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Sample records for basic leucine zipper

  1. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  2. Analysis of basic leucine zipper genes and their expression during bud dormancy in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Yue; Fu, Xi-Ling; Tan, Qiu-Ping; Liu, Li; Chen, Min; Zhu, Cui-Ying; Li, Ling; Chen, Xiu-De; Gao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Dormancy is a biological characteristic developed to resist the cold conditions in winter. The bZIP transcription factors are present exclusively in eukaryotes and have been identified and classified in many species. bZIP proteins are known to regulate numerous biological processes, however, the role of bZIP in bud dodormancy has not been studied extensively. In total, 50 PpbZIP transcription factor-encoding genes were identified and categorized them into 10 groups (A-I and S). Similar intron/exon structures, additional conserved motifs, and DNA-binding site specificity supported our classification scheme. Additionally, chromosomal distribution and collinearity analyses suggested that expansion of the PpbZIP transcription factor family was due to segment/chromosomal duplications. We also predicted the dimerization properties based on characteristic features of the leucine zipper and classified PpbZIP proteins into 23 subfamilies. Furthermore, qRT-PCR results indicated that PpbZIPs genes may be involved in regulating dormancy. The same gene of different species might participate in different regulating networks through interactions with specific partners. Our expression profiling results complemented the microarray data, suggesting that co-expression patterns of bZIP transcription factors during dormancy differed among deciduous fruit trees. Our findings further clarify the molecular characteristics of the PpbZIP transcription factor family, including potential gene functions during dormancy. This information may facilitate further research on the evolutionary history and biological functions of bZIP proteins in peach and other rosaceae plants. PMID:27107182

  3. Genome-wide analysis of basic leucine zipper transcription factor families in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza saliva and Populus trichocarpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Qian; ZHANG Liang-sheng; WANG Yi-fei; WANG Jian

    2009-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors form a large gene family that is important in pathogen defense, light and stress signaling, etc. The Completed whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza saliva) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) constitute a valuable resource for genome-wide analysis and genomic comparative analysis, as they are representatives of the two major evolutionary lineages within the angiosperms: the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons. In this study, bioinformatics analysis identified 74, 89 and 88 bZIP genes respectively in Arabidopsis, rice and poplar. Moreover, a comprehensive overview of this gene family is presented, including the gene structure, phylogeny, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs. As a result, the plant bZIPs were organized into 10 subfamilies on basis of phylogenetic relationship. Gene duplication events during the family evolution history were also investigated. And it was further concluded that chromosomal/segmental duplication might have played a key role in gene expansion of bZIP gene family.

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of the heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun and Fos are components of the AP1 family of transcription factors and bind to the promoters of a diverse multitude of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and cancer. Here, using the powerful technique of isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterize the thermodynamics of heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos. Our data suggest that the heterodimerization of leucine zippers is driven by enthalpic forces with unfavorable entropy change at physiological temperatures. Furthermore, the basic regions appear to modulate the heterodimerization of leucine zippers and may undergo at least partial folding upon heterodimerization. Large negative heat capacity changes accompanying the heterodimerization of leucine zippers are consistent with the view that leucine zippers do not retain α-helical conformations in isolation and that the formation of the native coiled-coil α-helical dimer is attained through a coupled folding-dimerization mechanism

  5. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  6. Marek disease virus encodes a basic-leucine zipper gene resembling the fos/jun oncogenes that is highly expressed in lymphoblastoid tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D; Lee, L.(Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA); Liu, J. L.; Kung, H J; Tillotson, J K

    1992-01-01

    Marek disease virus (MDV) is a herpesvirus of chickens that induces T lymphomas within 3 weeks of infection. The short latency and polyclonal nature of MDV-induced tumors have suggested that the virus may encode one or more direct-acting oncogenes. To date, however, no MDV-specific tumor antigens or candidate transforming genes have been demonstrated. In this paper, we report the identification of a MDV gene encoding a protein with homology to the leucine-zipper class of nuclear oncogenes. It...

  7. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  8. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  9. Structure of homeobox-leucine zipper genes suggests a model for the evolution of gene families.

    OpenAIRE

    Schena, M; Davis, R W

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes are present in both plants and animals. Homeobox-leucine zipper genes, however, have been identified thus far only in the small mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This observation suggests that homeobox-leucine zipper genes evolved after the divergence of plants and animals, perhaps to mediate specific regulatory events. To better understand this gene family, we isolated several sequences containing the homeobox-leucine zipper motif and carried out a comparative analysis of ni...

