bits of memory...

  7. Bound entanglement and local realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Zukowski, Marek; Gnacinski, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    We show using a numerical approach, which gives necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of local realism, that the bound entangled state presented in Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5385 (1999)] admits a local and realistic description. We also find the lowest possible amount of some appropriate entangled state that must be ad-mixed to the bound entangled state so that the resulting density operator has no local and realistic description and as such can be useful in quantum communication and quantum computation

  8. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Yalcin, Erdal; Schröder, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...... on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...

  9. Sequence and function of basic helix-loop-helix proteins required for stomatal development in Arabidopsis are deeply conserved in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, Cora A; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2011-01-01

    Stomata are a broadly conserved feature of land plants with a crucial role regulating transpiration and gas exchange between the plant and atmosphere. Stereotyped cell divisions within a specialized cell lineage of the epidermis generate stomata and define the pattern of their distribution. The behavior of the stomatal lineage varies in its detail among different plant groups, but general features include asymmetric cell divisions and an immediate precursor (the guard mother cell [GMC]) that divides symmetrically to form the pair of cells that will differentiate into the guard cells. In Arabidopsis, the closely related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup Ia transcription factors SPEECHLESS, MUTE, and FAMA promote asymmetric divisions, the acquisition of GMC identity and guard cell differentiation, respectively. Genome sequence data indicate that these key positive regulators of stomatal development are broadly conserved among land plants. While orthologies can be established among individual family members within the angiosperms, more distantly related groups contain subgroup Ia bHLHs of unclear affinity. We demonstrate group Ia members from the moss Physcomitrella patens can partially complement MUTE and FAMA and recapitulate gain of function phenotypes of group Ia genes in multiple steps in the stomatal lineage in Arabidopsis. Our data are consistent with a mechanism whereby a multifunctional transcription factor underwent duplication followed by specialization to provide the three (now nonoverlapping) functions of the angiosperm stomatal bHLHs. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Review: WNT/Frizzled signalling: receptor–ligand selectivity with focus on FZD-G protein signalling and its physiological relevance: IUPHAR Review 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, J P; Petersen, J; Schulte, G

    2014-01-01

    The wingless/int1 (WNT)/Frizzled (FZD) signalling pathway controls numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell-fate decisions, migration and plays a crucial role during embryonic development. Nineteen mammalian WNTs can bind to 10 FZDs thereby activating different downstream pathways such as WNT/β-catenin, WNT/planar cell polarity and WNT/Ca2+. However, the mechanisms of signalling specification and the involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins are still unclear. Disturbances in the pathways can lead to various diseases ranging from cancer, inflammatory diseases to metabolic and neurological disorders. Due to the presence of seven-transmembrane segments, evidence for coupling between FZDs and G proteins and substantial structural differences in class A, B or C GPCRs, FZDs were grouped separately in the IUPHAR GPCR database as the class FZD within the superfamily of GPCRs. Recently, important progress has been made pointing to a direct activation of G proteins after WNT stimulation. WNT/FZD and G protein coupling remain to be fully explored, although the basic observation supporting the nature of FZDs as GPCRs is compelling. Because the involvement of different (i) WNTs; (ii) FZDs; and (iii) intracellular binding partners could selectively affect signalling specification, in this review we present the current understanding of receptor/ligand selectivity of FZDs and WNTs. We pinpoint what is known about signalling specification and the physiological relevance of these interactions with special emphasis on FZD–G protein interactions. LINKED ARTICLESThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24032637

  11. Entropy Bounds and Field Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pesci

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For general metric theories of gravity, we compare the approach that describes/derives the field equations of gravity as a thermodynamic identity with the one which looks at them from entropy bounds. The comparison is made through the consideration of the matter entropy flux across (Rindler horizons, studied by making use of the notion of a limiting thermodynamic scale l* of matter, previously introduced in the context of entropy bounds. In doing this: (i a bound for the entropy of any lump of matter with a given energy-momentum tensor Tab is considered, in terms of a quantity, which is independent of the theory of gravity that we use; this quantity is the variation of the Clausius entropy of a suitable horizon when the element of matter crosses it; (ii by making use of the equations of motion of the theory, the same quantity is then expressed as the variation of Wald’s entropy of that horizon (and this leads to a generalized form of the generalized covariant entropy bound, applicable to general diffeomorphism-invariant theories of gravity; and (iii a notion of l* for horizons, as well as an expression for it, is given.

  12. Bounded Densities and Their Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozine, Igor; Krymsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how one can compute interval-valued statistical measures given limited information about the underlying distribution. The particular focus is on a bounded derivative of a probability density function and its combination with other available statistical evidence for computing ...

  13. Semiclassical bounds in magnetic bottles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Kovařík, H.; Weidl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2016), s. 1650002 ISSN 0129-055X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : magnetic Laplacian * discrete spectrum * eigenvalue bounds Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2016

  14. Positivity bounds for Sivers functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Zhongbo; Soffer, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    We generalize a positivity constraint derived initially for parity-conserving processes to the parity-violating ones, and use it to derive non-trivial bounds on several Sivers functions, entering in the theoretical description of single spin asymmetry for various processes.

  15. Moderate deviations for bounded subsequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stoica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study Davis' series of moderate deviations probabilities for Lp-bounded sequences of random variables (p>2. A certain subseries therein is convergent for the same range of parameters as in the case of martingale difference or i.i.d. sequences.

  16. Pieter Paul Rubens, "Prometheus Bound."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Marla K.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a full-color reproduction of Pieter Paul Rubens' painting, "Prometheus Bound," and a lesson plan for using it with students in grades 10 through 12. The goal of the lesson is to introduce students to the techniques of design and execution used by Rubens. (JDH)

  17. Upward Bound: In the Beginning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groutt, John; Hill, Calvin

    2001-01-01

    Describes the early history of the Upward Bound program, including the role of President Johnson's vision, the Task Force on Poverty, the Office of Economic Opportunity, and Community Action Programs; influences on the development of the program; establishment of the program's administrative structure; pilot programs; and early problems leading to…

  18. A Functional Calculus for Quotient Bounded Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Mirel Stoian

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available If (X, P is a sequentially locally convex space, then a quotient bounded operator T beloging to QP is regular (in the sense of Waelbroeck if and only if it is a bounded element (in the sense of Allan of algebra QP. The classic functional calculus for bounded operators on Banach space is generalized for bounded elements of algebra QP.

