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Sample records for basic protein bound

  1. CBC bound proteins and RNA fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacometti, Simone

    the different CBC subcomplexes are recruited to the RNP. Here, we used an individual nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) approach to identify the transcriptome-wide targets for 5 different components of the CBCAP and CBCN complexes, and compared results to the previously...... may therefore be determined by additional RNA features and/or by other RNA-binding proteins, which may synergize with the cap and drive the formation of one specific CBC subcomplex instead of another. In an attempt to identify yet unknown factors that may interact with cap-bound CBCAP and CBCN, we...

  2. Stochastic Ratchet Mechanisms for Replacement of Proteins Bound to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, S.; Marko, J.F.; Monasson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments indicate that unbinding rates of proteins from DNA can depend on the concentration of proteins in nearby solution. Here we present a theory of multi-step replacement of DNA-bound proteins by solution-phase proteins. For four different kinetic scenarios we calculate the dependence of protein unbinding and replacement rates on solution protein concentration. We find (1) strong effects of progressive ‘rezipping’ of the solution-phase protein onto DNA sites liberated by ‘unzipping’ of the originally bound protein; (2) that a model in which solution-phase proteins bind non-specifically to DNA can describe experiments on exchanges between the non specific DNA-binding proteins Fis-Fis and Fis-HU; (3) that a binding specific model describes experiments on the exchange of CueR proteins on specific binding sites. PMID:24972228

  3. Identification of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Talens

    Full Text Available Several proteins are known to bind to a fibrin network and to change clot properties or function. In this study we aimed to get an overview of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins. A plasma clot was formed by adding thrombin, CaCl(2 and aprotinin to citrated platelet-poor plasma and unbound proteins were washed away with Tris-buffered saline. Non-covalently bound proteins were extracted, separated with 2D gel electrophoresis and visualized with Sypro Ruby. Excised protein spots were analyzed with mass spectrometry. The identity of the proteins was verified by checking the mass of the protein, and, if necessary, by Western blot analysis. Next to established fibrin-binding proteins we identified several novel fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins, including α(2-macroglobulin, carboxypeptidase N, α(1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, serum amyloid P, and the apolipoproteins A-I, E, J, and A-IV. The latter six proteins are associated with high-density lipoprotein particles. In addition we showed that high-density lipoprotein associated proteins were also present in fibrinogen preparations purified from plasma. Most plasma proteins in a fibrin clot can be classified into three groups according to either blood coagulation, protease inhibition or high-density lipoprotein metabolism. The presence of high-density lipoprotein in clots might point to a role in hemostasis.

  4. Identification of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Talens (Simone); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); D.C. Rijken (Dingeman)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSeveral proteins are known to bind to a fibrin network and to change clot properties or function. In this study we aimed to get an overview of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins. A plasma clot was formed by adding thrombin, CaCl2 and aprotinin to citrated platelet-poor plasma and unbound

  5. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  6. Substrate-Bound Protein Gradients to Study Haptotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien G. Ricoult

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins – including many secreted cues – are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact-printing, light patterning and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro, and focus on their application to study axon guidance. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein make possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  7. Substrate-bound protein gradients to study haptotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricoult, Sébastien G; Kennedy, Timothy E; Juncker, David

    2015-01-01

    Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however, it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins - including many secreted cues - are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact printing, light patterning, and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein makes possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  8. Adaptation of the Bradford protein assay to membrane-bound proteins by solubilizing in glucopyranoside detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, B O

    1987-04-01

    A procedure was developed for the quantitation of solubilized proteins using the Bradford assay in the presence of glucopyranoside detergents. These detergents solubilized membrane-bound proteins with minimal background absorbance at 595 nm. Absorbance at 650 nm was also low, indicating that these detergents do not significantly stabilize the neutral species of Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 that produces interference in the presence of other detergents. Hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside produced less absorbance than did larger glucopyranosides, and the increase in its absorbance at 595 nm in the presence of dye reagent was related linearly to its concentration from 0 to 2%. Absorbance produced by membrane-bound protein was increased by the presence of up to 0.2% hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (final concentration in dye reagent) and then remained stable up to 1%, indicating that these concentrations of this detergent allowed membrane-bound proteins to react completely with the dye reagent. Standard curves of several proteins were similar in the absence or presence of 0.1-0.5% hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The quantitation of both soluble and membrane-bound proteins by the Bradford assay was similar in the presence of 0.2% hexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Estimates of membrane-bound protein by this assay agreed with estimates obtained with the Lowry assay and with quantitative amino acid analysis. This procedure requires no extra steps; thus, it is as rapid and convenient as the original Bradford protein assay.

  9. Microcystin-Bound Protein Patterns in Different Cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Field Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nian; Hu, Lili; Song, Lirong; Gan, Nanqin

    2016-01-01

    Micocystin (MC) exists in Microcystis cells in two different forms, free and protein-bound. We examined the dynamic change in extracellular free MCs, intracellular free MCs and protein-bound MCs in both batch cultures and semi-continuous cultures, using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blot. The results showed that the free MC per cell remained constant, while the quantity of protein-bound MCs increased with the growth of Microcystis cells in both kinds of culture. Significant changes in the dominant MC-bound proteins occurred in the late exponential growth phase of batch cultures, while the dominant MC-bound proteins in semi-continuous cultures remained the same. In field samples collected at different months in Lake Taihu, the dominant MC-bound proteins were shown to be similar, but the amount of protein-bound MC varied and correlated with the intracellular MC content. We identified MC-bound proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis immunoblots and mass spectrometry. The 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL was a prominent MC-bound protein. Three essential glycolytic enzymes and ATP synthase alpha subunit were also major targets of MC-binding, which might contribute to sustained growth in semi-continuous culture. Our results indicate that protein-bound MC may be important for sustaining growth and adaptation of Microcystis sp. PMID:27754336

  10. Specific interaction of central nervous system myelin basic protein with lipids effects of basic protein on glucose leakage from liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, R.M.; London, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The leakage from liposomes preloaded with glucose was continuously monitored in a Perkin-Elmer Model 356 dual beam spectrophotometer using an enzyme-linked assay system. The central nervous system myelin basic protein (A1 protein) caused a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of leakage from liposomes prep

  11. Ensemble-based characterization of unbound and bound states on protein energy landscape

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Tuzikov, Alexander V; Vakser, Ilya A

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of protein energy landscape and conformational ensembles is important for understanding mechanisms of protein folding and function. We studied ensembles of bound and unbound conformations of six proteins to explore their binding mechanisms and characterize the energy landscapes in implicit solvent. First, results show that bound and unbound spectra often significantly overlap. Moreover, the larger the overlap the smaller the RMSD between bound and unbound conformational ensembles. Second, the analysis of the unbound-to-bound changes points to conformational selection as the binding mechanism for four of the proteins. Third, the center of the unbound spectrum has a higher energy than the center of the corresponding bound spectrum of the dimeric and multimeric states for most of the proteins. This suggests that the unbound states often have larger entropy than the bound states considered outside of the complex. Fourth, the exhaustively long minimization, making small intra-rotamer adjustments, ...

  12. Technical updates to basic proteins focalization using IPG strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dépagne Jordane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gel-based proteomic is a popular and versatile method of global protein separation and quantification. However, separation of basic protein still represents technical challenges with recurrent problems of resolution and reproducibility. Results Three different protocols of protein loading were compared using MCF7 cells proteins. In-gel rehydration, cup-loading and paper-bridge loading were first compared using 6–11 IPG strips, as attempted, in-gel rehydration gave large horizontal steaking; paper-bridge loading displayed an interesting spot resolution, but with a predominant loss of material; cup-loading was selected as the most relevant method, but still needing improvement. Twelve cup-loading protocols were compared with various strip rehydration, and cathodic wick solutions. Destreak appeared as better than DTT for strip rehydration; the use of isopropanol gave no improvement. The best 2DE separation was observed with cathodic wicks filled with rehydration solution complemented with DTT. Paper-bridge loading was finally analyzed using non-limited samples, such as bovine milk. In this case, new spots of basic milk proteins were observed, with or without paper wicks. Conclusion According to this technical study of basic protein focalization with IPG strips, the cup-loading protocol clearly displayed the best resolution and reproducibility: strips were first rehydrated with standard solution, then proteins were cup-loaded with destreak reagent, and focalisation was performed with cathodic wicks filled with rehydration solution and DTT. Paper-bridge loading could be as well used, but preferentially with non-limited samples.

  13. From 'I' to 'L' and back again: the odyssey of membrane-bound M13 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Werner L; Nazarov, Petr V; Koehorst, Rob B M; Spruijt, Ruud B; Hemminga, Marcus A

    2009-05-01

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a surprising protein because it exists both as a membrane protein and as part of the M13 phage coat during its life cycle. Early studies showed that the phage-bound structure of the coat protein was a continuous I-shaped alpha-helix. However, throughout the years various structural models, both I-shaped and L-shaped, have been proposed for the membrane-bound state of the coat protein. Recently, site-directed labelling approaches have enabled the study of the coat protein under conditions that more closely mimic the in vivo membrane-bound state. Interestingly, the structure that has emerged from this work is I-shaped and similar to the structure in the phage-bound state.

  14. Differential Labeling of Free and Disulfide-Bound Thiol Functions in Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiwert, Bettina; Hayen, Heiko; Karst, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of the number of free cysteine groups and disulfide-bound cysteine groups in proteins has been developed based on the sequential labeling of free and bound thiol functionalities with two ferrocene-based maleimide reagents. Liquid chromatography/electrochem

  15. Synergistic interactions of lipids and myelin basic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufang; Doudevski, Ivo; Wood, Denise; Moscarello, Mario; Husted, Cynthia; Genain, Claude; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2004-09-01

    This report describes force measurements and atomic force microscope imaging of lipid-protein interactions that determine the structure of a model membrane system that closely mimics the myelin sheath. Our results suggest that noncovalent, mainly electrostatic and hydrophobic, interactions are responsible for the multilamellar structure and stability of myelin. We find that myelin basic protein acts as a lipid coupler between two apposed bilayers and as a lipid "hole-filler," effectively preventing defect holes from developing. From our protein-mediated-adhesion and force-distance measurements, we develop a simple quantitative model that gives a reasonably accurate picture of the molecular mechanism and adhesion of bilayer-bridging proteins by means of noncovalent interactions. The results and model indicate that optimum myelin adhesion and stability depend on the difference between, rather than the product of, the opposite charges on the lipid bilayers and myelin basic protein, as well as on the repulsive forces associated with membrane fluidity, and that small changes in any of these parameters away from the synergistically optimum values can lead to large changes in the adhesion or even its total elimination. Our results also show that the often-asked question of which membrane species, the lipids or the proteins, are the "important ones" may be misplaced. Both components work synergistically to provide the adhesion and overall structure. A better appreciation of the mechanism of this synergy may allow for a better understanding of stacked and especially myelin membrane structures and may lead to better treatments for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. lipid-protein interactions | myelin membrane structure | membrane adhesion | membrane regeneration/healing | demyelinating diseases

  16. CONTENTS OF SERUM MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN-IGG ANTIBODIES COMPLEXES IN NORMAL PREGNANCY AND GESTOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Levchenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum levels of myelin basic protein (MBP-bound immune complexes were studied in blood sera from women with gestosis, as compared with those in normal pregnancy and non-pregnant woman. The amounts of IgG-MBP complex in blood serum were determined by enzyme immunoassay using isolated anti-МBP-antibodies. The study has shown that about 0.05 mcg of IgG ml of blood serum are associated with myelin basic protein in unpregnant women or in normal pregnancy. Mild gestosis is accompanied by a 2-3-fold increase in MBP immunocomplex concentrations in blood serum. More severe stages of gestosis are characterized by its further rise, thus achieving maximal values of such MBP immune complexes (0.8 mcg/ml in patients with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Their amounts were reduced twice after the periods of eclampsia. Serum levels of MBP-bound IgGs may be used to determine severity of gestosis and to predict a risk of eclampsia in pregnant women.

  17. Structure and function of the proline-rich region of myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, P E; Deber, C M

    1985-08-13

    Myelin basic protein (MBP)--the major extrinsic membrane protein of central nervous system myelin--from several species contains a rarely encountered highly conserved triproline segment as residues 99-101 of its 170-residue sequence. Cis peptide bonds are known to arise at X-Pro junctions in proteins and may be of functional significance in protein folding, chain reversal, and/or maintenance of tertiary structure. We have examined the conformation of this proline-rich region using principally 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (125 MHz) both in intact bovine MBP and in several MBP fragment peptides which we synthesized, including octapeptide 97-104 (Arg-Thr-Pro-Pro-Pro-Ser-Gln-Gly). Results suggested an all-trans conformation in aqueous solution for the triproline segment in MBP hexapeptide (99-104), heptapeptide (98-104), and octapeptide. Comparison with the 13C spectrum of intact MBP (125 MHz) suggested that the proline-rich region, as well as all other X-Pro MBP peptide junctures, was also essentially all trans in aqueous solution. Although experiments in which octapeptide 97-104 was bound to a lipid preparation (4:1 dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidic acid) demonstrated that cis-proline bonds do arise (to the extent of ca. 5%) in the membrane environment, a role of linear chain propagation is suggested for the triproline segment of myelin basic protein.

  18. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  19. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Free and Protein-Bound NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    We introduce a methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image and not on the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. This represents a challenging case for lifetime imaging because the NADH decay times are just 0.4 and 1.0 ns in the free and bound states, respectively. In the present apparatus, lifetime images are created from a series of phase-sensitive images obtained with a gain-modulated image intensifier and recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The intensifier gain is modulated at the light-modulation frequency or a harmonic thereof. A series of stationary phase-sensitive images, each obtained with various phase shifts of the gain-modulation signal, is used to determine the phase angle or modulation of the emission at each pixel, which is in essence the lifetime image. We also describe an imaging procedure that allows specific decay times to be suppressed, allowing in this case suppression of the emission from either free or bound NADH. Since the fluorescence lifetimes of probes are known to be sensitive to numerous chemical and physical factors such as pH, oxygen, temperature, cations, polarity, and binding to macromolecules, this method allows imaging of the chemical or property of interest in macroscopic and microscopic samples. The concept of FLIM appears to have numerous potential applications in the biosciences.

  20. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    OpenAIRE

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa; Freeman, Colin L.; Woolley, Jos; Crisp, Molly K; Wilson, Julie; Fotakis, Anna Katerina; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Haile, James; Thomas, Jessica; Marean, Curtis W.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Mol...

  1. Protein-bound toxins: added value in their removal with high convective volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; Reque, Javier Eduardo; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. In recent years, protein-bound toxins have become more important due to their association with increased morbidity and mortality, characterised by inadequate clearance during dialysis. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of high convective volumes on postdilution online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) on the removal of medium-sized molecules, small molecules and protein-bound molecules.

  2. Basic Endochitinases Are Major Proteins in Castanea sativa Cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collada, C; Casado, R; Fraile, A; Aragoncillo, C

    1992-10-01

    Basic endochitinases are abundant proteins in Castanea sativa Mill. cotyledons. Three basic chitinases were purified with molecular masses of 25, 26, and 32 kD (Ch1, Ch2, and Ch3) and with isoelectric points between 8 and 9.5. Antibodies raised against Ch1 cross-reacted with Ch2 and Ch3. However, Ch3 showed differences when compared with the other two enzymes, especially in its higher cysteine content. The size, amino acid composition, and N-terminal sequence of Ch1 indicate that it is a class II endochitinase and, therefore, has no cysteine-rich hevein domain. Ch1 inhibits the growth of the fungus Trichoderma viride. The biological role of these endochitinases is discussed.

  3. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laet...

  4. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa; Freeman, Colin L; Woolley, Jos; Crisp, Molly K; Wilson, Julie; Fotakis, Anna; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M; Rakownikow Jersie-Christensen, Rosa; Olsen, Jesper V; Haile, James; Thomas, Jessica; Marean, Curtis W; Parkington, John; Presslee, Samantha; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Ditchfield, Peter; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Ward, Martyn W; Wang, Chunting Michelle; Shaw, Marvin D; Harrison, Terry; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; MacPhee, Ross DE; Kwekason, Amandus; Ecker, Michaela; Kolska Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael; Kröger, Roland; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Harding, John H; Cappellini, Enrico; Penkman, Kirsty; Collins, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17092.001 PMID:27668515

  5. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa;

    2016-01-01

    of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell......, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated...... sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C)....

  6. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  7. Non-protein-bound iron and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in classic autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Leoncini, Silvia; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Cerrone, Cosimina; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-02-01

    A link between oxidative stress and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) remains controversial with opposing views on its role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We investigated for the first time the levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), a pro-oxidant factor, and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts (4-HNE PAs), as a marker of lipid peroxidation-induced protein damage, in classic autism. Patients with classic autism (n=20, mean age 12.0±6.2years) and healthy controls (n=18, mean age 11.7±6.5years) were examined. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and 4-HNE PAs in erythrocyte membranes and plasma were detected by Western blotting. The antioxidant defences were evaluated as erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) levels using a spectrophotometric assay. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI levels were significantly increased (1.98- and 3.56-folds) in autistic patients, as compared to controls (p=0.0019 and pautism patients, with a consequent imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant defences. Increased levels of NPBI could contribute to lipid peroxidation and, consequently, to increased plasma and erythrocyte membranes 4-HNE PAs thus amplifying the oxidative damage, potentially contributing to the autistic phenotype.

  8. Determining the Topology of Membrane-Bound Proteins Using PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Vicky; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical methods can help elucidate the membrane topology of hydrophobic membrane proteins where X-ray crystallography is difficult or impractical, providing important structural data. Here, we describe the method of PEGylation, which uses a cysteine-reactive molecule, maleimide polyethylene glycol (mPEG), to determine the cytosolic accessibility of introduced cysteine residues. This accessibility is visualized using Western blotting to detect a band shift that indicates cysteine labeling by mPEG. Using scanning cysteine mutagenesis, followed by PEGylation, one can map the accessibility of the introduced cysteines, hence inferring the membrane topology of the protein.We used PEGylation to determine the membrane topology of the sterol regulatory domain of a cholesterol synthesis enzyme, squalene monooxygenase, identifying that it is anchored to the membrane via a re-entrant loop.

  9. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, Angelita [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Marzi, Stefano [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002 CNRS, IBMC (Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology), 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, France, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Fabbretti, Attilio [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale -INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gualerzi, Claudio O. [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  10. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  11. Separation of basic proteins from Leishmania using a combination of Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) and 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) under basic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Marie-Christine; Racine, Gina; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Basic proteins, an important class of proteins in intracellular organisms such as Leishmania, are usually underrepresented on 2D gels. This chapter describes a method combining basic proteins fractionation using Free flow electrophoresis in isoelectric focusing mode (IEF-FFE) followed by protein separation using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in basic conditions. The combination of these two techniques represents a great improvement for the visualization of Leishmania proteins with basic pI using 2D gels.

  12. Absorption and retention of free and milk protein-bound cyano- and hydroxocobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Linda Skibsted; Juul, Christian Bredgaard; Fedosov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    alone or bound to milk protein. Materials and methods We synthesized labeled OH[57Co]Cbl from commercially available CN[57Co]Cbl. Recombinant bovine transcobalamin (rbTC) was produced in yeast and skimmed milk obtained off the shelf. Male Wistar rats (250–300 g) received labeled Cbl by gastric gavage...

  13. Absorption of a mutagenic metabolite released from protein-bound residues of furazolidone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Bruchem, van G.D.; Sonne, K.; Enninga, I.C.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Heskamp, H.; Huveneers-Oorsprong, M.B.M.; Hoeven, van der J.C.M.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    The use of nitrofurans as veterinary drugs has been banned in the EU since 1993 due to doubts on the safety of the protein-bound residues of these drugs in edible products. Following treatment of pigs with the veterinary drug furazolidone free 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), the side-chain of the dru

  14. Mixed matrix hollow fiber membranes for removal of protein-bound toxins from human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijink, M.S.L.; Wester, M.; Glorieux, G.; Gerritsen, K; Sun, J.; Swart, P.C.; Borneman, Z.; Wessling, M.; Vanholder, R.; Joles, J.A.; Stamatialis, D.

    2013-01-01

    In end stage renal disease (ESRD) waste solutes accumulate in body fluid. Removal of protein bound solutes using conventional renal replacement therapies is currently very poor while their accumulation is associated with adverse outcomes in ESRD. Here we investigate the application of a hollow fiber

  15. Utilization of crystalline and protein-bound amino acids by growing-finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Buxant, L.; Clausen, D.

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that diets containing crystalline AA (CAA) and protein-bound AA had a comparable nitrogen retention rate, even though the CAA-based diet is optimized as having a standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of 100% for the CAA. Two isoenergetic diets were formulated to provide ident...

  16. Myelin Basic Protein Citrullination in Multiple Sclerosis: A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Tan, Dewei; Piao, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial demyelinating disease characterized by neurodegenerative events and autoimmune response against myelin component. Citrullination or deimination, a post-translational modification of protein-bound arginine into citrulline, catalyzed by Ca(2+) dependent peptidylarginine deiminase enzyme (PAD), plays an essential role in physiological processes include gene expression regulation, apoptosis and the plasticity of the central nervous system, while aberrant citrullination can generate new epitopes, thus involving in the initiation and/or progression of autoimmune disorder like MS. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is the major myelin protein and is generally considered to maintain the stability of the myelin sheath. This review describes the MBP citrullination and its consequence, as well as offering further support for the "inside-out" hypothesis that MS is primarily a neurodegenerative disease with secondary inflammatory demyelination. In addition, it discusses the role of MBP citrullination in the immune inflammation and explores the potential of inhibition of PAD enzymes as a therapeutic strategy for the disease.

  17. Coated carbon hemoperfusion provides limited clearance of protein-bound solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Diana C; Recht, Natalie S; Hostetter, Thomas H; Meyer, Timothy W

    2008-09-01

    This study assessed the capacity of a cartridge containing coated granular carbon to clear protein-bound solutes. Clearances for test solutes were measured while an albumin solution representing plasma was pumped from a 10 L reservoir through the cartridge at a rate of 200 mL/min for 5 h. Clearance values for phenol red, phenytoin, and indican were well below the limit imposed by the plasma flow and declined with time. The clearance of phenol red, which was the most tightly bound solute, fell from 38 +/- 12 to 17 +/- 2 mL/min. Additional studies revealed that the cartridge contained enough carbon to absorb all the protein-bound test solutes, but that the rate of their clearance was limited by the inability of granular carbon to take up solutes rapidly at a low concentration. The rate of solute uptake at low concentration was shown to be much greater when carbon was in powdered rather than granular form. A device in which approximately 50 g of powdered carbon was recirculated in the dialysate compartment of hollow fiber kidneys cleared phenol red and phenytoin more rapidly than the hemoperfusion cartridge containing 300 g of coated granular carbon. These results indicate that hemoperfusion over coated granular carbon provides limited clearance of protein-bound solutes.

  18. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Beyond Maslow's culture-bound linear theory: a preliminary statement of the double-Y model of basic human needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuo-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Maslow's theory of basic human needs is criticized with respect to two of its major aspects, unidimensional linearity and cross-cultural validity. To replace Maslow's linear theory, a revised Y model is proposed on the base of Y. Yu's original Y model. Arranged on the stem of the Y are Maslow's physiological needs (excluding sexual needs) and safety needs. Satisfaction of these needs is indispensable to genetic survival. On the left arm of the Y are interpersonal and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and the self-actualization need. The thoughts and behaviors required for the fulfillment of these needs lead to genetic expression. Lastly, on the right arm of the Y are sexual needs, childbearing needs, and parenting needs. The thoughts and behaviors entailed in the satisfaction of these needs result in genetic transmission. I contend that needs for genetic survival and transmission are universal and that needs for genetic expression are culture-bound. Two major varieties of culture-specific expression needs are distinguished for each of the three levels of needs on the left arm of the Y model. Collectivistic needs for interpersonal affiliation and belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization prevail in collectivist cultures like those found in East Asian countries. Individualistic needs are dominant in individualist cultures like those in North America and certain European nations. I construct two separate Y models, one for people in collectivist cultures and the other for those in individualist ones. In the first (the Yc model), the three levels of expression needs on the left arm are collectivistic in nature, whereas in the second (the Yi model), the three levels of needs on the left arm are individualistic in nature. Various forms of the double-Y model are formulated by conceptually combining the Yc and Yi models at the cross-cultural, crossgroup, and intra-individual levels. Research directions for testing the various aspects of the double-Y model are

  20. Study of Myelin Basic Protein Associated with Pediatric Systematic Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Sida; He Xin; Yang Yiyu; Zhu Huihua; He Dansha; Deng Weiyi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the quantitative myelin basic protein (MBP) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum in pediatric systematic epilepsy (SEP), study the relation between SEP and MBP, and the possibility predicating'the injury of myelin and blood-brain barrier (BBB) from pediatric SEP. Background: While tactors induced destroy of cerebral and Myelin, MBP was released out into CSF to increase its concentration. On the other hand, the BBB was involved to make serum MBP increased. The related studies had confirmed these viewpoints above. The test for quantitative MBP was recognized as the specific biochemical index, which diagnose if there is or not organic injury of cerebral and myelin. There was few reports about the studies of quantitative MBP in CSF and serum of EP, not mention to those published in domestic pediatric academia. Methods: 47 cases were studied during one month after the SEP attack, whose MBP in serum were quantitatively and 31 inside in CSF were also tested by easy MBP-ELISA method; the quantitative MBP in serum of 30 control cases and 10 in CSF were tested, too. Results: MBP values in CSF and serum of SEP pediatric patients were 2.95±0.61 ng/ml and 3.17±0.53 ng/ml; whereas 1.41 ±0.19 ng/ml and 1.30±0.04 ng/ml in control group. Both mean valves of MBP in CSF and serum in study group were significantly higher than control group (either P< 0.01). Discussion: In general, electrophysiological evidences supported the issue that epileptic episode was originated from abnormal electrical activities of nervous cells. Pathological studies revealed degeneration and necrosis of nerve existed in temporal epileptic focus, where there was morphological change of myelin. This study showed MBP values in CSF and serum of SEEP, during one month after attack, increased significantly; suggested there was changed component of MBP, while SEP could not be controled. Those above indicated the destroy of myelin, increasing of BBB permeability that induced its

  1. A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Chen; Wen-Qi Huang

    2005-01-01

    A branch and bound algorithm is proposed for the two-dimensional protein folding problem in the HP lattice model. In this algorithm, the benefit of each possible location of hydrophobic monomers is evaluated and only promising nodes are kept for further branching at each level. The proposed algorithm is compared with other well-known methods for 10 benchmark sequences with lengths ranging from 20 to 100 monomers. The results indicate that our method is a very efficient and promising tool for the protein folding problem.

  2. Appraisal of the Missing Proteins Based on the mRNAs Bound to Ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohang; Zhou, Ruo; Ren, Zhe; Zhou, Baojin; Lin, Zhilong; Hou, Guixue; Deng, Yamei; Zi, Jin; Lin, Liang; Wang, Quanhui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Wen, Bo; Liu, Siqi

    2015-12-01

    Considering the technical limitations of mass spectrometry in protein identification, the mRNAs bound to ribosomes (RNC-mRNA) are assumed to reflect the mRNAs participating in the translational process. The RNC-mRNA data are reasoned to be useful for appraising the missing proteins. A set of the multiomics data including free-mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs, and proteomes was acquired from three liver cancer cell lines. On the basis of the missing proteins in neXtProt (release 2014-09-19), the bioinformatics analysis was carried out in three phases: (1) finding how many neXtProt missing proteins have or do not have RNA-seq and/or MS/MS evidence, (2) analyzing specific physicochemical and biological properties of the missing proteins that lack both RNA-seq and MS/MS evidence, and (3) analyzing the combined properties of these missing proteins. Total of 1501 missing proteins were found by neither RNC-mRNA nor MS/MS in the three liver cancer cell lines. For these missing proteins, some are expected higher hydrophobicity, unsuitable detection, or sensory functions as properties at the protein level, while some are predicted to have nonexpressing chromatin structures on the corresponding gene level. With further integrated analysis, we could attribute 93% of them (1391/1501) to these causal factors, which result in the expression products scarcely detected by RNA-seq or MS/MS.

  3. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE.

  4. Mineral and Protein-Bound Water and Latching Action Control Mechanical Behavior at Protein-Mineral Interfaces in Biological Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijush Ghosh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The nacre structure consists of laminated interlocked mineral platelets separated by nanoscale organic layers. Here, the role of close proximity of mineral to the proteins on mechanical behavior of the protein is investigated through steered molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations indicate that energy required for unfolding protein in the proximity of mineral aragonite is several times higher than that for isolated protein in the absence of the mineral. Here, we present details of specific mechanisms which result in higher energy for protein unfolding in the proximity of mineral. At the early stage of pulling, peaks in the load-displacement (LD plot at mineral proximity are quantitatively correlated to the interaction energy between atoms involved in the latching phenomenon of amino acid side chain to aragonite surface. Water plays an important role during mineral and protein interaction and water molecules closer to the mineral surface are highly oriented and remain rigidly attached as the protein strand is pulled. Also, the high magnitude of load for a given displacement originates from attractive interactions between the protein, protein-bound water, and mineral. This study provides an insight into mineral-protein interactions that are predominant in biological nanocomposites and also provides guidelines towards design of biomimetic nanocomposites.

  5. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  6. Conformational studies of immunodominant myelin basic protein 1-11 analogues using NMR and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laimou, Despina; Lazoura, Eliada; Troganis, Anastassios N; Matsoukas, Minos-Timotheos; Deraos, Spyros N; Katsara, Maria; Matsoukas, John; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Tselios, Theodore V

    2011-11-01

    Τwo dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies complimented by molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the conformation of the immunodominant epitope of acetylated myelin basic protein residues 1-11 (Ac-MBP(1-11)) and its altered peptide ligands, mutated at position 4 to an alanine (Ac-MBP(1-11)[4A]) or a tyrosine residue (Ac-MBP(1-11)[4Y]). Conformational analysis of the three analogues indicated that they adopt an extended conformation in DMSO solution as no long distance NOE connectivities were observed and seem to have a similar conformation when bound to the active site of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC II). The interaction of each peptide with MHC class II I-A(u) was further investigated in order to explore the molecular mechanism of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction/inhibition in mice. The present findings indicate that the Gln(3) residue, which serves as a T-cell receptor (TCR) contact site in the TCR/peptide/I-A(u) complex, has a different orientation in the mutated analogues especially in the Ac-MBP(1-11)[4A] peptide. In particular the side chain of Gln(3) is not solvent exposed as for the native Ac-MBP(1-11) and it is not available for interaction with the TCR.

  7. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors...... were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells...... bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and CR2 (CD21) both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high...

  8. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  9. Study of the protein-bound fraction of calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc in bovine milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernando V.; Lopes, Gisele S.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Souza, Gilberto B.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2001-10-01

    Two approaches were used to study the interaction of Ca, Fe, Mg and Zn with bovine milk proteins by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES). Selective separations in bovine milk samples were accomplished employing an acid protein precipitation using 100 g l -1 trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and an enzymatic protein hydrolysis using 50 g l -1 pepsin (PEP) solution, respectively. The results were compared with total mineral contents determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The results obtained by enzymatic and acid precipitation evidenced the different interaction forms of Ca, Fe, Mg and Zn in the system formed by milk components. Iron was not solubilized by the TCA treatment, but was recovered completely after the enzymatic treatment. Quantitative recoveries of Ca, Mg and Zn were obtained using both approaches, showing that these analytes were bound to milk compounds affected by either treatment. Calcium, Mg and Zn are mainly associated with colloidal calcium phosphate and Fe is bound to the backbone of the casein polypeptide chain, cleaved by pepsin enzyme. The proposed approaches could be used to assess the complexity of these chemical interactions.

  10. Urinary proteins of tubular origin: basic immunochemical and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherberich, J E

    1990-01-01

    A variety of tubular marker proteins, as compared to healthy controls, are excreted at an increased rate in the urine of patients with renal damage. Beside cytoplasmic glutathione-S-transferase and lysosomal beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG) the majority of kidney-related urine proteins derives from membrane surface components of the most vulnerable proximal tubule epithelia, among them ala-(leu-gly)-aminopeptidase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), the tubular portion of angiotensinase A, the major brush border glycoprotein 'SGP-240' and adenosine-deaminase-binding protein. Urinary tissue proteins, e.g. brush border (BB) microvilli, are immunologically identical with those antigens prepared from cell membranes of the human kidney itself. BB antigens are shed into the urine of patients with glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, systemic diseases, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus and multiple myeloma, arterial hypertension, infectious diseases (malaria, AIDS) and after operations, renal grafting and administration of X-ray contrast media, aminoglycosides or certain cytostatics (cis-platinum). Tissue proteinuria of tubular proteins is determined by enzyme-kinetic or quantitative immunological assays applying either poly- or monoclonal antikidney antibodies. Clinical, ultrastructural and histochemical studies support the idea that both 'soluble' and high-molecular-weight membrane particles (vacuolar blebs, greater than 10(6) dalton) as well as microfilamental components of the epithelial cytoskeleton contribute to tubular 'histuria' which appears as a sensitive parameter in monitoring tubular damage under clinical conditions at a very early phase.

  11. Protein-bound solute removal during extended multipass versus standard hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eloot, Sunny; Van Biesen, Wim; Axelsen, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multipass hemodialysis (MPHD) is a recently described dialysis modality, involving the use of small volumes of dialysate which are repetitively recycled. Dialysis regimes of 8 hours for six days a week using this device result in an increased removal of small water soluble solutes...... and middle molecules compared to standard hemodialysis (SHD). Since protein-bound solutes (PBS) exert important pathophysiological effects, we investigated whether MPHD results in improved removal of PBS as well. METHODS: A cross-over study (Clinical Trial NCT01267760) was performed in nine stable HD...

  12. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  13. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; (Stanford-MED); (CH-Boston)

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  14. Protein-membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-{alpha}-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  15. Protein membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-α-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of growth factor receptor bound-protein in Clonorchis sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clonorchis sinensis causes clonorchiasis, a potentially serious disease. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2 is a cytosolic protein conserved among animals and plays roles in cellular functions such as meiosis, organogenesis and energy metabolism. In the present study, we report first molecular characters of growth factor receptor bound-protein (CsGrb2 from C. sinensis as counter part of Grb2 from animals and its possible functions in development and organogenesis of C. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A CsGrb2 cDNA clone retrieved from the C. sinensis transcriptome encoded a polypeptide with a SH3-SH2-SH3 structure. Recombinant CsGrb2 was bacterially produced and purified to homogeneity. Native CsGrb2 with estimated molecular weight was identified from C. sinensis adult extract by western blotting using a mouse immune serum to recombinant CsGrb2. CsGrb2 transcripts was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adults. Immunohistochemical staining showed that CsGrb2 was localized to the suckers, mesenchymal tissues, sperms in seminal receptacle and ovary in the adults, and abundantly expressed in most organs of the metacercariae. Recombinant CsGrb2 was evaluated to be little useful as a serodiagnostic reagent for C. sinesis human infections. CONCLUSION: Grb2 protein found in C. sinensis was conserved among animals and suggested to play a role in the organogenesis, energy metabolism and mitotic spermatogenesis of C. sinensis. These findings from C. sinensis provide wider understanding on diverse function of Grb2 in lower animals such as platyhelminths.

  17. Evolution of protein bound Maillard reaction end-products and free Amadori compounds in low lactose milk in presence of fructosamine oxidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Buonanno, Martina; Fiore, Alberto; Monti, Simona Maria; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Thermal treatments and storage influence milk quality, particularly in low lactose milk as the higher concentration of reducing sugars can lead to the increased formation of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The control of the Amadori products (APs) formation is the key step to mitigate the Maillard reaction (MR) in milk. The use of fructosamine oxidases, (Faox) provided promising results. In this paper, the effects of Faox I were evaluated by monitoring the concentration of free and bound MRPs in low lactose milk during shelf life. Results showed that the enzyme reduced the formation of protein-bound MRPs down to 79% after six days at 37°C. Faox I lowered the glycation of almost all the free amino acids resulting effective on basic and polar amino acids. Data here reported corroborate previous findings on the potentiality of Faox enzymes in controlling the early stage of the MR in foods.

  18. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Klinge Brimnes

    Full Text Available B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35 and CR2 (CD21 both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides. The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  19. The complete amino acid sequence of the basic nuclear protein of bull spermatozoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelingh, J.P.; Monfoort, Cornelis H.; Rozijn, Thomas H.; Gevers Leuven, Jan A.; Schiphof, R.; Steyn-Parvé, Elizabeth P.; Braunitzer, Gerhard; Schrank, Barbara; Ruhfus, Annette

    1972-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the basic nuclear protein of bull spermatozoa has been established. The sequence was partially deduced by characterization of peptides isolated from thermolysine and chymotryptic digests of the reduced and S-aminoethylated protein. The complete sequence of the fir

  20. Characterization of Poly(A)-Protein Complexes Isolated from Free and Membrane-Bound Polyribosomes of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Counotte-Potman, Anda D.; Venrooij, Walther J. van

    1976-01-01

    Proteins present in messenger ribonucleoprotein particles were labeled with [35S]-methionine in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in which synthesis of new ribosomes was inhibited. Poly(A)-protein complexes were isolated from free and membrane-bound polyribosomes by sucrose gradient centrifugation and aff

  1. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Esteban Ithuralde

    Full Text Available Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD, a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how

  2. A photophysical study of two fluorogen-activating proteins bound to their cognate fluorogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, Tiziano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Hau B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jung, Jaemyeong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gnanakaran, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-14

    We are exploring the feasibility of using recently developed flu orogen-activating proteins (FAPs) as reporters for single-molecule imaging. FAPs are single-chain antibodies choosen to specifically bind small chromophoric molecules termed f1uorogens. Upon binding to its cognate FAP the fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorogen can increase substantially giving rise to a fluorescent complex. Based on the seminal work of Szent-Gyorgyi et al. (Nature Biotechnology, Volume 26, Number 2, pp 235-240, 2008) we have chosen to study two fluorogen-activating single-chain antibodies, HL 1.0.1-TOI and H6-MG bound to their cognate fluorogens, thiazole orange and malachite green derivatives, respectively. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study the photophysics of these fluorescent complexes.

  3. Glucosylation of membrane-bound proteins by lipid-linked glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont Lezica, R; Romero, P A; Hopp, H E

    1978-01-01

    Particulate preparations from Pisum sativum. were able to incorporate [(14)C]glucose from UDP-[(14)C]glucose into oligosaccharide-linked lipids was formed by an oligosaccharide chain containing 7-8 glucose residues linked to dolichol, presumably via a pyrophosphate. The polymer was identified as a membrane-bound glucoprotein that could be solubilized by Triton X-100. SDS gel electrophoresis showed that a polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 13,000 could be glucosylated from dolichyl-phosphate-glucose. This was coincident with the electrophoretic mobility of the β subunit of the pea lectin in the same system. The glucosylated protein was solubilized from the membranes by sonication and showed the same carbohydrate-binding ability as pea lectins. These results strongly suggest that pea lectins can be glucosylated by the lipid intermediate pathway.

  4. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    spherical, enlarged and finally lysed. Depletion of each mre gene separately conferred similar gross changes in cell morphology and viability. Thus, the three proteins encoded by mreBCD are all essential and function in the same morphogenetic pathway. Interestingly, the presence of a multicopy plasmid......D. In contrast, MreB and MreD did not interact in this assay. Thus, we conclude that the E. coli MreBCD form an essential membrane-bound complex. Curiously, MreB did not form cables in cell depleted for MreC, MreD or RodA, indicating a mutual interdependency between MreB filament morphology and cell shape. Based...

  5. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  6. Compartmentalization of ER-Bound Chaperone Confines Protein Deposit Formation to the Aging Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikangas, Juha; Caudron, Fabrice; Prasad, Rupali; Moreno, David F; Bolognesi, Alessio; Aldea, Martí; Barral, Yves

    2017-03-20

    In order to produce rejuvenated daughters, dividing budding yeast cells confine aging factors, including protein aggregates, to the aging mother cell. The asymmetric inheritance of these protein deposits is mediated by organelle and cytoskeletal attachment and by cell geometry. Yet it remains unclear how deposit formation is restricted to the aging lineage. Here, we show that selective membrane anchoring and the compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane confine protein deposit formation to aging cells during division. Supporting the idea that the age-dependent deposit forms through coalescence of smaller aggregates, two deposits rapidly merged when placed in the same cell by cell-cell fusion. The deposits localized to the ER membrane, primarily to the nuclear envelope (NE). Strikingly, weakening the diffusion barriers that separate the ER membrane into mother and bud compartments caused premature formation of deposits in the daughter cells. Detachment of the Hsp40 protein Ydj1 from the ER membrane elicited a similar phenotype, suggesting that the diffusion barriers and farnesylated Ydj1 functioned together to confine protein deposit formation to mother cells during division. Accordingly, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements in dividing cells indicated that a slow-diffusing, possibly client-bound Ydj1 fraction was asymmetrically enriched in the mother compartment. This asymmetric distribution depended on Ydj1 farnesylation and intact diffusion barriers. Taking these findings together, we propose that ER-anchored Ydj1 binds deposit precursors and prevents them from spreading into daughter cells during division by subjecting them to the ER diffusion barriers. This ensures that the coalescence of precursors into a single deposit is restricted to the aging lineage.

  7. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que; (UW)

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  8. Basic residues within the ebolavirus VP35 protein are required for its viral polymerase cofactor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Kathleen C; Binning, Jennifer M; Shabman, Reed S; Leung, Daisy W; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F

    2010-10-01

    The ebolavirus (EBOV) VP35 protein binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), inhibits host alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) production, and is an essential component of the viral polymerase complex. Structural studies of the VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) identified specific structural features, including a central basic patch and a hydrophobic pocket, that are important for dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition. Several other conserved basic residues bordering the central basic patch and a separate cluster of basic residues, called the first basic patch, were also identified. Functional analysis of alanine substitution mutants indicates that basic residues outside the central basic patch are not required for dsRNA binding or for IFN inhibition. However, minigenome assays, which assess viral RNA polymerase complex function, identified these other basic residues to be critical for viral RNA synthesis. Of these, a subset located within the first basic patch is important for VP35-nucleoprotein (NP) interaction, as evidenced by the inability of alanine substitution mutants to coimmunoprecipitate with NP. Therefore, first basic patch residues are likely critical for replication complex formation through interactions with NP. Coimmunoprecipitation studies further demonstrate that the VP35 IID is sufficient to interact with NP and that dsRNA can modulate VP35 IID interactions with NP. Other basic residue mutations that disrupt the VP35 polymerase cofactor function do not affect interaction with NP or with the amino terminus of the viral polymerase. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of conserved basic residues from the EBOV VP35 C-terminal IID and validate the VP35 IID as a potential therapeutic target.

  9. Interaction of C4-binding protein with cell-bound C4b. A quantitative analysis of binding and the role of C4-binding protein in proteolysis of cell-bound C4b

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Purified C4-binding protein (C4-bp) was shown to bind to cell-bound C4b by radioactive tracer techniques. With EAC4 bearing greater than 3,000 C4b-molecules/cell, the number of C4-bp molecules bound was directly proportional to the number of C4b molecule on the cell surface; EAC4 bearing less than 3,000 C4b-molecules/cell bound a very small amount of C4-bp. Scatchard analysis of binding of C4-bp indicated an equilibrium constant of 4.6 X 10(8) L/M and a maximum of 0.43 C4-bp molecules bound p...

  10. Functions of bounded variation

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The paper begins with a short survey of monotone functions. The functions of bounded variation are introduced and some basic properties of these functions are given. Finally the jump function of a function of bounded variation is defined.