  10. Restricted leucine zipper dimerization and specificity of DNA recognition of the melanocyte master regulator MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogenberg, Vivian; Ogmundsdóttir, Margrét H; Bergsteinsdóttir, Kristín; Schepsky, Alexander; Phung, Bengt; Deineko, Viktor; Milewski, Morlin; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a master regulator of melanocyte development and an important oncogene in melanoma. MITF heterodimeric assembly with related basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factors is highly restricted, and its binding profile to cognate DNA sequences is distinct. Here, we determined the crystal structure of MITF in its apo conformation and in the presence of two related DNA response elements, the E-box and M-box. In addition, we investigated mouse and human Mitf mutations to dissect the functional significance of structural features. Owing to an unusual three-residue shift in the leucine zipper register, the MITF homodimer shows a marked kink in one of the two zipper helices to allow an out-of-register assembly. Removal of this insertion relieves restricted heterodimerization by MITF and permits assembly with the transcription factor MAX. Binding of MITF to the M-box motif is mediated by an unusual nonpolar interaction by Ile212, a residue that is mutated in mice and humans with Waardenburg syndrome. As several related transcription factors have low affinity for the M-box sequence, our analysis unravels how these proteins discriminate between similar target sequences. Our data provide a rational basis for targeting MITF in the treatment of important hereditary diseases and cancer. PMID:23207919

  11. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  12. Design and characterization of short antimicrobial peptides using leucine zipper templates with selectivity towards microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Mishra, Nripendra N; Shukla, Praveen K; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2014-11-01

    Design of antimicrobial peptides with selective activity towards microorganisms is an important step towards the development of new antimicrobial agents. Leucine zipper sequence has been implicated in cytotoxic activity of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides; moreover, this motif has been utilized for the design of novel antimicrobial peptides with modulated cytotoxicity. To understand further the impact of substitution of amino acids at 'a' and/or 'd' position of a leucine zipper sequence of an antimicrobial peptides on its antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties four short peptides (14-residue) were designed on the basis of a leucine zipper sequence without or with replacement of leucine residues in its 'a' and 'd' positions with D-leucine or alanine or proline residue. The original short leucine zipper peptide (SLZP) and its D-leucine substituted analog, DLSA showed comparable activity against the tested Gram-positive and negative bacteria and the fungal strains. The alanine substituted analog (ASA) though showed appreciable activity against the tested bacteria, it showed to some extent lower activity against the tested fungi. However, the proline substituted analog (PSA) showed lower activity against the tested bacterial or fungal strains. Interestingly, DLSA, ASA and PSA showed significantly lower cytotoxicity than SLZP against both human red blood cells (hRBCs) and murine 3T3 cells. Cytotoxic and bactericidal properties of these peptides matched with peptide-induced damage/permeabilization of mammalian cells and bacteria or their mimetic lipid vesicles suggesting cell membrane could be the target of these peptides. As evidenced by tryptophan fluorescence and acrylamide quenching studies the peptides showed similarities either in interaction or in their localization within the bacterial membrane mimetic negatively charged lipid vesicles. Only SLZP showed localization inside the mammalian membrane mimetic zwitterionic lipid vesicles. The results show

  13. Homeodomain-Leucine zipper II family of transcription factors to the limelight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, Monica; Turchi, Luana; Ruzza, Valentino; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes 10 Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip) II transcription factors that can be subdivided into 4 clades (α–δ). All the γ (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 2 [ATHB2], HOMEOBOX ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA 1 [HAT1], HAT2) and δ (HAT3, ATHB4) genes are regulated by light quality changes (Low Red [R]/Far-Red [FR]) that induce the shade avoidance response in most of the angiosperms. HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ transcription factors function as positive regulators of shade avoidance, and there is evidence that at least ATHB2 is directly positively regulated by the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5. Recent evidence demonstrate that, in addition to their function in shade avoidance, HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ proteins play an essential role in plant development from embryogenesis onwards in a white light environment. PMID:23838958

  14. Electrostatic Contributions to the Stability of the GCN4 Leucine Zipper Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Matousek, William M.; Ciani, Barbara; Fitch, Carolyn A.; Bertrand García-Moreno, E.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2007-01-01

    Ion pairs are ubiquitous in X-ray structures of coiled coils, and mutagenesis of charged residues can result in large stability losses. By contrast, pKa values determined by NMR in solution often predict only small contributions to stability from charge interactions. To help reconcile these results we used triple-resonance NMR to determine pKa values for all groups that ionize between pH 1 and 13 in the 33-residue leucine zipper fragment, GCN4p. In addition to the native state we also determi...