  19. The treatment of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes with chloroquine leads to accumulation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX bound to particular parasite proteins and to the inhibition of the parasite's 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin O.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FPIX is a potentially toxic product of hemoglobin digestion by intra-erythrocytic malaria parasites. It is detoxified by biomineralization or through degradation by glutathione. Both processes are inhibited by the antimalarial drug chloroquine, leading to the accumulation of FPIX in the membranes of the infected cell and their consequent permeabilization. It is shown here that treatment of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes with chloroquine also leads to the binding of FPIX to a subset of parasite proteins. Parasite enzymes such as aldolase, pyrimidine nucleoside monophosphate kinase and pyrimidine 5'- nucleotidase were inhibited by FPIX in vitro, but only the activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was reduced significantly in cells after drug treatment. Additional proteins were extracted from parasite cytosol by their ability to bind FPIX. Sequencing of these proteins identified heat shock proteins 90 and 70, enolase, elongation factor 1-α, phoshoglycerate kinase, glyceraldehyde 3- phosphate dehydrogenase, L-lactate dehydrogenase and gametocytogenesis onset-specific protein. The possible involvement of these proteins in the antimalarial mode of action of chloroquine is discussed. It is concluded that drug-induced binding of FPIX to parasite glycolytic enzymes could underlie the demonstrable inhibition of glycolysis by chloroquine. The inhibition of 6- phosphogluconate dehydrogenase could explain the reduction of the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt by the drug. Inhibition of both processes is deleterious to parasite survival. Binding of FPIX to other proteins is probably inconsequential to the rapid killing of the parasite by chloroquine.

  20. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  1. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs....... The extracellular domain of SLA-I was connected to porcine beta2 microglobulin by glycine-rich linkers. The engineered sin.-le-chain proteins, consisting of fused SLA-I and beta2 microglobulin, were overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Also, variants were made of the single-chain proteins...

  2. Submatrices of character tables and basic sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation of character tables of nite groups we study basic sets and associated representation theoretic data for complementary sets of conjugacy lasses. For the symmetric groups we nd unexpected properties of characters on restricted sets of conjugacy classes, like beautiful...... combinatorial determinant formulae for submatrices of the character table and Cartan matrices with respect to basic sets; we observe that similar phenomena occur for the transition matrices between power sum symmetric functions to bounded partitions and the k-Schur functions dened by Lapointe and Morse...

  3. A Note on the W-S Lower Bound of the MEE Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badong Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The minimum error entropy (MEE estimation is concerned with the estimation of a certain random variable (unknown variable based on another random variable (observation, so that the entropy of the estimation error is minimized. This estimation method may outperform the well-known minimum mean square error (MMSE estimation especially for non-Gaussian situations. There is an important performance bound on the MEE estimation, namely the W-S lower bound, which is computed as the conditional entropy of the unknown variable given observation. Though it has been known in the literature for a considerable time, up to now there is little study on this performance bound. In this paper, we reexamine the W-S lower bound. Some basic properties of the W-S lower bound are presented, and the characterization of Gaussian distribution using the W-S lower bound is investigated.

  4. Modeling of kinetics of the inducible protein complexes of the SOS system in bacteria E. coli which realize TLS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model describing kinetics of the inducible genes of the protein complexes, formed during SOS response in bacteria Escherichia coli is developed. Within the bounds of developed approaches the auxiliary mathematical model describing changes in concentrations of the dimers, which are the components of final protein complexes, is developed. The solutions of both models are based on the experimental data concerning expression of the basic genes of the SOS system in bacteria Escherichia coli

  5. Computer simulation of bounded plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of simulating a one-dimensional bounded plasma system using particles in a gridded space are systematically explored and solutions to them are given. Such problems include the injection of particles at the boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation, and the inclusion of an external circuit between the confining boundaries. A recently discovered artificial cooling effect is explained as being a side-effect of quiet injection, and its potential for causing serious but subtle errors in bounded simulation is noted. The methods described in the first part of the thesis are then applied to the simulation of an extension of the Pierce diode problem, specifically a Pierce diode modified by an external circuit between the electrodes. The results of these simulations agree to high accuracy with theory when a theory exists, and also show some interesting chaotic behavior in certain parameter regimes. The chaotic behavior is described in detail

  6. Bounded Rationality in Transposition Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Studies explaining the timeliness and correctness of the transposition of EU directives into national legislation have provided rather inconclusive findings. They do not offer a clear-cut prediction concerning the transposition of the patients’ rights directive, which is one of the first that con......Studies explaining the timeliness and correctness of the transposition of EU directives into national legislation have provided rather inconclusive findings. They do not offer a clear-cut prediction concerning the transposition of the patients’ rights directive, which is one of the first...... that concerns the organisation and financing of national healthcare systems. This article applies the perspective of bounded rationality to explain (irregularities in) the timely and correct transposition of EU directives. The cognitive and organisational constraints long posited by the bounded rationality...

  7. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ...; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report AGENCY: The Office... considered public records. Title of Collection: Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance...) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department is requesting a new APR because of...

  8. Complexity Bounds for Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-22

    iently thanin lassi al omputation, onstru tion of small ir uits whi h an arry out phase estimation, show-ing that the quantum ontent of strong...on lower bounds for omputing parity or fanout using onstant or log depth quantum ir uits, quantum simulations of lassi al ir uit elements and...lasses, su h as thresh-old and mod fun tions, and the general relationships between quantum omplexity lasses and orre-sponding lassi al lasses

  9. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Health Insurance Basics What's ... advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  10. PASCAL vs BASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundie, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between PASCAL and BASIC as general purpose microprocessor languages rates PASCAL above BASIC in such points as program structure, data types, structuring methods, control structures, procedures and functions, and ease in learning. (CMV)

  11. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ...

  13. Basic residues in the 74-83 and 191-198 segments of protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit are implicated in negative but not in positive regulation by the beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, S; Vaglio, P; Marin, O

    1997-01-01

    by the beta-subunit many fold more than that of alpha wild type, while extrastimulation by beta mutant D55L56E57A, observable with alpha wild type, is abolished with these mutants. These data support the conclusion that down regulation by the acidic residues clustered in the N-terminal moiety of beta......Protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinase whose holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two non-catalytic, beta-subunits. The beta-subunit possesses antagonist functions that can be physically dissected by generating synthetic...... fragments encompassing its N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Here we show that by mutating basic residues in the 74-77 and in the 191-198 regions of the alpha-subunit, the negative regulation by the beta-subunit and by its N-terminal synthetic fragment CK2beta-(1-77), which is observable using calmodulin...

  14. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  15. Programming Visual Basic 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    This information-packed guide helps you understand Visual Basic 2005, the next-generation release of the popular Visual Basic programming language. This book aims to make you immediately productive in creating Windows and web applications using Visual Basic 2005 and all of its tools. Perfect for experienced VB6 and novice programmers

  16. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs...