  11. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    bone cofactor was identified as a lipid containing a ceramide phosphate, a single chained glycerol lipid and a linker. Tendon uses a different cofactor made up of two fatty acid chains linked directly to the phosphate yielding a molecule about half the size. Moreover, adding the tendon factor/cofactor to osteosarcoma cells causes them to stop growing, which is opposite to its role with tendon cells. Thus, the cofactor is cell type specific both in composition and in the triggered response. Further support of its proposed role came from frozen sections from 5 week old mice where an antibody to the factor stained strongly at the growing ends of the tendon as predicted. In conclusion, the molecule needed for cell density signaling is a small protein bound to a unique, tissue-specific phospholipid yielding a membrane associated but diffusible molecule. Signal transduction is postulated to occur by an increased ordering of the plasma membrane as the concentration of this protein/lipid increases with cell density.

  12. The Influence of Free 3-Nitrotyrosine and Saliva on the Quantitative Analysis of Protein-Bound 3-Nitrotyrosine in Sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Ueshima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have recently developed a new technique for quantitatively measuring protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, a footprint of nitrosative stress, utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD system. Using this system, we showed that 3-NT formation was upregulated in the sputum of both COPD and asthmatic patients. However, in order to improve the accuracy of the measurement system. We have to resolve some problems which were the influence of free amino acid form of 3-NT and of salivary contamination. Objectives: We initially investigated the amount of the free amino acid form of 3-NT in induced sputum and compared with that of protein-bound 3-NT. Next, we evaluated the concentration of protein-bound 3-NT in saliva and compared with that in induced sputum by means of HPLC-ECD.Methods: Five male COPD patients were enrolled. Induced sputum and saliva were obtained from the patients. The free amino acid form of 3-NT in sputum and saliva was measured by HPLC-ECD, and the protein-bound 3-NT and tyrosine in sputum and saliva were enzymatically hydrolyzed by Streptomyces griseus Pronase and measured for the protein hydrolysate by HPLC-ECD.Results: The mean value of the amount of protein-bound 3-NT was 65.0 fmol (31.2 to 106.4 fmol. On the other hand, the amount of the free amino acid form of 3-NT was under the detection limit (<10 fmol. The levels of both 3-NT (sputum: 0.55 ± 0.15 pmol/ml, saliva: 0.02 ± 0.01 pmol/ml, p < 0.01 and tyrosine (sputum: 0.81 ± 0.43 μmol/ml, saliva: 0.07 ± 0.04 μmol/ml, p < 0.01 in saliva were significantly lower than in sputum. The percentage of 3-NT in saliva to that in sputum was about 3.1%, and that of tyrosine was about 9.0%.Conclusion: The free amino acid form of 3-NT does not affect the measurement of protein-bound 3-NT. Furthermore, the influence of salivary contamination on the measurement of protein-bound 3-NT in induced sputum by means of HPLC

  13. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP.

  14. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F. [OGG-INFM, Grenoble (France); Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Genova (Italy); Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Fasano, A. [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Bari (Italy); Riccio, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia D.B.A.F., Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP. (orig.)

  15. The role of basic residues in the adsorption of blood proteins onto the graphene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Wang, Lingle; Zhou, Hong; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    With its many unique properties, graphene has shown great potential in various biomedical applications, while its biocompatibility has also attracted growing concerns. Previous studies have shown that the formation of protein-graphene corona could effectively reduce its cytotoxicity; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains not well-understood. Herein, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that blood proteins such as bovine fibrinogen (BFG) can absorb onto the graphene surface quickly and tightly to form a corona complex. Aromatic residues contributed significantly during this adsorption process due to the strong π-π stacking interactions between their aromatic rings and the graphene sp2-carbons. Somewhat surprisingly, basic residues like arginine, also played an equally or even stronger role during this process. The strong dispersion interactions between the sidechains of these solvent-exposed basic residues and the graphene surface provide the driving force for a tight binding of these basic residues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study with blood proteins to show that, in addition to the aromatic residues, the basic residues also play an important role in the formation of protein-graphene corona complexes.

  16. Ox peripheral nerve myelin membrane. Purification and partial characterization of two basic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Two basic proteins were purified from the peripheral nervous system. The isolation was achieved by (1) delipidation with chloroform-butanol mixtures, dry acetone, and dry ether, (2) acid extraction at pH 2 and then (3) dialysis against distilled water, lyophilization, and solubilization in pH-10.7 b

  17. Studying repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo using the Flp-nick system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Andersen, Anni Hangaard; Bjergbæk, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The Flp-nick system is a simple in vivo system developed for studying the cellular responses to a protein-bound nick at a single genomic site in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Flp-nick system takes advantage of a mutant Flp recombinase that can introduce a nick at a specific Flp ...

  18. In vivo monitoring of protein-bound and free NADH during ischemia by nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); A.N. Bader (Arjen); H.S. de Bruijn (Riette); A.V.D.P. van den Heuvel (Angélique); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNonlinear spectral imaging microscopy (NSIM) allows simultaneous morphological and spectroscopic investigation of intercellular events within living animals. In this study we used NSIM for in vivo timelapse in-depth spectral imaging and monitoring of protein-bound and free reduced nicoti

  19. In vivo monitoring of protein-bound and free NADH during ischemia by nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palero, J.A.; Bader, A.N.; de Bruijn, H.S.; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, A.; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy (NSIM) allows simultaneous morphological and spectroscopic investigation of intercellular events within living animals. In this study we used NSIM for in vivo time-lapse in-depth spectral imaging and monitoring of protein-bound and free reduced nicotinamide aden

  20. Protein-bound carbohydrates in breast cancer. Liquid-chromatographic analysis for mannose, galactose, fucose, and sialic acid in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochek, J E; Dinsmore, S R; Tormey, D C; Waalkes, T P

    1976-09-01

    We describr high-resolution chromatographic analysis for protein-bound sialic acid in serum, with use of a cerate oxidimetric detector. Values for sera from normal women averaged 680.5 mg/liter, with a coefficient of variation of 23%. Including data obtained by previously developed chromatographic procedures for protein-bound mannose, galactose, and fucsoe, we assessed sera from breast-cancer patients whose malignancy had been categorized as either stable, responsive, or progressive (based on clinical observations spaced from two to five months apart). All of 12 responsive patients had decreases of protein-bound fucose averaging 34.5% (SD, 16.1) and all of 10 patients with progressive disease had increases averaging 38.3% (SD 21.5). Changes in fucose averaged less than 6.7% (SD, 4.9) for eight patients with clinically stable breast cancer. Changes in protein-bound mannose, galactose, and sialic acid did not correlate as well as did fucose with the clinical disease status of the patients.

  1. Protein-bound carbohydrates in breast cancer. Liquid-chromatographic analysis for mannose, galactose, fucose, and sialic acid in serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrochek, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Dinsmore, S.R.; Tormey, D.C.; Waalkes, T.P.

    1976-09-01

    High-resolution chromatographic analysis for protein-bound sialic acid in serum, with use of a cerate oxidimetric detector is described. Values for sera from normal women averaged 680.5 mg/liter, with a coefficient of variation of 23%. Including data obtained by previously developed chromatographic procedures for protein-bound mannose, galactose, and fucose, sera from breast-cancer patients whose malignancy had been categorized as either stable, responsive, or progressive (based on clinical observations spaced from two to five months apart) were assessed. All of 12 responsive patients had decreases of protein-bound fucose averaging 34.5% (SD, 16.1) and all of 10 patients with progressive disease had increases averaging 38.3% (SD 21.5). Changes in fucose averaged less than 6.7% (SD, 4.9) for eight patients with clinically stable breast cancer. Changes in protein-bound mannose, galactose, and sialic acid did not correlate as well as did fucose with the clinical disease status of the patients.

  2. Comparison of methods for determination of testosterone and non-protein bound testosterone in men with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    The serum concentrations of testosterone and of non-protein bound testosterone were determined in 28 men with alcoholic liver disease having normal to decreased serum albumin concentrations and normal to raised SHBG concentrations. Serum testosterone concentrations determined with two radioimmuno...

  3. Intraerythrocyte Non-Protein-Bound Iron in Children with Bronchopulmonary Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Vasilyeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 230 children having bronchopulmonary pathology (BPP were examined. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their intraerythrocyte non-protein- bound iron (IE-NPBI levels. We investigated the relationship of the IE-NPBI level with parameters of respiratory function (RF tests, the severity of comorbidities, and level of other free intracellular ions, such as copper, zinc, and magnesium. The pronounced increase in IE-NPBI level was typical for patients with the connective tissue dysplasia, often accompanied by mitral valve prolapse, osteopenia, and mineral metabolism violation. The severe comorbid diagnoses were typical for patients with reduced levels of IE-NPBI (chronic cor pulmonale, tuberculosis infection. The largest number of comorbidities, aggravating the underlying disease, took place in the group of patients with a significant reduction in IE-NPBI level. A significant increase in IE-NPBI level, as well as a marked reduction of IE-NPBI level, was an unfavorable factor for the underlying disease. We found a correlation between IE-NPBI level and parameters of RF-test in patients with moderate increase in IE-NPBI level.

  4. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  5. Increased protein oxidation and loss of protein-bound sialic acid in hepatic tissues of D-galactose induced aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakatay, Ufuk; Aydın, Seval; Atukeren, Pınar; Yanar, Karolin; Sitar, Mustafa E; Dalo, Enis; Uslu, Ezel

    2013-07-01

    A redox basis of the increased oxidative protein damage and free radical-mediated desialylation have not been fully elucidated in aging. It is well known that the incidence of several liver diseases increase with age. This original research focuses on protein oxidation mechanisms and protein-bound sialic acid levels in liver tissue of the mimetic aging rats. Injection of D-galactose (60 mg/kg/day) for six weeks to male Sprague-Dawley rats (20-week-old) used to establish mimetic aging model. We investigated the tissue levels of various protein oxidation markers such as protein carbonyl groups, suitable advanced oxidation protein products and protein thiol groups. Our study also covered protein-bound sialic acid in liver tissue of D-galactose-induced aging rats. PCO (Protein Carbonyl Groups), P-OOH (Protein Hydroperoxides) and AOPP (Advanced Oxidation Protein Products) levels in aging rats were significantly higher compared to young control groups. On the other hand, P-SH (Protein Thiol Groups) levels were not found to be different between two groups. SA (Sialic Acid) levels in D-galactose-induced aging rats were significantly lower compared to control groups. Our results demonstrated greater susceptibility to hepatic oxidative protein damage and desialylation of hepatocellular proteins in Dgalactose- induced aging rats. These molecular mechanisms may be operative in the many age-related liver diseases, which are pertinent to increased oxidative stress and altered redox homeostasis.

  6. Kinetics of the interaction of myelin basic protein with phospholipid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facci, Paolo; Cavatorta, Paolo; Cristofolini, Luigi; Fontana, M. P.; Riccio, Paolo

    1999-04-01

    The time dependence of the adsorption of myelin basic protein onto dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol multilayers has been followed directly, using a novel application of a microgravimetric gauge. Our results, supplemented by other data obtained by FTIR, show the ease and versatility of the quartz microbalance for investigating the interaction processes between proteins and phospholipid layers and show that the protein adsorption is accompanied by structural changes in the proteolipid ensemble and adsorbed liquid water; it is furthermore dependent on the mesoscopic defect morphology of the ensemble.

  7. Competition between bound and free peptides in an ELISA-based procedure that assays peptides derived from protein digests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pace Umberto

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe an ELISA-based method that can be used to identify and quantitate proteins in biological samples. In this method, peptides in solution, derived from proteolytic digests of the sample, compete with substrate-attached synthetic peptides for antibodies, also in solution, generated against the chosen peptides. The peptides used for the ELISA are chosen on the basis of their being (i products of the proteolytic (e.g. tryptic digestion of the protein to be identified and (ii unique to the target protein, as far as one can know from the published sequences. Results In this paper we describe the competition assay and we define the optimal conditions for the most effective assay. We have performed an analysis of the kinetics of interaction between the four components of the assay: the plastic substratum to which the peptide is bound, the bound peptide itself, the competing added peptide, and the antibody that is specific for the peptide and we compare the results of theoretical simulations to the actual data in some model systems. Conclusion The data suggest that the peptides bind to the plastic substratum in more than one conformation and that, once bound, the peptide displays different affinities for the antibody, depending on how it has bound to the plate

  8. Effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on myelin basic protein expression in the rat lateral olfactory tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Xiong; He Huang; Hui Wang; Yan Cai; Jing Yang; Jufang Huang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dithiocarbamates can cause demyelination of axons in the peripheral nervous system. Its derivate, diethyldithiocarbamate, is cytotoxic, and causes olfactory mucosal damage and atrophy of the olfactory bulb. However, it is still unclear whether the myelin sheath of the lateral olfactory tract is affected by diethyldithiocarbamate.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on the myelin sheath of the rat lateral olfactory tract. This was done by examining changes in myelin basic protein expression after diethyldithiocarbamate treatment.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study was performed at the Laboratory of the Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology, Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, China from July to November 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 72 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into a diethyldithiocarbamate group (n=32), a solvent control group (n=32), and a blank control group (n=8). The diethyldithiocarbamate and solvent control groups were separately divided into 3-d, 7-d, 14-d and 28-d survival subgroups, with eight rats in each. Diethyldithiocarbamate (Sigma, USA) and goat anti-myelin basic protein polyclonal antibody (Santa Cruz, USA) were used in this study.METHODS: Rats in the diethyldithiocarbamate and solvent control groups were subcutaneously injected with diethyldithiocarbamate (600 mg/kg) and 0.01 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (600 mg/kg) at the posterior neck, respectively. Rats in the blank control group received no treatment.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot assay were used to measure myelin basic protein expression in the rat lateral olfactory tract.RESULTS: Following immunohistochemical staining, myelin basic protein was uniformly distributed in the rat lateral olfactory tract in the blank control and solvent control groups. Western blot assay showed 21.5, 18, 17 and 14 ku positive bands. No significant difference was found

  9. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

  10. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Aggarwal

    Full Text Available Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

  11. Structure-based design of ligands for protein basic domains: Application to the HIV-1 Tat protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikov, Anton V.; James, Thomas L.

    1998-05-01

    A methodology has been developed for designing ligands to bind a flexible basic protein domain where the structure of the domain is essentially known. It is based on an empirical binding free energy function developed for highly charged complexes and on Monte Carlo simulations in internal coordinates with both the ligand and the receptor being flexible. HIV-1 encodes a transactivating regulatory protein called Tat. Binding of the basic domain of Tat to TAR RNA is required for efficient transcription of the viral genome. The structure of a biologically active peptide containing the Tat basic RNA-binding domain is available from NMR studies. The goal of the current project is to design a ligand which will bind to that basic domain and potentially inhibit the TAR-Tat interaction. The basic domain contains six arginine and two lysine residues. Our strategy was to design a ligand for arginine first and then a superligand for the basic domain by joining arginine ligands with a linker. Several possible arginine ligands were obtained by searching the Available Chemicals Directory with DOCK 3.5 software. Phytic acid, which can potentially bind multiple arginines, was chosen as a building block for the superligand. Calorimetric binding studies of several compounds to methylguanidine and Arg-/Lys-containing peptides were performed. The data were used to develop an empirical binding free energy function for prediction of affinity of the ligands for the Tat basic domain. Modeling of the conformations of the complexes with both the superligand and the basic domain being flexible has been carried out via Biased Probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) simulations in internal coordinates (ICM 2.6 suite of programs). The simulations used parameters to ensure correct folding, i.e., consistent with the experimental NMR structure of a 25-residue Tat peptide, from a random starting conformation. Superligands for the basic domain were designed by joining together two molecules of phytic acid with

  12. Multiple sclerosis autoantigen myelin basic protein escapes control by ubiquitination during proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-06-20

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome.

  13. Myelin basic protein reduces molecular motions in DMPA, an elastic neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    2001-07-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L- α-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) vesicles using the elastic neutron scattering technique. Elastic scans have been performed in a wide temperature range (20-300 K). In the lower temperature region the behaviour of the integrated elastic intensity was the typical one of harmonic systems. The analysis of the Q and T dependence performed in terms of an asymmetric double well potential clearly showed that the effect of the protein consisted in a significant reduction of the conformational mobility of the DMPA bilayers and in the stabilisation of the membrane.

  14. Myelin basic protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein.

  15. Hematopoietic progenitors express myelin basic protein and ensheath axons in Shiverer brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, James; Makar, Tapas; Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl; Bever, Christopher T; Pessac, Bernard; Trisler, David

    2013-04-15

    Oligodendroglia are cells of the central nervous system (CNS) that form myelin sheath, which insulates neuronal axons. Neuropathologies of the CNS include dysmyelination of axons in multiple sclerosis and CNS trauma. Cell replacement is a promising but largely untested therapy for dysmyelination. Shiverer mouse, a genetic mutant that does not synthesize full-length myelin basic protein (MBP), a critical prerequisite protein in CNS myelin sheath formation, provides an unequivocal model for determining the potential of stem cells to become oligodendroglia. We demonstrate that adult wild-type mouse bone marrow stem cells can express MBP and ensheath axons when transplanted into Shiverer brain.

  16. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  17. Optimised purification and characterisation of lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b from barley malt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Melanie; Lombard, Nicolaas; Rautenbach, Marina

    2014-08-15

    In beer brewing, brewers worldwide strive to obtain product consistency in terms of flavour, colour and foam. Important proteins contributing to beer foam are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), in particular LTP1 and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b, which are known to transport lipids in vivo and prevent lipids from destabilising the beer foam. LTP1 and LTP1b were successfully purified using only five purification steps with a high purified protein yield (160 mg LTP1 and LTP1b from 200 g barley). Circular dichroism of LTP1 and LTP1b confirmed that both proteins are highly tolerant to high temperatures (>90 °C) and are pH stable, particularly at a neutral to a more basic pH. Only LTP1 exhibited antiyeast and thermo-stable lytic activity, while LTP1b was inactive, indicating that the fatty acid moiety compromised the antimicrobial activity of LTP1. This lack in antiyeast activity and the positive foam properties of LTP1b would benefit beer fermentation and quality.

  18. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties.

  19. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-01

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  20. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  1. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  2. Experimental and theoretical analysis of DEP-based particle deflection for the separation of protein-bound particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Lim, Geon-Gyu; Lee, Hyang-Beom; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical analysis of dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle deflection in a microfluidic channel for the separation of protein-bound particles. A 2D electrode array with widely spaced bars is designed to deflect a particle at the exit of the fluidic channel by negative DEP force. When particles pass through the channel, the particle streams are deflected differently depending on the DEP characteristics of the particles. In this paper, we propose methodologies to characterize the DEP force with the deflection distance using comparative analyses of a simulation and an experiment. The deflection distances of the particles are measured as a function of the ac voltage applied and compared with full 3D simulations. The Clausius-Mossotti (CM) factor of a protein-bound particle is analyzed, based on frequency-dependent deflection distance data measured experimentally, and protein-bound particles are separated from a mixture with nonbound particles in a real application. Two particle groups, 2.3 µm and 6.4 µm polystyrene particles, were used for the simulation and experimental study, and the 6.4 µm diameter particles were selected as an adequate protein-binding substrate for the application of biomolecular detection. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a test target protein. The particle's BSA binding is identified by the change in the particle's deflection distance. In particular, we used 1 wt% BSA as a target protein sample to investigate the deflection of 6.4 µm diameter particles as a function of protein concentration. The frequency-dependent CM factor curves for BSA-bound and nonbound particles are also calculated theoretically. Therefore, this paper shows a model analytic study on the biomolecular detection performance of a fabricated DEP-deflection microsystem. In addition, we present further significant analyses such as calculation of the electrical surface conductance of BSA around a particle, and we trace simulation errors. The

  3. Native SDS-PAGE: High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins With Retention of Native Properties Including Bound Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B.; Wobig, William J.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn2+ bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn2+ proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ. PMID:24686569

  4. Effects of solution chemistry and aging time on prion protein adsorption and replication of soil-bound prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    Full Text Available Prion interactions with soil may play an important role in the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie. Prions are known to bind to a wide range of soil surfaces, but the effects of adsorption solution chemistry and long-term soil binding on prion fate and transmission risk are unknown. We investigated HY TME prion protein (PrP(Sc adsorption to soil minerals in aqueous solutions of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and deionized water using western blotting. The replication efficiency of bound prions following adsorption in these solutions was also evaluated by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Aging studies investigated PrP(Sc desorption and replication efficiency up to one year following adsorption in PBS or DI water. Results indicate that adsorption solution chemistry can affect subsequent prion replication or desorption ability, especially after incubation periods of 30 d or longer. Observed effects were minor over the short-term (7 d or less. Results of long-term aging experiments demonstrate that unbound prions or prions bound to a diverse range of soil surfaces can readily replicate after one year. Our results suggest that while prion-soil interactions can vary with solution chemistry, prions bound to soil could remain a risk for transmitting prion diseases after months in the environment.

  5. Localization of sites for ionic interaction with lipid in the C-terminal third of the bovine myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A J; Rumsby, M G

    1977-12-01

    The myelin basic protein from bovine brain tissue was purified and the two peptides obtained by cleavage of the polypeptide chain at the single tryptophan residue were isolated. The interaction of these peptides and the intact basic protein with complex lipids was investigated by following the solubilization of lipid-protein complexes into chloroform in a biphasic solvent system. The C-terminal peptide fragment (residues 117-170) and the intact basic protein both formed chloroform-soluble complexes with acidic lipids, but not with neutral complex lipids. The N-terminal fragment (residues 1-115) did not form chloroform-soluble complexes with either acidic or neutral complex lipids. The molar ratio of lipid to protein that caused a 50% loss of protein from the upper phase to the lower chloroform phase was the same for the intact basic protein as for the smaller C-terminal peptide fragment. Phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were approximately twice as efficient as sulphatide at causing protein redistribution to the chloroform phase. The results are interpreted as indicating that the sites for ionic interactions between lipid and charged groups on the basic protein of myelin are located in the C-terminal region of the protein molecule.

  6. Multiple biological functions of novel basic proteins isolated from duck egg white: duck basic protein small 1 (dBPS1) and 2 (dBPS2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naknukool, Supaporn; Hayakawa, Shigeru; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2011-05-11

    Biological functions of duck basic protein small 1 (dBPS(1)) and 2 (dBPS(2)) were investigated by in vitro experiments. Results of agarose gel retardation assay indicated that dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) associate with RNA. Addition of NaCl or urea induced partial dissociation of dBPS(1)/dBPS(2)-RNA complex, implying that electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen bonds are involved in the association of dBPS(1)/dBPS(2) to RNA. dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) inhibited pancreatic lipase activity with the fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 250 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Peptic hydrolysates of dBPS(1) and those of dBPS(2) showed a potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with an IC(50) of 22.5 and 49.6 mg/L. The most potent ACE-inhibitory peptide was a nanopeptide (EKKGFCAGY) from dBPS(1) and an octapeptide (KYCPKVGY) from dBPS(2). These multiple biological functions of dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) may contribute to reducing the risk of lifestyle diseases.

  7. 13C NMR studies of porphobilinogen synthase: observation of intermediates bound to a 280,000-dalton protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, E K; Markham, G D

    1987-07-14

    13C NMR has been used to observe the equilibrium complex of [4-13C]-5-aminolevulinate ([4-13C]ALA) bound to porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), a 280,000-dalton protein. [4-13C]ALA (chemical shift = 205.9 ppm) forms [3,5-13C]PBG (chemical shifts = 121.0 and 123.0 ppm). PBG prepared from a mixture of [4-13C]ALA and [15N]ALA was used to assign the 121.0 and 123.0 ppm resonances to C5 and C3, respectively. For the enzyme-bound equilibrium complex formed from holoenzyme and [4-13C]ALA, two peaks of equal area with chemical shifts of 121.5 and 127.2 ppm are observed (line widths approximately 50 Hz), indicating that the predominant species is probably a distorted form of PBG. When excess free PBG is present, it is in slow exchange with bound PBG, indicating an exchange rate of less than 10 s-1, which is consistent with the turnover rate of the enzyme. For the complex formed from [4-13C]ALA and methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) modified PBG synthase, which does not catalyze PBG formation, the predominant species is a Schiff base adduct (chemical shift = 166.5 ppm, line width approximately 50 Hz). Free ALA is in slow exchange with the Schiff base. Activation of the MMTS-modified enzyme-Schiff base complex with 113Cd and 2-mercaptoethanol results in the loss of the Schiff base signal and the appearance of bound PBG with the same chemical shifts as for the bound equilibrium complex with Zn(II) enzyme. Neither splitting nor broadening from 113Cd-13C coupling was observed.

  8. The protein ORF80 from the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus binds highly site-specifically to double-stranded DNA and represents a novel type of basic leucine zipper protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Ibanez, Pablo; Stroessenreuther, Thomas; Hekimian, Katya; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    The cryptic high copy number plasmid pRN1 from the thermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus islandicus shares three conserved open reading frames with other S.islandicus plasmids. One of the open reading frames, namely orf80, encodes a 9.5 kDa protein that has no homology to any characterised protein. Recombinant ORF80 purified from Escherichia coli binds to double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner as suggested by EMSA experiments and DNase I footprints. Two highly symmetrical binding sites separated by ∼60 bp were found upstream of the orf80 gene. Both binding sites contain two TTAA motifs as well as other conserved bases. Fluorescence measurements show that short duplex DNAs derived from a single binding site sequence are bound with submicromolar affinity and moderate cooperativity by ORF80. On DNA fragments carrying both binding sites, a rather large protein–DNA complex is formed in a highly cooperative manner. ORF80 contains an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a highly basic domain at its C-terminus. Compared to all known basic leucine zipper proteins the order of the domains is reversed in ORF80. ORF80 may therefore constitute a new subclass of basic leucine zipper DNA-binding proteins. PMID:11812827

  9. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...... groups were thus presented further away from the interface, and a hydration layer between the protein and the functionalized interface was observed in the self-assembled supramolecular structures....

  10. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Wang Bing [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States); Lee, Chul Won [Chonnam National University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P., E-mail: giedroc@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Merz, Kenneth M., E-mail: kmerz1@gmail.com [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis of intact basic proteins using noncovalently triple-layer coated capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselberg, Rob; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2009-07-01

    The usefulness of a noncovalent, positively charged capillary coating for the efficient analysis of intact basic proteins with CE was studied. Capillaries were coated by subsequent flushing with solutions of 10% w/v Polybrene (PB), 3% w/v dextran sulfate (DS), and again 10% w/v PB. Coating characterization studies showed that stable coatings could be produced which exhibited a pH-independent and highly reproducible EOF. The PB-DS-PB coating was evaluated with Tris phosphate BGEs of various pH using the four basic model proteins: alpha-chymotrypsinogen A, ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, and lysozyme. Typical migration time RSDs for the proteins were less than 0.85%, and apparent plate numbers were above 125,000 using a capillary length of 40 cm. The high separation efficiency allowed detection of several minor impurities in the model proteins. Using a BGE of medium pH, the CE system with triple-layer coating appeared to be useful for the repeatable profiling of recombinant humanized mouse monoclonal immunoglobulin G(1) showing a characteristic pattern of glycoforms. The CE system was also applied to the characterization of two llama antibodies, which were produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, revealing the presence of a side product in one of the antibodies. The high migration time stability allowed the reliable determination of antibody-antigen binding by monitoring migration time shifts. Finally, the feasibility of using the PB-DS-PB coated capillaries for CE with mass spectrometric detection was shown by the characterization of the impure llama antibody sample.

  12. Ionic liquid-polyvinyl chloride ionomer for highly selective isolation of basic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yang; Chen, Xu-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2010-04-15

    Hydrophilic ionic liquid-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) hybrids were prepared by immobilizing N-methylimidazole (N-mim) to PVC chains in toluene. The NmimCl-PVC hybrids were characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, surface charge analysis and elemental analysis. The immobilization ratio, i.e., the percentage of chloride on PVC chain reacting with N-mim to form the hybrid, varies from 4.3% to 15.1% by increasing the N-mim/PVC molar ratio. The most distinct feature of the hybrid is its excellent selectivity for adsorbing basic proteins by effective suppression of the non-specific protein adsorption by pure PVC, and a higher immobilization ratio facilitates better selectivity. In Tris-HCl buffer, 100 microg mL(-1) of basic proteins, i.e., lysozyme (Lys), cytochrome c (cyt-c) and hemoglobin (Hb), were favorably adsorbed with efficiencies of 97%, 98% and 94% by the hybrid with an immobilization ratio of 15.1%, while the adsorption of acidic proteins, i.e., bovine albumin serum (BSA), transferring (Trf) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were negligible. The retained Lys, cyt-c and Hb could be readily recovered by elution with phosphate buffer, carbonate buffer and SDS solution with efficiencies of 89%, 87% and 84%, respectively. Another feature of the hybrid is the significant improvement of the biocompatibility characterized by the maintenance of the activity of hemoglobin after adsorption and elution process. The practical usefulness of the hybrid was demonstrated by selective isolation of hemoglobin from human whole blood.

  13. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  14. Stable protein device platform based on pyridine dicarboxylic acid-bound cubic-nanostructured mesoporous titania films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajeong; Park, Sung Soo; Seo, Jooyeok; Ha, Chang-Sik; Moon, Cheil; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2013-08-14

    Here we shortly report a protein device platform that is extremely stable in a buffer condition similar to human bodies. The protein device platform was fabricated by covalently attaching cytochrome c (cyt c) protein molecules to organic coupler molecules (pyridine dicarboxylic acid, PDA) that were already covalently bound to an electron-transporting substrate. A cubic nanostructured mesoporous titania film was chosen as an electron-transporting substrate because of its large-sized cubic holes (∼7 nm) and highly crystalline cubic titania walls (∼0.4 nm lattice). Binding of PDA molecules to the mesoporous titania surface was achieved by esterification reaction between carboxylic acid groups (PDA) and hydroxyl groups (titania) in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) mediator, whereas the immobilization of cyt c to the PDA coupler was carried out by the EDC-mediated amidation reaction between carboxylic acid groups (PDA) and amine groups (cyt c). Results showed that the 2,4-position isomer among several PDAs exhibited the highest oxidation and reduction peak currents. The cyt c-immobilized PDA-bound titania substrates showed stable and durable electrochemical performances upon continuous current-voltage cycling for 240 times (the final current change was less than 3%) and could detect superoxide that is a core indicator for various diseases including cancers.

  15. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis.

  16. Phosphate cycling on the basic protein of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The presence of infected cell-specific phosphoproteins was investigated in Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV)-infected fat body using [32P]orthophosphoric acid labeling. One infected cell-specific phosphoprotein had a mobility similar to that of the basic protein (VP12) of PiGV. Further analysis, using immunoblotting and acid-urea gel analysis of infected fat body, confirmed that this phosphoprotein was VP12. However we did not detect phosphorylated VP12 in 32P-labeled nucleocapsids. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP12 revealed that phosphoserine was present in the basic protein. Since VP12 is phosphorylated in the infected cell, but not in the nucleocapsid, it appears that dephosphorylation of VP12 is a critical event in the life cycle of the virus. We therefore assayed virus nucleocapsids and infected fat body for the presence of phosphatase activity. Phosphatase activity was not detected in the virus, but the infected fat body had more activity than uninfected fat body. A model for nucleocapsid assembly and uncoating is presented which takes into account the phosphorylation state of VP12, the role of Zn2+ in the nucleocapsid, and the role of the capsid-associated kinase.

  17. Distribution between protein-bound and free forms of plasma cortisol in the gilt and fetal pig near term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattesh, H G; Baumbach, G A; Gillespie, B B; Schneider, J F; Murai, J T

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five time-dated pregnant gilts were used to document plasma levels of total and free cortisol, corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binding capacity, and percent distribution of cortisol among protein-bound (CBG and albumin) and free forms in the fetal pig during the last 24 days of gestation. Plasma from fetal pigs on days 110-114 of gestation (gestation length 114 days) had significantly higher levels of total cortisol (p pigs located in the cervical region of the uterus had lower (p pig are directly related and highly similar to those of another precocious species, the sheep.

  18. Making myelin basic protein -from mRNA transport to localized translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Bauer, Nina M; Schäfer, Isabelle; White, Robin

    2013-09-27

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of most vertebrates, oligodendrocytes enwrap neuronal axons with extensions of their plasma membrane to form the myelin sheath. Several proteins are characteristically found in myelin of which myelin basic protein (MBP) is the second most abundant one after proteolipid protein. The lack of functional MBP in rodents results in a severe hypomyelinated phenotype in the CNS demonstrating its importance for myelin synthesis. Mbp mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and is translated locally at the axon-glial contact site. Axonal properties such as diameter or electrical activity influence the degree of myelination. As oligodendrocytes can myelinate many axonal segments with varying properties, localized MBP translation represents an important part of a rapid and axon-tailored synthesis machinery. MBP's ability to compact cellular membranes may be problematic for the integrity of intracellular membranous organelles and can also explain why MBP is transported in oligodendrocytes in the form of an mRNA rather than as a protein. Here we review the recent findings regarding intracellular transport and signaling mechanisms leading to localized translation of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes. More detailed insights into the MBP synthesis pathway are important for a better understanding of the myelination process and may foster the development of remyelination therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  19. Making Myelin Basic Protein -from mRNA transport to localized translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eMüller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS of most vertebrates, oligodendrocytes enwrap neuronal axons with extensions of their plasma membrane to form the myelin sheath. Several proteins are characteristically found in myelin of which Myelin Basic Protein (MBP is the second most abundant one after Proteolipid Protein (PLP. The lack of functional MBP in rodents results in a severe hypomyelinated phenotype in the CNS demonstrating its importance for myelin synthesis. Mbp mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and is translated locally at the axon-glial contact site. Axonal properties such as diameter or electrical activity influence the degree of myelination. As oligodendrocytes can myelinate many axonal segments with varying properties, localized MBP translation represents an important part of a rapid and axon-tailored synthesis machinery. MBP’s ability to compact cellular membranes may be problematic for the integrity of intracellular membranous organelles and can also explain why MBP is transported in oligodendrocytes in the form of an mRNA rather than as a protein. Here we review the recent findings regarding intracellular transport and signalling mechanisms leading to localized translation of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes. More detailed insights into the MBP synthesis pathway are important for a better understanding of the myelination process and may foster the development of remyelination therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  20. Protein-bound water molecule counting by resolution of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiihne, S; Bryant, R G

    2000-01-01

    Water proton spin-lattice relaxation is studied in dilute solutions of bovine serum albumin as a function of magnetic field strength, oxygen concentration, and solvent deuteration. In contrast to previous studies conducted at high protein concentrations, the observed relaxation dispersion is accurately Lorentzian with an effective correlation time of 41 +/- 3 ns when measured at low proton and low protein concentrations to minimize protein aggregation. Elimination of oxygen flattens the relax...

  1. Rapid Exchange of Bound ADP on the Staphylococcus aureus Replication Initiation Protein DnaA*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, regulatory inactivation of the replication initiator DnaA occurs after initiation as a result of hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP, but it has been unknown how DnaA is controlled to coordinate cell growth and chromosomal replication in Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study examined the roles of ATP binding and its hydrolysis in the regulation of the S. aureus DnaA activity. In vitro, S. aureus DnaA melted S. aureus oriC in the presence of ATP but n...

  2. Mineral and Protein-Bound Water and Latching Action Control Mechanical Behavior at Protein-Mineral Interfaces in Biological Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Pijush Ghosh; Katti, Dinesh R.; Kalpana S. Katti

    2008-01-01

    The nacre structure consists of laminated interlocked mineral platelets separated by nanoscale organic layers. Here, the role of close proximity of mineral to the proteins on mechanical behavior of the protein is investigated through steered molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations indicate that energy required for unfolding protein in the proximity of mineral aragonite is several times higher than that for isolated protein in the absence of the mineral. Here, we present details of spe...

  3. Chromatin-bound NLS proteins recruit membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for nuclear envelope assembly via importin-α/β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanlong Lu; Zhigang Lu; Qinying Liu; Li Guo; He Ren; Jingyan Fu; Qing Jiang; Paul R Clarke; Chuanmao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for nuclear envelope (NE) assembly is not fully understood.Importin-β and the small GTPase Ran have been implicated in the spatial regulation of NE assembly process.Here we report that chromatin-bound NLS (nuclear localization sequence) proteins provide docking sites for the NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins via importin-α and -β during NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.We show that along with the fast recruitment of the abundant NLS proteins such as nucleoplasmin and histones to the demembranated sperm chromatin in the extracts,importin-α binds the chromatin NLS proteins rapidly.Meanwhile,importin-β binds cytoplasmic NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins.Through interacting with importin-α on the chromatin NLS proteins,importin-β targets the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins to the chromatin surface.Once encountering RanGTP on the chromatin generated by RCC1,importin-β preferentially binds Ran-GTP and releases the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for NE assembly.NE assembly is disrupted by blocking the interaction between importin-α and NLS proteins with excess soluble NLS proteins or by depletion of importin-β from the extract.Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism for NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.

  4. Combined effects of soy isoflavones and milk basic protein on bone mineral density in hind-limb unloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Tousen, Yuko; Nishide, Yoriko; Tadaishi, Miki; Kato, Ken; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2016-03-01

    We examined whether the combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein both are reported to be effective for bone metabolism, prevents bone loss induced by skeletal hind-limb unloading in mice. Female ddY strain mice, aged 8 weeks, were divided into six groups (n = 6-8 each): (1) normally housed group, (2) loading group, (3) hind-limb unloading group fed a control diet, (4) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates diet, (5) hind-limb unloading group fed a 1.0% milk basic protein diet, and (6) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates and 1.0% milk basic protein diet. After 3 weeks, femoral bone mineral density was markedly reduced in unloading mice. The combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein showed cooperative effects in preventing bone loss and milk basic protein inhibited the increased expression of osteogenic genes in bone marrow cells in unloading mice. These results suggest that the combination of soy isoflavone and milk basic protein may be useful for bone health in subjects with disabling conditions as well as astronauts.

  5. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (Piron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (Piron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source.

  6. Structures of the nucleoid occlusion protein SlmA bound to DNA and the C-terminal domain of the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Maria A; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-05-03

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by FtsZ, which polymerizes to create the cytokinetic Z ring. Multiple FtsZ-binding proteins regulate FtsZ polymerization to ensure the proper spatiotemporal formation of the Z ring at the division site. The DNA-binding protein SlmA binds to FtsZ and prevents Z-ring formation through the nucleoid in a process called "nucleoid occlusion" (NO). As do most FtsZ-accessory proteins, SlmA interacts with the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) that is connected to the FtsZ core by a long, flexible linker. However, SlmA is distinct from other regulatory factors in that it must be DNA-bound to interact with the FtsZ CTD. Few structures of FtsZ regulator-CTD complexes are available, but all reveal the CTD bound as a helix. To deduce the molecular basis for the unique SlmA-DNA-FtsZ CTD regulatory interaction and provide insight into FtsZ-regulator protein complex formation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, and Klebsiella pneumonia SlmA-DNA-FtsZ CTD ternary complexes. Strikingly, the FtsZ CTD does not interact with SlmA as a helix but binds as an extended conformation in a narrow, surface-exposed pocket formed only in the DNA-bound state of SlmA and located at the junction between the DNA-binding and C-terminal dimer domains. Binding studies are consistent with the structure and underscore key interactions in complex formation. Combined, these data reveal the molecular basis for the SlmA-DNA-FtsZ interaction with implications for SlmA's NO function and underscore the ability of the FtsZ CTD to adopt a wide range of conformations, explaining its ability to bind diverse regulatory proteins.

  7. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J. [MSKCC; (Rockefeller)

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  8. Structure analysis of free and bound states of an RNA aptamer against ribosomal protein S8 from Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlieva, Milya; Donarski, James; Wang, Jiachen; Shamoo, Yousif; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Several protein-targeted RNA aptamers have been identified for a variety of applications and although the affinities of numerous protein-aptamer complexes have been determined, the structural details of these complexes have not been widely explored. We examined the structural accommodation of an RNA aptamer that binds bacterial r-protein S8. The core of the primary binding site for S8 on helix 21 of 16S rRNA contains a pair of conserved base triples that mold the sugar-phosphate backbone to S8. The aptamer, which does not contain the conserved sequence motif, is specific for the rRNA binding site of S8. The protein-free RNA aptamer adopts a helical structure with multiple non-canonical base pairs. Surprisingly, binding of S8 leads to a dramatic change in the RNA conformation that restores the signature S8 recognition fold through a novel combination of nucleobase interactions. Nucleotides within the non-canonical core rearrange to create a G-(G-C) triple and a U-(A-U)-U quartet. Although native-like S8-RNA interactions are present in the aptamer-S8 complex, the topology of the aptamer RNA differs from that of the helix 21-S8 complex. This is the first example of an RNA aptamer that adopts substantially different secondary structures in the free and protein-bound states and highlights the remarkable plasticity of RNA secondary structure.

  9. T-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry: basic experimental procedures for protein complex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelevski, Izhak; Kirshenbaum, Noam; Sharon, Michal

    2010-07-31

    -MS analysis of protein complexes using the Synapt (Quadrupole-Ion Mobility-Time-of-Flight) HDMS instrument (Waters Ltd; the only commercial IM-MS instrument currently available)(10). We describe the basic optimization steps, the calibration of collision cross-sections, and methods for data processing and interpretation. The final step of the protocol discusses methods for calculating theoretical Omega values. Overall, the protocol does not attempt to cover every aspect of IM-MS characterization of protein assemblies; rather, its goal is to introduce the practical aspects of the method to new researchers in the field.

  10. Golli myelin basic proteins stimulate oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in remyelinating adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Pablo M; Cheli, Veronica T; Ghiani, Cristina A; Spreuer, Vilma; Handley, Vance W; Campagnoni, Anthony T

    2012-07-01

    Golli myelin basic proteins are necessary for normal myelination, acting via voltage and store-dependent Ca(2+) entry at multiple steps during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) development. To date nothing is known regarding the role of golli proteins in demyelination or remyelination events. Here the effects of golli ablation and overexpression in myelin loss and recovery were examined using the cuprizone (CPZ) model of demyelination/remyelination. We found severe demyelination in the corpus callosum (CC) of golli-overexpressing mice (JOE) during the CPZ treatment, which was accompanied by an increased number of reactive astrocytes and activation of microglia/macrophages. During demyelination of JOE brains, a significant increase in the number of proliferating OPCs was found in the CC as well as in the subventricular zone, and our data indicate that these progenitors matured and fully remyelinated the CC of JOE animals after CPZ withdrawal. In contrast, in the absence of golli (golli-KO mice) delayed myelin loss associated with a smaller immune response, and a lower number of OPCs was found in these mice during the CPZ treatment. Furthermore, incomplete remyelination was observed after CPZ removal in large areas of the CC of golli-KO mice, reflecting irregular recovery of the oligodendrocyte population and subsequent myelin sheath formation. Our findings demonstrate that golli proteins sensitize mature oligodendrocytes to CPZ-induced demyelination, while at the same time stimulate the proliferation/recruitment of OPCs during demyelination, resulting in accelerated remyelination.