  15. Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper II family of transcription factors to the limelight: central regulators of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, Monica; Turchi, Luana; Ruzza, Valentino; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2013-09-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes 10 Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip) II transcription factors that can be subdivided into 4 clades (α-δ). All the γ (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 2 [ATHB2], HOMEOBOX ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA 1 [HAT1], HAT2) and δ (HAT3, ATHB4) genes are regulated by light quality changes (Low Red [R]/Far-Red [FR]) that induce the shade avoidance response in most of the angiosperms. HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ transcription factors function as positive regulators of shade avoidance, and there is evidence that at least ATHB2 is directly positively regulated by the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5. Recent evidence demonstrate that, in addition to their function in shade avoidance, HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ proteins play an essential role in plant development from embryogenesis onwards in a white light environment. PMID:23838958

  16. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6122/P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit

  17. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  18. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R;

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...

  19. Leucine zipper like structure in rice WRKY89 enhances its affinity for binding with W box elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haihua; HAO Zhongna; XIE Ke; WU Kunlu; GUO Zejian

    2005-01-01

    WRKY proteins are transcriptional regulators involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, metabolisms, and developmental processes. In the present study, we isolated a WRKY cDNA, OsWRKY89 from a rice cDNA library. The deduced polypeptide contains 263 amino acid residues with a potential leucine zipper structure in its N-terminus, sharing low identity with other known WRKY members. OsWRKY89 and three deletion derivatives from its N-terminal were expressed in high levels in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally six-histidine-tagged fusion protein, and purified by employing one-step affinity chromatography on a Ni-NTA column. The recombinant OsWRKY89 protein was found to bind specially to sequences harboring W box cis elements by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This binding activity was decreased significantly by deletion of the leucine zipper-like structure in the N-terminal of OsWRKY89. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay system, we found that the leucine zipper motif of OsWRKY89 was involved in the protein-protein interaction. Further deletion to remove partial WRKY domain abolished completely the interaction between the expressed protein and the W boxes, indicating that the WRKY domain is essential to the DNA-binding. These data strongly suggest that the leucine zipper-like motif of OsWRKY89 plays a significant role in the protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions.

  20. Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase (MELK): A Novel Regulator in Cell Cycle Control, Embryonic Development, and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei Jiang; Deli Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) functions as a modulator of intracellular signaling and affects various cellular and biological processes, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, spliceosome assembly, gene expression, embryonic development, hematopoiesis, and oncogenesis. In these cellular processes, MELK functions by binding to numerous proteins. In general, the effects of multiple protein interactions with MELK are oncogenic in nature, and the overexpression of ...

  1. Regulation of Beta-Cell Function and Mass by the Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Elke

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most rapidly increasing diseases worldwide, whereby approximately 90-95% of patients suffer from type 2 diabetes. Considering its micro- and macrovascular complications like blindness and myocardial infarction, a reliable anti-diabetic treatment is needed. Maintaining the function and the mass of the insulin producing beta-cells despite elevated levels of beta-cell-toxic prediabetic signals represents a desirable mechanism of action of anti-diabetic drugs. The dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) inhibits the action of two transcription factors within the beta-cell, thereby interfering with insulin secretion and production and the conservation of beta-cell mass. Furthermore, DLK action is regulated by prediabetic signals. Hence, the inhibition of this kinase might protect beta-cells against beta-cell-toxic prediabetic signals and prevent the development of diabetes. DLK might thus present a novel drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:27100796

  2. Homeodomain leucine-zipper proteins and their role in synchronizing growth and development with the environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronny Brandt; Marc Cabedo; Yakun Xie; Stephan Wenkel

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) genome encodes for four distinct classes of homeodomain leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors (HD-ZIPI to HD-ZIPIV), which are all organized in multi-gene families. HD-ZIP transcription factors act as sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are able to control the expression level of target genes. While HD-ZIPI and HD-ZIPII proteins are mainly associated with environmental responses, HD-ZIPIII and HD-ZIPIV are primarily known to act as patterning factors. Recent studies have challenged this view. It appears that several of the different HD-ZIP families interact genetically to align both morphogenesis and environmental responses, most likely by modulating phytohormone-signal-ing networks.