  17. Crystal structures of a yeast 14-3-3 protein from Lachancea thermotolerans in the unliganded form and bound to a human lipid kinase PI4KB-derived peptide reveal high evolutionary conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eisenreichová, Andrea; Klíma, Martin; Bouřa, Evžen

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 11 (2016), s. 799-803 ISSN 2053-230X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 14-3-3 proteins * Bmh1 * Bmh2 * crystal structure * phosphopeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.799, year: 2016

  18. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and the proform of the eosinophil major basic protein (ProMBP) are associated with increased risk of death in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dembic, Maja; Hedley, Paula L.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Risk stratification and patient management in heart failure (HF) is difficult due to the unpredictable progression of the disease, necessitating the development of reliable diagnostic biomarkers to facilitate decision-making in clinical practice. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is ......MBP are associated with increased risk of death from all causes in HF and are potential prognostic markers of adverse outcomes in HF patients....

  19. The algebras of bounded and essentially bounded Lebesgue measurable functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortini Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Let X be a set in ℝn with positive Lebesgue measure. It is well known that the spectrum of the algebra L∞(X of (equivalence classes of essentially bounded, complex-valued, measurable functions on X is an extremely disconnected compact Hausdorff space.We show, by elementary methods, that the spectrum M of the algebra ℒb(X, ℂ of all bounded measurable functions on X is not extremely disconnected, though totally disconnected. Let ∆ = { δx : x ∈ X} be the set of point evaluations and let g be the Gelfand topology on M. Then (∆, g is homeomorphic to (X, Τdis,where Tdis is the discrete topology. Moreover, ∆ is a dense subset of the spectrum M of ℒb(X, ℂ. Finally, the hull h(I, (which is homeomorphic to M(L∞(X, of the ideal of all functions in ℒb(X, ℂ vanishing almost everywhere on X is a nowhere dense and extremely disconnected subset of the Corona M \\ ∆ of ℒb(X, ℂ.

  20. Culture-bound syndromes in Hispanic primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayles, Bryan P; Katerndahl, David A

    2009-01-01

    We sought to document Hispanic primary care patients' knowledge and experience of five culture-bound syndromes (CBS), as well as the basic socio-cultural correlates of these disorders. A convenience sample of 100 adult Hispanic patients presenting in an urban South Texas primary care clinic was recruited to complete a brief cross-sectional survey, presented in an oral format. Interviews sought information concerning five culture-bound syndromes--susto, empacho, nervios, mal de ojo, and ataques de nervios. Additional demographic, socio-economic, and acculturation data was collected. Descriptive and bivariate statistics (chi square, Fisher's) were used to assess relationships among variables and experience with each CBS. A multivariate logistic analysis was conducted to determine the possible contributions of age, gender, acculturation, and education to the personal experience of a culture-bound syndrome. Results indicate that 77% of respondents had knowledge of all five syndromes, with 42% reporting having personally experienced at least one CBS. Nervios was the most commonly suffered disorder, being reported by 30 respondents. This was followed, in declining order ofprevalence, by susto, mal de ojo, empacho, and ataques de nervios. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that higher education beyond high school was associated with a slightly decreased likelihood of reporting having suffered from any culture-bound syndrome. While co-occurrence among these disorders occurred, the patterns of predictors suggest that the co-occurrence is not a reflection of mislabeling of one common syndrome. Knowledge of and experience with culture-bound syndromes is common among Hispanic primary care patients in South Texas. Healthcare providers ought to consider discussing these illnesses in a non-judgmental manner with patients who present with symptoms that are consistent with these syndromes. Future studies, with larger sample sizes, are warranted to elucidate the nature

  1. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  2. Sensitivity analysis using probability bounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferson, Scott; Troy Tucker, W.

    2006-01-01

    Probability bounds analysis (PBA) provides analysts a convenient means to characterize the neighborhood of possible results that would be obtained from plausible alternative inputs in probabilistic calculations. We show the relationship between PBA and the methods of interval analysis and probabilistic uncertainty analysis from which it is jointly derived, and indicate how the method can be used to assess the quality of probabilistic models such as those developed in Monte Carlo simulations for risk analyses. We also illustrate how a sensitivity analysis can be conducted within a PBA by pinching inputs to precise distributions or real values

  3. Identification of peptides from foot‐and‐mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the peptide‐binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA‐2*0401 molecule based on a posi......Characterization of the peptide‐binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA‐2*0401 molecule based...... within the structural proteins of foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T‐cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted...

  4. Determining Normal-Distribution Tolerance Bounds Graphically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Graphical method requires calculations and table lookup. Distribution established from only three points: mean upper and lower confidence bounds and lower confidence bound of standard deviation. Method requires only few calculations with simple equations. Graphical procedure establishes best-fit line for measured data and bounds for selected confidence level and any distribution percentile.

  5. Protein distribution in lupin protein isolates from Lupinus angustifolius L. prepared by various isolation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranyi, Isabel S; Volke, Daniela; Hoffmann, Ralf; Eisner, Peter; Herfellner, Thomas; Brunnbauer, Markus; Koehler, Peter; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute

    2016-09-15

    Differences in the protein distribution of various protein isolates from Lupinus angustifolius L. Vitabor were identified as affected by the isolation procedure (alkaline and/or salt-induced extraction followed by isoelectric and/or dilutive precipitation). Protein isolates extracted in alkaline solution showed higher protein yields (26.4-31.7%) compared to salt-induced extraction (19.8-30.0%) or combined alkaline and salt-induced extraction (23.3-25.6%). Chemical variations among the protein isolates especially occurred within the albumins. Protein isolates precipitated isoelectrically showed the highest contents, whereas protein isolates precipitated by dilutive showed the lowest contents of conglutin δ. Furthermore, the alkaline subunits of conglutin α and conglutin γ decreased during alkaline extraction compared to salt-induced extraction. A decrease in protein-bound polar and basic amino acids was shown after protein isolation. In contrast, the amounts of nonpolar, aliphatic, aromatic, hydroxylated and sulfur-rich amino acids were higher in the lupin protein isolates compared to the lupin flakes. However, the functional side chains could not be related to the specific molecular arrangements of the protein isolates, as a similar amino acid composition was found among the protein isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The essential aspect of contemporary physics is to understand properties of nucleonic matter that constitutes the world around us. Over the years research in nuclear physics has provided strong guidance in understanding the basic principles of nuclear interactions. But, the scenario of nuclear physics changed ...

  7. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The essential aspect of contemporary physics is to understand properties of nucleonic matter that constitutes the world around us. Over the years research in nuclear physics has provided strong guidance in understanding the basic principles of nuclear interactions. But, the scenario of nuclear physics changed drastically as ...