  11. Transcriptional upregulation of myelin components in spontaneous myelin basic protein-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Kim A; Pombal, Diana; Schönefeldt, Susann; Van Helleputte, Lawrence; Maurin, Hervé; Dresselaers, Tom; Govaerts, Kristof; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Leuven, Fred; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Dooley, James; Humblet-Baron, Stephanie; Liston, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    Myelin is essential for efficient signal transduction in the nervous system comprising of multiple proteins. The intricacies of the regulation of the formation of myelin, and its components, are not fully understood. Here, we describe the characterization of a novel myelin basic protein (Mbp) mutant mouse, mbp(jive), which spontaneously occurred in our mouse colony. These mice displayed the onset of a shaking gait before 3 weeks of age and seizure onset before 2 months of age. Due to a progressive increase of seizure intensity, mbp(jive) mice experienced premature lethality at around 3 months of age. Mbp mRNA transcript or protein was undetectable and, accordingly, genetic analysis demonstrated a homozygous loss of exons 3 to 6 of Mbp. Peripheral nerve conductance was mostly unimpaired. Additionally, we observed grave structural changes in white matter predominant structures were detected by T1, T2 and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. We additionally observed that Mbp-deficiency results in an upregulation of Qkl, Mag and Cnp, suggestive of a regulatory feedback mechanism whereby compensatory increases in Qkl have downstream effects on Mag and Cnp. Further research will clarify the role and specifications of this myelin feedback loop, as well as determine its potential role in therapeutic strategies for demyelinating disorders.

  12. Purification of noncoding RNA and bound proteins using FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense-oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    To understand the function of certain RNAs, including noncoding RNAs, it is important to identify the proteins that interact with the RNAs. Here we describe the method for purification of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes composed of specific cellular RNAs by pull-down with FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Using this method, we identified a novel protein component of U7 snRNP complex.

  13. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  14. Post-translational Modifications of Chicken Myelin Basic Protein Charge Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Zhang, Rui; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith, Richard D.; Zand, Robert

    2008-07-11

    Purified myelin basic protein (MBP) from various species contains several post-translationally modified forms termed charge components or charge isomers. Chicken MBP contains four charge components denoted as C1, C2, C3 and C8. (The C8 isomer is a complex mixture and was not investigated in this study.) These findings are in contrast to those found for human, bovine and other mammalian MBP’s. Mammalian MBP’s, each of which contain seven or eight charge components depending on the analysis of the CM-52 chromatographic curves and the PAGE gels obtained under basic pH conditions. Chicken MBP components C1, C2 and C3 were treated with trypsin and endoproteinase Glu-C. The resulting digests were analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography combined with either an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer or with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. This instrumentation permitted establishing the amino acid composition and the determination of the posttranslational modifications for each of the three charge components C1-C3. With the exception of N-terminal acetylation, the post-translational modifications were partial.

  15. The proform of eosinophil major basic protein: a new maternal serum marker for adverse pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kasper; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Steen;

    2009-01-01

    MBP median was significantly reduced in pregnancies with SGA (0.81 MoM), spontaneous preterm delivery (0.83 MoM), preeclampsia (0.88 MoM) and gestational hypertension (0.60 MoM). The best screening performance was found for preeclampsia including the covariates proMBP and nulliparity yielding an area under......OBJECTIVE: To establish the first trimester serum levels of the proform of eosinophil major basic protein (proMBP) in pregnancies with adverse outcome. Furthermore, to determine the screening performance using proMBP alone and in combination with other first trimester markers. METHODS: A case......-control study was conducted in a primary hospital setting. The proMBP concentration was measured in cases with small-for-gestational age (SGA) (n = 150), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 88), preeclampsia (n = 40), gestational hypertension (n = 10) and in controls (n = 500). Concentrations were converted...

  16. A thermodynamic investigation on the binding of mercury ion with myelin basic protein at different temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Rezaei Behbehani; L. Barzegar; A.A. Saboury; S. Ghammami

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic study on the interaction of myelin basic protein with mercury ion was studied by using isothermal titration calorimetry, ITC, at 300.15, 310.15 and 320.15 K in Tris buffer solution at pH 7. The enthalpies of MBP + Hg2+ interaction are reported and analysed in terms of the extended solvation model. It was found that MBP has two identical and non-cooperative binding sites for Hg2+ ions. The intrinsic dissociation equilibrium constants are 99.904,112.968 and 126.724 |μmol/L, and the molar enthalpy of binding are -11.634, -10.768 and -10.117 kJ mol 1 at 300.15, 310.15 and 320.15 K, respectively.

  17. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Theres Weil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP, which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  18. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  19. Single-stranded DNA bound to bacterial cold-shock proteins: preliminary crystallographic and Raman analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Ralf; Zeeb, Markus; Dostál, Lubomir; Feske, Anette; Magg, Christine; Max, Klaas; Welfle, Heinz; Balbach, Jochen; Heinemann, Udo

    2004-04-01

    The cold-shock response has been described for several bacterial species. It is characterized by distinct changes in intracellular protein patterns whereby a set of cold-shock-inducible proteins become abundant. The major cold-shock proteins of Bacillus subtilis (Bs-CspB) and Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp) are small oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold proteins that have been described as binding single-stranded nucleic acids. Bs-CspB (Mr = 7365) and Bc-Csp (Mr = 7333) were crystallized in the presence of the deoxyhexanucleotide (dT)6. Crystals of (dT)6 with Bs-CspB grew in the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 49.0, b = 53.2, c = 77.0 A. Crystals with Bc-Csp grew in the primitive orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 64.9, c = 31.2 A. These crystals diffract to maximal resolutions of 1.78 and 1.29 A, respectively. The presence of protein and DNA in the crystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  1. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Caitlin R; Balsor, Justin L; Jones, David G; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, myelin is viewed as insulation around axons, however, more recent studies have shown it also plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism, and neuroimmune signaling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T-cells. Furthermore, Golli-MBP has been called a "molecular link" between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex specifically, myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan. Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging. Golli-MBP has early developmental changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, and gradually increases into aging. There are three stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition, the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  2. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin R Siu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally myelin is viewed as insulation around axons however more recent studies have shown it plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism and neuroimmune signalling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T cells, and has been called a 'molecular link' between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan: Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging; Golli-MBP has changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, before gradually increasing into aging. There are 3 stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  3. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram.

  4. Bioavailability of free lysine and protein-bound lysine from casein and fishmeal in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeckel, Saskia; Dietz, Carsten; Schulz, Carsten; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    In the present study, a linear regression analysis between lysine intake and lysine retention was conducted to investigate the efficiency of lysine utilisation (k(Lys)) at marginal lysine intake of either protein-bound or free lysine sources in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima). For this purpose, nine isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated to contain 2·25-4·12 g lysine/100 g crude protein (CP) to ensure that lysine was the first-limiting amino acid in all diets. The basal diet contained 2·25 g lysine/100 g CP. Graded levels of casein (Cas), fishmeal (FM) and L-lysine HCl (Lys) were added to the experimental diets to achieve stepwise lysine increments. A total of 240 fish (initial weight 50·1 g) were hand-fed all the experimental diets once daily until apparent satiation over a period of 56 d. Feed intake was significantly affected by dietary lysine concentration rather than by dietary lysine source. Specific growth rate increased significantly at higher lysine concentrations (PCas, Lys or FM were 0·833, 0·857 and 0·684, respectively. The bioavailability of lysine from the respective lysine sources was determined by a slope-ratio approach. The bioavailability of lysine (relative to the reference lysine source Cas) from FM and Lys was 82·1 and 103 %, respectively. Nutrient requirement for maintenance was in the range of 16·7-23·4 mg/kg(0·8) per d, and did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant differences in lysine utilisation efficiency or bioavailability of protein-bound or crystalline lysine from the respective sources observed when lysine was confirmed to be the first-limiting nutrient.

  5. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic plasma contains elevated levels of glucose and various low-molecular-weight carbonyl compounds derived from the metabolism of glucose and related materials. These compounds react with protein side chains (Arg, Lys, Cys, and His) to give glycated materials and advanced glycation end produ...

  6. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  7. Reduced myelin basic protein and actin-related gene expression in visual cortex in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Paul R; Eastwood, Sharon L; Harrison, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Most brain gene expression studies of schizophrenia have been conducted in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. The extent to which alterations occur in other cortical regions is not well established. We investigated primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) from the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium collection of tissue from 60 subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, or controls. We first carried out a preliminary array screen of pooled RNA, and then used RT-PCR to quantify five mRNAs which the array identified as differentially expressed in schizophrenia (myelin basic protein [MBP], myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG], β-actin [ACTB], thymosin β-10 [TB10], and superior cervical ganglion-10 [SCG10]). Reduced mRNA levels were confirmed by RT-PCR for MBP, ACTB and TB10. The MBP reduction was limited to transcripts containing exon 2. ACTB and TB10 mRNAs were also decreased in bipolar disorder. None of the transcripts were altered in subjects with major depression. Reduced MBP mRNA in schizophrenia replicates findings in other brain regions and is consistent with oligodendrocyte involvement in the disorder. The decreases in expression of ACTB, and the actin-binding protein gene TB10, suggest changes in cytoskeletal organisation. The findings confirm that the primary visual cortex shows molecular alterations in schizophrenia and extend the evidence for a widespread, rather than focal, cortical pathophysiology.

  8. Reduced myelin basic protein and actin-related gene expression in visual cortex in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Matthews

    Full Text Available Most brain gene expression studies of schizophrenia have been conducted in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. The extent to which alterations occur in other cortical regions is not well established. We investigated primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17 from the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium collection of tissue from 60 subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, or controls. We first carried out a preliminary array screen of pooled RNA, and then used RT-PCR to quantify five mRNAs which the array identified as differentially expressed in schizophrenia (myelin basic protein [MBP], myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG], β-actin [ACTB], thymosin β-10 [TB10], and superior cervical ganglion-10 [SCG10]. Reduced mRNA levels were confirmed by RT-PCR for MBP, ACTB and TB10. The MBP reduction was limited to transcripts containing exon 2. ACTB and TB10 mRNAs were also decreased in bipolar disorder. None of the transcripts were altered in subjects with major depression. Reduced MBP mRNA in schizophrenia replicates findings in other brain regions and is consistent with oligodendrocyte involvement in the disorder. The decreases in expression of ACTB, and the actin-binding protein gene TB10, suggest changes in cytoskeletal organisation. The findings confirm that the primary visual cortex shows molecular alterations in schizophrenia and extend the evidence for a widespread, rather than focal, cortical pathophysiology.

  9. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Hochhaus, Nina M; Fontana, Xavier; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Myelin basic proteins (MBP) are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

  10. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate.

  11. Ubiquitin-independent proteosomal degradation of myelin basic protein contributes to development of neurodegenerative autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kononikhin, Alexey; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Surina, Yelena; Smirnov, Ivan; Lomakin, Yakov; Bacheva, Anna; Stepanov, Alexey; Karpova, Yaroslava; Lyupina, Yulia; Kharybin, Oleg; Melamed, Dobroslav; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Sharova, Natalia; Nikolaev, Eugene; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Recent findings indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer as well as autoimmune and several neurodegenerative diseases, and is thus a target for novel therapeutics. One disease that is related to aberrant protein degradation is multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder involving the processing and presentation of myelin autoantigens that leads to the destruction of axons. Here, we show that brain-derived proteasomes from SJL mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an ubiquitin-independent manner generate significantly increased amounts of myelin basic protein peptides that induces cytotoxic lymphocytes to target mature oligodendrocytes ex vivo. Ten times enhanced release of immunogenic peptides by cerebral proteasomes from EAE-SJL mice is caused by a dramatic shift in the balance between constitutive and β1i(high) immunoproteasomes in the CNS of SJL mice with EAE. We found that during EAE, β1i is increased in resident CNS cells, whereas β5i is imported by infiltrating lymphocytes through the blood-brain barrier. Peptidyl epoxyketone specifically inhibits brain-derived β1i(high) immunoproteasomes in vitro (kobs/[I] = 240 M(-1)s(-1)), and at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, it ameliorates ongoing EAE in vivo. Therefore, our findings provide novel insights into myelin metabolism in pathophysiologic conditions and reveal that the β1i subunit of the immunoproteasome is a potential target to treat autoimmune neurologic diseases.

  12. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  13. Interaction of myelin basic protein isoforms with lipid bilayers studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael; Choo, Lin-P'ing; Boulias, Christopher; Moscarello, Mario A.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1993-05-01

    The secondary structure of the naturally occurring isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP1-8) from human myelin was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy under a variety of experimental conditions. In aqueous solution each isoform was found to be unstructured. In the presence of negatively charged liquid bilayers MBP1-4 were shown to exhibit an amide I band maximum indicative of the adoption of (alpha) -helical secondary structures. A detailed analysis revealed that significant proportions of (beta) -sheet secondary structure were also present. MBP5 and MBP8, which have significantly less cationic charge than MBP1-4, exhibited an amide I maximum identical to that seen in solution, suggesting that no interaction with the bilayer occurred. Analysis of the lipid CH2 and C equals O stretching vibrations also pointed towards significant interaction of MBP1-4 with the bilayer. The changes in intensity and frequency of these bands which typically accompany the phase transition in the pure bilayer were abolished by addition of the proteins. No such effect was seen for MBP5 and 8, the normal lipid phase transition being apparent. The implications of these results in the aetiology of multiple sclerosis is discussed.

  14. Purification and identification of lactoperoxidase in milk basic proteins as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Y; Ono, A; Serizawa, A; Yogo, K; Ishida-Kitagawa, N; Takeya, T; Ogawa, T

    2011-05-01

    A milk protein fraction with alkaline isoelectric points (milk basic protein, MBP) inhibits both bone resorption and osteoclastogenesis for in vitro models. We previously identified bovine angiogenin as a component of MBP that inhibits bone resorption. However, purified angiogenin had no effect on osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that MBP contains unidentified component(s) that inhibit osteoclast formation. In this study, we purified lactoperoxidase (LPO) as the predominant inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis in MBP. The LPO treatment downregulated levels of reactive oxygen species in osteoclasts. Signaling by receptor activator of NF-kappa-B ligand/receptor activator of NF-kappa-B (RANKL/RANK) was downregulated in LPO-treated cells, and, in particular, the ubiquitination of tumor necrosis factor receptor associate factor 6 (TRAF6) and activation of downstream signaling cascades (JNK, p38, ERK, and NFκB) were suppressed. Ultimately, LPO treatment led to decreased expression of c-Fos and NFAT2. These results suggest that MBP contains at least 2 components that independently suppress bone resorption through a unique mechanism: angiogenin inhibits bone resorption and LPO inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. These data explain many of the positive aspects of milk consumption on bone health.

  15. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure-area (π-A) and pressure-time (π-T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  16. Starch-bound 2S proteins and kernel texture in einkorn, Triticum monococcum ssp monococcum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Federica; Gazza, Laura; Conti, Salvatore; Muccilli, Vera; Foti, Salvatore; Pogna, Norberto Edgar

    2009-11-01

    The starch granule proteins from 113 einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum ssp monococcum) accessions were analyzed by acidic, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (A-PAGE), and two-dimensional A-PAGE x SDS-PAGE. All accessions were confirmed to contain equal amounts of two polypeptide chains corresponding to puroindoline B (Pin-B), as well as a prominent component plus a faint band corresponding to puroindoline A (Pin-A). When compared with soft-textured common wheat, "monococcum" accessions showed an increase of 3.2- and 2.7-fold in Pin-A and Pin-B levels on the starch granules, respectively. In addition, all accessions contained a novel component of the 2S super-family of seed proteins named Einkorn Trypsin Inhibitor (ETI), which was found to be encoded as a pre-protein 148 residues long. Wild-type ETI encoded by allele Eti-A(m) 1a and "valine-type" ETI encoded by allele Eti-A(m) 1b, which occurred in 107 and six einkorn accessions, respectively, were found to accumulate on starch granules as a mature protein of 121 amino acids with a hydrophobic central domain. The einkorn accessions exhibited an average SKCS index as low as -2.05 +/- 11.4, which is typical of extra-soft kernels. The total surface area of starch granules in "monococcum" wheat, as determined by visual assessments in counting chambers, was estimated at 764 mm(2)/mg of starch, and was about 1.5 times higher than that for common wheat. The results are discussed in relation to the identification of factors that cause the extra-soft texture of einkorn kernels.

  17. Functions that Protect Escherichia coli from Tightly Bound DNA-Protein Complexes Created by Mutant EcoRII Methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan L Henderson

    Full Text Available Expression of mutant EcoRII methyltransferase protein (M.EcoRII-C186A in Escherichia coli leads to tightly bound DNA-protein complexes (TBCs, located sporadically on the chromosome rather than in tandem arrays. The mechanisms behind the lethality induced by such sporadic TBCs are not well studied, nor is it clear whether very tight binding but non-covalent complexes are processed in the same way as covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs. Using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A block replication forks in vivo. Specific bubble molecules were detected as spots on the 2D gel, only when M.EcoRII-C186A was induced, and a mutation that eliminates a specific EcoRII methylation site led to disappearance of the corresponding spot. We also performed a candidate gene screen for mutants that are hypersensitive to TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A. We found several gene products necessary for protection against these TBCs that are known to also protect against DPCs induced with wild-type M.EcoRII (after 5-azacytidine incorporation: RecA, RecBC, RecG, RuvABC, UvrD, FtsK, XerCD and SsrA (tmRNA. In contrast, the RecFOR pathway and Rep helicase are needed for protection against TBCs but not DPCs induced by M.EcoRII. We propose that stalled fork processing by RecFOR and RecA promotes release of tightly bound (but non-covalent blocking proteins, perhaps by licensing Rep helicase-driven dissociation of the blocking M.EcoRII-C186A. Our studies also argued against the involvement of several proteins that might be expected to protect against TBCs. We took the opportunity to directly compare the sensitivity of all tested mutants to two quinolone antibiotics, which target bacterial type II topoisomerases and induce a unique form of DPC. We uncovered rep, ftsK and xerCD as novel quinolone hypersensitive mutants, and also obtained evidence against the involvement of a number of functions that might be expected to protect against quinolones.

  18. Functional analysis of membrane-bound complement regulatory protein on T-cell immune response in ginbuna crucian carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Indriyani; Abdelkhalek, Nevien K; Motobe, Shiori; Nakamura, Ryota; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2016-02-01

    Complements have long been considered to be a pivotal component in innate immunity. Recent researches, however, highlight novel roles of complements in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Membrane-bound complement regulatory protein CD46, a costimulatory protein for T cells, is a key molecule for T-cell immunomodulation. Teleost CD46-like molecule, termed Tecrem, has been newly identified in common carp and shown to function as a complement regulator. However, it remains unclear whether Tecrem is involved in T-cell immune response. We investigated Tecrem function related to T-cell responses in ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna Tecrem (gTecrem) proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation using anti-common carp Tecrem monoclonal antibody (mAb) and were ubiquitously expressed on blood cells including CD8α(+) and CD4(+) lymphocytes. gTecrem expression on leucocyte surface was enhanced after stimulation with the T-cell mitogen, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Coculture with the anti-Tecrem mAb significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that cross-linking of Tecrems on T-cells interferes with a signal transduction pathway for T-cell activation. These findings indicate that Tecrem may act as a T-cell moderator and imply that the complement system in teleost, as well as mammals, plays an important role for linking adaptive and innate immunity.

  19. Basic science and spine literature document bone morphogenetic protein increases cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasingly, clinical articles document that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/INFUSE: Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA and its derivatives utilized in spinal surgery increase the risk of developing cancer. However, there is also a large body of basic science articles that also document that various types of BMP and other members of the TGF-Beta (transforming growth factor beta family promote the growth of different types of cancers. Methods: This review looks at many clinical articles citing BMP/INFUSE′s role, largely "off-label", in contributing to complications encountered during spinal surgery. Next, however, specific attention is given to the clinical and basic science literature regarding how BMP and its derivatives (e.g. members of the TGF-beta family may also impact the development of breast and other cancers. Results: Utilizing BMP/INFUSE in spine surgery increased the risk of cancers/new malignancy as documented in several studies. For example, Carragee et al. found that for single-level instrumented posterolateral fusions (PLF using high-dose rhBMP-2 (239 patients vs. autograft (control group; n = 224, the risks of new cancers at 2 and 5 years postoperatively were increased. In laboratory studies, BMP′s along with other members of the TGF-Beta family also modulated/contributed to the proliferation/differentiation of breast cancer (e.g. bone formation/turnover, breast cancer-related solid tumors, and metastases, lung, adrenal, and colon cancer. Conclusions: BMP/INFUSE when utilized clinically in spinal fusion surgery appears to promote cancer at higher rates than observed in the overall population. Furthermore, BMP and TGF-beta are correlated with increased cancer growth both in the clinic and the laboratory.

  20. Identification of Proteins Bound to Dengue Viral RNA In Vivo Reveals New Host Proteins Important for Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacia L. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is the most prevalent cause of arthropod-borne infection worldwide. Due to the limited coding capacity of the viral genome and the complexity of the viral life cycle, host cell proteins play essential roles throughout the course of viral infection. Host RNA-binding proteins mediate various aspects of virus replication through their physical interactions with viral RNA. Here we describe a technique designed to identify such interactions in the context of infected cells using UV cross-linking followed by antisense-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified interactions, several of them novel, between host proteins and dengue viral RNA in infected Huh7 cells. Most of these interactions were subsequently validated using RNA immunoprecipitation. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated gene silencing, we showed that more than half of these host proteins are likely involved in regulating virus replication, demonstrating the utility of this method in identifying biologically relevant interactions that may not be identified using traditional in vitro approaches.

  1. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Wagner, Gerhard [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon [Université de Lyon, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, Institut des Sciences Analytiques (CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1) (France); Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for {sup 13}C line widths and <0.5 ppm {sup 15}N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the

  2. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally...... been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma......), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs...

  3. Basic Residues within the Ebolavirus VP35 Protein Are Required for Its Viral Polymerase Cofactor Function ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Prins, Kathleen C.; Binning, Jennifer M.; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Christopher F Basler

    2010-01-01

    The ebolavirus (EBOV) VP35 protein binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), inhibits host alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) production, and is an essential component of the viral polymerase complex. Structural studies of the VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) identified specific structural features, including a central basic patch and a hydrophobic pocket, that are important for dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition. Several other conserved basic residues bordering the central basic patch and ...

  4. Fluorescence property of photosystem II protein complexes bound to a gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Kazuki; Mohamed, Ahmed; Kawahara, Kousuke; Nagao, Ryo; Kato, Yuki; Fukumura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yutaka; Noguchi, Takumi

    2017-03-08

    Development of an efficient photo-anode system for water oxidation is key to the success of artificial photosynthesis. We previously assembled photosystem II (PSII) proteins, which are an efficient natural photocatalyst for water oxidation, on a gold nanoparticle (GNP) to prepare a PSII-GNP conjugate as an anode system in a light-driven water-splitting nano-device (Noji et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2011, 2, 2448-2452). In the current study, we characterized the fluorescence property of the PSII-GNP conjugate by static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and compared with that of free PSII proteins. It was shown that in a static fluorescence spectrum measured at 77 K, the amplitude of a major peak at 683 nm was significantly reduced and a red shoulder at 693 nm disappeared in PSII-GNP. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements showed that picosecond components at 683 nm decayed faster by factors of 1.4-2.1 in PSII-GNP than in free PSII, explaining the observed quenching of the major fluorescence peak. In addition, a nanosecond-decay component arising from a 'red chlorophyll' at 693 nm was lost in time-resolved fluorescence of PSII-GNP, probably due to a structural perturbation of this chlorophyll by interaction with GNP. Consistently with these fluorescence properties, degradation of PSII during strong-light illumination was two times slower in PSII-GNP than in free PSII. The enhanced durability of PSII is an advantageous property of the PSII-GNP conjugate in the development of an artificial photosynthesis device.

  5. Determination of Free-Form and Peptide Bound Pyrraline in the Commercial Drinks Enriched with Different Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyrraline, a causative factor for the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is also employed as an indicator to evaluate heat damage and formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs in foods. Peptide-enriched drinks (PEDs are broadly consumed worldwide due to rapid rate of absorption and perceived health effects. It can be hypothesized that PED is an important source of pyrraline, especially peptide bound pyrraline (Pep-Pyr. In this study we determined free-form pyrraline (Free-Pyr and Pep-Pyr in drinks enriched with whey protein hydrolysate (WPH, soy protein hydrolysate (SPH and collagen protein hydrolysate (CPH. A detection method was developed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detector coupled with tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction (SPE. The SPE led to excellent recovery rates ranging between 93.2% and 98.5% and a high reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSD of <5%. The limits of detection and quantification obtained were 30.4 and 70.3 ng/mL, respectively. Pep-Pyr was identified as the most abundant form (above 96 percent of total pyrraline, whereas Free-Pyr was present in a small proportion (less than four percent of total pyrraline. The results indicate that PED is an important extrinsic source of pyrraline, especially Pep-Pyr. As compared with CPH- and SPH-enriched drinks, WPH-enriched drinks contained high content of Pep-Pyr. The Pep-Pyr content is associated with the distribution of peptide lengths and the amino acid compositions of protein in PEDs.

  6. Interleukin-12 suppresses filaria-induced pulmonary eosinophilia, deposition of major basic protein and airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlotra, R K; Hall, L R; Higgins, A W; Dreshaj, I A; Haxhiu, M A; Kazura, J W; Pearlman, E

    1998-10-01

    Tropical Pulmonary Eosinophilia (TPE) is a severe form of allergic asthma caused by the host inflammatory response to filarial helminths in the lung microvasculature, and is characterized by pulmonary eosinophilia, increased filarial-specific IgG and IgE antibodies, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The current study examined the effect of IL-12 on pulmonary eosinophilia, deposition of eosinophil major basic protein and airway hyperresponsiveness in mice inoculated i.v. with Brugia malayi microfilariae. Injection of recombinant murine IL-12 modulated the T helper (Th) response in the lungs from Th2- to Th1-like, with elevated IFN-gamma, and decreased IL-4 and IL-5 production. Consistent with this shift in cytokine response, antigen-specific IgG2a was elevated, and IgG1 and total serum IgE were decreased. In addition, eosinophils in BAL fluid from IL-12 treated mice were reduced from 56% to 11%, and there was no detectable MBP on respiratory epithelial cells. Importantly, IL-12 suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness compared with saline-injected control animals. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that by modulating Th associated cytokine production, IL-12 down-regulates filaria-induced lung immunopathology.

  7. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    in the presence of molecular O(2) and redox-active metal ions (e.g. Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Cr(6+)), which are known to increase the rate of DOPA oxidation. The majority of oxidative damage appears to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and HO(.) radicals, though other DOPA oxidation products......, including semiquinone radicals, quinones, and metal ion-DOPA complexes have also been implicated in some cases. Non-radical reactions of DOPA with suitable nucleophiles (e.g. thiol groups) can also result in modification of the target, with this process being particularly prevalent with proteins...

  8. Microanalysis characterization of bioactive protein-bound polysaccharides produced by Amanita ponderosa cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Cátia; Martins, M Rosário; Caldeira, A Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Different compounds of edible mushrooms are responsible for their bioactivity. The ability to synthesize polysaccharides, namely protein-polysaccharide (PPS) complexes, is related to the antioxidant capacity of these compounds and present great interest in preventing a number of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular and auto-immune diseases, and accelerated aging. Amanita ponderosa are wild edible mushrooms that grow in Mediterranean "montado" areas [Portuguese name given to cork oak (Quercus suber) and holm oak (Quercus ilex) forests]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of PPS complexes obtained from A. ponderosa cultures using a new microanalytical approach to quickly and easily monitor the production process. Microanalysis using Fourier-transform infrared using attenuated total reflection and Raman spectroscopy of PPS samples showed spectra compatible with identification of this type of compound in culture extracts. PPS separated by size-exclusion chromatography showed seven main complexes. Molecular weights of the main PPS complexes isolated from cultures ranged between 1.5 and 20 kDa and did not present toxicity against Artemia salina, demonstrating the potential of A. ponderosa as a source of biologically active compounds with nutraceutical value. Application of this microanalytical approach to monitoring the production of PPS compounds can be successfully applied in biotechnological processes.

  9. Development of biomarkers of stress related to endocrine disruption in gastropods: alkali-labile phosphates, protein-bound lipids and vitellogenin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Beatrice; Gagné, François; André, Chantale; Blaise, Christian; Abbaci, Khedidja; Budzinski, Hélène; Dévier, Marie-Hélène; Garric, Jeanne

    2009-05-05

    The occurrence in aquatic environments of compounds capable of acting as endocrine disruptors (ED) is of concern for wildlife. Elevated levels of the egg-yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) are widely accepted as a biomarker for xenoestrogen exposure in aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for tracking changes in levels of Vg-like proteins in gastropods. Vg-like and egg-yolk proteins were analyzed in three freshwater gastropods having different modes of reproduction: Potamopyrgus antipodarum (asexual reproduction), Valvata piscinalis (hermaphroditism) and Lithoglyphus naticoides (sexual reproduction). Vitellogenin-like protein levels were examined by the alkali-labile phosphate (ALP) technique, a novel protein-bound lipid (PBL) assay, and by gradient gel electrophoresis with silver staining. The first phase of the study was dedicated to the development and optimization of an analytical method for detecting Vg-like proteins in these three gastropod species. In the second phase, the snails P. antipodarum and V. piscinalis were exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP) and tributyltin (TBT) for 14 and 28 days. Vg-like proteins were resolved in one major band at 250-300 kDa for L. naticoides and V. piscinalis and in two bands at 100 and 30 kDa for P. antipodarum. After 14 days of exposure, all techniques showed an increase in Vg-like protein levels at 100 microg/L BPA and at 1 microg/L OP in P. antipodarum. A decrease in these proteins was observed with high concentrations of OP (100 microg/L) and TBT (>or=5 ng/L). In V. piscinalis, a decrease in Vg-like proteins was shown after 14 days of exposure for OP >or=10 microg/L and TBT >or=5 ng/L; however, at 28 days, gel electrophoresis revealed an increase in these proteins. Histological observations showed significant necrosis in ovotestes of V. piscinalis with the three endocrine-disrupting compounds, while tissue modifications were not detected for P. antipodarum. A method for

  10. Megalin- and cubilin-mediated endocytosis of protein-bound vitamins, lipids, and hormones in polarized epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moestrup, S K; Verroust, P J

    2001-01-01

    Polarized epithelia have several functional and morphological similarities, including a high capacity for uptake of various substances present in the fluids facing the apical epithelial surfaces. Studies during the past decade have shown that receptor-mediated endocytosis, rather than nonspecific pinocytosis, accounts for the apical epithelial uptake of many carrier-bound nutrients and hormones. The two interacting receptors of distinct evolutionary origin, megalin and cubilin, are main receptors in this process. Both receptors are apically expressed in polarized epithelia, in which they function as biological affinity matrices for overlapping repertoires of ligands. The ability to bind multiple ligands is accounted for by a high number of replicated low-density lipoprotein receptor type-A repeats in megalin and CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and bone morphogenic protein-1) domains in cubilin. Here we summarize and discuss the structural, genetic, and functional aspects of megalin and cubilin, with emphasis on their function as receptors for uptake of protein-associated vitamins, lipids, and hormones.

  11. Protein-bound polysaccharide activates dendritic cells and enhances OVA-specific T cell response as vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Abbi L; Sun, Guan-Cheng; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren R; Strobe, Katie; Yang, Yi; Dang, Yushe; Disis, Mary L; Lu, Hailing

    2013-12-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) is a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor mushroom. It has been used traditionally in Asian countries for its immune stimulating and anti-cancer effects. We have recently found that PSK can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). TLR2 is highly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), so the current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of PSK on DC activation and the potential of using PSK as a vaccine adjuvant. In vitro experiments using mouse bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) demonstrated that PSK induces DC maturation as shown by dose-dependent increase in the expression of CD80, CD86, MHCII, and CD40. PSK also induces the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines by DC, including IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-6, at both mRNA and protein levels. In vivo experiments using PSK as an adjuvant to OVAp323-339 vaccine showed that PSK as adjuvant leads to enlarged draining lymph nodes with higher number of activated DC. PSK also stimulates proliferation of OVA-specific T cells, and induces T cells that produce multiple cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. Altogether, these results demonstrate the ability of PSK to activate DC in vitro and in vivo and the potential of using PSK as a novel vaccine adjuvant.

  12. The prognostic value ofserum C-reactive protein-bound serum amyloid A inearly-stage lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueYanZhang; GeZhang; YingJiang; DanLiu; ManZhiLi; QianZhong; ShanQiZeng; WanLiLiu; MuShengZeng

    2015-01-01

    Background:Elevated levels of serum C‑reactive protein (CRP) have been reported to have prognostic signiifcance in lung cancer patients. This study aimed to further identify CRP‑bound components as prognostic markers for lung cancer and validate their prognostic value. Methods:CRP‑bound components obtained from the serum samples from lung cancer patients or healthy controls were analyzed by differential proteomics analysis. CRP‑bound serum amyloid A (CRP‑SAA) was evaluated by co‑immunoprecipitation (IP). Serum samples from two independent cohorts with lung cancer (retrospective cohort, 242 patients; prospective cohort, 222 patients) and healthy controls (159 subjects) were used to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP‑SAA by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Results:CRP‑SAA was identiifed speciifcally in serum samples from lung cancer patients by proteomic analysis. CRP binding to SAA was conifrmed by co‑IP in serum samples from lung cancer patients and cell culture media. The level of CRP‑SAA was signiifcantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (0.37±0.58 vs. 0.03±0.04,P<0.001). Elevated CRP‑SAA levels were signiifcantly associated with severe clinical features of lung cancer. The elevation of CRP‑SAA was associated with lower survival rates for both the retrospective (hazard ration [HR]=2.181, 95% conifdence interval [CI]=1.641–2.897,P<0.001) and the prospective cohorts (HR=2.744, 95% CI=1.810–4.161,P<0.001). Multivariate Cox analysis showed that CRP‑SAA was an independent prognostic marker for lung cancer. Remarkably, in stages I–II patients, only CRP‑SAA, not total SAA or CRP, showed signiifcant association with overall survival in two cohorts. Moreover, univariate and multivariate Cox analyses also showed that only CRP‑SAA could be used as an inde‑pendent prognostic marker for early‑stage lung cancer patients. Conclusion:CRP‑SAA could be a better prognostic marker for lung cancer than total SAA or CRP

  13. A small basic protein from the brz-brb operon is involved in regulation of bop transcription in Halobacterium salinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyall-Smith Mike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum expresses bacteriorhodopsin, a retinal-protein that allows photosynthetic growth. Transcription of the bop (bacterioopsin gene is controlled by two transcription factors, Bat and Brz that induce bop when cells are grown anaerobically and under light. Results A new gene was identified that is transcribed together with the brz gene that encodes a small basic protein designated as Brb (bacteriorhodopsin-regulating basic protein. The translation activity of the start codon of the brb gene was confirmed by BgaH reporter assays. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis of the brb gene showed that the Brb protein cooperates with Brz in the regulation of bop expression. Using a GFP reporter assay, it was demonstrated that Brb cooperates with both Brz and Bat proteins to activate bop transcription under phototrophic growth conditions. Conclusions The activation of the bop promoter was shown to be dependent not only on two major factors, Bat and Brz, but is also tuned by the small basic protein, Brb.

  14. Variation in NOD2 augments Th2- and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Enevold, Christian; Sellebjerg, Finn;

    2011-01-01

    cell proliferation elicited by human myelin basic protein (MBP) in blood mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from 29 patients with MS. No polymorphism was observed at rs5743277. No associations with the rs2066842 polymorphism were found. Concerning rs5743291, none were homozygous for the minor allele...

  15. IgG reactivity against citrullinated myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Seze, J; Dubucquoi, S; Lefranc, D; Virecoulon, F; Nuez, I; Dutoit, V; Vermersch, P; Prin, L

    2001-07-02

    An increased level of citrullinated myelin basic protein (MBP-C8) has been reported in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the involvement of the immune response to post-translational modified MBP in the pathophysiology of MS remains speculative. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies to several MBP epitopes, before and after citrullination, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sera of MS patients using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We analyzed antibody reactivity against various MBP-peptides in the CSF and sera of 60 MS patients, and 30 patients with other neurological diseases (OND) as controls. The peptides tested were: MBP(75-98) (peptide 1), native (peptide 2) and citrullinated (peptide 3) MBP(108-126) (ARG(122)-->Cit(122)), and native (peptide 4) and citrullinated (peptide 5) MBP(151-170) (ARG(159, 170)-->Cit(159, 170)). All selected peptides could support an immune reactivity in CSF and sera of MS and OND patients. A higher reactivity against peptide 4 was found in the CSF of MS patients compared with OND patients (P<0.0001), but not against citrullinated peptides (peptides 3 and 5). However, we observed that the citrullination state of peptide 2 modified the patterns of immune reactivity more markedly in MS patients (P<0.0001) than in OND patients (P<0.02). Although some MBP epitopes could be a potential target in MS, our data did not demonstrate any difference of antibody response to MBP peptides in their citrullinated forms.

  16. Translation of myelin basic protein mRNA in oligodendrocytes is regulated by integrin activation and hnRNP-K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lisbeth Schmidt; Chan, Colin W; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system provides a unique example of how cells establish asymmetry. The myelinating cell, the oligodendrocyte, extends processes to and wraps multiple axons of different diameter, keeping the number of wraps proportional to the axon diameter. Local regulation...... translation of a key sheath protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), by reversing the inhibitory effect of the mRNA 3′UTR. During oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination α6β1-integrin interacts with hnRNP-K, an mRNA-binding protein, which binds to MBP mRNA and translocates from the nucleus to the myelin...

  17. Clusters of basic amino acids contribute to RNA binding and nucleolar localization of ribosomal protein L22.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Houmani

    Full Text Available The ribosomal protein L22 is a component of the 60S eukaryotic ribosomal subunit. As an RNA-binding protein, it has been shown to interact with both cellular and viral RNAs including 28S rRNA and the Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA, EBER-1. L22 is localized to the cell nucleus where it accumulates in nucleoli. Although previous studies demonstrated that a specific amino acid sequence is required for nucleolar localization, the RNA-binding domain has not been identified. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the nucleolar accumulation of L22 is linked to its ability to bind RNA. To address this hypothesis, mutated L22 proteins were generated to assess the contribution of specific amino acids to RNA binding and protein localization. Using RNA-protein binding assays, we demonstrate that basic amino acids 80-93 are required for high affinity binding of 28S rRNA and EBER-1 by L22. Fluorescence localization studies using GFP-tagged mutated L22 proteins further reveal that basic amino acids 80-93 are critical for nucleolar accumulation and for incorporation into ribosomes. Our data support the growing consensus that the nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins may not be mediated by a defined localization signal, but rather by specific interaction with established nucleolar components such as rRNA.

  18. Basic Tilted Helix Bundle – A new protein fold in human FKBP25/FKBP3 and HectD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helander, Sara; Montecchio, Meri [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lemak, Alexander [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farès, Christophe [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Almlöf, Jonas [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Li, Yanjun [Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Yee, Adelinda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Sunnerhagen, Maria, E-mail: maria.sunnerhagen@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • We describe the structure of a novel fold in FKBP25 and HectD. • The new fold is named the Basic Tilted Helix Bundle (BTHB) domain. • A conserved basic surface patch is presented, suggesting a functional role. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe the structure of a N-terminal domain motif in nuclear-localized FKBP25{sub 1–73}, a member of the FKBP family, together with the structure of a sequence-related subdomain of the E3 ubiquitin ligase HectD1 that we show belongs to the same fold. This motif adopts a compact 5-helix bundle which we name the Basic Tilted Helix Bundle (BTHB) domain. A positively charged surface patch, structurally centered around the tilted helix H4, is present in both FKBP25 and HectD1 and is conserved in both proteins, suggesting a conserved functional role. We provide detailed comparative analysis of the structures of the two proteins and their sequence similarities, and analysis of the interaction of the proposed FKBP25 binding protein YY1. We suggest that the basic motif in BTHB is involved in the observed DNA binding of FKBP25, and that the function of this domain can be affected by regulatory YY1 binding and/or interactions with adjacent domains.

  19. ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR): An R package for the statistical detection of protein-bound genomic regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino, J.M.; Kaufmann, K.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Krajewski, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background In vivo detection of protein-bound genomic regions can be achieved by combining chromatin-immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing technology (ChIP-seq). The large amount of sequence data produced by this method needs to be analyzed in a statistically proper and computationally

  20. New low-flux mixed matrix membranes that offer superior removal of protein-bound toxins from human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, Denys; van Geffen, Esmée; van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Glorieux, Griet; Vanholder, Raymond; Gerritsen, Karin G. F.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    Hemodialysis is a widely available and well-established treatment for patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). However, although life-sustaining, patient mortality rates are very high. Several recent studies corroborated the link between dialysis patients’ outcomes and elevated levels of protein-bound uremic toxins (PBUT) that are poorly removed by conventional hemodialysis. Therefore, new treatments are needed to improve their removal. Recently, our group showed that the combination of dialysis and adsorption on one membrane, the mixed matrix membrane (MMM), can effectively remove those toxins from human plasma. However, these first MMMs were rather large in diameter and their mass transport characteristics needed improvement before application in the clinical setting. Therefore, in this study we developed a new generation of MMMs that have a smaller diameter and optimized characteristics offering superior ability in removing the PBUT indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) in comparison to first generation MMMs (30 and 125% respectively), as well as, a commercial dialysis membrane (more than 100% better removal).

  1. Graviton Mass Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Tolley, Andrew J; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, aLIGO has announced the first direct detections of gravitational waves, a direct manifestation of the propagating degrees of freedom of gravity. The detected signals GW150914 and GW151226 have been used to examine the basic properties of these gravitational degrees of freedom, particularly setting an upper bound on their mass. It is timely to review what the mass of these gravitational degrees of freedom means from the theoretical point of view, particularly taking into account the recent developments in constructing consistent massive gravity theories. Apart from the GW150914 mass bound, a few other observational bounds have been established from the effects of the Yukawa potential, modified dispersion relation and fifth force that are all induced when the fundamental gravitational degrees of freedom are massive. We review these different mass bounds and examine how they stand in the wake of recent theoretical developments and how they compare to the bound from GW150914.

  2. Expression and Purification of Recombinant Human Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Fusion Proteins and Their Uses in Human Stem Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imsoonthornruksa, Sumeth; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn; Parnpai, Rangsun; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the cost of cytokines and growth factors in stem cell research, a simple method for the production of soluble and biological active human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) fusion protein in Escherichia coli was established. Under optimal conditions, approximately 60-80 mg of >95% pure hbFGF fusion proteins (Trx-6xHis-hbFGF and 6xHis-hbFGF) were obtained from 1 liter of culture broth. The purified hbFGF proteins, both with and without the fusion tags, were biologically active, which was confirmed by their ability to stimulate proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. The fusion proteins also have the ability to support several culture passages of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells and induce pluripotent stem cells. This paper describes a low-cost and uncomplicated method for the production and purification of biologically active hbFGF fusion proteins.

  3. The HLA-DP2 protein binds the immunodominant epitope from myelin basic protein, MBP85-99, with high affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B E; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Madsen, H O;

    2011-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant epitope for T-cell responses is assigned to the amino acid sequence MBP84-102, which binds to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2a (DRB5*0101) and HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) of the HLA-DR2 haplotype...