  3. Structural basis for the regulation of maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Sha Cao

    Full Text Available MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase, which is a member of the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase-related kinase family, plays important roles in diverse cellular processes and has become a promising drug target for certain cancers. However, the regulatory mechanism of MELK remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of a fragment of human MELK that contains the kinase domain and ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain. The UBA domain tightly binds to the back of the kinase domain, which may contribute to the proper conformation and activity of the kinase domain. Interestingly, the activation segment in the kinase domain displays a unique conformation that contains an intramolecular disulfide bond. The structural and biochemical analyses unravel the molecular mechanisms for the autophosphorylation/activation of MELK and the dependence of its catalytic activity on reducing agents. Thus, our results may provide the basis for designing specific MELK inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  4. Combinatorial Regulation of Photoreceptor Differentiation Factor, Neural Retina Leucine Zipper Gene Nrl, Revealed by in Vivo Promoter Analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Kautzmann, Marie-Audrey I.; Kim, Douglas S; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Development and homeostasis require stringent spatiotemporal control of gene expression patterns that are established, to a large extent, by combinatorial action of transcription regulatory proteins. The bZIP transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper) is critical for rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate choice during retinal development and acts as a molecular switch to produce rods from postmitotic precursors. Loss of Nrl in mouse leads to a cone-only retina, whereas ectopic ...

  5. The "putative" leucine zipper region of murine leukemia virus transmembrane protein (P15e) is essential for viral infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdale, E E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-06-01

    In order to determine the role of the putative leucine zipper region of murine leukemia virus (MLV) transmembrane protein p15E, nine mutations in this region were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. None of these mutations affected the expression or transport of the envelope protein or incorporation into virions. The mutants were analyzed for their ability to infect NIH3T3 cells and to induce cell fusion in a rat XC cell fusion assay. Mutations removing the charge of the hydrophilic residues reduced infectivity in NIH3T3 cells but had either no effect or a minor effect on envelope-induced XC cell fusion. Six mutations of hydrophobic residues of the putative leucine zipper region were constructed; four completely abolished the ability to infect NIH3T3 cells and these mutant envelopes were also unable to induce cell fusion in the XC cell fusion assay. These data demonstrate the absolute requirement for the putative leucine zipper region for both fusion and infection of MLV. PMID:8659102

  6. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1

  7. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase is stabilized in mitosis by phosphorylation and is partially degraded upon mitotic exit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase) is a cell cycle dependent protein kinase involved in diverse cell processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and mRNA processing. Noticeably, MELK expression is increased in cancerous tissues, upon cell transformation and in mitotically-blocked cells. The question of how MELK protein level is controlled is therefore important. Here, we show that MELK protein is restricted to proliferating cells derived from either cancer or normal tissues and that MELK protein level is severely decreased concomitantly with other cell cycle proteins in cells which exit the cell cycle. Moreover, we demonstrate in human HeLa cells and Xenopus embryos that approximately half of MELK protein is degraded upon mitotic exit whereas another half remains stable during interphase. We show that the stability of MELK protein in M-phase is dependent on its phosphorylation state.

  8. Structure and mechanical properties of artificial protein hydrogels assembled through aggregation of leucine zipper peptide domains

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wei; Kornfield, Julia A.; Tirrell, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial protein hydrogels made from a triblock protein (designated AC10A, where A is an acidic zipper domain and C10 comprises 10 repeats of the nonapeptide sequence exhibit normalized plateau storage moduli (G/nkT) less than 0.13 at all concentrations, pH values, and ionic strengths examined. These gels are surprisingly soft due to loop formation at the expense of bridges between physical junctions. Molecular-level evidence of loop formation is provided by strong fluorescence energy trans...

  9. Identification of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper as a key regulator of tumor cell proliferation in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Hervé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the molecules that contribute to tumor progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, currently a leading cause of mortality from gynecological malignancies. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ, an intracellular protein widely expressed in immune tissues, has been reported in epithelial tissues and controls some of key signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis. However, there has been no report on GILZ in EOC up to now. The objectives of the current study were to examine the expression of GILZ in EOC and its effect on tumor cell proliferation. Results GILZ expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining in tissue sections from 3 normal ovaries, 7 benign EOC and 50 invasive EOC. GILZ was not detected on the surface epithelium of normal ovaries and benign tumors. In contrast, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 80% EOC specimens. GILZ immunostaining scores correlated positively to the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Spearman test in univariate analysis, P P Conclusion The present study is the first to identify GILZ as a molecule produced by ovarian cancer cells that promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation. Our findings clearly indicate that GILZ activates AKT, a crucial signaling molecule in tumorigenesis. GILZ thus appears as a potential key molecule in EOC.