  8. Observational Bounds on Cosmic Doomsday

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2003-07-11

    Recently it was found, in a broad class of models, that the dark energy density may change its sign during the evolution of the universe. This may lead to a global collapse of the universe within the time t{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} years. Our goal is to find what bounds on the future lifetime of the universe can be placed by the next generation of cosmological observations. As an example, we investigate the simplest model of dark energy with a linear potential V({phi}) = V{sub 0}(1 + {alpha}{phi}). This model can describe the present stage of acceleration of the universe if {alpha} is small enough. However, eventually the field {phi} rolls down, V({phi}) becomes negative, and the universe collapses. The existing observational data indicate that the universe described by this model will collapse not earlier than t{sub c} {approx_equal} 10 billion years from the present moment. We show that the data from SNAP and Planck satellites may extend the bound on the ''doomsday'' time to tc 40 billion years at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Quantum bounds on Bell inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, Károly F.; Vértesi, Tamás

    2009-02-01

    We have determined the maximum quantum violation of 241 tight bipartite Bell inequalities with up to five two-outcome measurement settings per party by constructing the appropriate measurement operators in up to six-dimensional complex and eight-dimensional real-component Hilbert spaces using numerical optimization. Out of these inequalities 129 have been introduced here. In 43 cases higher-dimensional component spaces gave larger violation than qubits, and in three occasions the maximum was achieved with six-dimensional spaces. We have also calculated upper bounds on these Bell inequalities using a method proposed recently. For all but 20 inequalities the best solution found matched the upper bound. Surprisingly, the simplest inequality of the set examined, with only three measurement settings per party, was not among them, despite the high dimensionality of the Hilbert space considered. We also computed detection threshold efficiencies for the maximally entangled qubit pair. These could be lowered in several instances if degenerate measurements were also allowed.

  10. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  11. Estimation variance bounds of importance sampling simulations in digital communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D.; Yao, K.

    1991-01-01

    In practical applications of importance sampling (IS) simulation, two basic problems are encountered, that of determining the estimation variance and that of evaluating the proper IS parameters needed in the simulations. The authors derive new upper and lower bounds on the estimation variance which are applicable to IS techniques. The upper bound is simple to evaluate and may be minimized by the proper selection of the IS parameter. Thus, lower and upper bounds on the improvement ratio of various IS techniques relative to the direct Monte Carlo simulation are also available. These bounds are shown to be useful and computationally simple to obtain. Based on the proposed technique, one can readily find practical suboptimum IS parameters. Numerical results indicate that these bounding techniques are useful for IS simulations of linear and nonlinear communication systems with intersymbol interference in which bit error rate and IS estimation variances cannot be obtained readily using prior techniques.

  12. Holography, Dimensional Reduction and the Bekenstein Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Dongsu; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2004-04-01

    We consider dimensional reduction of the lightlike holography of the covariant entropy bound from D+1 dimensional geometry of M × S1 to the D dimensional geometry M. With a warping factor, the local Bekenstein bound in D+1 dimensions leads to a more refined form of the bound from the D dimensional view point. With this new local Bekenstein bound, it is quite possible to saturate the lightlike holography even with nonvanishing expansion rate. With a Kaluza-Klein gauge field, the dimensional reduction implies a stronger bound where the energy momentum tensor contribution is replaced by the energy momentum tensor with the electromagnetic contribution subtracted.

  13. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  14. Basic algebraic topology

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, Anant R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Basic Problem Fundamental Group Function Spaces and Quotient Spaces Relative Homotopy Some Typical Constructions Cofibrations Fibrations Categories and Functors Cell Complexes and Simplicial Complexes Basics of Convex Polytopes Cell Complexes Product of Cell Complexes Homotopical Aspects Cellular Maps Abstract Simplicial Complexes Geometric Realization of Simplicial Complexes Barycentric Subdivision Simplicial Approximation Links and Stars Covering Spaces and Fundamental Group Basic Definitions Lifting Properties Relation with the Fundamental Group Classification of Covering P

  15. Hydromechanics - basic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Tak; Lee, Je Geun

    1987-03-01

    This book tells of hydromechanics, which is about basic properties of hydromechanics such as conception, definition, mass, power and weight, and perfect fluid and perfect gas, hydrostatics with summary, basic equation of hydrostatics, relative balance of hydrostatics, and kinematics of hydromechanics, description method of floating, hydromechanics about basic knowledge, equation of moment, energy equation and application of Bernoulli equation, application of momentum theory, inviscid flow and fluid measuring.

  16. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  17. A material optimization model to approximate energy bounds for cellular materials under multiload conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedes, J.M.; Rodrigues, H.C.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a computational model, based on inverse homogenization and topology design, for approximating energy bounds for two-phase composites under multiple load cases. The approach allows for the identification of possible single-scale cellular materials that give rise to the optimal...... bounds within this class of composites. A comparison of the computational results with the globally optimal bounds given via rank-N layered composites illustrates the behaviour for tension and shear load situations, as well as the importance of considering the shape of the basic unit cell as part...

  18. Physical Activity Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How much physical activity do you need? Regular physical activity helps ...

  19. Interactions between macromolecule-bound antioxidants and Trolox during liposome autoxidation: A multivariate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Rubio, Jose Manuel Amigo; Andersen, Mogens L; Gökmen, Vural

    2017-12-15

    The interactions between free and macromolecule-bound antioxidants were investigated in order to evaluate their combined effects on the antioxidant environment. Dietary fiber (DF), protein and lipid-bound antioxidants, obtained from whole wheat, soybean and olive oil products, respectively and Trolox were used for this purpose. Experimental studies were carried out in autoxidizing liposome medium by monitoring the development of fluorescent products formed by lipid oxidation. Chemometric methods were used both at experimental design and multivariate data analysis stages. Comparison of the simple addition effects of Trolox and bound antioxidants with measured values on lipid oxidation revealed synergetic interactions for DF and refined olive oil-bound antioxidants, and antagonistic interactions for protein and extra virgin olive oil-bound antioxidants with Trolox. A generalized version of logistic function was successfully used for modelling the oxidation curve of liposomes. Principal component analysis revealed two separate phases of liposome autoxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Capacity Bounds for Parallel Optical Wireless Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-01-01

    A system consisting of parallel optical wireless channels with a total average intensity constraint is studied. Capacity upper and lower bounds for this system are derived. Under perfect channel-state information at the transmitter (CSIT), the bounds have to be optimized with respect to the power allocation over the parallel channels. The optimization of the lower bound is non-convex, however, the KKT conditions can be used to find a list of possible solutions one of which is optimal. The optimal solution can then be found by an exhaustive search algorithm, which is computationally expensive. To overcome this, we propose low-complexity power allocation algorithms which are nearly optimal. The optimized capacity lower bound nearly coincides with the capacity at high SNR. Without CSIT, our capacity bounds lead to upper and lower bounds on the outage probability. The outage probability bounds meet at high SNR. The system with average and peak intensity constraints is also discussed.