  4. Immunodominant fragments of myelin basic protein initiate T cell-dependent pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huaqing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath provides electrical insulation of mechanosensory Aβ-afferent fibers. Myelin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs damage the myelin sheath. The resulting electrical instability of Aβ-fibers is believed to activate the nociceptive circuitry in Aβ-fibers and initiate pain from innocuous tactile stimulation (mechanical allodynia. The precise molecular mechanisms, responsible for the development of this neuropathic pain state after nerve injury (for example, chronic constriction injury, CCI, are not well understood. Methods and results Using mass spectrometry of the whole sciatic nerve proteome followed by bioinformatics analyses, we determined that the pathways, which are classified as the Infectious Disease and T-helper cell signaling, are readily activated in the nerves post-CCI. Inhibition of MMP-9/MMP-2 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and concomitant TNF-α and IL-17A expression in nerves. MMP-9 proteolysis of myelin basic protein (MBP generated the MBP84-104 and MBP68-86 digest peptides, which are prominent immunogenic epitopes. In agreement, the endogenous MBP69-86 epitope co-localized with MHCII and MMP-9 in Schwann cells and along the nodes of Ranvier. Administration of either the MBP84-104 or MBP68-86 peptides into the naïve nerve rapidly produced robust mechanical allodynia with a concomitant increase in T cells and MHCII-reactive cell populations at the injection site. As shown by the genome-wide expression profiling, a single intraneural MBP84-104 injection stimulated the inflammatory, immune cell trafficking, and antigen presentation pathways in the injected naïve nerves and the associated spinal cords. Both MBP84-104-induced mechanical allodynia and characteristic pathway activation were remarkably less prominent in the T cell-deficient athymic nude rats. Conclusions These data implicate MBP as a novel mediator of pain. Furthermore, the action of MMPs expressed within 1

  5. Bound entanglement and entanglement bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, Simeon [Physikalisch-Astronomische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univesitaet Jena (Germany)]|[Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Melo, Fernando de; Mintert, Florian; Buchleitner, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Str.38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Bae, Joonwoo [School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-012 (Korea); Hiesmayr, Beatrix [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the separability of Bell-diagonal states of two qutrits. By using lower bounds to algebraically estimate concurrence, we find convex regions of bound entangled states. Some of these regions exactly coincide with the obtained results when employing optimal entanglement witnesses, what shows that the lower bound can serve as a precise detector of entanglement. Some hitherto unknown regions of bound entangled states were discovered with this approach, and delimited efficiently.

  6. MyelStones: the executive roles of myelin basic protein in myelin assembly and destabilization in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2015-11-15

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP, 14-21.5 kDa) are essential to formation of the multilamellar myelin sheath of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform links together the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocytes, but additionally participates in cytoskeletal turnover and membrane extension, Fyn-mediated signalling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides and maintenance of calcium homoeostasis. All MBP isoforms are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that interact via molecular recognition fragments (MoRFs), which thereby undergo local disorder-to-order transitions. Their conformations and associations are modulated by environment and by a dynamic barcode of post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation by mitogen-activated and other protein kinases and deimination [a hallmark of demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The MBPs are thus to myelin what basic histones are to chromatin. Originally thought to be merely structural proteins forming an inert spool, histones are now known to be dynamic entities involved in epigenetic regulation and diseases such as cancer. Analogously, the MBPs are not mere adhesives of compact myelin, but active participants in oligodendrocyte proliferation and in membrane process extension and stabilization during myelinogenesis. A central segment of these proteins is pivotal in membrane-anchoring and SH3 domain (Src homology 3) interaction. We discuss in the present review advances in our understanding of conformational conversions of this classic basic protein upon membrane association, including new thermodynamic analyses of transitions into different structural ensembles and how a shift in the pattern of its post-translational modifications is associated with the pathogenesis and potentially onset of demyelination in MS.

  7. Calcium receptor expression and function in oligodendrocyte commitment and lineage progression: potential impact on reduced myelin basic protein in CaR-null mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, N.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Yano, S.;

    2008-01-01

    cellular proliferation. We further observed that high Ca(2+) stimulates the mRNA levels of myelin basic protein in preoligodendrocytes, which is also CaR mediated. Finally, myelin basic protein levels were significantly reduced in the cerebellum of CaR-null mice during development. Our results show that Ca...

  8. Mutual stimulation by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate and myelin basic protein of their phosphorylation by the kinases solubilized from rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, D.S.; Kuizon, S.; Brockerhoff, H.

    1984-01-16

    Myelin basic protein and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate are phosphorylated in vitro by ATP and solubilized rat brain myelin. When both substrates are present together, the rate of phosphorylation of each is increased about eight-fold. It appears likely that the phosphate turnover of myelin basic protein and of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate are coupled in vivo.

  9. Cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: Separation of highly basic proteins using volatile acidic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Oostwaard, Th.M.J.; Laat, S.W. de; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1987-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of a number of globular proteins was studied on a Bio-Sil TSK CM-2-SW weak cation exchange HPLC column under acidic conditions. A linear gradient of O-I M NH₄Ac in I M HOAc, inducing a convex pH gradient from 2.4-4.8, resulted in an excellent separation of highly basic p

  10. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of ...

  11. MinC protein shortens FtsZ protofilaments by preferentially interacting with GDP-bound subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; García-Montañés, Concepción; Reija, Belén; Monterroso, Begoña; Margolin, William; Alfonso, Carlos; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2013-08-23

    The interaction of MinC with FtsZ and its effects on FtsZ polymerization were studied under close to physiological conditions by a combination of biophysical methods. The Min system is a widely conserved mechanism in bacteria that ensures the correct placement of the division machinery at midcell. MinC is the component of this system that effectively interacts with FtsZ and inhibits the formation of the Z-ring. Here we report that MinC produces a concentration-dependent reduction in the size of GTP-induced FtsZ protofilaments (FtsZ-GTP) as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Our experiments show that, despite being shorter, FtsZ protofilaments maintain their narrow distribution in size in the presence of MinC. The protein had the same effect regardless of its addition prior to or after FtsZ polymerization. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that MinC bound to FtsZ-GDP with a moderate affinity (apparent KD ∼10 μM at 100 mm KCl and pH 7.5) very close to the MinC concentration corresponding to the midpoint of the inhibition of FtsZ assembly. Only marginal binding of MinC to FtsZ-GTP protofilaments was observed by analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Remarkably, MinC effects on FtsZ-GTP protofilaments and binding affinity to FtsZ-GDP were strongly dependent on ionic strength, being severely reduced at 500 mM KCl compared with 100 mM KCl. Our results support a mechanism in which MinC interacts with FtsZ-GDP, resulting in smaller protofilaments of defined size and having the same effect on both preassembled and growing FtsZ protofilaments.

  12. MinC Protein Shortens FtsZ Protofilaments by Preferentially Interacting with GDP-bound Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; García-Montañés, Concepción; Reija, Belén; Monterroso, Begoña; Margolin, William; Alfonso, Carlos; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of MinC with FtsZ and its effects on FtsZ polymerization were studied under close to physiological conditions by a combination of biophysical methods. The Min system is a widely conserved mechanism in bacteria that ensures the correct placement of the division machinery at midcell. MinC is the component of this system that effectively interacts with FtsZ and inhibits the formation of the Z-ring. Here we report that MinC produces a concentration-dependent reduction in the size of GTP-induced FtsZ protofilaments (FtsZ-GTP) as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Our experiments show that, despite being shorter, FtsZ protofilaments maintain their narrow distribution in size in the presence of MinC. The protein had the same effect regardless of its addition prior to or after FtsZ polymerization. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that MinC bound to FtsZ-GDP with a moderate affinity (apparent KD ∼10 μm at 100 mm KCl and pH 7.5) very close to the MinC concentration corresponding to the midpoint of the inhibition of FtsZ assembly. Only marginal binding of MinC to FtsZ-GTP protofilaments was observed by analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Remarkably, MinC effects on FtsZ-GTP protofilaments and binding affinity to FtsZ-GDP were strongly dependent on ionic strength, being severely reduced at 500 mm KCl compared with 100 mm KCl. Our results support a mechanism in which MinC interacts with FtsZ-GDP, resulting in smaller protofilaments of defined size and having the same effect on both preassembled and growing FtsZ protofilaments. PMID:23853099

  13. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  14. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnsen, Lars; Christensen, Jeppe Romme; Ratzer, Rikke;

    2015-01-01

    patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had...... increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic...... protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein...

  15. Identification of a nuclear transport inhibitory signal (NTIS) in the basic domain of HIV-1 Vif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedler, A; Zakai, N; Karni, O; Friedler, D; Gilon, C; Loyter, A

    1999-06-11

    The HIV-1 auxiliary protein Vif contains a basic domain within its sequence. This basic region,90RKKR93, is similar to the prototypic nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, Vif is not a nuclear protein and does not function in the nucleus. Here we have studied the karyophilic properties of this basic region. We have synthesized peptides corresponding to this positively charged NLS-like region and observed that these peptides inhibited nuclear transport via the importin pathway in vitro with IC50values in the micromolar range. Inhibition was observed only with peptides derived from the positively charged region, but not from other regions of the Vif protein, showing sequence specificity. On the other hand, the Vif inhibitory peptide Vif88-98 did not confer karyophilic properties when conjugated to BSA. The inactive Vif conjugate and the active SV40-NLS-BSA conjugate both contained a similar number of peptides conjugated to each BSA molecule, as was determined by amino acid analysis of the peptide-BSA conjugates. Thus, the lack of nuclear import of the Vif peptide-BSA conjugate cannot be attributed to insufficient number of conjugated peptide molecules per BSA molecule. Our results suggest that the HIV-1 Vif protein carries an NLS-like sequence that inhibits, but does not mediate, nuclear import via the importin pathway. We have termed such signals as nuclear transport inhibitory signals (NTIS). The possible role of NTIS in controlling nuclear uptake, and specifically during virus infection, is discussed herein. Our results raise the possibility that NLS-like sequences of certain low molecular weight viral proteins may serve as regulators of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and not neccessarily as mediators of nuclear import.

  16. Tubulin binding, protein-bound conformation in solution, and antimitotic cellular profiling of noscapine and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennani, Youssef L; Gu, Wenxin; Canales, Angeles; Díaz, Fernando J; Eustace, Brenda K; Hoover, Russell R; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus; Nezami, Azin; Wang, Tiansheng

    2012-03-08

    Noscapine and its 7-hydroxy and 7-amino derivatives were characterized for their binding to tubulin. A solution NMR structure of these compounds bound to tubulin shows that noscapine and its 7-aniline derivative do not compete for the same binding site nor does its small molecule crystal structure match its tubulin-bound conformation. These compounds were also tested for their antiproliferative effects on a panel hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

  17. Molecular "negativity" may underlie multiple sclerosis: role of the myelin basic protein family in the pathogenesis of MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musse, Abdiwahab A; Harauz, George

    2007-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to negatively charged lipids on the cytosolic surface of oligodendrocyte membranes and is responsible for adhesion of these surfaces in the multilayered myelin sheath. The pattern of extensive posttranslational modifications of MBP is dynamic during normal central nervous system development and during myelin degeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting its interactions with the myelin membranes and other proteins. In particular, the degree of deimination (or citrullination) of MBP is correlated with the severity of MS, and may represent a primary defect that precedes neurodegeneration due to autoimmune attack. That MBP deimination also affects topological accessibility of an otherwise partially buried immunodominant epitope of the protein indicates that this modification may play a major role in the autoimmune pathogenesis of the disease. In this chapter, we describe the structural and functional consequences of MBP deimination in healthy and diseased myelin.

  18. Site-selective protein-modification chemistry for basic biology and drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Nikolaus; da Cruz, Filipa P.; Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nature has produced intricate machinery to covalently diversify the structure of proteins after their synthesis in the ribosome. In an attempt to mimic nature, chemists have developed a large set of reactions that enable post-expression modification of proteins at pre-determined sites. These reactions are now used to selectively install particular modifications on proteins for many biological and therapeutic applications. For example, they provide an opportunity to install post-translational modifications on proteins to determine their exact biological roles. Labelling of proteins in live cells with fluorescent dyes allows protein uptake and intracellular trafficking to be tracked and also enables physiological parameters to be measured optically. Through the conjugation of potent cytotoxicants to antibodies, novel anti-cancer drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects may be obtained. In this Perspective, we highlight the most exciting current and future applications of chemical site-selective protein modification and consider which hurdles still need to be overcome for more widespread use.

  19. Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein 14 Undergoes Light-Dependent Intracellular Translocation in Rod Photoreceptors: Functional Role on Retinal Insulin Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rajala, Ammaji; Roger J. Daly; Tanito, Masaki; Allen, Dustin T.; Lowenna J Holt; Lobanova, Ekaterina; Arshavsky, Vadim Y; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 14 (Grb14) is involved in growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Here we report that light causes a major redistribution of Grb14 among the individual subcellular compartments of the retinal rod photoreceptor. Grb14 is localized predominantly to the inner segment, nuclear layer and synapse in dark-adapted rods, whereas in the light-adapted rods, Grb14 redistributed throughout the entire cell, including the outer segment. The translocation of Grb...

  20. Solution NMR Structure of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Protein U (IscU) with Zinc Bound at the Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Kornhaber, Greg J.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Honig, Barry; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-19

    IscU is a highly conserved protein that serves as the scaffold for IscS-mediated assembly of iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters. We report the NMR solution structure of monomeric Haemophilus influenzae IscU with zinc bound at the [Fe-S] cluster assembly site. The compact core of the globular structure has an {alpha}-{beta} sandwich architecture with a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and four {alpha}-helices. A nascent helix is located N-terminal to the core structure. The zinc is ligated by three cysteines and one histidine that are located in and near conformationally dynamic loops at one end of the IscU structure. Removal of the zinc metal by chelation results in widespread loss of structure in the apo form. The zinc-bound IscU may be a good model for iron-loaded IscU and may demonstrate structural features found in the iron-sulfur cluster bound form. Structural and functional similarities, genomic context in operons containing other homologous genes, and distributions of conserved surface residues support the hypothesis that IscU protein domains are homologous (i.e. derived from a common ancestor) with the SufE/YgdK family of iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins.

  1. CORCEMA refinement of the bound ligand conformation within the protein binding pocket in reversibly forming weak complexes using STD-NMR intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, V.; Rama Krishna, N.

    2004-05-01

    We describe an intensity-restrained optimization procedure for refining approximate structures of ligands within the protein binding pockets using STD-NMR intensity data on reversibly forming weak complexes. In this approach, the global minimum for the bound-ligand conformation is obtained by a hybrid structure refinement method involving CORCEMA calculation of intensities and simulated annealing optimization of torsion angles of the bound ligand using STD-NMR intensities as experimental constraints and the NOE R-factor as the pseudo-energy function to be minimized. This method is illustrated using simulated STD data sets for typical carbohydrate and peptide ligands. Our procedure also allows for the optimization of side chain torsion angles of protein residues within the binding pocket. This procedure is useful in refining and improving initial models based on crystallography or computer docking or other algorithms to generate models for the bound ligand (e.g., a lead compound) within the protein binding pocket compatible with solution STD-NMR data. This method may facilitate structure-based drug design efforts.

  2. Structural analysis of the complex between calmodulin and full-length myelin basic protein, an intrinsically disordered molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majava, Viivi; Wang, Chaozhan; Myllykoski, Matti; Kangas, Salla M; Kang, Sung Ung; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Baumgärtel, Peter; Heape, Anthony M; Lubec, Gert; Kursula, Petri

    2010-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is present between the cytoplasmic leaflets of the compact myelin membrane in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and characterized to be intrinsically disordered in solution. One of the best-characterized protein ligands for MBP is calmodulin (CaM), a highly acidic calcium sensor. We pulled down MBP from human brain white matter as the major calcium-dependent CaM-binding protein. We then used full-length brain MBP, and a peptide from rodent MBP, to structurally characterize the MBP-CaM complex in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering, NMR spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography. We determined 3D structures for the full-length protein-protein complex at different stoichiometries and detect ligand-induced folding of MBP. We also obtained thermodynamic data for the two CaM-binding sites of MBP, indicating that CaM does not collapse upon binding to MBP, and show that CaM and MBP colocalize in myelin sheaths. In addition, we analyzed the post-translational modifications of rat brain MBP, identifying a novel MBP modification, glucosylation. Our results provide a detailed picture of the MBP-CaM interaction, including a 3D model of the complex between full-length proteins.

  3. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  4. 13C NMR studies of methylene and methine carbons of substrate bound to a 280,000-dalton protein, porphobilinogen synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, E K; Markham, G D

    1988-06-14

    13C NMR has been used to observe the equilibrium complex of [5,5-2H,5-13C]-5-aminolevulinate [( 5,5-2H,5-13C]ALA) bound to porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), a 280,000-dalton protein. [5,5-2H,5-13C]ALA (chemical shift 46.9 ppm in D2O) was prepared from [5-13C]ALA through enolization in deuteriated neutral potassium phosphate buffer. In the PBG synthase reaction [5,5-2H,5-13C]ALA forms [2,11,11-2H,2,11-13C]PBG (chemical shifts 116.2 ppm for C2 and 34.2 ppm for C11 in D2O). For the complex formed between [5,5-2H,5-13C]ALA and methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) modified PBG synthase, which does not catalyze PBG formation but can form a Schiff base adduct, the chemical shift of 44.2 ppm (line width 92 Hz) identifies an imine structure as the predominant tautomeric form of the Schiff base. By comparison to model compounds, the stereochemistry of the imine has been deduced; however, the protonation state of the imine nitrogen remains unresolved. Reconstitution of the MMTS-modified enzyme-Schiff base complex with Zn(II) and 2-mercaptoethanol results in the holoenzyme-bound equilibrium complex; this complex contains predominantly enzyme-bound PBG, and spectra reveal two peaks from bound PBG and two from free PBG. For bound PBG, C2 is -2.8 ppm from the free signal and C11 is +2.6 ppm from the free signal; the line widths of the bound signals are 55 and 75 Hz, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. A Basic Protein Comparative Three-Dimensional Modeling Methodological Workflow Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mainá; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    When working with proteins and studying its properties, it is crucial to have access to the three-dimensional structure of the molecule. If experimentally solved structures are not available, comparative modeling techniques can be used to generate useful protein models to subsidize structure-based research projects. In recent years, with Bioinformatics becoming the basis for the study of protein structures, there is a crescent need for the exposure of details about the algorithms behind the softwares and servers, as well as a need for protocols to guide in silico predictive experiments. In this article, we explore different steps of the comparative modeling technique, such as template identification, sequence alignment, generation of candidate structures and quality assessment, its peculiarities and theoretical description. We then present a practical step-by-step workflow, to support the Biologist on the in silico generation of protein structures. Finally, we explore further steps on comparative modeling, presenting perspectives to the study of protein structures through Bioinformatics. We trust that this is a thorough guide for beginners that wish to work on the comparative modeling of proteins.

  6. The M Protein of SARS-CoV: Basic Structural and Immunological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongwu Hu; Jianping Shi; Xiangjun Tian; Feng Jiang; Xiaoqian Zhao; Jun Wang; Siqi Liu; Changqing Zeng; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Jie Wen; Lin Tang; Haijun Zhang; Xiaowei Zhang; Yan Li; Jing Wang; Yujun Han; Guoqing Li

    2003-01-01

    We studied structural and immunological properties of the SARS-CoV M (mem-brane) protein, based on comparative analyses of sequence features, phylogeneticinvestigation, and experimental results. The M protein is predicted to contain atriple-spanning transmembrane (TM) region, a single N-glycosylation site near itsN-terminus that is in the exterior of the virion, and a long C-terminal region inthe interior. The M protein harbors a higher substitution rate (0.6% correlated toits size) among viral open reading frames (ORFs) from published data. The foursubstitutions detected in the M protein, which cause non-synonymous changes,can be classified into three types. One of them results in changes of pI (isoelectricpoint) and charge, affecting antigenicity. The second changes hydrophobicity of theTM region, and the third one relates to hydrophilicity of the interior structure.Phylogenetic tree building based on the variations of the M protein appears tosupport the non-human origin of SARS-CoV. To investigate its immunogenicity,we synthesized eight oligopeptides covering 69.2% of the entire ORF and screenedthem by using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) with sera from SARSpatients. The results confirmed our predictions on antigenic sites.

  7. PCR typing of two short tandem repeat (STR) structures upstreams of the human myelin basic protein (MBP) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Frederiksen, J; Morling, N

    1995-01-01

    We investigated two short tandem tetranucleotide (TGGA) repeat polymorphisms upstreams of the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene. The region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the two repeat systems were separated by cutting with the restriction enzyme NlaIII. The lengths...... of the DNA fragments were analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. We compared the DNA fragment frequencies of the two MBP regions in 34 patients suffering from multiple sclerosis and in 78 suffering from monosymptomatic idiopathic optic neuritis to those...

  8. Neuron-specific Enclose and Myelin Basic Protein in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with First Episode Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuying; WU Hanrong; GUO Huirong; ZHAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    In order to study whether patients with schizophrenia have cerebral injury, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and myelin basic protein (MBP)in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 33 patients with first episode schizophrenia and 9 from the control group were determined by double antibody sandwich enzyme immunoassay method. The results showed that there was significant difference in the NSE contents between the experimental group and control group (P<0.01). The NSE contents in CSF in the experimental group were positively correlated with MBP in schizophrenia patients (P<0.05). These findings suggested that patients with schizophrenia had cerebral injury.

  9. [Diagnostic and prognostic significance of the antibodies to the myelin basic protein in acute neuroinfections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A S; Idrisova, Zh R; Vorov'eva, N L; Gervazieva, V B; Dekonenko, E P

    2001-01-01

    The development of severe CNS damages including encephalitis is highly probable in some respiratory and exanthemata viral infections (measles, rubella, parotitis). A high level of IgG antibodies to the myelin basic protein was found in patients with parotitis meningitis and rubella encephalitis but it was not high in 80% of patients with encephalitis of the unclear etiology and in 25% of cases with rubella encephalitis. More accurate analysis of clinical, neurovisual and immunologic data revealed a link of appearance of such complications with both the presence of more pronounced demyelinization and prolongation of the disease.

  10. Thermodynamic study of the binding of calcium and magnesium ions with myelin basic protein using the extended solvation theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Rezaei Behbehani; A.A. Saboury; A. Divsalar

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of myelin basic protein (MBP) from the bovine central nervous system with Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions, named as M2+, was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry at 27℃ in aqueous solution. The extended solvation model was used to reproduce the enthaipies of MBP+M2+ interactions.The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model were attributed to the structural change of MBP due to the metal ion interaction. It was found that there is a set of two identical and noninteracting binding sites for Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions.

  11. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  12. Measurement of electron transfer through cytochrome P450 protein on nanopillars and the effect of bound substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John E; Lederman, David; Wollenberg, Lance A; Li, Debin; Flora, Darcy R; Bostick, Christopher D; Tracy, Timothy S; Gannett, Peter M

    2013-03-13

    Electron transfer in cytochrome P450 enzymes is a fundamental process for activity. It is difficult to measure electron transfer in these enzymes because under the conditions typically used they exist in a variety of states. Using nanotechnology-based techniques, gold conducting nanopillars were constructed in an indexed array. The P450 enzyme CYP2C9 was attached to each of these nanopillars, and conductivity measurements made using conducting probe atomic force microscopy under constant force conditions. The conductivity measurements were made on CYP2C9 alone and with bound substrates, a bound substrate-effector pair, and a bound inhibitor. Fitting of the data with the Poole-Frenkel model indicates a correlation between the barrier height for electron transfer and the ease of CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of the bound substrates, though the spin state of iron is not well correlated. The approach described here should have broad application to the measurement of electron transfer in P450 enzymes and other metalloenzymes.

  13. Golli Myelin Basic Proteins Modulate Voltage-Operated Ca(++) Influx and Development in Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vt, Cheli; DA, Santiago González; V, Spreuer; V, Handley; At, Campagnoni; Pm, Paez

    2016-10-01

    The golli proteins, products of the myelin basic protein gene, are widely expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and neurons during the postnatal development of the brain. While golli appears to be important for oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation, its function in neuronal development is completely unknown. We have found that golli proteins function as new and novel modulators of voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in neurons. In vitro, golli knock-out (KO) neurons exhibit decreased Ca(++) influx after plasma membrane depolarization and a substantial maturational delay. Increased expression of golli proteins enhances L-type Ca(++) entry and processes outgrowth in cortical neurons, and pharmacological activation of L-type Ca(++) channels stimulates maturation and prevents cell death in golli-KO neurons. In situ, Ca(++) influx mediated by L-type VOCCs was significantly decreased in cortical and hippocampal neurons of the golli-KO brain. These Ca(++) alterations affect cortical and hippocampal development and the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells during the postnatal development of the golli-KO brain. The CA1/3 sections and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were reduced in the golli-KO mice as well as the density of dendrites in the somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, the golli-KO mice display abnormal behavior including deficits in episodic memory and reduced anxiety. Because of the expression of the golli proteins within neurons in learning and memory centers of the brain, this work has profound implication in neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders.

  14. Measurement of homonuclear three-bond J(HNH{alpha}) coupling constants in unlabeled peptides complexed with labeled proteins: Application to a decapeptide inhibitor bound to the proteinase domain of the NS3 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicero, Daniel O.; Barbato, Gaetano; Koch, Uwe; Ingallinella, Paolo; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Sambucini, Sonia; Neddermann, Petra; De Francesco, Raffaele; Pessi, Antonello; Bazzo, Renzo

    2001-05-15

    A new isotope-filtered experiment has been designed to measure homonuclear three-bond J(H{sup N}H{sup {alpha}}) coupling constants of unlabeled peptides complexed with labeled proteins. The new experiment is based on the 3D HNHA pulse scheme, and belongs to the 'quantitative J-correlation' type. It has been applied to a decapeptide inhibitor bound to the proteinase domain of the NS3 protein of human hepatitis C virus (HCV)

  15. Purification and Crystallization of Flammulin, a Basic Protein with Anti-tumor Activities from Flammulina Velutipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Flammulin, an anti-tumor protein, was purified from the aqueous extract of basidiomes of Flammulina Velutipes to electrophoretic homogeneity and crystallized by microdialysis against a polyethylene glycol- sodium phosphate buffer. The purified product was found to have marked antitumor effects and be able to affect the tumor cells directly.

  16. Accumulation of galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) does not interfere with phosphorylation and methylation of myelin basic protein in the twitcher mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Shinnoh, N.; Goto, I. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    In attempts to elucidate mechanisms of demyelination in the twitcher mouse (Twi), phosphorylation and methylation of myelin basic protein (MBP) were examined in the brainstem and spinal cord of this species. Phosphorylation of MBP in isolated myelin by an endogenous kinase and an exogenous (32P)ATP was not impaired and protein kinase C activity in the brain cytosol was not reduced. When the methylation of an arginine residue of MBP was examined in slices of the brainstem and spinal cord, using (3H)methionine as a donor of the methyl groups, no difference was found between Twi and the controls. Radioactivity of the (3H) methionine residue of MBP of Twi was also similar to that of the controls. Thus, accumulation of psychosine in Twi does not interfere with the activity of endogenous kinase, methylation of MBP, and the synthesis and transport of MBP into myelin membrane.

  17. Water soluble chlorophyll binding protein of higher plants: a most suitable model system for basic analyses of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions in chlorophyll protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, G; Pieper, J; Theiss, C; Trostmann, I; Paulsen, H; Renger, T; Eichler, H J; Schmitt, F-J

    2011-08-15

    This short review paper describes spectroscopic studies on pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions of chlorophyll (Chl) a and b bound to the recombinant protein of class IIa water soluble chlorophyll protein (WSCP) from cauliflower. Two Chls form a strongly excitonically coupled open sandwich dimer within the tetrameric protein matrix. In marked contrast to the mode of excitonic coupling of Chl and bacterio-Chl molecules in light harvesting complexes and reaction centers of all photosynthetic organisms, the unique structural pigment array in the Chl dimer of WSCP gives rise to an upper excitonic state with a large oscillator strength. This property opens the way for thorough investigations on exciton relaxation processes in Chl-protein complexes. Lifetime measurements of excited singlet states show that the unusual stability towards photodamage of Chls bound to WSCP, which lack any protective carotenoid molecule, originates from a high diffusion barrier to interaction of molecular dioxygen with Chl triplets. Site selective spectroscopic methods provide a wealth of information on the interactions of the Chls with the protein matrix and on the vibronic structure of the pigments. The presented data and discussions illustrate the great potential of WSCP as a model system for systematic experimental and theoretical studies on the functionalizing of Chls by the protein matrix. It opens the way for further detailed analyses and a deeper understanding of the properties of pigment protein complexes.

  18. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi, E-mail: h-yokoya@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  19. Structure of a heterogeneous, glycosylated, lipid-bound, in vivo-grown protein crystal at atomic resolution from the viviparous cockroach Diploptera punctata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sanchari; Coussens, Nathan P; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Srikanth, Jandhyam; Yagi, Koichiro J; Gray, James S S; Tobe, Stephen S; Stay, Barbara; Chavas, Leonard M G; Ramaswamy, Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular crystals for X-ray diffraction studies are typically grown in vitro from pure and homogeneous samples; however, there are examples of protein crystals that have been identified in vivo. Recent developments in micro-crystallography techniques and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers have allowed the determination of several protein structures from crystals grown in cellulo. Here, an atomic resolution (1.2 Å) crystal structure is reported of heterogeneous milk proteins grown inside a living organism in their functional niche. These in vivo-grown crystals were isolated from the midgut of an embryo within the only known viviparous cockroach, Diploptera punctata. The milk proteins crystallized in space group P1, and a structure was determined by anomalous dispersion from the native S atoms. The data revealed glycosylated proteins that adopt a lipocalin fold, bind lipids and organize to form a tightly packed crystalline lattice. A single crystal is estimated to contain more than three times the energy of an equivalent mass of dairy milk. This unique storage form of nourishment for developing embryos allows access to a constant supply of complete nutrients. Notably, the crystalline cockroach-milk proteins are highly heterogeneous with respect to amino-acid sequence, glycosylation and bound fatty-acid composition. These data present a unique example of protein heterogeneity within a single in vivo-grown crystal of a natural protein in its native environment at atomic resolution.

  20. Structure of a heterogeneous, glycosylated, lipid-bound, in vivo-grown protein crystal at atomic resolution from the viviparous cockroach Diploptera punctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchari Banerjee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecular crystals for X-ray diffraction studies are typically grown in vitro from pure and homogeneous samples; however, there are examples of protein crystals that have been identified in vivo. Recent developments in micro-crystallography techniques and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers have allowed the determination of several protein structures from crystals grown in cellulo. Here, an atomic resolution (1.2 Å crystal structure is reported of heterogeneous milk proteins grown inside a living organism in their functional niche. These in vivo-grown crystals were isolated from the midgut of an embryo within the only known viviparous cockroach, Diploptera punctata. The milk proteins crystallized in space group P1, and a structure was determined by anomalous dispersion from the native S atoms. The data revealed glycosylated proteins that adopt a lipocalin fold, bind lipids and organize to form a tightly packed crystalline lattice. A single crystal is estimated to contain more than three times the energy of an equivalent mass of dairy milk. This unique storage form of nourishment for developing embryos allows access to a constant supply of complete nutrients. Notably, the crystalline cockroach-milk proteins are highly heterogeneous with respect to amino-acid sequence, glycosylation and bound fatty-acid composition. These data present a unique example of protein heterogeneity within a single in vivo-grown crystal of a natural protein in its native environment at atomic resolution.

  1. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  2. S-layer proteins as basic building blocks in a biomolecular construction kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Neubauer, Angela; Györvary, Erika; Sára, Margit; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2000-06-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) proteins have been optimized during billions of years of biological evolution as constituent elements of one of the simplest self-assembly systems. Isolated S-layer proteins possess the intrinsic property of being able to recrystallize into two-dimensional arrays at a broad spectrum of surfaces (e.g. silicon) and interfaces (e.g. air-water interface or planar lipid films). The well-defined arrangement of functional groups on S-layer lattices allows the binding of molecules and particles in defined regular arrays. S-layers recrystallized on solid supports can be patterned in the submicrometre range using standard optical lithography. S-layers also represent templates for the formation of inorganic nanocrystal superlattices (e.g. CdS, Au, Ni, Pt, or Pd) as required for molecular electronics and nonlinear optics.

  3. Basic evidence for class A G-protein-coupled receptor heteromerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eFranco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs seem an exception to the general rule of receptor-receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backwards instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery.

  4. Basic Pharmacological and Structural Evidence for Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Lanciego, José L.; Navarro, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem an exception to the general rule of receptor–receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backward instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery. PMID:27065866

  5. A Dual Mechanism Controls Nuclear Localization in the Atypical Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Protein PAR1 of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anahit Galstyan; Jordi Bou-Torrent; Irma Roig-Villanova; Jaime F. Martínez-García

    2012-01-01

    PAR1 is an atypical basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein that negatively regulates the shade avoidance syndrome in Arabidopsis thaliana acting as a transcriptional cofactor.Consistently with this function,PAR1 has to be in the nucleus to display biological activity.Previous structure-function analyses revealed that the N-terminal region of PAR1 drives the protein to the nucleus.However,truncated forms of PAR1 lacking this region still display biological activity,implying that PAR1 has additional mechanisms to localize into the nucleus.In this work,we compared the primary structure of PAR1 and various related and unrelated plant bHLH proteins,which led us to suggest that PAR1 contains a non-canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal region.By overexpressing truncated and mutated derivatives of PAR1,we have also investigated the importance of other regions of PAR1,such as the acidic and the extended HLH dimerization domains,for its nuclear localization.We found that,in the absence of the N-terminal region,a functional HLH domain is required for nuclear localization.Our results suggest the existence of a dual mechanism for PAR1 nuclear localization:(1) one mediated by the N-terminal non-consensus NLS and (2) a second one that involves interaction with other proteins via the dimerization domain.

  6. High performance aptamer affinity chromatography for single-step selective extraction and screening of basic protein lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Zhao, Chao; Yin, Junfa; Wang, Hailin

    2012-08-15

    A DNA aptamer based high-performance affinity chromatography is developed for selective extraction and screening of a basic protein lysozyme. First, a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was synthesized in situ by thermally initiated radical polymerization, and then an anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer was covalently immobilized on the surface of the monolith through a 16-atom spacer arm. The target protein lysozyme but non-target proteins can be trapped by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. In contrast, lysozyme cannot be trapped by the immobilized oligodeoxynucleotide that does not contain the sequence of the anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. The study clearly demonstrates the trapping of lysozyme by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer is mainly due to specific recognition rather than simple electrostatic interaction of positively charged protein and the negatively charged DNA. The inter-day precision was determined as 0.8% for migration time and 4.2% for peak area, respectively. By the use of aptamer affinity monolith, a screening strategy is developed to selectively extract lysozyme from chicken egg white, showing the advantages of high efficiency, low cost and ease-of-operation.

  7. Lateral diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins on supported lipid bilayers is controlled by the additive frictional drags of (1) bound lipids and (2) protein domains penetrating into the bilayer hydrocarbon core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins bound to lipids on bilayer surfaces play central roles in a wide array of cellular processes, including many signaling pathways. These proteins diffuse in the plane of the bilayer and often undergo complex reactions involving the binding of regulatory and substrate lipids and proteins they encounter during their 2D diffusion. Some peripheral proteins, for example pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, dock to the bilayer in a relatively shallow position with little penetration into the bilayer. Other peripheral proteins exhibit more complex bilayer contacts, for example classical protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs) bind as many as six lipids in stepwise fashion, resulting in the penetration of three PKC domains (C1A, C1B, C2) into the bilayer headgroup and hydrocarbon regions. A molecular understanding of the molecular features that control the diffusion speeds of proteins bound to supported bilayers would enable key molecular information to be extracted from experimental diffusion constants, revealing protein-lipid and protein-bilayer interactions difficult to study by other methods. The present study investigates a range of 11 different peripheral protein constructs comprised by 1-3 distinct domains (PH, C1A, C1B, C2, anti-lipid antibody). By combining these constructs with various combinations of target lipids, the study measures 2D diffusion constants on supported bilayers for 17 different protein-lipid complexes. The resulting experimental diffusion constants, together with the known membrane interaction parameters of each complex, are used to analyze the molecular features correlated with diffusional slowing and bilayer friction. The findings show that both (1) individual bound lipids and (2) individual protein domains that penetrate into the hydrocarbon core make additive contributions to the friction against the bilayer, thereby defining the 2D diffusion constant. An empirical formula is developed that accurately estimates the diffusion

  8. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  9. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Seung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin or linear (amylose. The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM. We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is

  10. Affinity chromatography—dependent selection (ACDS) of genomic DNA fragments bound specifically to bacterial synthesized Myc/Myn proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHICAN; PEIWANG; 等

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to seek for mouse c-Myc/Myn proteins-bound specific sequences among genomic DNA.cDNA fragment of myn gene was obtained through RT-PCR technique from RNA of NIH3T3 cells.DNA fragments encoding BR/HLH/LZ structure of Myc and Myn proteins were cloned in frame into pGEX-2T vector respectively.Fusion GST-Myc and GST-Myn synthesized in E.coli hosts showed affinity to CACGTG E-box DNA and subsequently interacted with genomic fragments prepared through whole-genome-PCR.A PCR-assisted procedure which combines protein-DNA interaction and affinity chromatography was designed to enrich Myc/Myn bound DNA.At least two genomic DNA fragments obtained exhibit specifical binding capacity to Myc/Myn complex but not to GST alone.Significance of the work and of the technique itself as well asidentification of the DNAs are discussed.

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor Errγ induces C-reactive protein gene expression through induction of ER-bound Bzip transmembrane transcription factor CREBH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Misra

    Full Text Available The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ is a constitutively active transcription factor regulating genes involved in several important cellular processes, including hepatic glucose metabolism, alcohol metabolism, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response. cAMP responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH is an ER-bound bZIP family transcription factor that is activated upon ER stress and regulates genes encoding acute-phase proteins whose expression is increased in response to inflammation. Here, we report that ERRγ directly regulates CREBH gene expression in response to ER stress. ERRγ bound to the ERRγ response element (ERRE in the CREBH promoter. Overexpression of ERRγ by adenovirus significantly increased expression of CREBH as well as C-reactive protein (CRP, whereas either knockdown of ERRγ or inhibition of ERRγ by ERRγ specific inverse agonist, GSK5182, substantially inhibited ER stress-mediated induction of CREBH and CRP. The transcriptional coactivator PGC1α was required for ERRγ mediated induction of the CREBH gene as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay showing binding of both ERRγ and PGC1α on the CREBH promoter. The ChIP assay also revealed that histone H3 and H4 acetylation occurred at the ERRγ and PGC1α binding site. Moreover, chronic alcoholic hepatosteatosis, as well as the diabetic obese condition significantly increased CRP gene expression, and this increase was significantly attenuated by GSK5182 treatment. We suggest that orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ directly regulates the ER-bound transcription factor CREBH in response to ER stress and other metabolic conditions.

  12. Bacterial Surface-Displayed GII.4 Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins Bound to HBGA-Like Molecules in Romaine Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Rong, Shaofeng; Tian, Peng; Zhou, Yue; Guan, Shimin; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein on bacterial surface and used it as a new strategy to explore interaction between HuNoV protein and receptor candidates from romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins were confirmed on the surface of the transformed bacteria by an immunofluorescence assay. The distribution patterns of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins in romaine lettuce were identified through a confocal immunofluorescence assay. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be found in the stomata, and the surfaces of vein and leaf of romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be captured by an ELISA assay utilizing extract from leaf (LE) or vein (VE). The binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could be competitively blocked by histo-blood group antigens from human saliva. In addition, the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could also be attenuated by heat denaturation of lettuce proteins, and abolished by oxidation of lettuce carbohydrates. The results indicated that histo-blood group antigen-like molecules in LE or VE were involved in the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to romaine lettuce. All data demonstrated that the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be utilized in a new and simple system for investigation of the interaction between the HuNoVs and their candidate ligands.

  13. The coat protein leads the way: an update on basic and applied studies with the Brome mosaic virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C Cheng; Ni, Peng; Hema, Masarapu; Huang, Xinlei; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    The Brome mosaic virus (BMV) coat protein (CP) accompanies the three BMV genomic RNAs and the subgenomic RNA into and out of cells in an infection cycle. In addition to serving as a protective shell for all of the BMV RNAs, CP plays regulatory roles during the infection process that are mediated through specific binding of RNA elements in the BMV genome. One regulatory RNA element is the B box present in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of BMV RNA1 and RNA2 that play important roles in the formation of the BMV replication factory, as well as the regulation of translation. A second element is within the tRNA-like 3' UTR of all BMV RNAs that is required for efficient RNA replication. The BMV CP can also encapsidate ligand-coated metal nanoparticles to form virus-like particles (VLPs). This update summarizes the interaction between the BMV CP and RNAs that can regulate RNA synthesis, translation and RNA encapsidation, as well as the formation of VLPs.

  14. Purification and characterization of elicitor protein from Phytophthora colocasiae and basic resistance in Colocasia esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Kamal; Misra, Raj Shekhar

    2009-01-01

    An elicitor was identified in the fungus Phytophthora colocasiae. The molecular weight of the purified elicitor was estimated by means of gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE and was estimated as 15kDa. Protease treatment severely reduced its activity, allowing the conclusion that the elicitor is proteinaceous. Infiltration of a few nanograms of this proteinaceous elicitor into taro leaves caused the formation of lesions that closely resemble hypersensitive response lesions. The elicitation of the cells was effective in the induction of the activity of lipoxygenase. Cellular damage, restricted to the infiltrated zone, occurred only several hours later, after the infiltration of the elicitor protein. After few days, systemic acquired resistance was also induced. Thus, taro plant cells that perceived the glycoprotein generated a cascade of signals acting at local, short, and long distances, and causing the coordinate expression of specific defence. The obtained results give important information regarding the plant-pathogen interactions, mainly as subsidy for taro improvement against Phytophthora leaf blight.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the complex of the first von Willebrand type C domain bound to bone morphogenetic protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Li-yan; Zhang, Jin-li [Lehrstuhl für Physiologische Chemie II, Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Kotzsch, Alexander [Lehrstuhl für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie und Biophysik, Julius-von-Sachs Institut der Universität Würzburg, Julius-von-Sachs Platz 2, D-97082 Würzburg (Germany); Sebald, Walter [Lehrstuhl für Physiologische Chemie II, Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum (DFG Forschungszentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Versbacher Strasse 9, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Mueller, Thomas D., E-mail: mueller@botanik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Lehrstuhl für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie und Biophysik, Julius-von-Sachs Institut der Universität Würzburg, Julius-von-Sachs Platz 2, D-97082 Würzburg (Germany); Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum (DFG Forschungszentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Versbacher Strasse 9, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Physiologische Chemie II, Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2008-04-01

    Crystals of the complex of the first von Willebrand type C domain (VWC1) of crossveinless 2 (CV2) bound to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) exist in two tetragonal crystal forms belonging to either space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or I4{sub 1}, with one complete BMP2 dimer and two CV2 VWC1 domains per asymmetric unit, and diffract to 2.6 Å resolution. Crossveinless 2 (CV2) is a member of the chordin family, a protein superfamily that modulates the activity of bone morphogenetic proteins such as BMP2. The BMPs represent a large group of secreted proteins that control many steps during embryonal development and in tissue and organ homeostasis in the adult organism. The gene encoding the first von Willebrand type C domain (VWC1) of CV2 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The binary complex of CV2 VWC1 and BMP2 was purified and subjected to crystallization. Crystals of SeMet-labelled proteins were obtained in two different forms belonging to the tetragonal space groups P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and I4{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.7, c = 139.2 Å and a = b = 83.7, c = 139.6 Å, respectively. Initial analysis suggests that a complete binary complex consisting of one BMP2 dimer bound to two CV2 VWC1 domains is present in the asymmetric unit.

  16. N- and O-linked glycosylation site profiling of the human basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Sanna, Monica; Piras, Valentina; Liori, Barbara; Pisano, Elisabetta; Iavarone, Federica; Vincenzoni, Federica; Cordaro, Massimo; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we show that the heterogeneous mixture of glycoforms of the basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M, encoded by PRB3-M locus, is a major component of the acidic soluble fraction of human whole saliva in the first years of life. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of the intact proteoforms before and after N-deglycosylation with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of peptides obtained after Endoproteinase GluC digestion allowed the structural characterization of the peptide backbone and identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites. The heterogeneous mixture of the proteoforms derives from the combination of 8 different neutral and sialylated glycans O-linked to Threonine 50, and 33 different glycans N-linked to Asparagine residues at positions 66, 87, 108, 129, 150, 171, 192, and 213.