  10. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  11. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ regulates testicular FOXO1 activity and spermatogonial stem cell (SSC function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Ngo

    Full Text Available Spermatogonia stem cell (SSC self-renewal and differentiation are tightly regulated processes that ensure a continued production of mature sperm throughout male adulthood. In the present study, we investigated the role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ in maintenance of the male germline and spermatogenesis. GILZ was detectable in germ cells of wild type mice on the day of birth, suggesting a role for GILZ in prospermatogonia and SSC pool formation. Gilz KO mice were generated and adult males were azoospermic and sterile. During the first wave of spermatogenesis in Gilz KO mice, spermatogenesis arrested part way through pachytene of meiosis I. Subsequent waves resulted in a progressive depletion of germ cells through apoptosis to ultimately produce a Sertoli cell-only phenotype. Further, in contrast to wild type littermates, PLZF(+ cells were detected in the peri-luminal region of Gilz KO mice at day 6 post-natal, suggesting a defect in prospermatogonia migration in the absence of GILZ. At age 30 days, transient accumulation of PLZF(+ cells in a subset of tubules and severely compromised spermatogenesis were observed in Gilz KO mice, consistent with defective SSC differentiation. GILZ deficiency was associated with an increase in FOXO1 transcriptional activity, which leads to activation of a selective set of FOXO1 target genes, including a pro-apoptotic protein, BIM. On the other hand, no evidence of a heightened immune response was observed. Together, these results suggest that GILZ suppresses FOXO1 nuclear translocation, promotes SSC differentiation over self-renewal, and favours germ cell survival through inhibition of BIM-dependent pro-apoptotic signals. These findings provide a mechanism for the effects of GILZ on spermatogenesis and strengthen the case for GILZ being a critical molecule in the regulation of male fertility.

  12. Brassica napus L. Homeodomain Leucine-Zipper Gene BnHB6 Responds to Abiotic and Biotic Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Wu YU; Li-Da ZHANG; Kai-Jing ZUO; Dong-Qin TANG; Xiao-Fen SUN; Ke-Xuan TANG

    2005-01-01

    Ahomeodomain leucine-zipper(HD-Zip) gene BnHB6 (GenBank accession No. AY336103) was isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) following drought treatment through rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of BnHB6 was 1 611 bp and contained a 936-bp open reading frame encoding 311 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated that BnHB6 belonged to the HD-Zip I subfamily.High-stringency Southern boltting analysis showed that BnHB6 appeared in rape as a single copy but had homologous genes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that BnHB6 was expressed in several tissues tested under control conditions, but that expression was significantly upregulated in shoots by mannitol, NaCl, cold treatment, anaerobic culture, wounding, H2O2, abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA) treatments, but not by ultraviolet treatment. Further RTPCR analysis revealed that BnHB6 was a late-responsive gene, the expression of which was not activated by NaCl, cold treatment, H2O2, ABA, and SA at an early time point (20 min) of treatment in the shoot. However, after a certain period of treatment, the induced expression culminated and then declined until the next peak occurred. Tissue-specific analysis revealed that BnHB6 was expressed at certain levels in the roots, shoots, and flowers, and the roots were found to respond to the osmotic stimuli more rapidly than shoots to increase the expression of BnHB6. The present study implies that BnHB6 plays a positive role as a regulator of biotic and abiotic stresses on growth during seedling establishment.

  13. Absence of Leucine Zipper in the Natural FOXP3Δ2Δ7 Isoform Does Not Affect Dimerization but Abrogates Suppressive Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Mailer, R.K.; Falk, K.; Roetzschke, O.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phenotype and function of regulatory T cells (Treg) largely depend on the presence of the transcription factor FOXP3. In contrast to mice, human Treg cells express isoforms of this protein. Besides the full length version (FOXP3fl), an isoform lacking the exon 2 (FOXP3Delta2) is co-expressed in comparable amounts. Recently, a third splice variant has been described that in addition to exon 2 also misses exon 7 (FOXP3Delta2Delta7). Exon 7 encodes for a leucine zipper motif commonly...