  1. On order bounded subsets of locally solid Riesz spaces | Hong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a topological Riesz space there are two types of bounded subsets: order bounded subsets and topologically bounded subsets. It is natural to ask (1) whether an order bounded subset is topologically bounded and (2) whether a topologically bounded subset is order bounded. A classical result gives a partial answer to (1) ...

  2. VORONOI DIAGRAMS WITHOUT BOUNDING BOXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. K. Sang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010 and Nerbonne et al (2011.

  3. Cosmological bounds on neutrino statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Salas, P. F.; Gariazzo, S.; Laveder, M.; Pastor, S.; Pisanti, O.; Truong, N.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the phenomenological implications of the violation of the Pauli exclusion principle for neutrinos, focusing on cosmological observables such as the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and the primordial abundances of light elements. Neutrinos that behave (at least partly) as bosonic particles have a modified equilibrium distribution function that implies a different influence on the evolution of the Universe that, in the case of massive neutrinos, can not be simply parametrized by a change in the effective number of neutrinos. Our results show that, despite the precision of the available cosmological data, only very weak bounds can be obtained on neutrino statistics, disfavouring a more bosonic behaviour at less than 2σ.

  4. Fundamental Bounds on MIMO Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenborg, Casimir; Gustafsson, Mats

    2018-01-01

    Antenna current optimization is often used to analyze the optimal performance of antennas. Antenna performance can be quantified in e.g., minimum Q-factor and efficiency. The performance of MIMO antennas is more involved and, in general, a single parameter is not sufficient to quantify it. Here, the capacity of an idealized channel is used as the main performance quantity. An optimization problem in the current distribution for optimal capacity, measured in spectral efficiency, given a fixed Q-factor and efficiency is formulated as a semi-definite optimization problem. A model order reduction based on characteristic and energy modes is employed to improve the computational efficiency. The performance bound is illustrated by solving the optimization problem numerically for rectangular plates and spherical shells.

  5. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  6. Critical requirement for aspartic acid at position 82 of myelin basic protein 73-86 for recruitment of V beta 8.2+ T cells and encephalitogenicity in the Lewis rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltz, R B; Wauben, M H; Wolf, N A; Swanborg, R H

    1999-01-15

    We synthesized single amino acid-substituted peptide analogues of guinea pig myelin basic protein (MBP) 73-86 to study the importance of aspartic acid at residue 82 (QKSQRSQDENPV), which previous reports have suggested is a critical TCR contact residue. Whereas the wild-type 73-86 peptide elicited severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat, none of the peptide analogues with substitutions at position 82 were capable of inducing EAE. The inability to cause EAE was not due to a failure to bind MHC or to elicit T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. T cells specific for MBP73-86 did not cross-react with any of the analogues tested, further indicating the importance of this residue in T cell responses to 73-86. Analysis by flow cytometry showed that only the wild-type 73-86 peptide was capable of recruiting V beta 8.2+ T cells, which have been shown previously to be important for disease induction. Reduced expression of the V beta 8.2 TCR was also seen in Lewis rats protected from EAE by coimmunization of MBP73-86 with 73-86(82D-->A), despite an increase in cytokine production when both peptides were present during in vitro culture. The data indicate that aspartic acid 82 is a critical TCR contact residue and is required for the recruitment of V beta 8.2+ T cells and the encephalitogenic activity of MBP73-86.

  7. Generating substrate bound functional chemokine gradients in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    Microcontact printing (mCP) is employed to generate discontinuous microscale gradients of active fractalkine, a chemokine expressed by endothelial cells near sites of inflammation where it is believed to form concentration gradients descending away from the inflamed area. In vivo, fractalkine is ...... surface-bound chemokines (haptotactic gradients). The use of a capture antibody facilitates control of the orientation of tagged molecules, thereby ensuring a high degree of bio-functionality through correct presentation and reduced protein denaturation....

  8. BASIC Beats PASCAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ever, Jacob

    1981-01-01

    Features of two versions of the BASIC programing language are compared with the features of the PASCAL programing language. The application chosen for comparison was a word processor. The conclusion was that PASCAL had the best language features, but BASIC had better systems capabilities. (MP)

  9. Basic Electronics I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, L. Paul

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of twenty-nine units of instruction in five major content areas: Orientation, Basic Principles of Electricity/Electronics, Fundamentals of Direct Current, Fundamentals of Alternating Current, and Applying for a Job. Each instructional unit includes some or all of…

  10. Finding Basic Writing's Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mary P.; Brossell, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Posits that basic writing serves a vital function by providing writing support for at-risk students and serves the needs of a growing student population that universities accept yet feel needs additional writing instruction. Concludes that the basic writing classroom is the most effective educational support for at-risk students and their writing.…

  11. Basic Cancer Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basics of cancer . Carcinoma Cancer that starts in skin or tissues that line the inside or cover the outside of internal organs. Cells The basic units that make up the human body. Chemoprevention The use of natural, synthetic (made in a laboratory), or biologic (from a ...

  12. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... Abstract. We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment ...

  13. Indonesian Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This audiolingual course in Indonesian consists of 102 lesson units; Volumes I-XI. (Volume I is in two separately bound sections.) The lessons are designed to train beginning students to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Indonesian. (This scale rates native speakers on Level 5.) Units consist of perception drills…

  14. Defect Detection: Combining Bounded Model Checking and Code Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Akhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bounded model checking (BMC of C/C++ programs is a matter of scientific enquiry that attracts great attention in the last few years. In this paper, we present our approach to this problem. It is based on combining several recent results in BMC, namely, the use of LLVM as a baseline for model generation, employment of high-performance Z3 SMT solver to do the formula heavy-lifting, and the use of various function summaries to improve analysis efficiency and expressive power. We have implemented a basic prototype; experiment results on a set of simple test BMC problems are satisfactory.  