  17. Effects of active immunisation with myelin basic protein and myelin-derived altered peptide ligand on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamini J; Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Fivelman, Brett; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-09-15

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Specific myelin basic protein (MBP) peptides are encephalitogenic, and myelin-derived altered peptide ligands (APLs) are capable of preventing and ameliorating EAE. We investigated the effects of active immunisation with a weakly encephalitogenic epitope of MBP (MBP87-99) and its mutant APL (Cyclo-87-99[A(91),A(96)]MBP87-99) on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation in Lewis rats. MBP-treated rats exhibited significant mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity associated with infiltration of T cells, MHC class II expression and microglia activation in the spinal cord, without developing clinical signs of paralysis. Co-immunisation with APL significantly decreased pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation emphasising the important role of neuroimmune crosstalk in neuropathic pain.

  18. A tale of two citrullines--structural and functional aspects of myelin basic protein deimination in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harauz, George; Musse, Abdiwahab A

    2007-02-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to negatively charged lipids on the cytosolic surface of oligodendrocyte membranes and is responsible for adhesion of these surfaces in the multilayered myelin sheath. The pattern of extensive post-translational modifications of MBP is dynamic during normal central nervous system (CNS) development and during myelin degeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting its interactions with the myelin membranes and with other molecules. In particular, the degree of deimination (or citrullination) of MBP is correlated with the severity of MS, and may represent a primary defect that precedes neurodegeneration due to autoimmune attack. That the degree of MBP deimination is also high in early CNS development indicates that this modification plays major physiological roles in myelin assembly. In this review, we describe the structural and functional consequences of MBP deimination in healthy and diseased myelin.

  19. A particular set of small non-coding RNAs is bound to the distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi: insights from RNA-interference deficient organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Sanguinetti, Julia; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; Franzén, Oscar; Cayota, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    The study of small RNAs and Argonaute proteins in eukaryotes that are deficient in functional RNA interference could provide insights into novel functions of small RNAs. In this study we describe small non-coding RNAs bound to a distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi, TcPIWI-tryp. Co-immunoprecipitation of TcPIWI-tryp followed by deep sequencing of isolated RNA identified abundant small RNAs derived from rRNAs and tRNAs. The small RNA repertoire differed from that of the canonical Argonaute in organisms with functional RNA interference, which could indicate novel biological functions for TcPIWI-tryp in T. cruzi and other members of the trypanosomatid clade.

  20. A FRAP model to investigate reaction-diffusion of proteins within a bounded domain: a theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tsibidis, George D

    2008-01-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved measurements of protein transport inside cells provide important clues to the functional architecture and dynamics of biological systems. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) technique has been used over the past three decades to measure the mobility of macromolecules and protein transport and interaction with immobile structures inside the cell nucleus. A theoretical model is presented that aims to describe protein transport inside the nucleus, a process which is influenced by the presence of a boundary (i.e. membrane). A set of reaction-diffusion equations is employed to model both the diffusion of proteins and their interaction with immobile binding sites. The proposed model has been designed to be applied to biological samples with a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) equipped with the feature to bleach regions characterised by a scanning beam that has a radially Gaussian distributed profile. The proposed model leads to FRAP curves that depend on the o...

  1. The membrane bound LRR lipoprotein Slr, and the cell wall-anchored M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes both interact with type I collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bober

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR have been identified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20-30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid. The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1 and emm1 mutant strain (MC25 had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors.

  2. Regulation of protein kinase Cmu by basic peptides and heparin. Putative role of an acidic domain in the activation of the kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendt, M; Johannes, F J; Kittstein, W; Marks, F

    1997-08-15

    Protein kinase Cmu is a novel member of the protein kinase C (PKC) family that differs from the other isoenzymes in structural and enzymatic properties. No substrate proteins of PKCmu have been identified as yet. Moreover, the regulation of PKCmu activity remains obscure, since a structural region corresponding to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKC isoenzymes has not been found for PKCmu. Here we show that aldolase is phosphorylated by PKCmu in vitro. Phosphorylation of aldolase and of two substrate peptides by PKCmu is inhibited by various proteins and peptides, including typical PKC substrates such as histone H1, myelin basic protein, and p53. This inhibitory activity seems to depend on clusters of basic amino acids in the protein/peptide structures. Moreover, in contrast to other PKC isoenzymes PKCmu is activated by heparin and dextran sulfate. Maximal activation by heparin is about twice and that by dextran sulfate four times as effective as maximal activation by phosphatidylserine plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, the conventional activators of c- and nPKC isoforms. We postulate that PKCmu contains an acidic domain, which is involved in the formation and stabilization of an active state and which, in the inactive enzyme, is blocked by an intramolecular interaction with a basic domain. This intramolecular block is thought to be released by heparin and possibly also by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate/phosphatidylserine, whereas basic peptides and proteins inhibit PKCmu activity by binding to the acidic domain of the active enzyme.

  3. Perturbation of myelin basic protein (Mbp) splice variant expression in developing rat cerebellum following perinatal exposure to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2012-09-18

    Myelin sheaths surrounding axons are essential for saltatory conduction of nerve impulse in the central nervous system. A major protein constituent of myelin sheaths is produced by the myelin basic protein (Mbp) gene, whose expression in oligodendrocytes is conserved across vertebrates. In rat, five Mbp splice variants resulting from alternative splicing of exons 2, 5 and/or 6 are characterized. We developed a PCR-based strategy to quantify individual Mbp splice variants and characterized a sixth Mbp splice variant lacking only exon 5. This newly identified splice variant is predominantly expressed in developing rat brain and has orthologs in mouse and human. Many neurotoxic chemicals can perturb myelination and Mbp gene expression. Regulation of Mbp gene expression at the post-transcriptional level was assessed following perinatal exposure to neurotoxic methylmercury (2 mg/kg b.w./day). Similar reductions in total and individual Mbp splice variant mRNA levels suggest that methylmercury-induced perturbation in Mbp gene expression occurred as a consequence of decreased oligodendrocyte cell population in absence of a significant impact on its post-transcriptional regulation.

  4. Effect of phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol on myelin basic protein-mediated binding of actin filaments to lipid bilayers in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Joan M; Rangaraj, Godha; Dicko, Awa

    2012-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to negatively charged lipids on the cytosolic surface of oligodendrocytes and is believed to be responsible for adhesion of these surfaces in the multilayered myelin sheath. It can also assemble actin filaments and tether them to lipid bilayers through electrostatic interactions. Here we investigate the effect of increased negative charge of the lipid bilayer due to phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) on MBP-mediated binding of actin to the lipid bilayer, by substituting phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate for PI in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles. Phosphorylation of PI caused dissociation of the MBP/actin complex from the lipid vesicles due to repulsion of the negatively charged complex from the negatively charged membrane surface. An effect of phosphorylation could be detected even if the inositol lipid was only 2mol% of the total lipid. Calcium-calmodulin dissociated actin from the MBP-lipid vesicles and phosphorylation of PI increased the amount dissociated. These results show that changes to the lipid composition of myelin, which could occur during signaling or other physiological events, could regulate the ability of MBP to act as a scaffolding protein and bind actin filaments to the lipid bilayer.

  5. Caught red-handed: Rc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix protein conditioning red pericarp in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Megan T; Thomson, Michael J; Pfeil, Bernard E; McCouch, Susan

    2006-02-01

    Rc is a domestication-related gene required for red pericarp in rice (Oryza sativa). The red grain color is ubiquitous among the wild ancestors of O. sativa, in which it is closely associated with seed shattering and dormancy. Rc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein that was fine-mapped to an 18.5-kb region on rice chromosome 7 using a cross between Oryza rufipogon (red pericarp) and O. sativa cv Jefferson (white pericarp). Sequencing of the alleles from both mapping parents as well as from two independent genetic stocks of Rc revealed that the dominant red allele differed from the recessive white allele by a 14-bp deletion within exon 6 that knocked out the bHLH domain of the protein. A premature stop codon was identified in the second mutant stock that had a light red pericarp. RT-PCR experiments confirmed that the Rc gene was expressed in both red- and white-grained rice but that a shortened transcript was present in white varieties. Phylogenetic analysis, supported by comparative mapping in rice and maize (Zea mays), showed that Rc, a positive regulator of proanthocyanidin, is orthologous with INTENSIFIER1, a negative regulator of anthocyanin production in maize, and is not in the same clade as rice bHLH anthocyanin regulators.

  6. Determination of steady-state protein breakdown rate in vivo by the disappearance of protein-bound tracer-labeled amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; O'Rourke, Bruce; Ebenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the rate of protein breakdown in individual proteins was developed and tested in rats and confirmed in humans, using administration of deuterium oxide and incorporation of the deuterium into alanine that was subsequently incorporated into body proteins. Measurement of the fr...

  7. Comparison of antibodies hydrolyzing myelin basic protein from the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visilii B Doronin

    Full Text Available It was found that antibodies (Abs against myelin basic protein (MBP are the major components of the antibody response in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. We have recently shown that IgGs from sera of MS patients are active in the hydrolysis of MBP. However, in literature there are no available data concerning possible MBP-hydrolyzing Abs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of MS patients. We have shown that the average content of IgGs in their sera is about 195-fold higher than that in their CSF. Here we have compared, for the first time, the average content of lambda- and kappa-IgGs as well as IgGs of four different subclasses (IgG1-IgG4 in CSF and sera of MS patients. The average relative content of lambda-IgGs and kappa -IgGs in the case of CSFs (8.0 and 92.0% and sera (12.3 and 87.7% are comparable, while IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4: CSF - 40.4, 49.0, 8.2, and 2.5% of total IgGs, respectively and the sera - 53.6, 36.0, 5.6, and 4.8%, decreased in different order. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were obtained by sequential affinity chromatography of the CSF proteins on protein G-Sepharose and FPLC gel filtration. We present first evidence showing that IgGs from CSF efficiently hydrolyze MBP and that their average specific catalytic activity is unpredictably ∼54-fold higher than that of Abs from sera of the same MS patients. Some possible reasons of these findings are discussed. We suggest that anti-MBP abzymes of CSF may promote important neuropathologic mechanisms in this chronic inflammatory disorder and in MS pathogenesis development.

  8. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-09-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections.

  9. Glucose-Regulated Phosphorylation of the PUF Protein Puf3 Regulates the Translational Fate of Its Bound mRNAs and Association with RNA Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Der Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PUF proteins are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to the 3′ UTRs of mRNA transcripts. Herein, we show how a yeast PUF protein, Puf3p, responds to glucose availability to switch the fate of its bound transcripts that encode proteins required for mitochondrial biogenesis. Upon glucose depletion, Puf3p becomes heavily phosphorylated within its N-terminal region of low complexity, associates with polysomes, and promotes translation of its target mRNAs. Such nutrient-responsive phosphorylation toggles the activity of Puf3p to promote either degradation or translation of these mRNAs according to the needs of the cell. Moreover, activation of translation of pre-existing mRNAs might enable rapid adjustment to environmental changes without the need for de novo transcription. Strikingly, a Puf3p phosphomutant no longer promotes translation but becomes trapped in intracellular foci in an mRNA-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that the inability to properly resolve Puf3p-containing RNA-protein granules via a phosphorylation-based mechanism might be toxic to a cell.

  10. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-proteinbasic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of water in frozen biological tissues. Cross-relaxation effects between protein and bound water protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escanyé, J. M.; Canet, D.; Robert, J.

    Water proton longitudinal relaxation has been investigated in frozen mouse tissues including tumors. The nonfreezable water which gives rise to a relatively sharp NMR signal at this temperature (263 K) is identified as water bound to macromolecules. Measurements have been carried out by the nonselective inversion-recovery method at 90 and 6 MHz. Partially selective inversion has been achieved at 90 MHz by the DANTE sequence. The experimental data are analyzed by means of Solomon-type equations. This analysis provides the cross-relaxation term from which the dipolar contribution to water relaxation rate, arising from interactions with macromolecular protons, is calculated. This contribution seems to be dominant. The number of water protons interacting with a given macromolecular proton is found to be of the order of 10. The data at both frequencies can be consistently interpreted in terms of water diffusion, with a characteristic time of about 10 -9 sec. These conclusions are valid for all the tissues investigated here, their relaxation parameters exhibiting only slight differences.

  12. Apo and calcium-bound crystal structures of cytoskeletal protein alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1) from the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Puja; Nguyen, Emily Tam; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Svärd, Staffan G; Luecke, Hartmut

    2009-01-30

    Alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1), a member of the alpha giardin family of annexins, has been shown to localize to the flagella of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. Alpha giardins show a common ancestry with the annexins, a family of proteins most of which bind to phospholipids and cellular membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and are implicated in numerous membrane-related processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane organization. It has been proposed that alpha-14 giardin may play a significant role during the cytoskeletal rearrangement during differentiation of Giardia. To gain a better understanding of alpha-14 giardin's mode of action and its biological role, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-14 giardin and its phospholipid-binding properties. Here, we report the apo crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin determined in two different crystal forms as well as the Ca(2+)-bound crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin, refined to 1.9, 1.6 and 1.65 A, respectively. Although the overall fold of alpha-14 giardin is similar to that of alpha-11 giardin, multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing was required to solve the alpha-14 giardin structure, indicating significant structural differences between these two members of the alpha giardin family. Unlike most annexin structures, which typically possess N-terminal domains, alpha-14 giardin is composed of only a core domain, followed by a C-terminal extension that may serve as a ligand for binding to cytoskeletal protein partners in Giardia. In the Ca(2+)-bound structure we detected five bound calcium ions, one of which is a novel, highly coordinated calcium-binding site not previously observed in annexin structures. This novel high-affinity calcium-binding site is composed of seven protein donor groups, a feature rarely observed in crystal structures. In addition, phospholipid-binding assays suggest that alpha-14 giardin exhibits calcium-dependent binding to

  13. Bounds for Certain Character Sums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨锦; 郑志勇

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows a connection between exponential sums and character sums. In particular, we introduce a character sum that is an analog of the classical Kloosterman sums and establish the analogous Weil-Estermann's upper bound for it. The paper also analyzes a generalized Hardy-Littlewood example for character sums, which shows that the upper bounds given here are the best possible. The analysis makes use of local bounds for the exponential sums and character sums. The basic theorems have been previously established.

  14. Absolute quantification of the total and anti-drug antibody-bound concentrations of recombinant human α-glucosidase in human plasma using protein-G extraction and LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronsema, Kees J; Bischoff, Rainer; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Ploeg, Ans T van der; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2015-01-01

    The administration of protein-based pharmaceuticals can cause the in vivo formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) which may reduce the efficacy of the therapy by binding to the protein drug. An accurate determination of the total and ADA-bound concentrations of the drug gives information on the ext

  15. Complement and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune inflammatory disorders, RA and SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nibhriti

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is a major effecter system of the innate immunity that bridges with adaptive immunity. The system consists of about 40 humoral and cell surface proteins that include zymogens, receptors and regulators. The zymogens get activated in a cascade fashion by antigen-antibody complex, antigen alone or by polymannans, respectively, by the classical, alternative and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways. The ongoing research on complement regulators and complement receptors suggest key role of these proteins in the initiation, regulation and effecter mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immunity. Although, the complement system provides the first line of defence against the invading pathogens, its aberrant uncontrolled activation causes extensive self tissue injury. A large number of humoral and cell surface complement regulatory protein keep the system well-regulated in healthy individuals. Complement profiling had brought important information on the pathophysiology of several infectious and chronic inflammatory disorders. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases that affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This brief review discusses on the complement system, its functions and its importance as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases with focus on SLE and RA.

  16. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  17. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  18. Correlation of acidic and basic carrier ampholyte and immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns based on mass spectrometric protein identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrocki, A; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Podtelejnikov, A V;

    1998-01-01

    Separation of proteins on either carrier ampholyte-based or immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional (2-D) gels gives rise to electrophoretic patterns that are difficult to compare visually. In this paper we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI......-MS) to determine the identities of 335 protein spots in these two 2-D gel systems, including a substantial number of basic proteins which had never been identified before. Proteins that were identified in both gel systems allowed us to cross-reference the gel patterns. Vector analysis of these cross...

  19. Low seminal zinc bound to high molecular weight proteins in asthenozoospermic patients: evidence of increased sperm zinc content in oligoasthenozoospermic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, A; Siciliano, L; Petroni, M F; De Stefano, C; Aquila, S; Andó, S; Petrone, M F

    1998-01-01

    Total seminal zinc concentration, seminal zinc fraction bound to high molecular weight proteins (HMW-Zn%) and zinc content in spermatozoa were assayed in the ejaculates of 90 asthenozoospermic patients subdivided into two study groups: normoasthenozoospermics (group I: n = 50) and oligoasthenozoospermics (group II: n = 40). The zinc concentrations of patients were compared with those of a control group of donors showing normal semen parameters. All samples were also investigated for their sperm membrane functional integrity by the hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOS). The results showed normal total zinc concentrations but very low HMW-Zn% values (P spermatozoa of oligoasthenozoospermic patients compared to group I and to the control group. Oligoasthenozoospermics also displayed a lower HOS score (P spermatozoa. The higher intrasperm zinc content in these patients could be a reflection of their low sperm membrane functionality.

  20. Enhancement of Antitumor Effect of Tegafur/Uracil (UFT) plus Leucovorin by Combined Treatment with Protein-Bound Polysaccharide, PSK, in Mouse Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryoji Katoh; Mitsuru Ooshiro

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the antitumor effect of combined therapy with tegafur/uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) (UFT/LV)and protein-bound polysaccharide, PSK, in three mouse models of transplantable tumors. UFT/LV showed antitumor effect against Meth A sarcoma, and the antitumor effect was enhanced when PSK given concomitantly.UFT/LV showed antitumor effect to Lewis lung carcinoma and PSK alone also showed antitumor effect at high dose, but a combination of UFT/LV and PSK resulted in no enhanced antitumor effect. Colon 26 carcinoma was weakly responsive to UFT/LV, and no enhancement of antitumor effect was found even PSK was used in combination. In conclusion, while the effect of PSK varies depending on tumor, combined use of UFT/LV and PSK may be expected to augment the antitumor effect.

  1. An elevated level of circulating galanin promotes developmental expression of myelin basic protein in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetska, H; Zhang, L; Kong, J; Vrontakis, M

    2015-01-22

    Myelinogenesis is a scheduled process that is regulated by the intrinsic properties of the cell and extracellular signals. Galanin (GAL) is a bioactive neuropeptide that is widely distributed throughout the nervous system. Chronic increase in circulating GAL levels protects the demyelination processes. Furthermore, GAL is synthesized in myelin-producing glial cells, such as oligodendrocytes and its expression level is at its highest between postnatal days 10 and 40. In the present study, we use our GAL transgenic mouse model to examine the effects of GAL on postnatal myelinogenesis in the CNS. Although we observed no difference in the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, we found that GAL has a strong pro-myelinating effect. The transgenic mice at postnatal day 10 appeared to undergo myelinogenesis at an accelerated rate, as demonstrated by the increase in myelin basic protein (MBP) synthesis. The immunohistochemical results are consistent with our preliminary findings that suggest that GAL is a regulator of myelination and may be one of the myelination promoters. This finding is especially important for studies focusing on endogenous molecules for treating myelin-related diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and other leukodystrophies.

  2. Adrenomedullin promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes under pathological conditions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Takakuni; Takahashi, Yoko; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Liang, Anna C; Ihara, Masafumi; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2015-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes, which are the main cell type in cerebral white matter, are generated from their precursor cells (oligodendrocyte precursor cells: OPCs). However, the differentiation from OPCs to oligodendrocytes is disturbed under stressed conditions. Therefore, drugs that can improve oligodendrocyte regeneration may be effective for white matter-related diseases. Here we show that a vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (AM) promotes the in vitro differentiation of OPCs under pathological conditions. Primary OPCs were prepared from neonatal rat brains, and differentiated into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes over time. This in vitro OPC differentiation was inhibited by prolonged chemical hypoxic stress induced by non-lethal CoCl(2) treatment. However, AM promoted the OPC differentiation under the hypoxic stress conditions, and the AM receptor antagonist AM(22-52) canceled the AM-induced OPC differentiation. In addition, AM treatment increased the phosphorylation level of Akt in OPC cultures, and correspondingly, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked the AM-induced OPC differentiation. Taken together, AM treatment rescued OPC maturation under pathological conditions via an AM-receptor-PI3K/Akt pathway. Oligodendrocytes play critical roles in white matter by forming myelin sheath. Therefore, AM signaling may be a promising therapeutic target to boost oligodendrocyte regeneration in CNS disorders.

  3. Variation in NOD2 augments Th2- and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Juul Hedegaard

    Full Text Available Variations in the gene for the nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain (NOD 2 have been associated with Crohn's disease but not multiple sclerosis (MS. Here we investigate the effect of three polymorphisms in the NOD2 gene (rs5743277, rs2066842 and rs5743291 on cytokine production and CD4+ T cell proliferation elicited by human myelin basic protein (MBP in blood mononuclear cell (MNC cultures from 29 patients with MS. No polymorphism was observed at rs5743277. No associations with the rs2066842 polymorphism were found. Concerning rs5743291, none were homozygous for the minor allele. Seven of 29 (24% patients were heterozygous, and five of these (71% exhibited increased MBP-induced CD4+ T cell proliferation versus four of 22 (18%, who were homozygous for the major allele (p<0.04. Interleukin (IL-5 was induced by MBP in MNC from the same five carriers versus two (9% homozygotes (p<0.004; four carriers (57% versus three non-carriers (14% exhibited IL-17 responses to MBP (p<0.04. By contrast, we found no association between the polymorphisms investigated and interferon-gamma-, tumor necrosis factor-alpha-, IL-2, -4- or IL-10 responses to MBP. These results indicate that the rs5743291 polymorphism influences T helper (Th cell 2- and Th17 cell responses in MNC from MS patients.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging measures of white matter compared to myelin basic protein immunofluorescence in tissue cleared intact brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Chang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide datasets from combined ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and Clear Lipid-exchanged, Anatomically Rigid, Imaging/immunostaining compatible, Tissue hYdrogel (CLARITY performed on intact mouse brains. DTI-derived measures of fractional anisotropy (FA, radial diffusivity (RD, and axial diffusivity (AD were compared to antibody-based labeling of myelin basic protein (MBP, as measured by fluorescence microscopy. We used a customized CLARITY hydrogel solution to facilitate whole brain tissue clearing and subsequent immunolabeling. We describe how CLARITY was made compatible with magnetic resonance imaging with the intention of facilitating future multimodal imaging studies that may combine noninvasive imaging with 3D immunohistochemistry. These data and methods are related to the accompanying research article entitled, ‘The role of myelination in measures of white matter integrity: Combination of diffusion tensor imaging and two-photon microscopy of CLARITY intact brains’ (E.H. Chang, M. Argyelan, M. Aggarwal, T-S. Chandon, K.H. Karlsgodt, S. Mori, A.K. Malhotra, 2016 [1].

  5. Major basic protein from eosinophils and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils are required for protective immunity to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Amy E; Hess, Jessica A; Santiago, Gilberto A; Nolan, Thomas J; Lok, James B; Lee, James J; Abraham, David

    2011-07-01

    Eosinophils and neutrophils contribute to larval killing during the primary immune response, and neutrophils are effector cells in the secondary response to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms used by eosinophils and neutrophils to control infections with S. stercoralis. Using mice deficient in the eosinophil granule products major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), it was determined that eosinophils kill the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism in the primary immune response if other effector cells are absent. Infecting PHIL mice, which are eosinophil deficient, with S. stercoralis resulted in development of primary and secondary immune responses that were similar to those of wild-type mice, suggesting that eosinophils are not an absolute requirement for larval killing or development of secondary immunity. Treating PHIL mice with a neutrophil-depleting antibody resulted in a significant impairment in larval killing. Naïve and immunized mice with neutrophils deficient in myeloperoxidase (MPO) infected with S. stercoralis had significantly decreased larval killing. It was concluded that there is redundancy in the primary immune response, with eosinophils killing the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism and neutrophils killing the worms through an MPO-dependent mechanism. Eosinophils are not required for the development or function of secondary immunity, but MPO from neutrophils is required for protective secondary immunity.

  6. ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR: An R package for the statistical detection of protein-bound genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ham Roeland CHJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo detection of protein-bound genomic regions can be achieved by combining chromatin-immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing technology (ChIP-seq. The large amount of sequence data produced by this method needs to be analyzed in a statistically proper and computationally efficient manner. The generation of high copy numbers of DNA fragments as an artifact of the PCR step in ChIP-seq is an important source of bias of this methodology. Results We present here an R package for the statistical analysis of ChIP-seq experiments. Taking the average size of DNA fragments subjected to sequencing into account, the software calculates single-nucleotide read-enrichment values. After normalization, sample and control are compared using a test based on the ratio test or the Poisson distribution. Test statistic thresholds to control the false discovery rate are obtained through random permutations. Computational efficiency is achieved by implementing the most time-consuming functions in C++ and integrating these in the R package. An analysis of simulated and experimental ChIP-seq data is presented to demonstrate the robustness of our method against PCR-artefacts and its adequate control of the error rate. Conclusions The software ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR enables fast and accurate detection of protein-bound genomic regions through the analysis of ChIP-seq experiments. Compared to existing methods, we found that our package shows greater robustness against PCR-artefacts and better control of the error rate.

  7. Charge transfer and polarization for chloride ions bound in ClC transport proteins: natural bond orbital and energy decomposition analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan; Pezeshki, Soroosh; Davis, Christal; Lin, Hai

    2013-12-19

    ClC transport proteins show a distinct "broken-helix" architecture, in which certain α-helices are oriented with their N-terminal ends pointed toward the binding sites where the chloride ions are held extensively by the backbone amide nitrogen atoms from the helices. To understand the effectiveness of such binding structures, we carried out natural bond orbital analysis and energy decomposition analysis employing truncated active-site model systems for the bound chloride ions along the translocation pore of the EcClC proteins. Our results indicated that the chloride ions are stabilized in such a binding environment by electrostatic, polarization, and charge-transfer interactions with the backbone and a few side chains. Up to ~25% of the formal charges of the chloride ions were found smeared out to the surroundings primarily via charge transfer from the chloride's lone pair n(Cl) orbitals to the protein's antibonding σ*(N-H) or σ*(O-H) orbitals; those σ* orbitals are localized at the polar N-H and O-H bonds in the chloride's first solvation shells formed by the backbone amide groups and the side chains of residues Ser107, Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. Polarizations by the chloride ions were dominated by the redistribution of charge densities among the π orbitals and lone pair orbitals of the protein atoms, in particular the atoms of the backbone peptide links and of the side chains of Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. The substantial amounts of electron density involved in charge transfer and in polarization were consistent with the large energetic contributions by the two processes revealed by the energy decomposition analysis. The significant polarization and charge-transfer effects may have impacts on the mechanisms and dynamics of the chloride transport by the ClC proteins.

  8. Basic and clinical research on the regulation of the intestinal barrier by Lactobacillus and its active protein components: a review with experience of one center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Kang, Liang; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Probiotics got protective effects on the intestinal barrier. Our present study is to review the basic and clinical progress on the regulation of the intestinal barrier by Lactobacillus and its active protein components, combing the study of our center. Our study have isolated the active component of micro integral membrane protein (MIMP) within the media place of the integral membrane protein of Lactobacillus plantarum, which was verified about the protective effects against the intestinal epithelial dysfunction. On the other hand, we also found the effects of perioperative use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of postoperative intestinal barrier dysfunction, and reduction of the postoperative infective complications. In this review, we would like to report the founding of our center, involving in the basic and clinical research progress of regulation of intestinal barrier by Lactobacillus and its active protein component MIMP. Furthermore, we may also promote our following studies about the MIMP and its clinical verification.

  9. Exact entanglement bases and general bound entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Z Z

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we give the more general bound entangled states associated with the unextendible product bases (UPB), i.e. by using of the exact entanglement bases (EEB) and the complete basis with unextendible product bases (CBUPB), we prove that the arbitrary convex sums of the uniform mixtures (bound entangled states) associated with UPBs are still bound entangled states. Further, we discuss the equivalent transformation group and classification of the CBUPBs, and by using this classification, we prove that in the meaning of indistinguishability, the set of the above all possible bound entangled states can be reduced to the set of all possible mixtures of some fixed basic bound entangled states. At last, we prove that every operating of the partial transposition (PT) map acting upon a density matrix under any bipartite partitioning induces a mapping from the above reduced set of bound entangled states to oneself, which corresponds to a non-identical permutation of the basic bound entangled states.

  10. Overproduction of the membrane-bound receptor-like protein kinase 1, RPK1, enhances abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Mizuno, Shinji; Tanaka, Hidenori; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Osakabe, Keishi; Todaka, Daisuke; Fujita, Yasunari; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2010-03-19

    RPK1 (receptor-like protein kinase 1) localizes to the plasma membrane and functions as a regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis. In our current study, we investigated the effect of RPK1 disruption and overproduction upon plant responses to drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing the RPK1 protein showed increased ABA sensitivity in their root growth and stomatal closure and also displayed less transpirational water loss. In contrast, a mutant lacking RPK1 function, rpk1-1, was found to be resistant to ABA during these processes and showed increased water loss. RPK1 overproduction in these transgenic plants thus increased their tolerance to drought stress. We performed microarray analysis of RPK1 transgenic plants and observed enhanced expression of several stress-responsive genes, such as Cor15a, Cor15b, and rd29A, in addition to H(2)O(2)-responsive genes. Consistently, the expression levels of ABA/stress-responsive genes in rpk1-1 had decreased compared with wild type. The results suggest that the overproduction of RPK1 enhances both the ABA and drought stress signaling pathways. Furthermore, the leaves of the rpk1-1 plants exhibit higher sensitivity to oxidative stress upon ABA-pretreatment, whereas transgenic plants overproducing RPK1 manifest increased tolerance to this stress. Our current data suggest therefore that RPK1 overproduction controls reactive oxygen species homeostasis and enhances both water and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  11. Myelin management by the 18.5-kDa and 21.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M

    2013-05-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP's protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  12. Exosome-bound WD repeat protein Monad inhibits breast cancer cell invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makio Saeki

    Full Text Available Increased stabilization of mRNA coding for key cancer genes can contribute to invasiveness. This is achieved by down-regulation of exosome cofactors, which bind to 3'-UTR in cancer-related genes. Here, we identified amphiregulin, an EGFR ligand, as a target of WD repeat protein Monad, a component of R2TP/prefoldin-like complex, in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Monad specifically interacted with both the 3'-UTR of amphiregulin mRNA and the RNA degrading exosome, and enhanced decay of amphiregulin transcripts. Knockdown of Monad increased invasion and this effect was abolished with anti-amphiregulin neutralizing antibody. These results suggest that Monad could prevent amphiregulin-mediated invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

  13. Reproducing the conformations of protein-bound ligands: a critical evaluation of several popular conformational searching tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, J

    2001-12-01

    Several programs (Catalyst, Confort, Flo99, MacroModel, and Omega) that are commonly used to generate conformational ensembles have been tested for their ability to reproduce bioactive conformations. The ligands from thirty-two different ligand-protein complexes determined by high-resolution (Confort) performed least well. For the seven ligands in the set having eight or more rotatable bonds, none of the bioactive conformations were ever found, save for one exception (Flo99). These ligands do not bind in a local minimum conformation according to AMBER*\\GB/SA. Taking these last two observations together, it is clear that geometrically similar structures should be collected in order to increase the probability of finding the bioactive conformation among the generated ensembles. Factors influencing bioactive conformational retrieval have been identified and are discussed.

  14. Immunolocalization of alpha-keratins and associated beta-proteins in lizard epidermis shows that acidic keratins mix with basic keratin-associated beta-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    The differentiation of the corneous layers of lizard epidermis has been analyzed by ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using specific antibodies against alpha-keratins and keratin associated beta-proteins (KAbetaPs, formerly indicated as beta-keratins). Both beta-cells and alpha-cells of the corneous layer derive from the same germinal layer. An acidic type I alpha-keratin is present in basal and suprabasal layers, early differentiating clear, oberhautchen, and beta-cells. Type I keratin apparently disappears in differentiated beta- and alpha-layers of the mature corneous layers. Conversely, a basic type II alpha-keratin rich in glycine is absent or very scarce in basal and suprabasal layers and this keratin likely does not pair with type I keratin to form intermediate filaments but is weakly detected in the pre-corneous and corneous alpha-layer. Single and double labeling experiments show that in differentiating beta-cells, basic KAbetaPs are added and replace type-I keratin to form the hard beta-layer. Epidermal alpha-keratins contain scarce cysteine (0.2-1.4 %) that instead represents 4-19 % of amino acids present in KAbetaPs. Possible chemical bonds formed between alpha-keratins and KAbetaPs may derive from electrostatic interactions in addition to cross-linking through disulphide bonds. Both the high content in glycine of keratins and KAbetaPs may also contribute to increase the hydrophobicy of the beta- and alpha-layers and the resistance of the corneous layer. The increase of gly-rich KAbetaPs amount and the bonds to the framework of alpha-keratins give rise to the inflexible beta-layer while the cys-rich KAbetaPs produce a pliable alpha-layer.

  15. Use of mass spectrometry techniques for the characterization of metal bound to proteins (metallomics) in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ariza, J.L.; Garcia-Barrera, T.; Lorenzo, F.; Bernal, V.; Villegas, M.J.; Oliveira, V

    2004-10-25

    The need to determine the individual chemical species (speciation), especially when they are known to have a differential action and behavior in relation to toxicity, mobility, or bioavailability, is discussed. The analytical approaches for small mass metal species characterization, as well as sample treatment and storage, is now well established on the basis of chromatographic-atomic detector combinations. The description of a new scenario centered on endogenous and exogenous metallic species in biological systems, bioactive macromolecules, such as proteins, DNA restriction fragments, phytochelatins, metallothioneins and others is fulfilled. Many of these systems are not well known at present and require a new generation of analytical tools that substitute the traditional atomic detectors based in the use of photons (atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), flame photoionization detector (FPD), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS)) by mass detectors (mass spectrometry (MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) that characterize ions. The photonic analytical tool is now being substituted by the ionic paradigm. Many cases related to biological molecules involving proteins and multiprotein systems, in which metals frequently participate (metallomics) are described, and a generic metallomics analytical approach is proposed for the identification and quantification of metalloproteins, and other metallomacromolecules present in life systems, on the basis of three experimental focuses: (i) a separation technique - selectivity component; (ii) an element-high sensitivity detector--sensitivity component; and (iii) a molecule-specific detector, generally based on mass spectrometry-structural component. This multiplexed analytical approach brings together both elemental and molecular detectors for easy metalloproteins identification. Finally, the possibilities of the metallomics approach in

  16. Bounded Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballester Pla, Coralio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The observation of the actual behavior by economic decision makers in the lab and in the field justifies that bounded rationality has been a generally accepted assumption in many socio-economic models. The goal of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties involved in providing a correct definition of what a rational (or irrational agent is. In this paper we describe two frameworks that employ different approaches for analyzing bounded rationality. The first is a spatial segregation set-up that encompasses two optimization methodologies: backward induction and forward induction. The main result is that, even under the same state of knowledge, rational and non-rational agents may match their actions. The second framework elaborates on the relationship between irrationality and informational restrictions. We use the beauty contest (Nagel, 1995 as a device to explain this relationship.

    La observación del comportamiento de los agentes económicos tanto en el laboratorio como en la vida real justifica que la racionalidad acotada sea un supuesto aceptado en numerosos modelos socio-económicos. El objetivo de este artículo es ilustrar las dificultades que conlleva una correcta definición de qué es un agente racional (irracional. En este artículo se describen dos marcos que emplean diferentes metodologías para analizar la racionalidad acotada. El primero es un modelo de segregación espacial donde se contrastan dos metodologías de optimización: inducción hacia atrás y hacia adelante. El resultado principal es que, incluso con el mismo nivel de conocimiento, tanto agentes racionales como irracionales podrían coincidir en sus acciones. El segundo marco trabaja sobre la relación entre irracionalidad y restricción de información. Se utiliza el juego llamado “beauty contest” (Nagel 1995 como mecanismo para explicar dicha relación.

  17. Peripheral nerve P2 basic protein and the Guillain-Barre syndrome : In vitro demonstration of P2-specific antibody-secreting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Jong, W.A.C. de; Demel, R.A.; Heijnen, C.J.; Ballieux, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    An immune response to the peripheral nerve basic protein P2 may be operative in the pathogenesis of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A method is described for the purification of P2 of human origin. Purified P2 was used to investigate whether lymphocytes derived from peripheral blood of GBS patien

  18. T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2 and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Krakauer, Martin; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Autoreactive T cells are thought to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined the stimulatory effect of human myelin basic protein (MBP) on mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from 22 patients with MS and 22 sex-matched and age-matched healthy individuals, and...

  19. Structure of the red fluorescent protein from a lancelet (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): a novel GYG chromophore covalently bound to a nearby tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z., E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.; Fradkov, Arkady F.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Chepurnykh, Tatyana; Yampolsky, Ilia V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wlodawer, Alexander [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pletnev, Sergei, E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); SAIC-Frederick, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of the novel red emitting fluorescent protein from lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata) revealed an unusual five residues cyclic unit comprising Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60 chromophore, the following Phe61 and Tyr62 covalently bound to chromophore Tyr59. A key property of proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family is their ability to form a chromophore group by post-translational modifications of internal amino acids, e.g. Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67 in GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria (Cnidaria). Numerous structural studies have demonstrated that the green GFP-like chromophore represents the ‘core’ structure, which can be extended in red-shifted proteins owing to modifications of the protein backbone at the first chromophore-forming position. Here, the three-dimensional structures of green laGFP (λ{sub ex}/λ{sub em} = 502/511 nm) and red laRFP (λ{sub ex}/λ{sub em} ≃ 521/592 nm), which are fluorescent proteins (FPs) from the lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata), were determined together with the structure of a red variant laRFP-ΔS83 (deletion of Ser83) with improved folding. Lancelet FPs are evolutionarily distant and share only ∼20% sequence identity with cnidarian FPs, which have been extensively characterized and widely used as genetically encoded probes. The structure of red-emitting laRFP revealed three exceptional features that have not been observed in wild-type fluorescent proteins from Cnidaria reported to date: (i) an unusual chromophore-forming sequence Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60, (ii) the presence of Gln211 at the position of the conserved catalytic Glu (Glu222 in Aequorea GFP), which proved to be crucial for chromophore formation, and (iii) the absence of modifications typical of known red chromophores and the presence of an extremely unusual covalent bond between the Tyr59 C{sup β} atom and the hydroxyl of the proximal Tyr62. The impact of this covalent bond on the red emission and the large Stokes shift (

  20. Coordination Environment of Cu(II) Ions Bound to N-Terminal Peptide Fragments of Angiogenin Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrì, Antonio; Munzone, Alessia; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Hansson, Orjan; Satriano, Cristina; Rizzarelli, Enrico; La Mendola, Diego

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenin (Ang) is a potent angiogenic factor, strongly overexpressed in patients affected by different types of cancers. The specific Ang cellular receptors have not been identified, but it is known that Ang-actin interaction induces changes both in the cell cytoskeleton and in the extracellular matrix. Most in vitro studies use the recombinant form (r-Ang) instead of the form that is normally present in vivo ("wild-type", wt-Ang). The first residue of r-Ang is a methionine, with a free amino group, whereas wt-Ang has a glutamic acid, whose amino group spontaneously cyclizes in the pyro-glutamate form. The Ang biological activity is influenced by copper ions. To elucidate the role of such a free amino group on the protein-copper binding, we scrutinized the copper(II) complexes with the peptide fragments Ang(1-17) and AcAng(1-17), which encompass the sequence 1-17 of angiogenin (QDNSRYTHFLTQHYDAK-NH₂), with free amino and acetylated N-terminus, respectively. Potentiometric, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) studies demonstrate that the two peptides show a different metal coordination environment. Confocal microscopy imaging of neuroblastoma cells with the actin staining supports the spectroscopic results, with the finding of different responses in the cytoskeleton organization upon the interaction, in the presence or not of copper ions, with the free amino and the acetylated N-terminus peptides.

  1. Reproducing the conformations of protein-bound ligands: A critical evaluation of several popular conformational searching tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jonas

    2001-12-01

    Several programs (Catalyst, Confort, Flo99, MacroModel, and Omega) that are commonly used to generate conformational ensembles have been tested for their ability to reproduce bioactive conformations. The ligands from thirty-two different ligand-protein complexes determined by high-resolution ( le2.0 Å) X-ray crystallography have been analyzed. The Low-Mode Conformational Search method (with AMBER* and the GB/SA hydration model), as implemented in MacroModel, was found to perform better than the other algorithms. The rule-based method Omega, which is orders of magnitude faster than the other methods, also gave reasonable results but were found to be dependent on the input structure. The methods supporting diverse sampling (Catalyst, Confort) performed least well. For the seven ligands in the set having eight or more rotatable bonds, none of the bioactive conformations were ever found, save for one exception (Flo99). These ligands do not bind in a local minimum conformation according to AMBER*GB/SA. Taking these last two observations together, it is clear that geometrically similar structures should be collected in order to increase the probability of finding the bioactive conformation among the generated ensembles. Factors influencing bioactive conformational retrieval have been identified and are discussed.

  2. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Hedegaard, Chris; Søndergaard, Helle B; Krakauer, Martin; Hesse, Dan; Nielsen, Claus H; Sorensen, Per S; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels of interferon-β-inducible genes with an increased expression of interleukin-10 and a milder disease course in untreated multiple sclerosis patients, whereas other studies reported an association with a poor response to treatment with interferon-β. In the present study, we found that untreated multiple sclerosis patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.

  3. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  4. Truncation of merozoite surface protein 3 disrupts its trafficking and that of acidic-basic repeat protein to the surface of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kerry E; Pearce, J Andrew; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F

    2002-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3), an important vaccine candidate, is a soluble polymorphic antigen associated with the surface of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites. The MSP3 sequence contains three blocks of heptad repeats that are consistent with the formation of an intramolecular coiled-coil. MSP3 also contains a glutamic acid-rich region and a putative leucine zipper sequence at the C-terminus. We have disrupted the msp3 gene by homologous recombination, resulting in the expression of a truncated form of MSP3 that lacks the putative leucine zipper sequence but retains the glutamic acid-rich region and the heptad repeats. Here, we show that truncated MSP3, lacking the putative leucine zipper region, does not localize to the parasitophorous vacuole or interact with the merozoite surface. Furthermore, the acidic-basic repeat antigen (ABRA), which is present on the merozoite surface, also was not localized to the merozoite surface in parasites expressing the truncated form of MSP3. The P. falciparum merozoites lacking MSP3 and ABRA on the surface show reduced invasion into erythrocytes. These results suggest that MSP3 is not absolutely essential for blood stage growth and that the putative leucine zipper region is required for the trafficking of both MSP3 and ABRA to the parasitophorous vacuole.

  5. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  6. Process expression of bounded Petri nets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴哲辉

    1996-01-01

    The concept of process expression of bounded Petri nets is presented.Moreover,an algorithm to find the process expression for a bounded Petri net is given.A process expression of a bounded Petri net is a regular expression whose every alphabet symbol represents a basic subprocess of the net.The regular set expressed by the regular expression is the set of all surjective processes of a bounded Petri net.A surjective process of a bounded Petri net is a process of this net in which every s-cut corresponds to a reachable marking of the net.Therefore,all surjective processes of a bounded Petri net can be obtained as long as its process expression and the basic subprocess represented by the alphabet symbols of the process expression are given.

  7. Rapid mitogen-activated protein kinase by basic fibroblast growth factor in rat intestin after ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bing Fu; Yin-Hui Yang; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wei Chen; Jun-You Li; Zhi-Yong Sheng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies showed that exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) could improve physiological dysfunction after intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanisms of this protective effect of bFGF are still unclear. The present study was to detect the effect of bFGF on the activities of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MlAPK) signaling pathway in rat intestine after I/R injury, and to investigate the protective mechanisms of bFGF on intestinal ischemia injury. METttODS: Rat intestinal I/R injury was produced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 45minutes and followed by repeffusion for 48 hours. Seventyeight Wistar rats were used and divided randomly into sham-operated group (A), normal saline control group (B),bFGF antibody pre-treated group (C), and bFGF treated group (D). Tn group A, SMA was separated without occlusion. In groups B, C and D, SMA was separated and occluded for 45 minutes, then, released for reperfusion for 48 hours. After the animals were sacrificed, blood and tissue samples were taken from the intestine 45 minutes after ischemia in group A and 2, 6, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion in the other groups. Phosphorylated forms of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK and stress activated protein kinase/C-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) were measured by immunohistochemistry. Plasma levels of D-lactate were examined and histological changes were observed under the light microscope. RESULTS: Intestinal I/R injury induced the expression of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK, and SAPK/JNK pathways and exogenous bFGF stimulated the early activation of p42/p44 MAPK and p38 MlAPK pathways. The expression of phosphorylated forms of p42/p44 MAPK was primarily localized in the nuclei of crypt cells and in the cytoplasm and nuclei of villus cells. The positive expression of p38MAPK was localized mainly in the nuclei of crypt cells, very few in villus cells. The activities of p42/p44 MAPK and p38MAPK peaked 6 hours after

  8. OsbHLH148, a basic helix-loop-helix protein, interacts with OsJAZ proteins in a jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ju-Seok; Joo, Joungsu; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong Seob; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Yang Do

    2011-03-01

    Jasmonates play important roles in development, stress responses and defense in plants. Here, we report the results of a study using a functional genomics approach that identified a rice basic helix-loop-helix domain gene, OsbHLH148, that conferred drought tolerance as a component of the jasmonate signaling module in rice. OsbHLH148 transcript levels were rapidly increased by treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or abscisic acid, and abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity, low temperature and wounding. Transgenic over-expression of OsbHLH148 in rice confers plant tolerance to drought stress. Expression profiling followed by DNA microarray and RNA gel-blot analyses of transgenic versus wild-type rice identified genes that are up-regulated by OsbHLH148 over-expression. These include OsDREB and OsJAZ genes that are involved in stress responses and the jasmonate signaling pathway, respectively. OsJAZ1, a rice ZIM domain protein, interacted with OsbHLH148 in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, but it interacted with the putative OsCOI1 only in the presence of coronatine. Furthermore, the OsJAZ1 protein was degraded by rice and Arabidopsis extracts in the presence of coronatine, and its degradation was inhibited by MG132, a 26S proteasome inhibitor, suggesting 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of OsJAZ1 via the SCF(OsCOI1) complex. The transcription level of OsJAZ1 increased upon exposure of rice to MeJA. These results show that OsJAZ1 could act as a transcriptional regulator of the OsbHLH148-related jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance. Thus, our study suggests that OsbHLH148 acts on an initial response of jasmonate-regulated gene expression toward drought tolerance, constituting the OsbHLH148-OsJAZ-OsCOI1 signaling module in rice.

  9. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography : application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herráez-Hernández, R; van de Merbel, N C; Brinkman, U A

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of dr

  10. Molecular Basis for Structural Heterogeneity of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Bound to a Partner by Combined ESI-IM-MS and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Konijnenberg, Albert; Rossetti, Giulia; Habchi, Johnny; Li, Jinyu; Carloni, Paolo; Sobott, Frank; Longhi, Sonia; Grandori, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) form biologically active complexes that can retain a high degree of conformational disorder, escaping structural characterization by conventional approaches. An example is offered by the complex between the intrinsically disordered NTAIL domain and the phosphoprotein X domain (PXD) from measles virus (MeV). Here, distinct conformers of the complex are detected by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility (IM) techniques yielding estimates for the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) in solution and the average collision cross-section (CCS) in the gas phase. Computational modeling of the complex in solution, based on experimental constraints, provides atomic-resolution structural models featuring different levels of compactness. The resulting models indicate high structural heterogeneity. The intermolecular interactions are predominantly hydrophobic, not only in the ordered core of the complex, but also in the dynamic, disordered regions. Electrostatic interactions become involved in the more compact states. This system represents an illustrative example of a hydrophobic complex that could be directly detected in the gas phase by native mass spectrometry. This work represents the first attempt to modeling the entire NTAIL domain bound to PXD at atomic resolution.

  11. Improved dialytic removal of protein-bound uraemic toxins with use of albumin binding competitors: an in vitro human whole blood study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xia; Thijssen, Stephan; Kotanko, Peter; Ho, Chih-Hu; Henrie, Michael; Stroup, Eric; Handelman, Garry

    2016-03-22

    Protein-bound uraemic toxins (PBUTs) cause various deleterious effects in end-stage kidney disease patients, because their removal by conventional haemodialysis (HD) is severely limited by their low free fraction in plasma. Here we provide an experimental validation of the concept that the HD dialytic removal of PBUTs can be significantly increased by extracorporeal infusion of PBUT binding competitors. The binding properties of indoxyl sulfate (IS), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and hippuric acid (HIPA) and their binding competitors, ibuprofen (IBU), furosemide (FUR) and tryptophan (TRP) were studied in uraemic plasma. The effect of binding competitor infusion on fractional removal of PBUT was then quantified in an ex vivo single-pass HD model using uraemic human whole blood. The infusion of a combination of IBU and FUR increased the fractional removal of IS from 6.4 ± 0.1 to 18.3 ± 0.4%. IAA removal rose from 16.8 ± 0.3 to 34.5 ± 0.7%. TRP infusion increased the removal of IS and IAA to 10.5 ± 0.1% and 27.1 ± 0.3%, respectively. Moderate effects were observed on HIPA removal. Pre-dialyzer infusion of PBUT binding competitors into the blood stream can increase the HD removal of PBUTs. This approach can potentially be applied in current HD settings.

  12. Crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states from Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nidhi; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Bhose, Sumit; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The Znu system, a member of ABC transporter family, is critical for survival and pathogenesis of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLA). Two homologues of this system have been identified in CLA. Here, we report high resolution crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein from second of the two gene clusters of Znu system in CLA (CLas-ZnuA2) in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states. CLas-ZnuA2 showed maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific solute binding proteins (SBPs) of cluster A-I family. The overall fold of CLas-ZnuA2 is similar to the related cluster A-I family SBPs. The sequence and structure analysis revealed the unique features of CLas-ZnuA2. The comparison of CLas-ZnuA2 structure in three states showed that metal binding and release is facilitated by a large displacement along with a change in orientation of the side chain for one of the metal binding residue (His39) flipped away from metal binding site in metal-free form. The crystal structure captured in intermediate state of metal binding revealed the changes in conformation and interaction of the loop hosting His39 during the metal binding. A rigid body movement of C-domain along with partial unfolding of linker helix at its C-terminal during metal binding, as reported for PsaA, was not observed in CLas-ZnuA2. The present results suggest that despite showing maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific SBPs, the mechanistic resemblance of CLas-ZnuA2 seems to be closer to Zn-specific SBPs of cluster A-I family.

  13. Role of Very-late Antigen-4 (VLA-4) in Myelin Basic Protein-primed T Cell Contact-induced Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Microglial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-01-01

    The presence of neuroantigen-primed T cells recognizing self-myelin antigens within the CNS is necessary for the development of demyelinating autoimmune disease like multiple sclerosis. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in microglial cells. MBP-primed T cells alone induced specifically the microglial expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1α tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-6, proinflamma...

  14. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET as a method to calculate the dimerization strength of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Centonze Victoria E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factor HAND1, we show that HAND1 is phosphorylated during the trophoblast giant cell differentiation on residues residing in Helix I of the bHLH domain. Our hypothesis is that these modifications result in changes in HAND1 dimerization affinities with other bHLH factors. To test this idea, we employed FRET to measure the protein-protein interactions of HAND1 and HAND1 point mutants in HEK293 cells using YFP and CFP fusion proteins and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  15. In-capillary enrichment, proteolysis and separation using capillary electrophoresis with discontinuous buffers: application on proteins with moderately acidic and basic isoelectric points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Chandra A; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2009-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry and capillary-format separation continue to improve the sensitivity of protein analysis. Of equal importance is the miniaturization of sample pretreatment such as enrichment and proteolysis. In a previous report (Nesbitt et al., Electrophoresis, 2008, 29, 466-474), nanoliter-volume protein enrichment, tryptic digestion, and partial separation was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis followed by MALDI mass spectral analysis. A discontinuous buffer system, consisting of ammonium (pH 10) and acetate (pH 4), was used to create a pH junction inside the capillary, trapping a protein with a neutral isoelectric point, myoglobin (pI 7.2). Moreover, co-enrichment of myoglobin with trypsin led to an in-capillary digestion. In this paper, the ability of this discontinuous buffer system to perform similar in-capillary sample pretreatment on proteins with moderately acidic and basic pI was studied and reported. Lentil lectin (pI 8.6) and a multi-phosphorylated protein, beta-casein (pI 5.1), were selected as model proteins. In addition to the previously shown tryptic digestion, proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N was also performed. Digestion of these acidic and basic pI proteins produced a few peptides with extreme pI values lying outside the trapping range of the discontinuous buffer. An alteration in the peptide trapping procedure was made to accommodate these analytes. Offline MALDI mass spectral analysis confirmed the presence of the expected peptides. The presented miniaturized sample pretreatment methodology was proven to be applicable on proteins with a moderately wide range of pI. Flexibility in the choice of protease was also evident.

  16. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  17. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics A A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  18. Separation of metalloproteins using a novel metal ion contaminant sweeping technique and detection of protein-bound copper by a metal ion probe in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: distribution of copper in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shingo; Kawashima, Mitsuyoshi; Ohshima, Hiroki; Enomoto, Kazuki; Sato, Makoto; Yoshimura, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Keitaro; Maeda, Mizuo; Shibukawa, Masami

    2013-10-21

    A polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)-based method has been developed, consisting of two types of gel electrophoresis, to obtain an accurate distribution of protein-bound metal ions in biological samples. First, proteins are separated by PAGE without the uptake of contaminant metal ions in the separation field and dissociation of metal ions from the proteins. This is followed by another PAGE for the separation and detection of protein-bound metal ions in small volume samples with high sensitivity in the ppt range using a fluorescent metal probe. The former is a new technique using blue-native (BN) PAGE to electrophoretically sweep all metal contaminants by employing two kinds of chelating agents. These agents form complexes with contaminants in the gel and the separation buffer solution, which migrate towards opposite pole directions, thus lowering the contaminants to below the ppt level during separation. This is termed "Metal Ion Contaminant Sweeping BN-PAGE (MICS-BN-PAGE)". After the separation of proteins under these first metal-free conditions, the metal ions in the gel fractions are eluted, followed by derivatization of copper ions into the metal probe complexes to be separated and determined by fluorescence detection in the second PAGE. In this PAGE-based method, the copper ions bound to ceruloplasmin and superoxide dismutase were quantitatively determined, in addition to the exchangeable albumin-bound copper ions. This system successfully provided distribution maps of protein-copper in human serum. The precise distribution of copper in human serum was investigated, and found to be different from that which is widely accepted.

  19. Isoaspartic acid is present at specific sites in myelin basic protein from multiple sclerosis patients: could this represent a trigger for disease onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Michael G; Hancock, Sarah E; Raftery, Mark J; Truscott, Roger J W

    2016-08-12

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with breakdown of the myelin sheath that coats neurons in the central nervous system. The cause of MS is not known, although the pathogenesis involves destruction of myelin by the immune system. It was the aim of this study to examine the abundant myelin protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), to determine if there are sites of modification that may be characteristic for MS. MBP from the cerebellum was examined from controls and MS patients across the age range using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Amino acid racemization data indicated that myelin basic protein is long-lived and proteomic analysis of MBP showed it to be highly modified. A common modification of MBP was racemization of Asp and this was significantly greater in MS patients. In long-lived proteins, L-Asp and L-Asn can racemize to three other isomers, D-isoAsp, L-isoAsp and D-Asp and this is significant because isoAsp formation in peptides renders them immunogenic.Proteomic analysis revealed widespread modifications of MBP with two surface regions that are altered in MS. In particular, isoAsp was significantly elevated at these sites in MS patients. The generation of isoAsp could be responsible for eliciting an immune response to modified MBP and therefore be implicated in the etiology of MS.

  20. The MUC4 membrane-bound mucin regulates esophageal cancer cell proliferation and migration properties: Implication for S100A4 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyere, Emilie; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Frenois, Frederic [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Mariette, Christophe [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Department of Digestive and Oncological Surgery, University Hospital Claude Huriez, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Van Seuningen, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.vanseuningen@inserm.fr [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Loss of MUC4 reduces proliferation of esophageal cancer cells. {yields} MUC4 inhibition impairs migration of esophageal cancer cells but not their invasion. {yields} Loss of MUC4 significantly reduces in vivo tumor growth. {yields} Decrease of S100A4 induced by MUC4 inhibition impairs proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC4 is a membrane-bound mucin known to participate in tumor progression. It has been shown that MUC4 pattern of expression is modified during esophageal carcinogenesis, with a progressive increase from metaplastic lesions to adenocarcinoma. The principal cause of development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is the gastro-esophageal reflux, and MUC4 was previously shown to be upregulated by several bile acids present in reflux. In this report, our aim was thus to determine whether MUC4 plays a role in biological properties of human esophageal cancer cells. For that stable MUC4-deficient cancer cell lines (shMUC4 cells) were established using a shRNA approach. In vitro (proliferation, migration and invasion) and in vivo (tumor growth following subcutaneous xenografts in SCID mice) biological properties of shMUC4 cells were analyzed. Our results show that shMUC4 cells were less proliferative, had decreased migration properties and did not express S100A4 protein when compared with MUC4 expressing cells. Absence of MUC4 did not impair shMUC4 invasiveness. Subcutaneous xenografts showed a significant decrease in tumor size when cells did not express MUC4. Altogether, these data indicate that MUC4 plays a key role in proliferative and migrating properties of esophageal cancer cells as well as is a tumor growth promoter. MUC4 mucin appears thus as a good therapeutic target to slow-down esophageal tumor progression.

  1. MLK-3: identification of a widely-expressed protein kinase bearing an SH3 domain and a leucine zipper-basic region domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Y L; Leung, I W; Heng, H H; Tsui, L C; Lassam, N J

    1994-06-01

    We have identified a novel protein kinase, designated MLK-3, from human thymus using RT-PCR and cDNA library screening. The deduced open reading frame, derived from sequencing a 3.5 kb MLK-3 cDNA, encodes a protein of 847 amino acids with several interesting structural features. These include an SH3 domain in the absence of an SH2 domain, a region containing two leucine zippers with an adjacent carboxy-terminal basic region, and a proline rich region. This kinase shows homology with the mixed-lineage family of protein kinases (MLK) and shares the unusual leucine zipper-basic motif found in previously identified MLK kinases. By northern analysis, MLK-3 mRNA was detected in a wide variety of normal and transformed human cell lines and tissue specimens. The gene encoding MLK-3 has been mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 11 q13.1-13.3, a region frequently altered in human malignancies.

  2. One step physically adsorbed coating of silica capillary with excellent stability for the separation of basic proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The coating of capillary inner surface is considered to be an effective approach to suppress the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface in CE. However, most of coating materials reported are water-soluble, which may dissolve in BGE during the procedure of electrophoresis. In this study, a novel strategy for selection of physically coating materials has been illustrated to get coating layer with excellent stability using materials having poor solubility in commonly used solvents. Taking natural chitin as example (not hydrolyzed water soluble chitosan), a simple one step coating method using chitin solution in hexafluoroisopropanol was adopted within only 21 min with good coating reproducibility (RSDs of EOF for within-batch coated capillaries of 1.55% and between-batch coated capillaries of 2.31%), and a separation of four basic proteins on a chitin coated capillary was performed to evaluate the coating efficacy. Using chitin coating, the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface was successfully suppressed with reversed and stable EOF, and four basic proteins including lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A were baseline separated within 16 min with satisfied separation efficiency using 20 mM pH 2.0 H3PO4-Na2HPO4 as back ground electrolyte and 20 kV as separation voltage. What is more important, the chitin coating layer could be stable for more than two months during this study, which demonstrates that chitin is an ideal material for preparing semi-permanent coating on bare fused silica capillary inner wall and has hopeful potential in routine separation of proteins with CE.

  3. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS.

  4. Crystal structures of a yeast 14-3-3 protein from Lachancea thermotolerans in the unliganded form and bound to a human lipid kinase PI4KB-derived peptide reveal high evolutionary conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenreichova, Andrea; Klima, Martin; Boura, Evzen

    2016-11-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind phosphorylated binding partners to regulate several of their properties, including enzymatic activity, stability and subcellular localization. Here, two crystal structures are presented: the crystal structures of the 14-3-3 protein (also known as Bmh1) from the yeast Lachancea thermotolerans in the unliganded form and bound to a phosphopeptide derived from human PI4KB (phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase B). The structures demonstrate the high evolutionary conservation of ligand recognition by 14-3-3 proteins. The structural analysis suggests that ligand recognition by 14-3-3 proteins evolved very early in the evolution of eukaryotes and remained conserved, underlying the importance of 14-3-3 proteins in physiology.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of intact basic proteins using Polybrene-dextran sulfate-Polybrene-coated capillaries: system optimization and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselberg, Rob; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2010-09-23

    A capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) method using sheath liquid electrospray ionization interfacing was studied and optimized for the analysis of intact basic proteins. To prevent protein adsorption, capillaries with a noncovalent positively charged coating were utilized. Capillaries were coated by subsequent rinsing with solutions of Polybrene, dextran sulfate and Polybrene. The coating proved to be fully compatible with MS detection, causing no background signals and ionization suppression. The composition of the sheath liquid and BGE was optimized using the model proteins α-chymotrypsinogen A, ribonuclease A, lysozyme and cytochrome c. A sheath liquid of isopropanol-water-acetic acid (75:25:0.1, v/v/v) at 2 μL min(-1) resulted in optimal signal intensities for most proteins, but caused dissociation of the heme group of cytochrome c. Optimum protein responses were obtained with a BGE of 50 mM acetic acid (pH 3.0), which allowed a baseline separation of the test protein mixture. Several minor impurities present in the mixture could be detected and provisionally identified using accurate mass and a protein modification database. The selectivity of the CE-MS system was investigated by the analysis of acetylated lysozyme. Eight highly related species, identified as non-acetylated lysozyme and lysozyme acetylated in various degrees, could be distinguished. The CE-MS system showed good reproducibility yielding interday (three weeks period) RSDs for migration time and peak area within 2% and 10%, respectively. With the CE-MS system, determination coefficients (R(2)) for protein concentration and peak area were higher than 0.996, whereas detection limits were between 11 and 19 nM.

  6. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2: insights into basic properties of the CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I;

    2001-01-01

    subunits, which make no direct contact with one another. Each catalytic subunit interacts with both regulatory chains, predominantly via an extended C-terminal tail of the regulatory subunit. The CK2 structure is consistent with its constitutive activity and with a flexible role of the regulatory subunit......The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalytic...... as a docking partner for various protein kinases. Furthermore it shows an inter-domain mobility in the catalytic subunit known to be functionally important in protein kinases and detected here for the first time directly within one crystal structure....

  7. Structural insight into the function of myelin basic protein as a ligand for integrin αMβ2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapulionis, Romualdas; Oliveira, Cristiano; Gjelstrup, Mikkel Carstensen;

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease where phagocytic cells infiltrate the nerve tissue and act as terminal agents in destruction of the myelin sheath. However, the mechanism that triggers the ability of these cells to recognize myelin remains obscure. We show that myelin basic...... protein (MBP), a major autoantigen in MS, is a potent and specific ligand for the integrin αMβ2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) expressed mainly on phagocytic cells. MBP undergoes a dramatic conformational change when liberated from the lipid-rich environment of the myelin sheath. The MS drug glatiramer acetate...

  8. The effect of beta-interferon therapy on myelin basic protein-elicited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Krakauer, Martin; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-beta therapy has well-established clinical benefits in multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying modulation of cytokine responses to myelin self-antigens remains poorly understood. We analysed the CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine responses elicited by myelin basic protein...... (MBP) and a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), in mononuclear cell cultures from fourteen MS patients undergoing IFN-beta therapy. The MBP-elicited IFN-gamma-, TNF-alpha- and IL-10 production decreased during therapy (p...

  9. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  10. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Junya [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Hirano, Hidemi [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  11. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Chaudhuri; S Mallik; S Das Gupta

    2014-05-01

    We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment multiplicity, isotopic distribution and isoscaling. Extension of canonical thermodynamical model to a projectile fragmentation model is outlined. Application of the projectile fragmentation model for calculating average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of the largest cluster at different bound, differential charge distribution and cross-section of neutron-rich nuclei of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies are described. Application of nuclear multifragmentation reaction in basic research as well as in other domains is outlined.

  12. Basic domains target protein subunits of the RNase MRP complex to the nucleolus independently of complex association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Heijden, A.G. van der; Janssen, R.J.T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The RNase MRP and RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles both function as endoribonucleases, have a similar RNA component, and share several protein subunits. RNase MRP has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing and mitochondrial DNA replication, whereas RNase P functions in pre-tRNA processing. Both R

  13. Classic 18.5- and 21.5-kDa myelin basic protein isoforms associate with cytoskeletal and SH3-domain proteins in the immortalized N19-oligodendroglial cell line stimulated by phorbol ester and IGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham S T; Homchaudhuri, Lopamudra; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2012-06-01

    The 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intrinsically disordered protein arising from the Golli (Genes of Oligodendrocyte Lineage) gene complex and is responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. This MBP splice isoform also has a plethora of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, deimination, methylation, and deamidation, that reduce its overall net charge and alter its protein and lipid associations within oligodendrocytes (OLGs). It was originally thought that MBP was simply a structural component of myelin; however, additional investigations have demonstrated that MBP is multi-functional, having numerous protein-protein interactions with Ca²⁺-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and proteins with SH3-domains, and it can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. Here, we have examined cytoskeletal interactions of classic 18.5-kDa MBP, in vivo, using early developmental N19-OLGs transfected with fluorescently-tagged MBP, actin, tubulin, and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1). We show that MBP redistributes to distinct 'membrane-ruffled' regions of the plasma membrane where it co-localizes with actin and tubulin, and with the SH3-domain-containing proteins cortactin and ZO-1, when stimulated with PMA, a potent activator of the protein kinase C pathway. Moreover, using phospho-specific antibody staining, we show an increase in phosphorylated Thr98 MBP (human sequence numbering) in membrane-ruffled OLGs. Previously, Thr98 phosphorylation of MBP has been shown to affect its conformation, interactions with other proteins, and tethering of other proteins to the membrane in vitro. Here, MBP and actin were also co-localized in new focal adhesion contacts induced by IGF-1 stimulation in cells grown on laminin-2. This study supports a role for classic MBP isoforms in cytoskeletal and other protein-protein interactions during membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling in OLGs.

  14. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD.

  15. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Therapies that Ag-specifically target pathologic T lymphocytes responsible for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases would be expected to have improved therapeutic indices compared with Ag-nonspecific therapies. We have developed a cellular immunotherapy that uses chimeric receptors...... to selectively redirect therapeutic T cells against myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T lymphocytes implicated in MS. We generated two heterodimeric receptors that genetically link the human MBP(84-102) epitope to HLA-DR2 and either incorporate or lack a TCRzeta signaling domain. The Ag-MHC domain serves...... as a bait, binding the TCR of MBP-specific target cells. The zeta signaling region stimulates the therapeutic cell after cognate T cell engagement. Both receptors were well expressed on primary T cells or T hybridomas using a tricistronic (alpha, beta, green fluorescent protein) retroviral expression system...

  16. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy.

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  18. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  19. A highly basic sequence at the N-terminal region is essential for targeting the DNA replication protein ORC1 to the nucleus in Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devanand; Kumar, Diwakar; Saha, Swati

    2012-07-01

    The conserved eukaryotic DNA replication protein ORC1 is one of the constituents of pre-replication complexes that assemble at or very near origins prior to replication initiation. ORC1 has been shown to be constitutively nuclear in Leishmania major. This study investigates the sequences involved in nuclear localization of ORC1 in Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) have been reported in only a few Leishmania proteins. Functional analyses have delineated NLSs to regions of ~60 amino acids in length in the tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I and type II DNA topoisomerase of L. donovani, and in the L. major kinesin KIN13-1. Using a panel of site-directed mutations we have identified a sequence essential for nuclear import of LdORC1. This sequence at the N terminus of the protein comprises residues 2-5 (KRSR), with K2, R3 and R5 being crucial. Independent mutation of the K2 residue causes exclusion of the protein from the nucleus, while mutating the R5 residue leads to diffusion of the protein throughout the cell. This sequence, however, is insufficient for targeting a heterologous protein (β-galactosidase) to the nucleus. Analysis of additional ORC1 mutations and reporter constructs reveals that while the highly basic tetra-amino acid sequence at the N terminus is essential for nuclear localization, the ORC1 NLS in its entirety is more complex, and of a distributive character. Our results suggest that nuclear localization signalling sequences in Leishmania nuclear proteins are more complex than what is typically seen in higher eukaryotes.

  20. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: From understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Matias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10-12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models.

  1. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: from understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Pedro M; Baek, Sung Hee; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Dutta, Anindya; Houry, Walid A; Llorca, Oscar; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10-12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models.

  2. Elevated endogenous expression of the dominant negative basic helix-loop-helix protein ID1 correlates with significant centrosome abnormalities in human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutmann Anja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ID proteins are dominant negative inhibitors of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that have multiple functions during development and cellular differentiation. Ectopic (over-expression of ID1 extends the lifespan of primary human epithelial cells. High expression levels of ID1 have been detected in multiple human malignancies, and in some have been correlated with unfavorable clinical prognosis. ID1 protein is localized at the centrosomes and forced (over-expression of ID1 results in errors during centrosome duplication. Results Here we analyzed the steady state expression levels of the four ID-proteins in 18 tumor cell lines and assessed the number of centrosome abnormalities. While expression of ID1, ID2, and ID3 was detected, we failed to detect protein expression of ID4. Expression of ID1 correlated with increased supernumerary centrosomes in most cell lines analyzed. Conclusions This is the first report that shows that not only ectopic expression in tissue culture but endogenous levels of ID1 modulate centrosome numbers. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis that ID1 interferes with centrosome homeostasis, most likely contributing to genomic instability and associated tumor aggressiveness.

  3. Passage of stable isotope-labeled grass silage fiber and fiber-bound protein through the gastroinstestinal tract of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Dijkstra, J.; Hendriks, W.H.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional passage rates are required to predict nutrient absorption in ruminants but data on nutrient-specific passage kinetics are largely lacking. With the use of the stable isotope ratio (d) as an internal marker, we assessed passage kinetics of fiber and fiber-bound nitrogen (N) of intrinsicall

  4. Upward Bound alum honored

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Robert Cobb Jr., of Greensboro, N.C., a 1986-89 participant in the Virginia Tech Upward Bound program, was recently named Virginia's TRIO Achiever for 2004. Federal TRIO programs include Upward Bound and Educational Talent Search.

  5. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  8. Schizophrenia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  11. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Basic Information About Fluoride Benefits: Strong Teeth History of Fluoride in Water Cost: Saves Money, Saves Teeth Fluoride in the Water Today The mineral fluoride occurs naturally on earth and is released from rocks into the soil, ...

  12. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  15. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chhanda Samanta

    2001-08-01

    The essential aspect of contemporary physics is to understand properties of nucleonic matter that constitutes the world around us. Over the years research in nuclear physics has provided strong guidance in understanding the basic principles of nuclear interactions. But, the scenario of nuclear physics changed drastically as the new generation of accelerators started providing more and more rare isotopes, which are away from the line of stability. These weakly bound nuclei are found to exhibit new forms of nuclear matter and unprecedented exotic behaviour. The low breakup thresholds of these rare nuclei are posing new challenges to both theory and experiments. Fortunately, nature has provided a few loosely bound stable nuclei that have been studied thoroughly for decades. Attempts are being made to find a consistent picture for the unstable nuclei starting from their stable counterparts. Some significant differences in the structure and reaction mechanisms are found.

  16. Responsiveness to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) is associated with salivary levels of two specific basic proline-rich proteins in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Tiziana; Melis, Melania; Castagnola, Massimo; Padiglia, Alessandra; Tepper, Beverly J; Messana, Irene; Tomassini Barbarossa, Iole

    2012-01-01

    Thiourea tasting can be predictive of individual differences in bitter taste responses, general food preferences and eating behavior, and could be correlated with saliva chemical composition. We investigated the possible relationship between PROP bitter taste responsiveness and the salivary proteome in subjects genotyped for TAS2R38 and gustin gene polymorphisms. Taste perception intensity evoked by PROP and NaCl solutions was measured in sixty-three volunteers (21 males, 42 females, age 25±3 y) to establish their PROP taster status, and 24 PROP super-tasters and 21 nontasters were selected to participate in the study. TAS2R38 and gustin gene molecular analysis were performed using PCR techniques. Qualitative and quantitative determination of salivary proteins was performed by HPLC-ESI-MS before and after PROP taste stimulation. PROP super-tastings was strongly associated with the 'taster' variant (PAV haplotype) of TAS2R38 and the A allele of rs2274333 polymorphism in the gustin gene and nontasting was associated with the minor alleles at both loci. ANOVA revealed that basal levels of II-2 and Ps-1 proteins, belonging to the basic proline-rich protein (bPRPs) family, were significantly higher in PROP super-taster than in nontaster un-stimulated saliva, and that PROP stimulation elicited a rapid increase in the levels of these same proteins only in PROP super-taster saliva. These data show for the first time that responsiveness to PROP is associated with salivary levels of II-2 peptide and Ps-1 protein, which are products of the PRB1 gene. These findings suggest that PRB1, in addition to TAS2R38 and gustin, could contribute to individual differences in thiourea sensitivity, and the expression of the PROP phenotype as a complex genetic trait.

  17. Substitutions mimicking deimination and phosphorylation of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein exert local structural effects that subtly influence its global folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Jenkins, Andrew D; Velte, Caroline J; Kattnig, Daniel R; Boggs, Joan M; Hinderberger, Dariush; Harauz, George

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsically-disordered proteins (IDPs) present a complex interplay of conformational variability and multifunctionality, modulated by environment and post-translational modifications. The 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) is essential to the formation of the myelin sheath of the central nervous system and is exemplary in this regard. We have recently demonstrated that the unmodified MBP-C1 component undergoes co-operative global conformational changes in increasing concentrations of trifluoroethanol, emulating the decreasing dielectric environment that the protein encounters upon adsorption to the oligodendrocyte membrane [K.A. Vassall et al., Journal of Molecular Biology, 427, 1977-1992, 2015]. Here, we extended this study to the pseudo-deiminated MBP-C8 charge component, one found in greater proportion in developing myelin and in multiple sclerosis. A similar tri-conformational distribution as for MBP-C1 was observed with slight differences in Gibbs free energy. A more dramatic difference was observed by cathepsin D digestion of the protein in both aqueous and membrane environments, which showed significantly greater accessibility of the F42-F43 cut site of MBP-C8, indicative of a global conformational change. In contrast, this modification caused little change in the protein's density of packing on myelin-mimetic membranes as ascertained by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy [D.R. Kattnig et al., Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (Biomembranes), 1818, 2636-2647, 2012], or in its affinity for Ca(2+)-CaM. Site-specific threonyl pseudo-phosphorylation at residues T92 and/or T95 did not appreciably affect any of the thermodynamic mechanisms of conformational transitions, susceptibility to cathepsin D, or affinity for Ca(2+)-CaM, despite previously having been shown to affect local structure and disposition on the membrane surface.

  18. The 21.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein has a non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham S.T.; Seymour, Lauren V. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Boggs, Joan M. [Molecular Structure and Function, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harauz, George, E-mail: gharauz@uoguelph.ca [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform is translocated to the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesized that the exon-II-encoded sequence contained the NLS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We mutated this sequence in RFP-tagged constructs and transfected N19-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Abolition of two key positively-charged residues resulted in loss of nuclear-trafficking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 21.5-kDa isoform of classic MBP contains a non-traditional PY-NLS. -- Abstract: The predominant 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is mainly responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system, but is multifunctional, having numerous interactions with Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and SH3-domains, and can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. The full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform has an additional 26 residues encoded by exon-II of the classic gene, which causes it to be trafficked to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes (OLGs). We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues within this segment in red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged constructs, which were then transfected into the immortalized N19-OLG cell line to view protein localization using epifluorescence microscopy. We found that 21.5-kDa MBP contains two non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signals, and that arginine and lysine residues within these motifs were involved in subcellular trafficking of this protein to the nucleus, where it may have functional roles during myelinogenesis.

  19. Responsiveness to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP is associated with salivary levels of two specific basic proline-rich proteins in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Cabras

    Full Text Available Thiourea tasting can be predictive of individual differences in bitter taste responses, general food preferences and eating behavior, and could be correlated with saliva chemical composition. We investigated the possible relationship between PROP bitter taste responsiveness and the salivary proteome in subjects genotyped for TAS2R38 and gustin gene polymorphisms. Taste perception intensity evoked by PROP and NaCl solutions was measured in sixty-three volunteers (21 males, 42 females, age 25±3 y to establish their PROP taster status, and 24 PROP super-tasters and 21 nontasters were selected to participate in the study. TAS2R38 and gustin gene molecular analysis were performed using PCR techniques. Qualitative and quantitative determination of salivary proteins was performed by HPLC-ESI-MS before and after PROP taste stimulation. PROP super-tastings was strongly associated with the 'taster' variant (PAV haplotype of TAS2R38 and the A allele of rs2274333 polymorphism in the gustin gene and nontasting was associated with the minor alleles at both loci. ANOVA revealed that basal levels of II-2 and Ps-1 proteins, belonging to the basic proline-rich protein (bPRPs family, were significantly higher in PROP super-taster than in nontaster un-stimulated saliva, and that PROP stimulation elicited a rapid increase in the levels of these same proteins only in PROP super-taster saliva. These data show for the first time that responsiveness to PROP is associated with salivary levels of II-2 peptide and Ps-1 protein, which are products of the PRB1 gene. These findings suggest that PRB1, in addition to TAS2R38 and gustin, could contribute to individual differences in thiourea sensitivity, and the expression of the PROP phenotype as a complex genetic trait.

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... segment of DNA that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes ... the gene to code for a slightly different protein. Some mutations are harmless, some can be helpful, ...

  1. Two Distantly Spaced Basic Patches in the Flexible Domain of Huntingtin-Interacting Protein 1 (HIP1 Are Essential for the Binding of Clathrin Light Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A. Ybe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between HIP family proteins (HIP1 and HIP12/1R and clathrin is fundamental to endocytosis. We used circular dichroism (CD to study the stability of an HIP1 subfragment (aa468-530 that is splayed open. CD thermal melts show HIP1 468-530 is only stable at low temperatures, but this HIP1 fragment contains a structural unit that does not melt out even at 83C∘. We then created HIP1 mutants to probe our hypothesis that a short hydrophobic path in the opened region is the binding site for clathrin light chain. We found that the binding of hub/LCb was sensitive to mutating two distantly separated basic residues (K474 and K494. The basic patches marked by K474 and K494 are conserved in HIP12/1R. The lack of conservation in sla2p (S. cerevisiae, HIP1 from D. melanogaster, and HIP1 homolog ZK370.3 from C. elegans implies the binding of HIP1 and HIP1 homologs to clathrin light chain may be different in these organisms.

  2. UV irradiation-induced apoptosis leads to activation of a 36-kDa myelin basic protein kinase in HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, M.L.; Sato, Mitsuhiro; Cao, Boliang; Richie, J.P. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-08-20

    UV irradiation induces apoptosis (or programmed cell death) in HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells within 3 h. UV-induced apoptosis is accompanied by activation of a 36-kDa myelin basic protein kinase (p36 MBP kinase). This kinase is also activated by okadaic acid and retinoic acid-induced apoptosis. Irrespective of the inducing agent, p36 MBP kinase activation is restricted to the subpopulation of cells actually undergoing apoptosis. Activation of p36 MBP kinase occurs in enucleated cytoplasts, indicating no requirements for a nucleus or fragmented DNA in signaling. We also demonstrate the activation of p36 kinase in tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-and serum starvation-induced cell death using the human prostatic tumor cell line LNCap and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, respectively. We postulate that p36 MBP kinase is a common component in diverse signaling pathways leading to apoptosis. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  4. The Zea mays glycine-rich RNA-binding protein MA16 is bound to a ribonucleotide(s) by a stable linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2012-09-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the maize glycine-rich RNA-binding protein MA16 is developmentally regulated and it is involved in environmental stress responses. The MA16 protein shows a wide spectrum of RNA-binding activities. On the basis of in vivo labelling, where a [³²P]phosphate label was linked to the MA16 protein, Freire and Pages (Plant Mol Biol 29:797-807, 1995) suggested that the protein may be post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. However, further analysis showed that the [³²P]phosphate label was sensitive to different treatments, suggesting that modification distinct from protein phosphorylation might occur in the MA16 protein. Biochemical analysis revealed that this [³²P]phosphate labelling was resistant to phenol extraction and denaturing SDS-PAGE but sensitive to micrococcal nuclease, RNase A and RNase T1 treatments. The mobility of [³⁵S] labelled MA16 protein on SDS-PAGE did not significantly changed after the nuclease treatments suggesting that the [³²P]phosphate label associated to MA16 protein could be a ribonucleotide or a very short ribonucleotide chain. In addition, immunoprecipitation of labelled extracts showed that the ribonucleotide(s) linked to the MA16 protein was removed by phosphorolytic activity. This activity could be catalysed by a phosphate-dependent ribonuclease. The C-terminus of MA16 protein harbouring a glycine-rich domain was predicted to be an intrinsically disordered region.

  5. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  6. Body Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System Heart and Circulatory System Immune ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit ... final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other ...

  8. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are You At Risk? Diabetes Basics Living with Diabetes Food & Fitness In My ... Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy ...

  9. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  10. A high-molecular-weight complex of membrane proteins BAP29/BAP31 is involved in the retention of membrane-bound IgD in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Kuppig, Stephan; Becker, Bernd; Gimborn, Kerstin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Reth, Michael

    2003-08-19

    B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprising membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mIgs) and Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimers. In most cases, transport of mIgs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface requires assembly with the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta subunits. In addition to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta, mIg molecules also bind two ER-resident membrane proteins, BAP29 and BAP31, and the chaperone heavy chain binding protein (BiP). In this article, we show that neither Ig-alpha/Ig-beta nor BAP29/BAP31 nor BiP bind simultaneously to the same mIgD molecule. Blue native PAGE revealed that only a minor fraction of intracellular mIgD is associated with high-molecular-weight BAP29/BAP31 complexes. BAP-binding to mIgs was found to correlate with ER retention of chimeric mIgD molecules. On high-level expression in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, mIgD molecules were detected on the cell surface in the absence of Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. This aberrant transport was prevented by coexpression of BAP29 and BAP31. Thus, BAP complexes contribute to ER retention of mIg complexes that are not bound to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. Furthermore, the mechanism of ER retention of both BAP31 and mIgD is not through retrieval from a post-ER compartment, but true ER retention. In conclusion, BAP29 and BAP31 might be the long sought after retention proteins and/or chaperones that act on transmembrane regions of various proteins.

  11. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E;

    2001-01-01

    , in peri-infarct areas in adult rat brain after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and correlated it to the expression of the growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a marker for axonal regeneration and sprouting, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques. Within the infarct, MBP......, corresponding to the appearance of process-bearing MBP and occasional MOG-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes in parallel sections. Quantitative analysis revealed significant increases in the density of oligodendrocytes (up to 7.6-fold) and in the level of MBP mRNA expressed by individual cells. Parallel sections...... showed that increased expression of GAP-43 mRNA in neurons was concomitant to MBP mRNA upregulation in oligodendrocytes. While the mechanisms regulating oligodendrocyte survival and myelination signals are not clear at this point, axonal sprouting could putatively serve as a stimulus for the upregulation...

  12. Interplay between Structure and Charge as a Key to Allosteric Modulation of Human 20S Proteasome by the Basic Fragment of HIV-1 Tat Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Karpowicz

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a giant protease responsible for degradation of the majority of cytosolic proteins. Competitive inhibitors of the proteasome are used against aggressive blood cancers. However, broadening the use of proteasome-targeting drugs requires new mechanistic approaches to the enzyme's inhibition. In our previous studies we described Tat1 peptide, an allosteric inhibitor of the proteasome derived from a fragment of the basic domain of HIV-Tat1 protein. Here, we attempted to dissect the structural determinants of the proteasome inhibition by Tat1. Single- and multiple- alanine walking scans were performed. Tat1 analogs with stabilized beta-turn conformation at positions 4-5 and 8-9, pointed out by the molecular dynamics modeling and the alanine scan, were synthesized. Structure of Tat1 analogs were analyzed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, supplemented by molecular dynamics simulations. Biological activity tests and structural studies revealed that high flexibility and exposed positive charge are hallmarks of Tat1 peptide. Interestingly, stabilization of a beta-turn at the 8-9 position was necessary to significantly improve the inhibitory potency.

  13. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    in microsomal and synaptosomal fractions. Furthermore, the formation of cross-link complexes with membrane proteins appeared to be developmentally and regionally regulated in the brain and inhibited upon ATP hydrolysis. The data suggest the requirement of specific protein interactions for MPR 300 functions...

  14. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  15. Wavelet basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Since the study of wavelets is a relatively new area, much of the research coming from mathematicians, most of the literature uses terminology, concepts and proofs that may, at times, be difficult and intimidating for the engineer. Wavelet Basics has therefore been written as an introductory book for scientists and engineers. The mathematical presentation has been kept simple, the concepts being presented in elaborate detail in a terminology that engineers will find familiar. Difficult ideas are illustrated with examples which will also aid in the development of an intuitive insight. Chapter 1 reviews the basics of signal transformation and discusses the concepts of duals and frames. Chapter 2 introduces the wavelet transform, contrasts it with the short-time Fourier transform and clarifies the names of the different types of wavelet transforms. Chapter 3 links multiresolution analysis, orthonormal wavelets and the design of digital filters. Chapter 4 gives a tour d'horizon of topics of current interest: wave...

  16. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenrick A Vassall

    Full Text Available The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence -T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99- containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90 upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72-S107 with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012. Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the

  17. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bessonov, Kyrylo; De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence -T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99-) containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90) upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72-S107) with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012). Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the global structure

  18. Fluorescence competition assay for the assessment of green leaf volatiles and trans-β-farnesene bound to three odorant-binding proteins in the wheat aphid Sitobion avenae (Fabricius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Tao; Yin, Jiao; Deng, Sisi; Li, Kebin; Cao, Yazhong

    2012-06-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are important parts of insect olfactory systems, and sensitive olfaction is vital for phytophagous insects in host foraging. Electrophysiological studies are helpful in understanding olfactory sensing in Sitobion avenae (Hemiptera: Aphididae), but the functions of odorant-binding proteins in this insect are poorly understood. In this study, we used fluorescence competition assays to measure the binding specificities of SaveOBPs. The results showed that both SaveOBP2 and SaveOBP3 were superior to SaveOBP7 in binding green leaf volatiles. It was unexpected that SaveOBP7 bound trans-β-farnesene strongly, which was known as alarm pheromone of this species. Host volatiles were recognized much more easily by SaveOBP2, and the observed binding activity of SaveOBP2 equaled for tested green leaf volatiles. Our results imply that SaveOBP7 might play a more important role in aphid alarm pheromone discrimination.