  15. Ecotin-Like ISP of L. major Promastigotes Fine-Tunes Macrophage Phagocytosis by Limiting the Pericellular Release of Bradykinin from Surface-Bound Kininogens: A Survival Strategy Based on the Silencing of Proinflammatory G-Protein Coupled Kinin B2 and B1 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Svensjö

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of serine peptidases (ISPs expressed by Leishmania major enhance intracellular parasitism in macrophages by targeting neutrophil elastase (NE, a serine protease that couples phagocytosis to the prooxidative TLR4/PKR pathway. Here we investigated the functional interplay between ISP-expressing L. major and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS. Enzymatic assays showed that NE inhibitor or recombinant ISP-2 inhibited KKS activation in human plasma activated by dextran sulfate. Intravital microscopy in the hamster cheek pouch showed that topically applied L. major promastigotes (WT and Δisp2/3 mutants potently induced plasma leakage through the activation of bradykinin B2 receptors (B2R. Next, using mAbs against kininogen domains, we showed that these BK-precursor proteins are sequestered by L. major promastigotes, being expressed at higher % in the Δisp2/3 mutant population. Strikingly, analysis of the role of kinin pathway in the phagocytic uptake of L. major revealed that antagonists of B2R or B1R reversed the upregulated uptake of Δisp2/3 mutants without inhibiting macrophage internalization of WT L. major. Collectively, our results suggest that L. major ISP-2 fine-tunes macrophage phagocytosis by inhibiting the pericellular release of proinflammatory kinins from surface bound kininogens. Ongoing studies should clarify whether L. major ISP-2 subverts TLR4/PKR-dependent prooxidative responses of macrophages by preventing activation of G-protein coupled B2R/B1R.

  16. Ecotin-like ISP of L. major promastigotes fine-tunes macrophage phagocytosis by limiting the pericellular release of bradykinin from surface-bound kininogens: a survival strategy based on the silencing of proinflammatory G-protein coupled kinin B2 and B1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensjö, Erik; Nogueira de Almeida, Larissa; Vellasco, Lucas; Juliano, Luiz; Scharfstein, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of serine peptidases (ISPs) expressed by Leishmania major enhance intracellular parasitism in macrophages by targeting neutrophil elastase (NE), a serine protease that couples phagocytosis to the prooxidative TLR4/PKR pathway. Here we investigated the functional interplay between ISP-expressing L. major and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). Enzymatic assays showed that NE inhibitor or recombinant ISP-2 inhibited KKS activation in human plasma activated by dextran sulfate. Intravital microscopy in the hamster cheek pouch showed that topically applied L. major promastigotes (WT and Δisp2/3 mutants) potently induced plasma leakage through the activation of bradykinin B2 receptors (B2R). Next, using mAbs against kininogen domains, we showed that these BK-precursor proteins are sequestered by L. major promastigotes, being expressed at higher % in the Δisp2/3 mutant population. Strikingly, analysis of the role of kinin pathway in the phagocytic uptake of L. major revealed that antagonists of B2R or B1R reversed the upregulated uptake of Δisp2/3 mutants without inhibiting macrophage internalization of WT L. major. Collectively, our results suggest that L. major ISP-2 fine-tunes macrophage phagocytosis by inhibiting the pericellular release of proinflammatory kinins from surface bound kininogens. Ongoing studies should clarify whether L. major ISP-2 subverts TLR4/PKR-dependent prooxidative responses of macrophages by preventing activation of G-protein coupled B2R/B1R.

  17. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  18. Instanton bound states in ABJM theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    The partition function of the ABJM theory receives non-perturbative corrections due to instanton effects. We study these non-perturbative corrections, including bound states of worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons, in the Fermi-gas approach. We require that the total non-perturbative correction should be always finite for arbitrary Chern-Simons level. This finiteness is realized quite non-trivially because each bound state contribution naively diverges at some levels. The poles of each contribution should be canceled out in total. We use this pole cancellation mechanism to find unknown bound state corrections from known ones. We conjecture a general expression of the bound state contribution. Summing up all the bound state contributions, we find that the effect of bound states is simply incorporated into the worldsheet instanton correction by a redefinition of the chemical potential in the Fermi-gas system. Analytic expressions of the 3- and 4-membrane instanton corrections are also proposed.

  19. Basic rocks in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirainen, T.; Gehoer, S.; Iljina, M.; Kaerki, A.; Paakkola, J.; Vuollo, J.

    1992-10-01

    Basic igneous rocks, containing less than 52% SiO 2 , constitute an important part of the Finnish Archaean and Proterozoic crust. In the Archaean crust exist two units which contain the majority of the basic rocks. The Arcaean basic rocks are metavolcanics and situated in the Greenstone Belts of Eastern Finland. They are divided into two units. The greenstones of the lower one are tholeiites, komatiites and basaltic komatiites. The upper consists of bimodal series of volcanics and the basic rocks of which are Fe-tholeiites, basaltic komatiites and komatiites. Proterozoic basic rocks are divided into seven groups according to their ages. The Proterozoic igneous activity started by the volominous basic magmatism 2.44 Ga ago. During this stage formed the layered intrusions and related dykes in the Northern Finland. 2.2 Ga old basic rocks are situated at the margins of Karelian formations. 2.1 Ga aged Fe-tholeiitic magmatic activity is widespread in Eastern and Northern Finland. The basic rocks of 1.97 Ga age group are met within the Karelian Schist Belts as obducted ophiolite complexes but they occur also as tholeiitic diabase dykes cutting the Karelian schists and Archean basement. The intrusions and the volcanics of the 1.9 Ga old basic igneous activity are mostly encountered around the Granitoid Complex of Central Finland. Subjotnian, 1.6 Ga aged tholeiitic diabases are situated around the Rapakivi massifs of Southern Finland, and postjotnian, 1.2 Ga diabases in Western Finland where they form dykes cutting Svecofennian rocks

  20. From basic needs to basic rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facio, A

    1995-06-01

    After arriving at an understanding that basic rights refer to all human needs, it is clear that a recognition of the basic needs of female humans must precede the realization of their rights. The old Women in Development (WID) framework only understood women's needs from an androcentric perspective which was limited to practical interests. Instead, women's primary need is to be free from their subordination to men. Such an understanding places all of women's immediate needs in a new light. A human rights approach to development would see women not as beneficiaries but as people entitled to enjoy the benefits of development. Discussion of what equality before the law should mean to women began at the Third World Conference on Women in Nairobi where the issue of violence against women was first linked to development. While debate continues about the distinction between civil and political rights and economic, social, and cultural rights, the realities of women's lives do not permit such a distinction. The concept of the universality of human rights did not become codified until the UN proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. The declaration has been criticized by feminists because the view of human rights it embodies has been too strongly influenced by a liberal Western philosophy which stresses individual rights and because it is ambiguous on the distinction between human rights and the rights of a citizen. The protection of rights afforded by the Declaration, however, should not be viewed as a final achievement but as an ongoing struggle. International conferences have led to an analysis of the human-rights approach to sustainable development which concludes that women continue to face the routine denial of their rights. Each human right must be redefined from the perspective of women's needs, which must also be redefined. Women must forego challenging the concept of the universality of human rights in order to overcome the argument of cultural