  19. Identification of peptides from foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L E; Harndahl, M; Nielsen, M; Patch, J R; Jungersen, G; Buus, S; Golde, W T

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of the peptide-binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA-2*0401 molecule based on a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach. By combining this binding motif with data achieved by applying the NetMHCpan peptide prediction algorithm to both SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401, we identified high-affinity binding peptides. A total of 727 different 9mer and 726 different 10mer peptides within the structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T-cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-2*0401, whereas five of the nine predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-1*0401. These methods provide the characterization of T-cell epitopes in response to pathogens in more detail. The development of such approaches to analyze vaccine performance will contribute to a more accelerated improvement of livestock vaccines by virtue of identifying and focusing analysis on bona fide T-cell epitopes.

  20. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  1. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-09-01

    A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral and basic substances covered by the method were identified in postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples from forensic autopsy cases, clinical forensic cases and driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases by a reverse target database search. The screening method covered 467 substances. Validation was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng/g to 500ng/g. Sample preparation was performed using simple protein precipitation of 300μL of whole blood with acetonitrile and methanol. Ten microliters of the reconstituted extract were injected and separated within a 13.5min UPLC gradient reverse-phase run. Positive electrospray ionization (ESI) was used to generate the ions in the m/z range of 50-1000. Fragment ions were generated by bbCID. Identification was based on retention time, accurate mass, fragment ion(s) and isotopic pattern. A very sensitive broad toxicological screening method using positive electrospray ionization UPLC-HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method was shown to combine high sensitivity with a very broad scope that has not previously been reported in toxicological whole blood screening when using only one injection.

  2. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

  4. LB3D: a protein three-dimensional substructure search program based on the lower bound of a root mean square deviation value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashi, Genki; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko

    2012-05-01

    Searching for protein structure-function relationships using three-dimensional (3D) structural coordinates represents a fundamental approach for determining the function of proteins with unknown functions. Since protein structure databases are rapidly growing in size, the development of a fast search method to find similar protein substructures by comparison of protein 3D structures is essential. In this article, we present a novel protein 3D structure search method to find all substructures with root mean square deviations (RMSDs) to the query structure that are lower than a given threshold value. Our new algorithm runs in O(m + N/m(0.5)) time, after O(N log N) preprocessing, where N is the database size and m is the query length. The new method is 1.8-41.6 times faster than the practically best known O(N) algorithm, according to computational experiments using a huge database (i.e., >20,000,000 C-alpha coordinates).

  5. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  6. Regression Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Kahane, Leo H

    2007-01-01

    Using a friendly, nontechnical approach, the Second Edition of Regression Basics introduces readers to the fundamentals of regression. Accessible to anyone with an introductory statistics background, this book builds from a simple two-variable model to a model of greater complexity. Author Leo H. Kahane weaves four engaging examples throughout the text to illustrate not only the techniques of regression but also how this empirical tool can be applied in creative ways to consider a broad array of topics. New to the Second Edition Offers greater coverage of simple panel-data estimation:

  7. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus: molecular cloning and analysis of 22 individual recombinant monoclonal kappa light chains specifically hydrolyzing human myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Anna M; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies hydrolyzing myelin basic protein (MBP) can play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An immunoglobulin light chain phagemid library derived from peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with SLE was used. Small pools of phage particles displaying light chains with different affinities for MBP were isolated by affinity chromatography on MBP-Sepharose, and the fraction eluted with 0.5 M NaCl was used for preparation of individual monoclonal light chains (MLChs, 26-27 kDa). Seventy-two of 440 individual colonies were randomly chosen, expressed in Escherichia coli in a soluble form, and MLChs were purified by metal chelating chromatography. Twenty-two of 72 MLChs have high affinity and efficiently hydrolyze only MBP (not other control proteins) demonstrating various pH optima in a 5.7-9.0 range and different substrate specificity in the hydrolysis of four different MBP oligopeptides. Four MLChs demonstrated serine protease-like and three thiol protease-like activities, while 11 MLChs were metalloproteases. The activity of three MLChs was inhibited by both phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), two other by EDTA and iodoacetamide, and one by PMSF, EDTA, and iodoacetamide. The ratio of relative activity in the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Co(2+) was individual for each of 22 MLCh preparations. It is the first examples of human MLChs, which probably can possess two or even three different proteolytic activities. These observations suggest an extreme diversity of anti-MBP abzymes in SLE patients. The immune systems of individual SLE patients can generate a variety of anti-MBP abzymes, which can attack MBP of myelin-proteolipid sheath of axons and play an important role in MS and SLE pathogenesis.

  9. Role of very-late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in myelin basic protein-primed T cell contact-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-06-20

    The presence of neuroantigen-primed T cells recognizing self-myelin antigens within the CNS is necessary for the development of demyelinating autoimmune disease like multiple sclerosis. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in microglial cells. MBP-primed T cells alone induced specifically the microglial expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-1alpha tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6, proinflammatory cytokines that are primarily involved in the pathogenesis of MS. This induction was primarily dependent on the contact between MBP-primed T cells and microglia. The activation of microglial NF-kappaB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) by MBP-primed T cell contact and inhibition of contact-mediated microglial expression of proinflammatory cytokines by dominant-negative mutants of p65 and C/EBPbeta suggest that MBP-primed T cells induce microglial expression of cytokines through the activation of NF-kappaB and C/EBPbeta. In addition, we show that MBP-primed T cells express very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), and functional blocking antibodies to alpha4 chain of VLA-4 (CD49d) inhibited the ability of MBP-primed T cells to induce microglial proinflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, the blocking of VLA-4 impaired the ability of MBP-primed T cells to induce microglial activation of only C/EBPbeta but not that of NF-kappaB. This study illustrates a novel role of VLA-4 in regulating neuroantigen-primed T cell-induced activation of microglia through C/EBPbeta

  10. A lack of association between hyperserotonemia and the increased frequency of serum anti-myelin basic protein auto-antibodies in autistic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL-Ayadhi Laila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most consistent biological findings in autism is the elevated blood serotonin levels. Immune abnormalities, including autoimmunity with production of brain specific auto-antibodies, are also commonly observed in this disorder. Hyperserotonemia may be one of the contributing factors to autoimmunity in some patients with autism through the reduction of T-helper (Th 1-type cytokines. We are the first to investigate the possible role of hyperserotonemia in the induction of autoimmunity, as indicated by serum anti-myelin-basic protein (anti-MBP auto-antibodies, in autism. Methods Serum levels of serotonin and anti-MBP auto-antibodies were measured, by ELISA, in 50 autistic patients, aged between 5 and 12 years, and 30 healthy-matched children. Results Autistic children had significantly higher serum levels of serotonin and anti-MBP auto-antibodies than healthy children (P Conclusions Hyperserotonemia may not be one of the contributing factors to the increased frequency of serum anti-MBP auto-antibodies in some autistic children. These data should be treated with caution until further investigations are performed. However, inclusion of serum serotonin levels as a correlate may be useful in other future immune studies in autism to help unravel the long-standing mystery of hyperserotonemia and its possible role in the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  11. Effect of nerve growth factor on changes of myelin basic protein and functional repair of peripheral nerve following sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵阳; 马海涵; 伍亚民; 陈恒胜; 曾琳; 李民; 龙在云; 李应玉; 杨恒文

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor ( NGF ) on changes of myelin basic protein (MBP) and functional repair of sensory and motor nerve following sciatic nerve injury. Methods: The sciatic nerves of rats were injured by sectioning with shaver, and divided into 3 groups: NGF group ( Group A ), group of normal saline solution ( Group B), untreated group (Group C). The time point of observation was at the 4th week after operation. Sensory evoked potential (SEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) were detected by Model WD-4000 nerve potential working diagnosis system. Immunohistochemical analysis was used for identification of MBP. Results: The latency of SEP in the Group A at the 4th week after operation was shorter than that in the Group B ( P < 0.05). The MEP was elicited in 76 % of the Group A and was higher than that in the Group B. Results of immunohistochemistry showed that there were less MBP-positive cells in the Group A than in the Group B in one and four weeks respectively. Conclusions: NGF can improve the conductive function of injured peripheral nerve and facilitate regeneration of nerve.

  12. Psychiatric disorder in a familial 15;18 translocation and sublocalization of myelin basic protein to 18q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzolari, E.; Aiello, V.; Palazzi, P.; Sensi, A. [Universita Ferrara (Italy)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    Two related patients with similar clinical features consisting of a few dysmorphic signs and psychiatric disturbance were reported to have a partial trisomy of chromosomes 15(pter-q13.3) and 18(q23-qter) deriving from a familial translocation t(15;18). One patient is affected by bipolar disorder and the other by schizoaffective disorder. Both cases have a predominantly affective course; nevertheless, a clear diagnosis is difficult in the first patient, who is 15 years of age, and only a longitudinal course will allow us to establish a definite diagnosis. The possibility that these two pathologies belong to a single category is discussed, and the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 18 is hypothesized. Cytogenetic data, FISH, and DNA studies indicate that the myelin basic protein (MPB) gene is not involved in the translocation, and localize it centromeric to the breakpoint on chromosome 18(q22.3). Thus, it is unlikely to be involved in the disease. 58 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Ameliorative effects of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on myelin basic protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myung-Soon Ko; Hyeong-geun Park; Young-Min Yun; Jeong Chan Ra; Taekyun Shin; Kyoung-Kap Lee

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been previously shown to exert an immunomodulatory function. The present study sought to investigate the effects of multipotential human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs) on disease progression and cytokine expression in Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by myelin basic protein. The duration of EAE paralysis in the group treated on day 7 postimmunization with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the 1 × 106 hAdMSC- treated group. The duration of EAE paralysis in the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 1 and day 7 postimmunization was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 7 and day 10 postimmunization. The mRNA expression of interleukin-10 and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase was significantly decreased in the hAdMSC-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of hAdMSCs on EAE symptoms operate in a dose- and time-dependent manner and can be mediated in part by the ample production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Schrapers

    Full Text Available A cobalamin (Cbl cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmbCoIII(OH2, (dmbCoII(OH2, and (dmbCoIII(CH3 sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2, CoII(OH2, and CoIII(CH3 sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II. The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  15. Low Piconewton Towing of CNS Axons against Diffusing and Surface-Bound Repellents Requires the Inhibition of Motor Protein-Associated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; O'Mahony, James J.; Lee, Gil U.

    2014-11-01

    Growth cones, dynamic structures at axon tips, integrate chemical and physical stimuli and translate them into coordinated axon behaviour, e.g., elongation or turning. External force application to growth cones directs and enhances axon elongation in vitro; however, direct mechanical stimulation is rarely combined with chemotactic stimulation. We describe a microfluidic device that exposes isolated cortical axons to gradients of diffusing and substrate-bound molecules, and permits the simultaneous application of piconewton (pN) forces to multiple individual growth cones via magnetic tweezers. Axons treated with Y-27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor, were successfully towed against Semaphorin 3A gradients, which repel untreated axons, with less than 12 pN acting on a small number of neural cell adhesion molecules. Treatment with Y-27632 or monastrol, a kinesin-5 inhibitor, promoted axon towing on substrates coated with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, potent axon repellents. Thus, modulating key molecular pathways that regulate contractile stress generation in axons counteracts the effects of repellent molecules and promotes tension-induced growth. The demonstration of parallel towing of axons towards inhibitory environments with minute forces suggests that mechanochemical stimulation may be a promising therapeutic approach for the repair of the damaged central nervous system, where regenerating axons face repellent factors over-expressed in the glial scar.

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... life," contains all the information inherited from our parents that helps to define who we are, such as our looks and certain abilities, such as a good singing voice. A gene is a segment of DNA that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also ...

  17. Biochemical characterization of novel lignans isolated from the wood of Taxus yunnanensis as effective stimulators for glycogen synthase kinase-3β and the phosphorylation of basic brain proteins by the kinase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Kenzo; Miyai, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Akira; Morikawa, Kouhei; Okano, Tetsuroh

    2012-01-01

    The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of several compounds and lignans isolated from the water extract of Taxus yunnanensis on the phosphorylation of three functional brain proteins (bovine myelin basic protein (bMBP), recombinant human tau protein (rhTP) and rat collapsin response mediator protein-2 (rCRMP-2)) by glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were quantitatively compared in vitro, using (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate [(-)EGCG] as a positive control. We found that (i) three selected Taxus lignans [(3S,4R)-4'-hydroxy-6,3'-dimethoxyisoflavan-4-ol,(7R)-7-hydroxytaxiresinol and tanegool] highly stimulated the autophosphorylation of GSK-3β and the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of two basic brain proteins [bMBP (pI=11.3) and rhTP (pI=8.2)], but inhibited dose-dependently the phosphorylation of an acidic protein (rCRMP-2, pI=6.0) by the kinase; (ii) these three Taxus lignans showed binding-affinities with bMBP as well as rhTP, but had low affinities with rCRMP-2; (iii) the binding of tanegool and (7R)-7-hydroxytaxiresinol to these two basic proteins induced their novel potent phosphorylation sites for GSK-3β; and (iv) these three Taxus lignans, but not EGCG, induced Tyr-phosphorylation of GSK-3β in vitro. These results provided here suggest that (i) these three Taxus lignans act as novel effective activators for GSK-3β and the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of their binding basic proteins (rhTP and bMBP); and (ii) tanegool (IC(50)=1 μM) is an effective inhibitor for the phosphorylation of rCRMP-2 by the kinase in vitro.

  18. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, M.; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (m...

  19. The flexible structure of the K24S28 region of Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) bound to apatites as a function of surface type, calcium, mutation, and ionic strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Junxia; Burton, Sarah D.; Xu, Yimin; Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-07-11

    Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) is a member of the amelogenin family of biomineralization proteins, proteins which play a critical role in enamel formation. Recent studies have revealed the structure and orientation of the N- and C-terminus of LRAP bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP), a surface used as an analog of enamel. The structure of one region, K24 to S28, was found to be sensitive to phosphorylation of S16, the only naturally observed site of serine phosphorylation in LRAP, suggesting that the residues from K24 to S28 may sit at a key region of structural flexibility and play a role in the protein’s function. In this work, we investigated the sensitivity of the structure and orientation of this region when bound to HAP as a function of several factors which may vary during enamel formation to influence structure: the ionic strength (0.05 M, 0.15 M, 0.2 M), the calcium concentration (0.07 mM and 0.4 mM), and the surface to which it is binding (HAP and carbonated apatite (CAP), a more direct mimic of enamel). A naturally occurring mutation found in amelogenin (T21I), was also investigated. The structure in the K24S28 region of the protein was found to be sensitive to these conditions, with the CAP surface and excess Ca2+ (8:1 [Ca2+]:[LRAP-K24S28(+P)]) resulting in a much tighter helix, while low ionic strength relaxed the helical structure. Higher ionic strength and the point mutation did not result in any structural change in this region. The distance of the backbone of K24 from the surface was most sensitive to excess Ca2+ and in the T21I-mutation. Collectively, these data suggest that the protein is able to accommodate structural changes while maintaining its interaction with the surface, and provides further evidence of the structural sensitivity of the K24 to S28 region, a sensitivity that may contribute to function in biomineralization. This research was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest

  20. Inflation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  1. Inflation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  2. Asymmetric dark matter bound state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhaofeng; Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2017-02-01

    We propose an interesting framework for asymmetric scalar dark matter (ADM), which has novel collider phenomenology in terms of an unstable ADM bound state (ADMonium) produced via Higgs portals. ADMonium is a natural consequence of the basic features of ADM: the (complex scalar) ADM is charged under a dark local U (1 )d symmetry which is broken at a low scale and provides a light gauge boson X . The dark gauge coupling is strong and then ADM can annihilate away into X -pair effectively. Therefore, the ADM can form a bound state due to its large self-interaction via X mediation. To explore the collider signature of ADMonium, we propose that ADM has a two-Higgs doublet portal. The ADMonium can have a sizable mixing with the heavier Higgs boson, which admits a large cross section of ADMonium production associated with b b ¯. The resulting signature at the LHC depends on the decays of X . In this paper we consider a case of particular interest: p p →b b ¯ +ADMonium followed by ADMonium→2 X →2 e+e- where the electrons are identified as (un)converted photons. It may provide a competitive explanation to heavy di-photon resonance searches at the LHC.

  3. A possibility of a protein-bound water molecule as the ionizable group responsible for pKe at the alkaline side in human matrix metalloproteinase 7 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Aiko; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2012-05-01

    Human matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) activity exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profile with the acidic and alkaline pK(a) (pK(e1) and pK(e2)) values of about 4 and 10. The ionizable group for pK(e2) was assigned to Lys or Arg by thermodynamic analysis; however, no such residues are present in the active site. Hence, based on the crystal structure, we hypothesized that a water molecule bound to the main-chain nitrogen of Ala162 (W1) or the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of Pro217 (W2) is a candidate for the ionizable group for pK(e2) [Takeharu, H. et al. (2011) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1814, 1940-1946]. In this study, we inspected this hypothesis. In the hydrolysis of (7-methoxycoumarin-4-yl)acetyl-L-Pro-L-Leu-Gly-L-Leu-[N(3)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropionyl]-L-Ala-L-Arg-NH(2), all 19 variants, in which one of all Lys and Arg residues was replaced by Ala, retained activity, indicating that neither Lys nor Arg is the ionizable group. pK(e2) values of A162S, A162V and A162G were 9.6 ± 0.1, 9.5 ± 0.1 and 10.4 ± 0.2, respectively, different from that of wild-type MMP-7 (WT) (9.9 ± 0.1) by 0.3-0.5 pH unit, and those of P217S, P217V and P217G were 10.1 ± 0.1, 9.8 ± 0.1 and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, different from that of WT by 0.1-0.2 pH unit. These results suggest a possibility of W1 or W2 as the ionizable group for pK(e2).

  4. Bound or free: interaction of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) with the tetrameric core of SSB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xun-Cheng; Wang, Yao; Yagi, Hiromasa; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Mason, Claire E; Smith, Paul J; Vandevenne, Marylène; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) protects ssDNA from degradation and recruits other proteins for DNA replication and repair. Escherichia coli SSB is the prototypical eubacterial SSB in a family of tetrameric SSBs. It consists of a structurally well-defined ssDNA binding domain (OB-domain) and a disordered C-terminal domain (C-domain). The eight-residue C-terminal segment of SSB (C-peptide) mediates the binding of SSB to many different SSB-binding proteins. Previously published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the monomeric state at pH 3.4 showed that the C-peptide binds to the OB-domain at a site that overlaps with the ssDNA binding site, but investigating the protein at neutral pH is difficult because of the high molecular mass and limited solubility of the tetramer. Here we show that the C-domain is highly mobile in the SSB tetramer at neutral pH and that binding of the C-peptide to the OB-domain is so weak that most of the C-peptides are unbound even in the absence of ssDNA. We address the problem of determining intramolecular binding affinities in the situation of fast exchange between two states, one of which cannot be observed by NMR and cannot be fully populated. The results were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. The C-peptide-OB-domain interaction is shown to be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, so that binding of 1 equiv of (dT)35 releases practically all C-peptides from the OB-domain tetramer. The interaction is much more sensitive to NaCl than to potassium glutamate, which is the usual osmolyte in E. coli. As the C-peptide is predominantly in the unbound state irrespective of the presence of ssDNA, long-range electrostatic effects from the C-peptide may contribute more to regulating the activity of SSB than any engagement of the C-peptide by the OB-domain.

  5. ERT basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butters, M. [MBC Energy and Environment, Ottawa, ON (Canada)]|[National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    ERT is an economic instrument which helps power companies achieve emission reduction compliance cost-effectively. This paper presents the basics of ERT with reference to trading concepts, types of systems and types of emissions. The paper also describes the state of the Canadian energy market regarding greenhouse gases (GHG), nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and volatile organic compounds. The association between ERT and district energy is also explained. By 2010, the global market for GHG trading is expected to be worth $10 billion to $3 trillion U.S. Canada has committed to reducing its GHG to 6 per cent below 1990 levels by 2012, but currently emits 705 Mt per year. This is expected to increase to 770 Mt by 2010. Therefore, in order to meet its commitment, GHGs will have to be reduced 200 Mt per year. Canada is currently considering ratifying the Kyoto agreement and a trading system is being developed. There are several abatement technologies currently under consideration for district energy systems, including adding scrubbers, improving efficiency, and fuel switching. The marginal cost of abatement was also discussed. tabs., figs.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus mutants lacking cell wall-bound protein A found in isolates from bacteraemia, MRSA infection and a healthy nasal carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørum, Marit; Sangvik, Maria; Stegger, Marc; Olsen, Renate S; Johannessen, Mona; Skov, Robert; Sollid, Johanna U E

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a multitude of virulence factors enables it to cause infections, from superficial lesions to life-threatening systemic conditions. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a surface protein contributing to S. aureus pathogenesis by interfering with immune responses and activating inflammation. Seven isolates with frameshift mutations in the spa repeat region were investigated to determine whether these mutations lead to truncation and secretion of SpA into the extracellular environment. Five isolates originated from blood cultures, one from an MRSA infection and one from a persistent nasal carrier. Full-length spa genes from the seven isolates were sequenced, and Western blot experiments were performed to localize SpA. Three isolates had identical deviating 25-bp spa repeats, but all isolates displayed different repeat successions. The DNA sequence revealed that the frameshift mutations created premature stop codons in all seven isolates, resulting in truncated SpA of different lengths, however, all lacking the XC region with the C-terminal sorting signal. SpA was detected by Western blot in six of the seven isolates, mainly extracellularly. Our findings demonstrate that S. aureus isolates with truncated SpA, not anchored to the cell wall, can still be found in bacteraemia, infection and among carriers.

  7. Crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the apo and cefotaxime-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Kawai, Fumihiro; Obayashi, Eiji; Akashi, Satoko; Roper, David I; Tame, Jeremy R H; Park, Sam-Yong

    2012-10-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen, and a methicillin-resistant form (MRSA) is particularly difficult to treat clinically. We have solved two crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 (PBP3) from MRSA, the apo form and a complex with the β-lactam antibiotic cefotaxime, and used electrospray mass spectrometry to measure its sensitivity to a variety of penicillin derivatives. PBP3 is a class B PBP, possessing an N-terminal non-penicillin-binding domain, sometimes called a dimerization domain, and a C-terminal transpeptidase domain. The model shows a different orientation of its two domains compared to earlier models of other class B PBPs and a novel, larger N-domain. Consistent with the nomenclature of "dimerization domain", the N-terminal region forms an apparently tight interaction with a neighboring molecule related by a 2-fold symmetry axis in the crystal structure. This dimer form is predicted to be highly stable in solution by the PISA server, but mass spectrometry and analytical ultracentrifugation provide unequivocal evidence that the protein is a monomer in solution.

  8. The effect of cytosolic extract of Alternaria aternata fungus on Monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and T-lymphocyte polarization in the presence of myelin basic protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loghmanni A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease with impairment in function of central nervous system. Macrophages and dendritic cells play important roles in alleviating or progression of the disease. These cells can cause inflammation and damage to the myelin of nerve cells by realizing of harmful substances when these cells get matured. We studied the effect of Alternaria alternata extract on maturation of monocyte- derived dendritic cell (modc and T-cell responses in the presence of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP as a laboratory model of multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of this study is suitable dendritic cells production for usage in MS immunotherapy.Methods: For this study plastic adherent monocytes were cultured with granulocyte/ macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin -4 for converting these cells to modc and pulsed with MBP and matured in the presence of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM in control group and MCM + Alternaria alternata extract in treatment groups. Anti-CD14, anti-CD83, anti-human leukocyte antigen-DR (anti HLA-DR monoclonal antibody were carried out for phenotyping. Autologos T cell responses and cytokine production were evaluated.Results: The results showed that the expression of CD14 decreased and CD83, HLA-DR increased in treatment groups in comparison with control groups. The production amount of IL-10 overcame IL-12 and in T cell the production of cytokines, IL-17 and Interferon-γ (IFN-γ decreased and IL-4 was increased (P<0.05. These effects escalated with increasing of dosage from 50 to 100 (mg/ml (P<0.001.Conclusion: Alternaria alternata extract can cause maturation of MBP-pulsed modc and skewing of T- lymphocyte toward Th2 and thereby can evolve into a new strategy in immunotherapy of MS.

  9. Differential effects of myelin basic protein-activated Th1 and Th2 cells on the local immune microenvironment of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yue-Juan; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, An-You; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Feng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Lü, He-Zuo

    2016-03-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) activated T cells (MBP-T) play an important role in the damage and repair process of the central nervous system (CNS). However, whether these cells play a beneficial or detrimental role is still a matter of debate. Although some studies showed that MBP-T cells are mainly helper T (Th) cells, their subtypes are still not very clear. One possible explanation for MBP-T immunization leading to conflicting results may be the different subtypes of T cells are responsible for distinct effects. In this study, the Th1 and Th2 type MBP-T cells (MBP-Th1 and -Th2) were polarized in vitro, and their effects on the local immune microenvironment and tissue repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) after adoptive immunization were investigated. In MBP-Th1 cell transferred rats, the high levels of pro-inflammatory cells (Th1 cells and M1 macrophages) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, -β, IL-1β) were detected in the injured spinal cord; however, the anti-inflammatory cells (Th2 cells, regulatory T cells, and M2 macrophages) and cytokines (IL-4, -10, and -13) were found in MBP-Th2 cell transferred animals. MBP-Th2 cell transfer resulted in decreased lesion volume, increased myelination of axons, and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement. These results indicate that MBP-Th2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects on the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of Th2 cells may alter the local microenvironment from one primarily populated by Th1 and M1 cells to another dominated by Th2, Treg, and M2 cells and is conducive for SCI repair.

  10. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein after tractive spinal cord injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; L(U) Bo; TU Chong-qi; CHI Lei-ting; WANG Guang-lin; PEI Fu-xing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) after tractive spinal cord injury in rats and to explore the recovery of spinal cord function.Methods: The rats were subjected to tractive spinal cord injury at T13-L2. Cortical somatosensory-evoked potential (CSEP) was closely monitored and when P1-N1 wave amplitude decreased to 70% of that before operation, a small-bore catheter was inserted below the injured plane through subarachnoid cavity. In the treatment groups, 20 μl of bFGF solution (containing 20 μg of bFGF) was injected through the catheter right after the operation and 1,2, 3, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h postoperatively. In the control group, same volume of normal saline was injected and every four rats were killed at 1, 4, 7, 14 and 21 d after the operation. Combined behavior score (CBS) and electro-physiological examination were adopted to evaluate function recovery. Expression of GFAP was observed by immuno-histochemical staining and was analyzed quantitatively by computer image analysis.Results: There was statistically significant difference in GFAP-positive cells between bFGF treatment group and the control group (P<0.01). Similar tendency was indicated by the results of CBS and CSEP.Conclusions: bFGF can induce large expression of GFAP after tractive spinal cord injury in rats and promote spinal function recovery, which is highly important for spinal cord regeneration.

  11. Epitope specificity and V gene expression of cerebrospinal fluid T cells specific for intact versus cryptic epitopes of myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K; Chou, Y K; Bourdette, D; Whitham, R; Hashim, G A; Offner, H; Vandenbark, A A

    1993-04-01

    Recent evidence supports the possible involvement of myelin basic protein (BP) as one of the target autoantigens in multiple sclerosis (MS), including elevated frequencies of MS blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T cells, and the presence in MS plaque tissue of V beta gene sequences and CDR3 motifs characteristic of BP-reactive T cells. Because of its proximity to the target organ, the CSF has long been thought to harbor T cells involved in the pathogenic process. In order to evaluate their frequency and response characteristics, BP-reactive T cells were isolated by limiting dilution from the CSF of patients with MS and other neurological diseases (OND) for quantitation and determination of epitope specificity and V alpha and V beta gene expression. In addition to isolates responsive to intact BP epitopes that were present at a significantly higher frequency in MS versus OND CSF, we here describe a second clonotype responsive to 'cryptic' BP epitopes that is present at approximately equal frequencies in MS and OND patients. In spite of their difference in recognition of intact versus 'cryptic' BP determinants, both clonotypes predominantly recognized epitopes in the N terminal half of human BP, using a similar V gene repertoire that included biased use of V alpha 2 and to a lesser degree V beta 7 and V beta 18. These V gene biases were not related to the epitope specificity of the T cells, indicating that V gene selection is not epitope-driven. These data suggest that there is differential recognition of intact versus 'cryptic' BP determinants in MS versus OND patients that may be related to the processing and presentation of BP to the immune system.

  12. Bounding species distribution models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN; Catherine S. JARNEVICH; Wayne E. ESAIAS; Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern.Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development,yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations.We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches:classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models,and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations,bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors,to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States.Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding,and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models,like those presented here,should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5):642-647,2011].

  13. Lectures on Bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Even a first approximation of bound states requires contributions of all powers in the coupling. This means that the concept of "lowest order bound state" needs to be defined. In these lectures I discuss the "Born" (no loop, lowest order in $\\hbar$) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. As a check of the method, Positronium states of any momentum are determined as eigenstates of the QED Hamiltonian, quantized at equal time. Analogously, states bound by a strong external field $A^\\mu(\\xv)$ are found as eigenstates of the Dirac Hamiltonian. Their Fock states have dynamically created $e^+e^-$ pairs, whose distribution is determined by the Dirac wave function. The linear potential of $D=1+1$ dimensions confines electrons but repels positrons. As a result, the mass spectrum is continuous and the wave functions have features of both bound states and plane waves. The classical solutions of Gauss' law are explored for hadrons in QCD. A non-vanishing bo...

  14. The flexible structure of the K24S28 region of Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP bound to apatites as a function of surface type, calcium, mutation, and ionic strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia eLu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP is a member of the amelogenin family of biomineralization proteins, proteins which play a critical role in enamel formation. Recent studies have revealed the structure and orientation of the N- and C-terminus of LRAP bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP, a surface used as an analog of enamel. The structure of one region, K24 to S28, was found to be sensitive to phosphorylation of S16, the only naturally observed site of serine phosphorylation in LRAP, suggesting that K24S28 may sit at a key region of structural flexibility and play a role in the protein’s function. In this work, we investigated the sensitivity of the structure and orientation of this region when bound to HAP as a function of several factors which may vary during enamel formation to influence structure: the ionic strength (0.05 M, 0.15 M, 0.2 M, the calcium concentration (0.07 mM and 0.4 mM, and the surface to which it is binding (HAP and carbonated apatite (CAP, a more direct mimic of enamel. A naturally occurring mutation found in amelogenin (T21I was also investigated. The structure in the K24S28 region of the protein was found to be sensitive to these conditions, with the CAP surface and excess Ca2+ (8:1 [Ca2+]:[LRAP-K24S28(+P] resulting in a tighter helix, while low ionic strength relaxed the helical structure. Higher ionic strength and the point mutation did not result in any structural change in this region. The distance of the backbone of K24 from the surface was most sensitive to excess Ca2+ and in the T21I-mutation. Collectively, these data suggest that phosphorylated LRAP is able to accommodate structural changes while maintaining its interaction with the surface, and provides further evidence of the structural sensitivity of the K24S28 region, a sensitivity that may contribute to function in biomineralization.

  15. ELEMENTARY DENSITY BOUNDS FOR SELF-SIMILAR SETS AND APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Falconer[1] used the relationship between upper convex density and upper spherical density to obtain elementary density bounds for s-sets at HS-almost all points of the sets. In this paper, following Falconer[1], we first provide a basic method to estimate the lower bounds of these two classes of set densities for the self-similar s-sets satisfying the open set condition (OSC), and then obtain elementary density bounds for such fractals at all of their points. In addition, we apply the main results to the famous classical fractals and get some new density bounds.

  16. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  17. Information, Utility & Bounded Rationality

    CERN Document Server

    Ortega, Pedro A

    2011-01-01

    Perfectly rational decision-makers maximize expected utility, but crucially ignore the resource costs incurred when determining optimal actions. Here we employ an axiomatic framework for bounded rational decision-making based on a thermodynamic interpretation of resource costs as information costs. This leads to a variational "free utility" principle akin to thermodynamical free energy that trades off utility and information costs. We show that bounded optimal control solutions can be derived from this variational principle, which leads in general to stochastic policies. Furthermore, we show that risk-sensitive and robust (minimax) control schemes fall out naturally from this framework if the environment is considered as a bounded rational and perfectly rational opponent, respectively. When resource costs are ignored, the maximum expected utility principle is recovered.

  18. Bounded Computational Capacity Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Penelope

    2010-01-01

    We study repeated games played by players with bounded computational power, where, in contrast to Abreu and Rubisntein (1988), the memory is costly. We prove a folk theorem: the limit set of equilibrium payoffs in mixed strategies, as the cost of memory goes to 0, includes the set of feasible and individually rational payoffs. This result stands in sharp contrast to Abreu and Rubisntein (1988), who proved that when memory is free, the set of equilibrium payoffs in repeated games played by players with bounded computational power is a strict subset of the set of feasible and individually rational payoffs. Our result emphasizes the role of memory cost and of mixing when players have bounded computational power.

  19. Bounding Noncommutative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, C E; Lebed, R F; Carlson, Carl E.; Carone, Christopher D.; Lebed, Richard F.

    2001-01-01

    Jurco, Moller, Schraml, Schupp, and Wess have shown how to construct noncommutative SU(N) gauge theories from a consistency relation. Within this framework, we present the Feynman rules for noncommutative QCD and compute explicitly the most dangerous Lorentz-violating operator generated through radiative corrections. We find that interesting effects appear at the one-loop level, in contrast to conventional noncommutative U(N) gauge theories, leading to a stringent bound. Our results are consistent with others appearing recently in the literature that suggest collider limits are not competitive with low-energy tests of Lorentz violation for bounding the scale of spacetime noncommutativity.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: cruzipain and membrane-bound cysteine proteinase isoform(s) interacts with human alpha(2)-macroglobulin and pregnancy zone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Adrián M; Duschak, Vilma G; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M; Barboza, Mariana; Remedi, María S; Vides, Miguel A; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2002-02-01

    Plasmatic levels of pregnancy zone protein (PZP) increase in children with acute Chagas disease. PZP, as well as alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), are able to interact with Trypanosoma cruzi proteinases. The interaction of alpha2-M and PZP with cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi, was investigated. Several molecular changes on both alpha-M inhibitors under reaction with cruzipain were found. PAGE analysis showed: (i) formation of complexes of intermediate mobility and tetramerization of native alpha2-M and PZP, respectively; (ii) limited proteolysis of bait region in alpha2-M and PZP, and (iii) covalent binding of cruzipain to PZP and alpha2-M. Conformational and structural changes experimented by alpha-Ms correlate with modifications of the enzyme electrophoretic mobility and activity. Cruzipain-alpha-M complexes were also detected by gelatin SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using polyclonal anti-cruzipain antibodies. Concomitantly, alpha2-M and PZP impaired the activity of cruzipain towards Bz-Pro-Phe-Arg-pNA substrate. In addition, alpha-Ms were able to form covalent complexes with membrane isoforms of cysteine proteinases cross-reacting with cruzipain. The present study suggests that both human alpha-macroglobulin inhibitors could prevent or minimize harmful action of cruzipain on host's molecules and hypothetically regulate parasite functions controlled by cruzipain.

  1. Robust expression of the human neonatal Fc receptor in a truncated soluble form and as a full-length membrane-bound protein in fusion with eGFP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Seijsing

    Full Text Available Studies on the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn have revealed a multitude of important functions in mammals, including protection of IgG and serum albumin (SA from lysosomal degradation. The pharmacokinetic behavior of therapeutic antibodies, IgG-Fc- and SA-containing drugs is therefore influenced by their interaction with FcRn. Pre-clinical development of such drugs is facilitated if their interaction with FcRn can be studied in vitro. For this reason we have developed a robust system for production of the soluble extracellular domain of human FcRn as well as the full-length receptor as fusion to green fluorescent protein, taking advantage of a lentivirus-based gene delivery system where stable over-expressing cells are easily and rapidly generated. Production of the extracellular domain in multiple-layered culture flasks, followed by affinity purification using immobilized IgG, resulted in capture of milligram amounts of soluble receptor per liter cell culture with retained IgG binding. The receptor was further characterized by SDS-PAGE, western blotting, circular dichroism spectroscopy, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and a temperature stability assay showing a functional and stable protein of high purity. The full-length receptor was found to be successfully over-expressed in a membrane-bound form with retained pH-dependent IgG- and SA-binding.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) gene polymorphism and expression of membrane-bound TNFα protein on CD11b+ and IgM+ cells in cows naturally infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Kaczmarczyk, E; Stachura, A; Kubińska, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether SNP at position -824 (promoter region) of the TNFα gene significantly differentiates the size of IgM+, CD5+ and CD11b+ cell subpopulations and affects the expression of membrane-bound TNFα protein (mTNFα) on these cells and their susceptibility to BLV infections. In this study, significant differences were determined for the first time between TNFα genotypes and the percentage of cells with the CD11b+TNFα+p24+ immunophenotype. Furthermore, greater expansion of lymphocytes with the IgM+TNFα+p24+ immunophenotype was reported in cows with the G/G genotype than in A/A homozygotes. Cells with the above immunophenotype were more frequently observed in cows with persistent leukocytosis than in aleukemic cattle. Our results suggest that polymorphism of the TNFα-824 A>G gene and mTNFα protein expression play an important role in the pathogenesis of enzootic bovine leukosis.

  3. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    of variables. One application is to the bitsize of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of an integer matrix, which also yields a new proof that the problem is polynomial. We also compare against recent lower bounds on the absolute value of the root coordinates by Brownawell and Yap [5], obtained under...

  4. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  5. Myelin basic protein as a novel genetic risk factor in rheumatoid arthritis--a genome-wide study combined with immunological analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikashi Terao

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a major cause of adult chronic inflammatory arthritis and a typical complex trait. Although several genetic determinants have been identified, they account for only a part of the genetic susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study of RA in Japanese using 225,079 SNPs genotyped in 990 cases and 1,236 controls from two independent collections (658 cases and 934 controls in collection1; 332 cases and 302 controls in collection2, followed by replication studies in two additional collections (874 cases and 855 controls in collection3; 1,264 cases and 948 controls in collection4. SNPs showing p<0.005 in the first two collections and p<10(-4 by meta-analysis were further genotyped in the latter two collections. A novel risk variant, rs2000811, in intron2 of the myelin basic protein (MBP at chromosome 18q23 showed strong association with RA (p = 2.7×10(-8, OR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.14-1.32. The transcription of MBP was significantly elevated with the risk allele compared to the alternative allele (p<0.001. We also established by immunohistochemistry that MBP was expressed in the synovial lining layer of RA patients, the main target of inflammation in the disease. Circulating autoantibody against MBP derived from human brain was quantified by ELISA between patients with RA, other connective tissue diseases and healthy controls. As a result, the titer of anti-MBP antibody was markedly higher in plasma of RA patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.001 and patients with other connective tissue disorders (p<0.001. ELISA experiment using citrullinated recombinant MBP revealed that a large fraction of anti-MBP antibody in RA patients recognized citrullinated MBP. This is the first report of a genetic study in RA implicating MBP as a potential autoantigen and its involvement in pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. Introduction to QCD - a bound state perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    These lecture notes focus on the bound state sector of QCD. Motivated by data which suggests that the strong coupling \\alpha_s(Q) freezes at low Q, and by similarities between the spectra of hadrons and atoms, I discuss if and how QCD bound states may be treated perturbatively. I recall the basic principles of perturbative gauge theory bound states at lowest order in the \\hbar expansion. Born level amplitudes are insensitive to the i\\epsilon prescription of propagators, which allows to eliminate the Z-diagrams of relativistic, time-ordered Coulomb interactions. The Dirac wave function thus describes a single electron which propagates forward in time only, even though the bound state has any number of pair constituents when Feynman propagators are used. In the absence of an external potential, states that are bound by the Coulomb attraction of their constituents can be analogously described using only their valence degrees of freedom. The instantaneous A^0 field is determined by Gauss' law for each wave functi...

  7. On Entropy Bounds and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We show that the holographic entropy bound for gravitational systems and the Bekenstein entropy bound for nongravitational systems are holographically related. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we find that the Bekenstein bound on the boundary is obtained from the holographic bound in the bulk by minimizing the boundary energy with respect the AdS radius or the cosmological constant. This relation may also ameliorate some problems associated with the Bekenstein bound.

  8. Bounded Satisfiability for PCTL

    CERN Document Server

    Bertrand, Nathalie; Schewe, Sven

    2012-01-01

    While model checking PCTL for Markov chains is decidable in polynomial-time, the decidability of PCTL satisfiability, as well as its finite model property, are long standing open problems. While general satisfiability is an intriguing challenge from a purely theoretical point of view, we argue that general solutions would not be of interest to practitioners: such solutions could be too big to be implementable or even infinite. Inspired by bounded synthesis techniques, we turn to the more applied problem of seeking models of a bounded size: we restrict our search to implementable -- and therefore reasonably simple -- models. We propose a procedure to decide whether or not a given PCTL formula has an implementable model by reducing it to an SMT problem. We have implemented our techniques and found that they can be applied to the practical problem of sanity checking -- a procedure that allows a system designer to check whether their formula has an unexpectedly small model.

  9. BOUNDING PYRAMIDS AND BOUNDING CONES FOR TRIANGULAR BEZIER SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-song Deng; Fa-lai Chen; Li-li Wang

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes practical approaches on how to construct bounding pyramids and bounding cones for triangular Bézier surfaces. Examples are provided to illustrate the process of construction and comparison is made between various surface bounding volumes. Furthermore, as a starting point for the construction,we provide a way to compute hodographs of triangular Bézier surfaces and improve the algorithm for computing the bounding cone of a set of vectors.

  10. Applications of Recombinant DNA Technology in Gastrointestinal Medicine and Hepatology: Basic Paradigms of Molecular Cell Biology. Part C: Protein Synthesis and Post-Translational Processing in Eukaryotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Wild

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The translation of mRNA constitutes the first step in the synthesis of a functional protein. The polypeptide chain is subsequently folded into the appropriate three-dimensional configuration and undergoes a variety of processing steps before being converted into its active form. These processing steps are intimately related to the cellular events that occur in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments, and determine the sorting and transport of different proteins to their appropriate destinations within the cell. While the regulation of gene expression occurs primarily at the level of transcription, the expression of many genes can also be controlled at the level of translation. Most proteins can be regulated in response to extracellular signals. In addition, intracellular protein levels can be controlled by differential rates of protein degradation. Thus, the regulation of both the amounts and activities of intracellular proteins ultimately determines all aspects of cell behaviour.

  11. A single amino acid substitution in IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AtMYC1 leads to trichome and root hair patterning defects by abolishing its interaction with partner proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-04-20

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein transparent TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or werewolf (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or enhancer of GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors.

  12. Conformational choreography of a molecular switch region in myelin basic protein--molecular dynamics shows induced folding and secondary structure type conversion upon threonyl phosphorylation in both aqueous and membrane-associated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverini, Eugenia; Coll, Eoin P; Tieleman, D Peter; Harauz, George

    2011-03-01

    The 18.5 kDa isoform of myelin basic protein is essential to maintaining the close apposition of myelin membranes in central nervous system myelin, but its intrinsic disorder (conformational dependence on environment), a variety of post-translational modifications, and a diversity of protein ligands (e.g., actin and tubulin) all indicate it to be multifunctional. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a conserved central segment of 18.5 kDa myelin basic protein (residues Glu80-Gly103, murine sequence numbering) in aqueous and membrane-associated environments to ascertain the stability of constituent secondary structure elements (α-helix from Glu80-Val91 and extended poly-proline type II from Thr92-Gly103) and the effects of phosphorylation of residues Thr92 and Thr95, individually and together. In aqueous solution, all four forms of the peptide bent in the middle to form a hydrophobic cluster. The phosphorylated variants were stabilized further by electrostatic interactions and formation of β-structures, in agreement with previous spectroscopic data. In simulations performed with the peptide in association with a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, the amphipathic α-helical segment remained stable and membrane-associated, although the degree of penetration was less in the phosphorylated variants, and the tilt of the α-helix with respect to the plane of the membrane also changed significantly with the modifications. The extended segment adjacent to this α-helix represents a putative SH3-ligand and remained exposed to the cytoplasm (and thus accessible to binding partners). The results of these simulations demonstrate how this segment of the protein can act as a molecular switch: an amphipathic α-helical segment of the protein is membrane-associated and presents a subsequent proline-rich segment to the cytoplasm for interaction with other proteins. Phosphorylation of threonyl residues alters the degree of membrane penetration of the

  13. Primary structure of a 14 kDa basic structural protein (Lm-76) from the cuticle of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Andersen, S O; Højrup, P

    1993-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a 14 kDa structural protein (LM-76) isolated from pharate cuticle of the locust, Locusta migratoria, was determined by Edman degradation of the intact protein and enzymatically derived peptides. Plasma desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry was used...... region surrounded by two hydrophobic regions with 7 repeats of a (Tyr)-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala/Val motif. The conservation around the prolyl residues within this sequence motif is demonstrated for the hitherto sequenced presumptive exocuticle proteins from L. migratoria. The N-terminal region of protein Lm-76...

  14. Identification of Bound Nitro Musk-Protein Adduct in Fish Liver By Gas Chromatography-Mass Sectrometry: Biotransformation, Dose-Response and Toxicokinetics of Nitro Musk Metabolites Protein Adducts in Trout Liver as Biomarker of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The In vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) - protein adducts in trout liver have been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Bio...

  15. Critical SQG in bounded domains

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin, Peter; Ignatova, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the critical dissipative SQG equation in bounded domains, with the square root of the Dirichlet Laplacian dissipation. We prove global a priori interior $C^{\\alpha}$ and Lipschitz bounds for large data.

  16. Phactr3/scapinin, a member of protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family, interacts with the plasma membrane via basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Itoh

    Full Text Available Proteins that belong to the protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family are involved in cell motility and morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms that regulate the actin cytoskeleton are poorly understood. We have previously shown that phactr3, also known as scapinin, localizes to the plasma membrane, including lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. In the present study, experiments using deletion and point mutants showed that the basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus play crucial roles in the localization to the plasma membrane. A BH analysis (http://helixweb.nih.gov/bhsearch is a program developed to identify membrane-binding domains that comprise basic and hydrophobic residues in membrane proteins. We applied this program to phactr3. The results of the BH plot analysis agreed with the experimentally determined region that is responsible for the localization of phactr3 to the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the N-terminal itself binds to liposomes and acidic phospholipids. In addition, we showed that the interaction with the plasma membrane via the N-terminal membrane-binding sequence is required for phactr3-induced morphological changes in Cos7 cells. The membrane-binding sequence in the N-terminus is highly conserved in all members of the phactr family. Our findings may provide a molecular basis for understanding the mechanisms that allow phactr proteins to regulate cell morphogenesis.

  17. Blog life: Entropy Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Who is the blog written by? Peter Steinberg is a nuclear physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, US. He is acting project manager of the PHOBOS experiment, which used Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for unusual events produced during collisions between gold nuclei. He is also involved with the PHENIX experiment, which seeks to discover a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma. In addition to his own blog Entropy Bound, Steinberg is currently blogging on a website that was set up last year to publicize the involvement of US scientists with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  18. A bound on chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Maldacena, Juan; Stanford, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We conjecture a sharp bound on the rate of growth of chaos in thermal quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Chaos can be diagnosed using an out-of-time-order correlation function closely related to the commutator of operators separated in time. We conjecture that the influence of chaos on this correlator can develop no faster than exponentially, with Lyapunov exponent $\\lambda_L \\le 2 \\pi k_B T/\\hbar$. We give a precise mathematical argument, based on plausible physical assumptions, establishing this conjecture.

  19. Lower Bound Bayesian Networks - An Efficient Inference of Lower Bounds on Probability Distributions in Bayesian Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method to propagate lower bounds on conditional probability distributions in conventional Bayesian networks. Our method guarantees to provide outer approximations of the exact lower bounds. A key advantage is that we can use any available algorithms and tools for Bayesian networks in order to represent and infer lower bounds. This new method yields results that are provable exact for trees with binary variables, and results which are competitive to existing approximations in credal networks for all other network structures. Our method is not limited to a specific kind of network structure. Basically, it is also not restricted to a specific kind of inference, but we restrict our analysis to prognostic inference in this article. The computational complexity is superior to that of other existing approaches.

  20. Specificity of Baculorivus P6.9 Basic DNA-Binding Proteins and Critical Role of the C Terminus in Virion Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Tuladhar, E.; Shen, S.; Wang, H.; Oers, van M.M.; Vlak, J.M.; Westenberg, M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses infecting eukaryotic organisms use host- or virus-expressed histones or protamine-like proteins to condense their genomes. In contrast, members of the Baculoviridae family use a protamine-like protein named P6.9. The dephosphorylated form of P6.9 b

  1. Broadening Horizons and Teaching Basic Biology through Cell-Free Synthesis of Green Fluorescent Protein in a High School Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Cem; Jones, K. C.; Swartz, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a practical method for producing a broad variety of proteins. In addition, the direct accessibility to the reaction environment makes CFPS particularly suitable as a learning vehicle for fundamental biological concepts. Here, we describe its implementation as a teaching tool for a high school…

  2. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  3. Bounded Fixed-Point Iteration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    1992-01-01

    they obtain a quadratic bound. These bounds are shown to be tight. Specializing the case of strict and additive functions to functionals of a form that would correspond to iterative programs they show that a linear bound is tight. This is related to several analyses studied in the literature (including...

  4. Error bounds for set inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Xiyin(郑喜印)

    2003-01-01

    A variant of Robinson-Ursescu Theorem is given in normed spaces. Several error bound theorems for convex inclusions are proved and in particular a positive answer to Li and Singer's conjecture is given under weaker assumption than the assumption required in their conjecture. Perturbation error bounds are also studied. As applications, we study error bounds for convex inequality systems.

  5. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  6. Cramér-Rao-Type Bounds for Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization problem is fundamentally important for sensor networks. This paper, based on "Estimation bounds for localization" by the authors (2004 © IEEE, studies the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB for two kinds of localization based on noisy range measurements. The first is anchored localization in which the estimated positions of at least nodes are known in global coordinates. We show some basic invariances of the CRB in this case and derive lower and upper bounds on the CRB which can be computed using only local information. The second is anchor-free localization where no absolute positions are known. Although the Fisher information matrix is singular, a CRB-like bound exists on the total estimation variance. Finally, for both cases we discuss how the bounds scale to large networks under different models of wireless signal propagation.

  7. Measurement and analysis of myelin basic protein and antibodies to myelin basic protein in serum and CSF of patients with heroin spongiform leukoencephalopathy%海洛因海绵状白质脑病的脑脊液和血清髓鞘碱性蛋白及其抗体检测及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹恝; 陆兵勋; 李伟; 周亮

    2003-01-01

    目的通过对海洛因海绵状白质脑病(Heroin Spongiform Leukoencephalopathy,HSLE)患者血清和脑脊液髓鞘碱性蛋白(myelin basic protein,MBP)及其抗体(Anti-MBP)检测,探讨MBP与HSLE的关系.方法采用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)检测18例HSLE患者、23例Heroin成瘾者(吸毒但无HSLE临床症状者),17例多发性硬化患者(MS组)、对照组20例(NC组)的血清以及脑脊液(CSF)中MBP及Anti-MBP水平.结果 HSLE组、MS组CSF和血清MBP均值明显高于NC组和Heroin成瘾组(P0.05),Heroin成瘾组血清和CSF MBP均值与NC组间无统计学差异(P>0.05),4组血清和CSF的Anti-MBP含量差异不显著(P>0.05).结论 HSLE患者CSF及血清中MBP含量增高,MBP上升水平与髓鞘损伤程度有关,该病的髓鞘存在病理性损害,以及血脑屏障(blood- brain barrier,BBB)的通透性改变.MBP检测可作为HSLE诊断及与海洛因成瘾者鉴别诊断的重要参数,它在HSLE病理过程中的作用机制有待进一步研究.

  8. Could Intrathymic Injection of Myelin Basic Protein Suppress Inflammatory Response After Co-culture of T Lymphocytes and BV-2 Microglia Cells?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-Qun Cui; Bao-Long Liu; Qiao-Li Wu; Ying Cai; Wei-Jia Fan; Ming-Chao Zhang; Wei-Liang Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:The interaction between activated microglia and T lymphocytes can yield abundant pro-inflammatory cytokines.Our previous study proved that thymus immune tolerance could alleviate the inflammatory response.This study aimed to investigate whether intrathymic injection of myelin basic protein (MBP) in mice could suppress the inflammatory response after co-culture ofT lymphocytes and BV-2 microglia cells.Methods:Totally,72 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to three groups (n =24 in each):Group A:intrathymic injection of 100 μl MBP (1 mg/ml);Group B:intrathymic injection of 100 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS);and Group C:sham operation group.Every eight mice in each group were sacrificed to obtain the spleen at postoperative days 3,7,and 14,respectively.T lymphocytes those were extracted and purified from the spleens were then co-cultured with activated BV-2 microglia cells at a proportion of 1:2 in the medium containing MBP for 3 days.After identified the T lymphocytes by CD3,surface antigens of T lymphocytes (CD4,CD8,CD152,and CD154) and BV-2 microglia cells (CD45 and CD54) were detected by flow cytometry.The expressions of pro-inflammatory factors ofBV-2 microglia cells (interleukin [IL]-1β,tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α],and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the least significant difference test were used for data analysis.Results:The levels of CD152 in Group A showed an upward trend from the 3rd to 7th day,with a downward trend from the 7th to 14th day (20.12 ± 0.71%,30.71 ± 1.14%,13.50 ± 0.71% at postoperative days 3,7,and 14,respectively,P < 0.05).The levels of CD154 in Group A showed a downward trend from the 3rd to 7th day,with an upward trend from the 7th to 14th day (10.00 ± 0.23%,5.28 ± 0.69%,14.67 ± 2.71% at postoperative days 3,7,and 14,respectively,P < 0.05).The ratio ofCD4+/CD8 + T in Group

  9. Contents of myelin-basic protein and S-100 in serum and brain tissue of neonatal rats with intrauterine infection-caused brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojie Li; Hongying Li; Zhihai Lu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The change of the content of myelin basic protein (MBP) in serum and brain tissue is the bio chemical diadynamic index of amyelination. S-100 is a specific and sensitive marker of central nervous system (CNS) injury. Whether or not the content of S-100 and MBP in blood and brain tissue can be used as the quan titative index for early diagnosing the intrauterine infection-caused brain injury still needs investigation. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether or not MBP and S-100 detection can be used as the biochemical indexes for early diagnosing the intrauterine infection-caused brain injury. DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Neuro-rehabilitation, Medical College of Rehabilitation, Jiamusi University. MATERIALS: Sixty female and thirty male common Wistar rats, weighing from 180 to 240 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Jiamusi University. Reagent: Lipopolysaccharide(LPS, serological type 055: B5, SIGMA Company of USA); MBP enzyme linked immunosobent assay (ELISA) immunoreagent kit (Preclinicai Recombination DNA Laboratory, Chengdu Huaxi Medical Center, Sichuan Province); S-100 ELISA immunoreagent kit ( Department of Physiology, the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA) and bovine serum albumin(Haitaike Biotechnology Co.,Ltd.).METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Pediatric Neuro-Rehabilitation, Experimental Animal Center, Department of Pathology and Central Laboratory of Jiamusi University from July 2005 to March 2006. ① Preparation of models and grouping: The female and male rats were placed in one cage at 2: 1 at 17:00 o'clock. Vaginal smear was checked at 8:00 on the next morning. Sperm was found and 0 day of pregnancy was recorded. Pregnant rats were bred in another cage. The pregnant 47 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: control group (n =10) and experimental group (n =37). The experimental pregnant rats were intraperitoneally injected with LPS

  10. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing ...

  12. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  13. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-01-01

    -HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method......A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral...... was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng...

  14. Formation of high-molecular-weight angiotensinogen during pregnancy is a result of competing redox reactions with the proform of eosinophil major basic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Søren; Skov, Louise Lind; Glerup, Simon

    2013-01-01

    compared to monomeric AGT and the proMBP-AGT complex. Furthermore, we have used recombinant proteins to analyse the formation of the proMBP-PAPP-A and the proMBP-AGT complexes, and we demonstrate that they are competing reactions, depending on the same cysteine residue of proMBP, but differentially...... on the redox potential, potentially important for the relative amounts of the complexes in vivo. These findings may be important physiologically, since the biochemical properties of the proteins change as a consequence of complex formation....

  15. The 73 kilodalton heat shock cognate protein purified from rat brain contains nonesterified palmitic and stearic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidon, P T; Hightower, L E

    1986-08-01

    A protein related to the 71 kilodalton inducible rat heat shock protein was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in milligram amounts from brain tissue of nonheat-stressed rats. The protein has been designated as a stress cognate protein based on previous studies and data presented herein that this protein cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody originally raised against the Drosophila 70 kilodalton heat shock protein. The purified protein had an apparent molecular mass of 73 kilodaltons when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an apparent mass of 150 kilodaltons as determined by nondissociative gel chromatography, suggesting that the purified protein is a homodimer. The purified protein had isoelectric points of 5.0 under nondissociative conditions and 5.6 when exposed to protein denaturants, suggesting loss of bound anionic molecules and/or net exposure of basic residues upon denaturation. Chloroform/methanol extraction of the purified protein and subsequent analyses by thin layer and gas-liquid chromatography resulted in the identification of palmitic and stearic acids noncovalently bound to the protein. Approximately four molecules of fatty acids were bound per dimer with palmitic and stearic acids present in a one-to-one ratio. The purified protein did not bind exogenously added radioactive palmitate, indicating that the fatty acid-binding sites of the cognate protein were fully occupied and that the associated fatty acids were too tightly bound to exchange readily. The possible significance of the fatty acids associated with the 73 kilodalton stress cognate protein is discussed.

  16. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    and Rosenberg's theorem), are also hard for dynamic range searching in the group model. This theorem allows us to reuse decades of research on range reporting lower bounds to immediately obtain a range of new group model lower bounds. Amongst others, this includes an improved lower bound for the fundamental...... problem of dynamic d-dimensional orthogonal range searching, stating that tqtu = Ω((lg n/lg lg n)d-1). Here tq denotes the query time and tu the update time of the data structure. This is an improvement of a lg1-δn factor over the recent lower bound of Larsen [FOCS'11], where δ>0 is a small constant......Table of Contents -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In this paper we present a number of improved lower bounds for range searching in the pointer machine and the group model. In the pointer machine, we prove lower bounds for the approximate simplex...

  17. On functions of bounded variation

    OpenAIRE

    Aistleitner, Christoph; Pausinger, Florian; Svane, Anne Marie; Tichy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The recently introduced concept of $\\mathcal{D}$-variation unifies previous concepts of variation of multivariate functions. In this paper, we give an affirmative answer to the open question from Pausinger \\& Svane (J. Complexity, 2014) whether every function of bounded Hardy--Krause variation is Borel measurable and has bounded $\\mathcal{D}$-variation. Moreover, we show that the space of functions of bounded $\\mathcal{D}$-variation can be turned into a commutative Banach algebra.

  18. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  19. Upper bounds for centerlines

    CERN Document Server

    Bukh, Boris

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Bukh, Matousek, and Nivasch conjectured that for every n-point set S in R^d and every k, 0 <= k <= d-1, there exists a k-flat f in R^d (a "centerflat") that lies at "depth" (k+1) n / (k+d+1) - O(1) in S, in the sense that every halfspace that contains f contains at least that many points of S. This claim is true and tight for k=0 (this is Rado's centerpoint theorem), as well as for k = d-1 (trivial). Bukh et al. showed the existence of a (d-2)-flat at depth (d-1) n / (2d-1) - O(1) (the case k = d-2). In this paper we concentrate on the case k=1 (the case of "centerlines"), in which the conjectured value for the leading constant is 2/(d+2). We prove that 2/(d+2) is an *upper bound* for the leading constant. Specifically, we show that for every fixed d and every n there exists an n-point set in R^d for which no line in R^d lies at depth larger than 2n/(d+2) + o(n). This point set is the "stretched grid"---a set which has been previously used by Bukh et al. for other related purposes.

  20. On the minimum of a polynomial function on a basic closed semialgebraic set and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeronimo, Gabriela; Perrucci, Daniel; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2013-01-01

    We give an explicit upper bound for the algebraic degree and an explicit lower bound for the absolute value of the minimum of a polynomial function on a compact connected component of a basic closed semialgebraic set when this minimum is not zero. As an application, we obtain a lower bound for th...

  1. Basic Pentacysteine Proteins Repress Abscisic Acid Insensitive4 Expression via Direct Recruitment of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Zou, Meijuan; Sun, Xuwu; He, Baoye; Xu, Xiumei; Liu, Yini; Zhang, Lixin; Chi, Wei

    2017-01-30

    Plant transcription factors generally act in complex regulatory networks that function at multiple levels to govern plant developmental programs. Dissection of the interconnections among different classes of transcription factors can elucidate these regulatory networks and thus improve our understanding of plant development. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional relationships of the transcription factors ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) and members of the BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BPC) family in lateral root (LR) development of Arabidopsis thaliana Genetic analysis showed that BPCs promote LR development by repressing ABI4 expression. Molecular analysis showed that BPCs bind to the ABI4 promoter and repress ABI4 transcription in roots. BPCs directly recruit the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the ABI4 locus and epigenetically repress ABI4 expression by catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. In addition, BPCs and ABI4 coordinate their activities to fine-tune the levels of PIN-FORMED1, a component of the auxin signaling pathway, and thus modulate LR formation. These results establish a functional relationship between two universal and multiple-role transcription factors and provide insight into the mechanisms of the transcriptional regulatory networks that affect Arabidopsis organogenesis.

  2. Multiple sites of the cleavage of 21- and 25-mer encephalytogenic oligopeptides corresponding to human myelin basic protein (MBP by specific anti-MBP antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Timofeeva

    Full Text Available IgGs from patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE purified on MBP-Sepharose in contrast to canonical proteases hydrolyze effectively only myelin basic protein (MBP, but not many other tested proteins. Here we have shown for the first time that anti-MBP SLE IgGs hydrolyze nonspecific tri- and tetrapeptides with an extreme low efficiency and cannot effectively hydrolyze longer 20-mer nonspecific oligopeptides corresponding to antigenic determinants (AGDs of HIV-1 integrase. At the same time, anti-MBP SLE IgGs efficiently hydrolyze oligopeptides corresponding to AGDs of MBP. All sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis of 21-and 25-mer encephalytogenic oligopeptides corresponding to two known AGDs of MBP were found by a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, TLC, and MALDI spectrometry. Several clustered major, moderate, and minor sites of cleavage were revealed in the case of 21- and 25-mer oligopeptides. The active sites of anti-MBP abzymes are localised on their light chains, while heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of abzymes provide high affinity to MBP and specificity of this protein hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-MBP abzymes for intact MBP is approximately 1000-fold higher than for the oligopeptides. The data suggest that all oligopeptides interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal abzymes of total pool of IgGs, which possesses a lower affinity for substrates, and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific than globular protein and can occur in several sites.

  3. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  4. A Lower Bound on Concurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-Guo; TIAN Cheng-Lin; CHEN Ping-Xing; YUAN Nai-Chang

    2009-01-01

    We derive an analytical lower bound on the concurrence for bipartite quantum systems with an improved computable cross norm or realignment criterion and an improved positive partial transpose criterion respectively.Furthermore we demonstrate that our bound is better than that obtained from the local uncertainty relations criterion with optimal local orthogonal observables which is known as one of the best estimations of concurrence.

  5. Asynchronous Bounded Expected Delay Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhshi, Rena; Fokkink, Wan; Pang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The commonly used asynchronous bounded delay (ABD) network models assume a fixed bound on message delay. We propose a probabilistic network model, called asynchronous bounded expected delay (ABE) model. Instead of a strict bound, the ABE model requires only a bound on the expected message delay. While the conditions of ABD networks restrict the set of possible executions, in ABE networks all asynchronous executions are possible, but executions with extremely long delays are less probable. In contrast to ABD networks, ABE networks cannot be synchronised efficiently. At the example of an election algorithm, we show that the minimal assumptions of ABE networks are sufficient for the development of efficient algorithms. For anonymous, unidirectional ABE rings of known size N we devise a probabilistic leader election algorithm having average message and time complexity O(N).

  6. On the minimum of a polynomial function on a basic closed semialgebraic set and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeronimo, Gabriela; Perrucci, Daniel; Tsigaridas, Elias

    We give an explicit upper bound for the algebraic degree and an explicit lower bound for the absolute value of the minimum of a polynomial function on a compact connected component of a basic closed semialgebraic set when this minimum is not zero. As an application, we obtain a lower bound...... for the separation of two disjoint connected components of basic closed semialgebraic sets, when at least one of them is compact....

  7. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  8. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library A A A Did you ever wonder what ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  9. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library Print A A A Did you ever wonder ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  10. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  11. The bound state S-matrix for AdS5×S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; de Leeuw, M.; Torrielli, A.

    2009-01-01

    We determine the S-matrix that describes scattering of arbitrary bound states in the light-cone string theory in AdS5×S5. The corresponding construction relies on the Yangian symmetry and the superspace formalism for the bound state representations. The basic analytic structure supporting the S-matr

  12. The Out-bound and In-bound Travelling Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emily Yu

    2009-01-01

    @@ As the Spring Festival of China with a long vocation of seven days nationally is approaching,more and more attention is paid to the out-bound and inn-bound trayeling market.Will people hold their pockets firmly in the"cold winter"of world-wide financial crisis,or will they grab the great discount of traveling and take a good relax?

  13. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  14. Bounded Model Checking of CTL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Tao; Cong-Hua Zhou; Zhong Chen; Li-Fu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Bounded Model Checking has been recently introduced as an efficient verification method for reactive systems.This technique reduces model checking of linear temporal logic to propositional satisfiability.In this paper we first present how quantified Boolean decision procedures can replace BDDs.We introduce a bounded model checking procedure for temporal logic CTL* which reduces model checking to the satisfiability of quantified Boolean formulas.Our new technique avoids the space blow up of BDDs, and extends the concept of bounded model checking.

  15. New methods for measuring macromolecular interactions in solution via static light scattering: basic methodology and application to nonassociating and self-associating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Arun K; Minton, Allen P

    2005-02-01

    A method for rapid detection and characterization of reversible associations of macromolecules in solution is presented. A programmable dual-syringe infusion pump is used to introduce a solution of time-varying composition into parallel flow cells for concurrent measurement of laser light scattering at multiple angles and ultraviolet-visible absorbance. An experiment lasting less than 15 min produces a large and information-rich set of data, consisting of several thousand values of the Rayleigh ratio as a function of solute concentration(s) and scattering angle. Using a novel treatment of the data, the entire data set may be equally rapidly analyzed in the context of models for self-association. Validation experiments conducted on previously characterized nonassociating and self-associating proteins yielded robust values for molecular weights in the range 10-330 kDa and equilibrium association constants for dimer formation in the range 2 x 10(3)-6 x 10(5) M(-1).

  16. Myelin Basic Protein-Induced Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-6, and Presentation of the Immunodominant Peptide MBP85-99 by B Cells from Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Börnsen, Lars; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    to study cytokine production by B cells, but here we used the physiologically relevant self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) to stimulate B cells from untreated patients with RRMS and healthy donors. Moreover, we took advantage of the unique ability of the monoclonal antibody MK16 to recognize...... the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99 presented on HLA-DR15, and used it as a probe to directly study B-cell presentation of self-antigenic peptide. The proportions of B cells producing TNF-α or IL-6 after stimulation with MBP were higher in RRMS patients than in healthy donors, indicating a pro-inflammatory profile...... with reduced ability of B cells to produce IL-10 after stimulation with MBP, indicative of diminished B-cell immune regulatory function in patients with the most severe disease. Moreover, EDSS correlated positively with the frequencies of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 producing B cells after polyclonal stimulation...

  17. Computing Constrained Cramer Rao Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Tune, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the problem of computing submatrices of the Cram\\'er-Rao bound (CRB), which lower bounds the variance of any unbiased estimator of a vector parameter $\\vth$. We explore iterative methods that avoid direct inversion of the Fisher information matrix, which can be computationally expensive when the dimension of $\\vth$ is large. The computation of the bound is related to the quadratic matrix program, where there are highly efficient methods for solving it. We present several methods, and show that algorithms in prior work are special instances of existing optimization algorithms. Some of these methods converge to the bound monotonically, but in particular, algorithms converging non-monotonically are much faster. We then extend the work to encompass the computation of the CRB when the Fisher information matrix is singular and when the parameter $\\vth$ is subject to constraints. As an application, we consider the design of a data streaming algorithm for network measurement.

  18. Bound states in string nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  19. Some bounds for quantum copying

    CERN Document Server

    Rastegin, A E

    2001-01-01

    We derive lower bounds on the absolute error and the relative error of an abstract copying of two-state set. We do not specify a copying transformation and a dimension of state space. Only the unitarity of quantum mechanical transformations is used. Our approach is based on the notion of angle between two states. We first prove several useful statements, simply expressed in terms of angles. We then examine a lower bound on the absolute error, that was first considered by Hillery and Buzek. Our reasonings supplement and reinforce the results, obtained by them. So, we derive more strong bounds on the absolute error, and we also consider a tradeoff between size of error and corresponding probability distributions. After that we examine a lower bound on the relative error.

  20. Bound states in string nets

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, M D; Vidal, J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  1. Basics of Bayesian Learning - Basically Bayes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    Tutorial presented at the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing Workshop 2006, Maynooth, Ireland, September 8, 2006. The tutorial focuses on the basic elements of Bayesian learning and its relation to classical learning paradigms. This includes a critical discussion of the pros and cons...

  2. Opinion formation with time-varying bounded confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, QiPeng; Zhang, SiYing

    2017-01-01

    When individuals in social groups communicate with one another and are under the influence of neighbors’ opinions, they typically revise their own opinions to adapt to such peer opinions. The individual threshold of bounded confidence will thus be affected by both a change in individual confidence and by neighbor influence. Individuals thus update their own opinions with new bounded confidence, while their updated opinions also influence their neighbors’ opinions. Based on this reasoned factual assumption, we propose an opinion dynamics model with time-varying bounded confidence. A directed network is formed by the rule of the individual bounded confidence threshold. The threshold of individual bounded confidence involves both confidence variation and the in/out degree of the individual node. When the confidence variation is greater, an individual’s confidence in persisting in his own opinion in interactions is weaker, and the individual is more likely to adopt neighbors’ opinions. In networks, the in/out degree is determined by individual neighbors. Our main research involves the process of opinion evolution and the basic laws of opinion cluster formation. Group opinions converge exponentially to consensus with stable neighbors. An individual opinion evolution is determined by the average neighbor opinion effect strength. We also explore the conditions involved in forming a stable neighbor relationship and the influence of the confidence variation in the convergence of the threshold of bounded confidence. The results show that the influence on opinion evolution is greater with increased confidence variation. PMID:28264038

  3. Opinion formation with time-varying bounded confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YunHong; Liu, QiPeng; Zhang, SiYing

    2017-01-01

    When individuals in social groups communicate with one another and are under the influence of neighbors' opinions, they typically revise their own opinions to adapt to such peer opinions. The individual threshold of bounded confidence will thus be affected by both a change in individual confidence and by neighbor influence. Individuals thus update their own opinions with new bounded confidence, while their updated opinions also influence their neighbors' opinions. Based on this reasoned factual assumption, we propose an opinion dynamics model with time-varying bounded confidence. A directed network is formed by the rule of the individual bounded confidence threshold. The threshold of individual bounded confidence involves both confidence variation and the in/out degree of the individual node. When the confidence variation is greater, an individual's confidence in persisting in his own opinion in interactions is weaker, and the individual is more likely to adopt neighbors' opinions. In networks, the in/out degree is determined by individual neighbors. Our main research involves the process of opinion evolution and the basic laws of opinion cluster formation. Group opinions converge exponentially to consensus with stable neighbors. An individual opinion evolution is determined by the average neighbor opinion effect strength. We also explore the conditions involved in forming a stable neighbor relationship and the influence of the confidence variation in the convergence of the threshold of bounded confidence. The results show that the influence on opinion evolution is greater with increased confidence variation.

  4. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  5. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  6. ADMonium: Asymmetric Dark Matter Bound State

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Ko, P; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel framework for asymmetric scalar dark matter (ADM), which has interesting collider phenomenology in terms of an unstable ADM bound state (ADMonium) produced via Higgs portals. ADMonium is a natural consequence of the basic features of ADM: the (complex scalar) ADM is charged under a dark local $U(1)_d$ symmetry which is broken at a low scale and provides a light gauge boson $X$. The dark gauge coupling is strong and then ADM can annihilate away into $X$-pair effectively. Therefore, the ADM can form bound state due to its large self-interaction via $X$ mediation. To explore the collider signature of ADMonium, we propose that ADM has a two-Higgs doublet portal. The ADMonium can have a sizable mixing with the heavier Higgs boson, which admits a large cross section of ADMonium production associated with $b\\bar b$. Of particular interest, our setup nicely explains the recent di-photon anomaly at 750 GeV via the events from ${\\rm ADMonium}\\ra 2X(\\ra e^+e^-)$, where the electrons are identified as ...

  7. Bound states -- from QED to QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    These lectures are divided into two parts. In Part 1 I discuss bound state topics at the level of a basic course in field theory: The derivation of the Schr\\"odinger and Dirac equations from the QED Lagrangian, by summing Feynman diagrams and in a Hamiltonian framework. Less well known topics include the equal-time wave function of Positronium in motion and the properties of the Dirac wave function for a linear potential. The presentation emphasizes physical aspects and provides the framework for Part 2, which discusses the derivation of relativistic bound states at Born level in QED and QCD. A central aspect is the maintenance of Poincar\\'e invariance. The transformation of the wave function under boosts is studied in detail in D=1+1 dimensions, and its generalization to D=3+1 is indicated. Solving Gauss' law for $A^0$ with a non-vanishing boundary condition leads to a linear potential for QCD mesons, and an analogous confining potential for baryons.

  8. Phase separation of myelin sheath in Triton X-114 solution: predominant localization of the 21.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein in the lipid raft-associated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uruse, Michihiro; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugawa, Makoto; Matsuura, Keiko; Sato, Yurie; Seiwa, Chika; Watanabe, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu; Asou, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) isoforms in the myelin sheath are known to have distinct intracellular expression patterns, which are profoundly related to functional specificity. Determining the differential localization of MBP isoforms is therefore important for understanding their pathophysiological roles. In this study, we have developed a new method for phase separation of myelin. The non-ionic detergent Triton X-114 is used to solubilize myelin sheath which then undergoes phase separation to yield four fractions. The lipid raft-associated proteins and lipids in each fraction were analysed by immunoblotting and lipid analysis, respectively. The present method gives two lipid raft-enriched fractions, one of them was found to contain only lipid raft-associated galactocerebroside and cholesterol as the major lipids. The 21.5-kDa MBP isoforms (21.5 MBP), both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated, were exclusively contained in this fraction. Phosphorylated 21.5 MBP (21.5 pMBP) has been shown to specifically disappear from demyelinated loci. The present analytical method clearly indicated that disappearance of 21.5 pMBP corresponded to demyelination and its reappearance corresponded to prevention of demyelination. Demyelination was also associated with aging and was prevented by the myelin-protecting herbal medicine, Chinpi, a type of dried citrus peel.

  9. Analysis of basic clustering algorithms for numerical estimation of statistical averages in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Onufriev, Alexey

    2008-03-01

    In statistical mechanics, the equilibrium properties of a physical system of particles can be calculated as the statistical average over accessible microstates of the system. In general, these calculations are computationally intractable since they involve summations over an exponentially large number of microstates. Clustering algorithms are one of the methods used to numerically approximate these sums. The most basic clustering algorithms first sub-divide the system into a set of smaller subsets (clusters). Then, interactions between particles within each cluster are treated exactly, while all interactions between different clusters are ignored. These smaller clusters have far fewer microstates, making the summation over these microstates, tractable. These algorithms have been previously used for biomolecular computations, but remain relatively unexplored in this context. Presented here, is a theoretical analysis of the error and computational complexity for the two most basic clustering algorithms that were previously applied in the context of biomolecular electrostatics. We derive a tight, computationally inexpensive, error bound for the equilibrium state of a particle computed via these clustering algorithms. For some practical applications, it is the root mean square error, which can be significantly lower than the error bound, that may be more important. We how that there is a strong empirical relationship between error bound and root mean square error, suggesting that the error bound could be used as a computationally inexpensive metric for predicting the accuracy of clustering algorithms for practical applications. An example of error analysis for such an application-computation of average charge of ionizable amino-acids in proteins-is given, demonstrating that the clustering algorithm can be accurate enough for practical purposes.

  10. Basic Research Objectives Reaffirmed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ As a national institution for scientific research and a component of the national innovation system, CAS should and must make key contributions to the great national rejuvenation of the country. Keeping this in mind, CAS has developed four developmental targets for its basic research. This was revealed at a CAS conference on basic research held June 11-12 in Beijing.

  11. Cycles in basic innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de E.A. (Bert); Franses, P.H.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Basic innovations are often believed to be the drivers of economic growth. It has been widely documented that economic growth follows cyclical patterns of varying length. In this paper we examine if such patterns are also present in basic innovations. For an annual time series of count data covering

  12. Basic Science Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  13. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  14. Experimental activation of bound entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Ishizaka, Satoshi; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Kosaka, Hideo; Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2012-07-27

    Entanglement is one of the essential resources in quantum information and communication technology (QICT). The entanglement thus far explored and applied to QICT has been pure and distillable entanglement. Yet, there is another type of entanglement, called "bound entanglement," which is not distillable by local operations and classical communication. We demonstrate the experimental "activation" of the bound entanglement held in the four-qubit Smolin state, unleashing its immanent entanglement in distillable form, with the help of auxiliary two-qubit entanglement and local operations and classical communication. We anticipate that it opens the way to a new class of QICT applications that utilize more general classes of entanglement than ever, including bound entanglement.

  15. Eta nuclear bound states revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Mareš, J

    2013-01-01

    The strong energy dependence of the s-wave eta-N scattering amplitude at and below threshold, as evident in coupled-channels K-matrix fits and chiral models that incorporate the S11 N*(1535) resonance, is included self consistently in eta-nuclear bound state calculations. This approach, applied recently in calculations of kaonic atoms and Kbar-nuclear bound states, is found to impose stronger constraints than ever on the onset of eta-nuclear binding, with a minimum value of Re a_{eta N} approximately 0.9 fm required to accommodate an eta-4He bound state. Binding energies and widths of eta-nuclear states are calculated within several underlying eta-N models for nuclei across the periodic table, including eta-25Mg for which some evidence was proposed in a recent COSY experiment.

  16. Lower Bounds for Sparse Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Ba, Khanh Do; Price, Eric; Woodruff, David P

    2011-01-01

    We consider the following k-sparse recovery problem: design an m x n matrix A, such that for any signal x, given Ax we can efficiently recover x' satisfying ||x-x'||_1 <= C min_{k-sparse} x"} ||x-x"||_1. It is known that there exist matrices A with this property that have only O(k log (n/k)) rows. In this paper we show that this bound is tight. Our bound holds even for the more general /randomized/ version of the problem, where A is a random variable and the recovery algorithm is required to work for any fixed x with constant probability (over A).

  17. Variables Bounding Based Retiming Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫宗伟; 林争辉; 陈后鹏

    2002-01-01

    Retiming is a technique for optimizing sequential circuits. In this paper, wediscuss this problem and propose an improved retiming algorithm based on variables bounding.Through the computation of the lower and upper bounds on variables, the algorithm can signi-ficantly reduce the number of constraints and speed up the execution of retiming. Furthermore,the elements of matrixes D and W are computed in a demand-driven way, which can reducethe capacity of memory. It is shown through the experimental results on ISCAS89 benchmarksthat our algorithm is very effective for large-scale sequential circuits.

  18. Bounds for Completely Decomposable Jacobians

    CERN Document Server

    Duursma, Iwan

    2010-01-01

    A curve over the field of two elements with completely decomposable Jacobian is shown to have at most six rational points and genus at most 26. The bounds are sharp. The previous upper bound for the genus was 145. We also show that a curve over the field of $q$ elements with more than $q^{m/2}+1$ rational points has at least one Frobenius angle in the open interval $(\\pi/m,3\\pi/m)$. The proofs make use of the explicit formula method.

  19. Correlation between myelin basic protein contents and cerebral parenchyma damages in cerebral infarction patients%脑梗死患者血清髓鞘碱性蛋白含量与脑实质损害的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国元; 王晓明; 唐中; 郭晓兰; 龙存国; 廖涛

    2004-01-01

    目的:通过检测脑梗死患者及正常人的血清髓鞘碱性蛋白(myelin basic protein,MBP)的含量,探讨脑梗死患者血清髓鞘碱性蛋白含量与脑实质损害的相关性.方法:采用双抗体夹心酶联免疫吸附法对32位正常人及30例脑梗死患者血清MBP含量进行了检测.结果:脑梗死患者和对照组血清其MBP含量分别为(5.63±3.56),(1.10±0.45)μg/L,差异有极显著性(t=7.145,P<0.001),且血清MBP含量与脑梗死体积有一定的关系.结论:脑梗死时血清MBP含量明显升高,且与脑实质损害程度有一定的关系.%AIM: To discuss the correlation between myelin basic protein(MBP) contents and cerebral parenchyma damages in cerebral infarction patients through the assay of MBP contents in both cerebral infarction patients and healthy subjects.METHODS: The MBP serous contents of 32 healthy subjects and 30 cerebral infarction patients were detected by double-antibody-filling ELISA.RESULTS: The serous MBP contents of healthy subjects and cerebral infarction patients were(5.63 + 3.56) and(1.10 + 0.45) μg/L respectively.There was significance between the patient group and the control group ( t = 7. 145, P < 0. 001 ) . There was a certain relationship between the serous MBP content and the volume of cerebral infarct area.CONCLUSION: Serous MBP content markedly increases in cerebral infarction patients, and moreover, there is a certain relationship with the severity of cerebral parenchyma damage.

  20. Identification of peptides from foot‐and‐mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, M.; Nielsen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    within the structural proteins of foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T‐cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted...

  1. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  2. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  3. Variational Bounds for Creeping Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In the paper time dependent variational bounds are derived based on Extended Hashin-Shtrikman variational principles. Direct calculation leads to explicit formulas to be presented in the text. For various mechanical properties easy coding in Excel, say, can be used and verification of accuracy for numerical procedures is available using the derived formulas.

  4. Pieter Paul Rubens, "Prometheus Bound."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Marla K.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a full-color reproduction of Pieter Paul Rubens' painting, "Prometheus Bound," and a lesson plan for using it with students in grades 10 through 12. The goal of the lesson is to introduce students to the techniques of design and execution used by Rubens. (JDH)

  5. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings on t...

  6. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings on t...

  7. CD(4) has bounded width

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Catarina; Marković, Petar; Maróti, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the constraint languages invariant under a short sequence of J\\'onsson terms (containing at most three non-trivial ternary terms) are tractable by showing that they have bounded width. This improves the previous result by Kiss and Valeriote and presents some evidence that the Larose-Zadori conjecture holds in the congruence-distributive case.

  8. A Functional Calculus for Quotient Bounded Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Mirel Stoian

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available If (X, P is a sequentially locally convex space, then a quotient bounded operator T beloging to QP is regular (in the sense of Waelbroeck if and only if it is a bounded element (in the sense of Allan of algebra QP. The classic functional calculus for bounded operators on Banach space is generalized for bounded elements of algebra QP.

  9. A Note on the W-S Lower Bound of the MEE Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badong Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The minimum error entropy (MEE estimation is concerned with the estimation of a certain random variable (unknown variable based on another random variable (observation, so that the entropy of the estimation error is minimized. This estimation method may outperform the well-known minimum mean square error (MMSE estimation especially for non-Gaussian situations. There is an important performance bound on the MEE estimation, namely the W-S lower bound, which is computed as the conditional entropy of the unknown variable given observation. Though it has been known in the literature for a considerable time, up to now there is little study on this performance bound. In this paper, we reexamine the W-S lower bound. Some basic properties of the W-S lower bound are presented, and the characterization of Gaussian distribution using the W-S lower bound is investigated.

  10. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  11. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  12. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  13. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys ...

  14. Health Literacy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. 1 Health literacy is dependent on individual and systemic factors: Communication skills of lay persons and professionals Lay and professional ...

  15. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects...

  16. Basic Concurrency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvengreen, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming.......In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming....

  17. HPLC-ESI-MS and MS/MS structural characterization of multifucosylated N-glycoforms of the basic proline-rich protein IB-8a CON1+ in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Tiziana; Boi, Roberto; Pisano, Elisabetta; Iavarone, Federica; Fanali, Chiara; Nemolato, Sonia; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the characterization of the glycan moieties and the peptide backbone of six glycoforms of IB-8a CON1(+), a basic proline-rich protein present in human saliva. MS analyses on the intact glycoproteins before and after N-deglycosylation with PNGase F and high-resolution MS/MS sequencing by LTQ Orbitrap XL of peptides and glycopeptides from tryptic digests allowed the structural characterization of the glycan moieties and the polypeptide backbone, as well as to establish the glycosylation site at the asparagine residue at 98th position. Five of the glycoforms carry a biantennary N-linked glycan fucosylated in the innermost N-acetylglucosamine of the core and showing from zero to four additional fucoses in the antennal region. The sixth glycoform carries a monoantennary monofucosylated oligosaccharide. The glycoform cluster was detected on 28 of 71 adult saliva specimens. Level of fucosylation showed interindividual variability with the major relative abundance for the trifucosylated glycoform. Nonglycosylated IB-8a CON1(+) and the variant IB-8a CON1(-), lacking of the glycosylation site, have been also detected in human saliva.

  18. Rab proteins specify motorized vesicle transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanschers, B.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rab-family are key regulators of intracellular membrane traffic. These proteins constantly cycle between an 'active' GTP-bound and 'inactive' GDP-bound state. In their GTP-bound conformation Rab proteins can engage in complex formation with so called effector proteins. It is at

  19. Food Allergies: The Basics

    OpenAIRE

    Valenta, Rudolf; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Linhart, Birgit; Pahr, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    IgE-associated food allergy affects approximately 3% of the population and has severe effects on the daily life of patients—manifestations occur not only in the gastrointestinal tract but also affect other organ systems. Birth cohort studies have shown that allergic sensitization to food allergens develops early in childhood. Mechanisms of pathogenesis include cross-linking of mast cell– and basophil-bound IgE and immediate release of inflammatory mediators, as well as late-phase and chronic ...

  20. Lower Bounds on Paraclique Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Ronald D; Langston, Michael A; Wang, Kai

    2016-05-11

    The scientific literature teems with clique-centric clustering strategies. In this paper we analyze one such method, the paraclique algorithm. Paraclique has found practical utility in a variety of application domains, and has been successfully employed to reduce the effects of noise. Nevertheless, its formal analysis and worst-case guarantees have remained elusive. We address this issue by deriving a series of lower bounds on paraclique densities.