  1. Bounded elements in Locally C*-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Harti, Rachid

    2001-09-01

    In order to get more useful information about Locally C*-algebras, we introduce in this paper the notion of bounded elements. First, we study the connection between bounded elements and spectrally bounded elements. Some structural results of Locally C*-algebras are established in Theorems 1 , 2 and 3. As an immediate consequence of Theorem 3, we give a characterization of the connected component of the identity in the group of unitary elements for a Locally C*-algebra. (author)

  2. Boundedly UC spaces: characterisations and preservation | Jain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A metric space (X, d) is called a boundedly UC space if every closed and bounded subset of X is a UC space. A metric space (X, d) is called a UC space if each real-valued continuous function on (X, d) is uniformly continuous. In this paper, we study twenty-two equivalent conditions for a metric space to be a boundedly UC ...

  3. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  4. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  5. Bounded cohomology of discrete groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frigerio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The author manages a near perfect equilibrium between necessary technicalities (always well motivated) and geometric intuition, leading the readers from the first simple definition to the most striking applications of the theory in 13 very pleasant chapters. This book can serve as an ideal textbook for a graduate topics course on the subject and become the much-needed standard reference on Gromov's beautiful theory. -Michelle Bucher The theory of bounded cohomology, introduced by Gromov in the late 1980s, has had powerful applications in geometric group theory and the geometry and topology of manifolds, and has been the topic of active research continuing to this day. This monograph provides a unified, self-contained introduction to the theory and its applications, making it accessible to a student who has completed a first course in algebraic topology and manifold theory. The book can be used as a source for research projects for master's students, as a thorough introduction to the field for graduate student...

  6. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Martin, E-mail: marlohmann@gmail.com [Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  7. Modifications of the Bekenstein Bound from Dimensional Reduction of Covariant Entropy Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Ho-Ung

    2005-12-01

    We consider dimensional reduction of the covariant entropy bound from D + 1 dimensional geometry of M × S1 to the D dimensional geometry M. With a warping factor, the local Bekenstein bound in D + 1 dimensions leads to a more refined form of the local Bekenstein bound from the D dimensional view point. With this new local Bekenstein bound, it is possible to saturate the lightlike holography bound even with nonvanishing expansion rate. With a Kaluza-Klein gauge field, the dimensional reduction implies a stronger bound where the energy momentum tensor contribution is replaced by the energy momentum tensor with the electromagnetic contribution subtracted.

  8. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  9. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Treatment: The Basics Last Reviewed: March 22, 2018 ...

  10. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  13. Noise Radar Technology Basics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thayaparan, T; Wernik, C

    2006-01-01

    .... In this report, the basic theory of noise radar design is treated. The theory supports the use of noise waveforms for radar detection and imaging in such applications as covert military surveillance and reconnaissance...

  14. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of ... injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  16. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD Kristine Cichowski, MS Read Bio Founding ...

  18. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Environment Contact Us Share Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  19. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  20. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  1. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries ... Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, ...

  2. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  3. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D. [Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology, Sydney (Australia)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. T-cell seeding: neonatal transfer of anti-myelin basic protein T-cell lines renders Fischer rats susceptible later in life to the active induction of experimental autoimmune encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Mor, Felix; Machlenkin, Arthur; Machlenkin, Athur; Goldberger, Ofir; Marmor, Yotvat; Eisenbach, Lea; Cohen, Irun R; Cohen, Irun

    2009-09-01

    Fischer strain rats resist active induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) following immunization with guinea-pig myelin basic protein (MBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Nevertheless, we now report that an encephalitogenic CD4(+) anti-MBP T-cell line could be developed from actively immunized Fischer rats. Adoptive transfer of the activated line mediated acute EAE in adult Fischer rats, but not in 1-day-old rats. Moreover, we found that both resting and activated anti-MBP T cells injected 1 day post-natally rendered these rats susceptible later in life to the active induction of EAE by immunization with MBP/CFA. The actively induced EAE manifested the accelerated onset of a secondary, memory-type response. Resting anti-MBP T cells injected even up to 2 weeks post-natally produced no clinical signs but seeded 50-100% of the recipients for an active encephalitogenic immune response to MBP. An earlier T-cell injection (1-2 days) produced a higher incidence and stronger response. The transferred resting T cells entered the neonatal spleen and thymus and proliferated there but did not change the total anti-MBP precursor number in adults. Splenocytes harvested from rats that were injected neonatally but not exposed to MBP in vivo proliferated strongly and produced significant amounts of interferon-gamma to MBP in vitro. Similar results were observed in rats injected with resting T-cell lines reactive to ovalbumin, suggesting that the neonatal injection of resting T cells specific for a self or for a foreign antigen can seed the immune system with the potential for an enhanced effector response to that antigen later in life.

  5. [The effect of blue light on human retinal pigment epithelium cells α1D subunit protein expression and vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor secretion in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haihui; Cai, Shanjun; Gong, Xin; Wu, Zhipeng; Lyn, Jianping; Su, Gang; Xie, Bing

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of blue light on human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) α1D subunit protein expression and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) secretion in vitro. The fourth generation cultured human RPE cells in vitro were randomly divided into 4 groups, group A (control), group B (exposure to blue light), group C (exposure to blue light+nifedipine), group D [exposure to blue light+(-)Bay K8644]. Cells were exposed to blue light (2 000 ± 500) lx for 6 hours, and cells culture completed 24 hours later. VEGF and bFGF concentration were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analysis L-type calcium channel α1D subunit mRNA expression. Western blot was used to examine the protein expression of L-type calcium channel α1D subunit. Analysis of variance was used to compare the difference of α1D subunit mRNA and protein expression, VEGF and bFGF concentration between groups. Correlation analysis was used to show the relationship between α1D subunit protein expression and concentration of VEGF and bFGF. (1) There is significant statistically difference in the population mean of VEGF and bFGF concentration in four groups (F = 99.441, 21.310, P = 0.000,0.000) . VEGF and bFGF concentration in group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) and group D (3 808.01 ± 94.01, 1 485.82 ± 108.97) was higher than it was in group A (2 401.09 ± 228.07, 1 232.42 ± 65.41) , which was statistically different (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.019, 0.000). And it was higher in group D (3 808.01 ± 94.01, 1 485.82 ± 108.97) compared with group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) (P = 0.000, 0.006). While, it was lower in group C (1 927.28 ± 143.11, 1 149.39 ± 62.99) than it was in group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) (P = 0.000, 0.000) . (2) The mean of mRNA expression of α1D subunit between four groups was statistically significant (F

  6. Basic Concurrency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvengreen, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming.......In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming....

  7. Transportation Emissions: some basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontovas, Christos A.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2016-01-01

    . The main purpose of this chapter is to introduce some basic concepts that are relevant in the quest of green transportation logistics. First, we present the basics of estimating emissions from transportation activities, the current statistics and future trends, as well as the total impact of air emissions...... of the energy efficiency gap and examines why governments and companies may forego cost-effective investments in energy efficiency, even though they could significantly reduce energy consumption at a lower cost....

  8. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  9. Basic Monetary Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Farm, Ante

    2017-01-01

    This is an introduction to money and the workings of the financial system. The creation of money is discussed in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explains how international payments can add to money creation but also generate a new type of money, usually called Eurodollars. Basic securities are defined and characterized in Chapter 3, namely bills, bonds and shares, but basic derivatives, like futures, swaps, and options, are also discussed. Chapter 4 deals with pricing by banks when extending l...

  10. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Suyenty; Herlina Sentosa; Mariani Agustine; Sandy Anwar; Abun Lie; Erwin Sutanto

    2007-01-01

    Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemic...

  11. Water state in basic aluminium tungstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozharskaya, L.A.; Pitsyuga, V.G.; Mokhosoev, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    Water state in basic aluminium tungstates is investigated using the method of proton magnetic resonance. Existence of various types of water molecules, differing by their geometry and bond energies, is established in the investigated compounds. The obtained results permit to suppose that in Al 6 (OH) 16 WO 4 x10H 2 O, AL 4 (OH) 10 WO 4 x5,5H 2 O and Al 3 (OH) 7 WO 7 x7H 2 O compounds coordinationally non-saturated oxygen atoms in anion are saturated basically at the expense of OH-groups, and water molecules form hydrogen bonds as opposed to Al 2 (OH) 4 WO 4 x7H 2 O and AlOH(WO 4 )x8.5H 2 O in which a considerable part of water molecules is bound directly with anion oxygen atoms

  12. O{sup -} bound small polarons in oxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, O F [Department of Physics, University of Osnabrueck, D-49076 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Holes bound to acceptor defects in oxide crystals are often localized by lattice distortion at just one of the equivalent oxygen ligands of the defect. Such holes thus form small polarons in symmetric clusters of a few oxygen ions. An overview on mainly the optical manifestations of those clusters is given. The article is essentially divided into two parts: the first one covers the basic features of the phenomena and their explanations, exemplified by several paradigmatic defects; in the second part numerous oxide materials are presented which exhibit bound small polaron optical properties. The first part starts with summaries on the production of bound hole polarons and the identification of their structure. It is demonstrated why they show strong, wide absorption bands, usually visible, based on polaron stabilization energies of typically 1 eV. The basic absorption process is detailed with a fictitious two-well system. Clusters with four, six and twelve equivalent ions are realized in various oxide compounds. In these cases several degenerate optically excited polaron states occur, leading to characteristic final state resonance splittings. The peak energies of the absorption bands as well as the sign of the transfer energy depend on the topology of the clusters. A special section is devoted to the distinction between interpolaron and intrapolaron optical transitions. The latter are usually comparatively weak. The oxide compounds exhibiting bound hole small polaron absorptions include the alkaline earth oxides (e.g. MgO), BeO and ZnO, the perovskites BaTiO{sub 3} and KTaO{sub 3}, quartz, the sillenites (e.g. Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20}), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LiNbO{sub 3}, topaz and various other materials. There are indications that the magnetic crystals NiO, doped with Li, and LaMnO{sub 3}, doped with Sr, also show optical features caused by bound hole polarons. Beyond being elementary paradigms for the properties of small polarons in general, the defect species treated

  13. Stronger Lagrangian bounds by use of slack variables: applications to machine scheduling problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Hoogeveen (Han); S.L. van de Velde (Steef)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractLagrangian relaxation is a powerful bounding technique that has been applied successfully to manyNP-hard combinatorial optimization problems. The basic idea is to see anNP-hard problem as an easy-to-solve problem complicated by a number of nasty side constraints. We show that

  14. Relativistic effects in the study of weakly bound 17 F and 11 Be nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relativistic effects are employed to describe the weakly bound nuclei of 17 F and 11 B e . In order to calculate the energy levels of the ground state and the excited states of these nuclei, we solved the Dirac equation with pseudospin symmetry in the shell model by using the basic concept of supersymmetric shape ...

  15. Isoperimetric upper bounds for the first eigenvalue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [5] Buser P and Karcher H, Gromov's almost flat manifolds, Société mathématique de. France (1981). [6] Grosjean J F, Upper bounds for the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian on compact submanifolds, Pacific. J. Math. 206 (2002) 93–112. [7] Heintze Ernst, Extinsic upper bounds for λ1, Math. Ann. 280 (1988) 389–402.

  16. No-arbitrage bounds for financial scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Alois; Hanke, Michael; Weissensteiner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We derive no-arbitrage bounds for expected excess returns to generate scenarios used in financial applications. The bounds allow to distinguish three regions: one where arbitrage opportunities will never exist, a second where arbitrage may be present, and a third, where arbitrage opportunities...

  17. On the range of completely bounded maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that if every bounded linear map from a C*-algebra α to a von Neumann algebra β is completely bounded, then either α is finite-dimensional or β⫅⊗Mn, where is a commutative von Neumann algebra and Mn is the algebra of n×n complex matrices.

  18. Bound constrained quadratic programming via piecewise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Nielsen, Hans Bruun; Pinar, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the strictly convex quadratic programming problem with bounded variables. A dual problem is derived using Lagrange duality. The dual problem is the minimization of an unconstrained, piecewise quadratic function. It involves a lower bound of lambda/sub 1/ , the smallest eigenvalue...

  19. Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BASUDEB DATTA

    2011-11-20

    Nov 20, 2011 ... Preliminaries. Lower bound theorem. On going work. Definitions. An n-simplex is a convex hull of n + 1 affinely independent points. (called vertices) in some Euclidean space R. N . Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem. Basudeb Datta. Indian Institute of Science. 2 / 27 ...

  20. Exponential Lower Bounds For Policy Iteration

    OpenAIRE

    Fearnley, John

    2010-01-01

    We study policy iteration for infinite-horizon Markov decision processes. It has recently been shown policy iteration style algorithms have exponential lower bounds in a two player game setting. We extend these lower bounds to Markov decision processes with the total reward and average-reward optimality criteria.