  14. Hahb-10, a sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene, is regulated by light quality and quantity, and promotes early flowering when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Eva C; Dezar, Carlos A; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Chan, Raquel L

    2005-12-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper proteins constitute a family of transcription factors found only in plants. Expression patterns of the sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene Hahb-10 (Helianthus annuus homeobox-10), that belongs to the HD-Zip II subfamily, were analysed. Northern blots showed that Hahb-10 is expressed primarily in mature leaves, although expression is clearly detectable in younger leaves and also in stems. Considerably higher expression levels were detected in etiolated seedlings compared with light-grown seedlings. Induction of Hahb-10 expression was observed when seedlings were subjected to treatment with gibberellins. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express Hahb-10 under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter show special phenotypic characteristics such as darker cotyledons and planar leaves. A reduction in the life cycle of about 25% allowing earlier seed collection was also observed, and this phenomenon is clearly related to a shortened flowering time. When the number of plants per pot increased, the difference in developmental rate between transgenic and non-transformed individuals became larger. After gibberellin treatment, the relative difference in life cycle duration was considerably reduced. Several light-regulated genes have been tested as possible target genes of Hahb-10. One of them, PsbS, shows a different response to illumination conditions in transgenic plants compared with the response in wild-type plants while the other genes behave similarly in both genotypes. We propose that Hahb-10 functions in a signalling cascade(s) that control(s) plant responses to light quality and quantity, and may also be involved in gibberellin transduction pathways. PMID:16215272

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present w...

  16. Genome wide identification and expression analysis of Homeodomain leucine zipper subfamily IV (HDZ IV) gene family from Musa accuminata

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh ePandey; Prashant eMisra; Anshu eAlok; Navneet eKaur; Shivai eSharma; Deepika eLakhwani; Mehar H Hasan; Siddhartha eTiwari; Prabodh KUMAR Trivedi

    2016-01-01

    The homedodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present ...

  17. Increased abundance of the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes: evidence for altered adiponectin signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.M.; Yi, Z; De Filippis, E.; Berria, R.; S. Shahani; P. Sathyanarayana; Sherman, V.; K. Fujiwara; Meyer, C.; Christ-Roberts, C.; Hwang, H; Finlayson, J.; Dong, L. Q.; Mandarino, L. J.; Bajaj, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The adiponectin signalling pathway is largely unknown, but recently the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1), has been shown to interact directly with adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR)1. APPL1 is present in C2C12 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle, but its presence in human skeletal muscle has not been investigated. Methods Samples from type 2 diabetic, and lean and non-diabetic obese participants w...

  18. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  19. Crosstalk between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells through a glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper/developmental endothelial locus-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nianlan; Baban, Babak; Isales, Carlos M; Shi, Xing-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Bone marrow is a reservoir for regulatory T (T(reg)) cells, but how T(reg) cells are regulated in that environment remains poorly understood. We show that expression of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone marrow mesenchymal lineage cells or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increases the production of T(reg) cells via a mechanism involving the up-regulation of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), an endogenous leukocyte-endothelial adhesion inhibitor. We found that the expression of Del-1 is increased ∼4-fold in the bone tissues of GILZ transgenic (Tg) mice, and this increase is coupled with a significant increase in the production of IL-10 (2.80 vs. 0.83) and decrease in the production of IL-6 (0.80 vs. 2.33) and IL-12 (0.25 vs. 1.67). We also show that GILZ-expressing BMSCs present antigen in a way that favors T(reg) cells. These results indicate that GILZ plays a critical role mediating the crosstalk between BMSCs and T(reg) in the bone marrow microenvironment. These data, together with our previous findings that overexpression of GILZ in BMSCs antagonizes TNF-α-elicited inflammatory responses, suggest that GILZ plays important roles in bone-immune cell communication and BMSC immune suppressive functions. PMID:26038125

  20. An evolutionarily conserved mechanism for cAMP elicited axonal regeneration involves direct activation of the dual leucine zipper kinase DLK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yan; Frey, Erin; Yoon, Choya; Wong, Hetty; Nestorovski, Douglas; Holzman, Lawrence B; Giger, Roman J; DiAntonio, Aaron; Collins, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    A broadly known method to stimulate the growth potential of axons is to elevate intracellular levels of cAMP, however the cellular pathway(s) that mediate this are not known. Here we identify the Dual Leucine-zipper Kinase (DLK, Wnd in Drosophila) as a critical target and effector of cAMP in injured axons. DLK/Wnd is thought to function as an injury ‘sensor’, as it becomes activated after axonal damage. Our findings in both Drosophila and mammalian neurons indicate that the cAMP effector kinase PKA is a conserved and direct upstream activator of Wnd/DLK. PKA is required for the induction of Wnd signaling in injured axons, and DLK is essential for the regenerative effects of cAMP in mammalian DRG neurons. These findings link two important mediators of responses to axonal injury, DLK/Wnd and cAMP/PKA, into a unified and evolutionarily conserved molecular pathway for stimulating the regenerative potential of injured axons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14048.001 PMID:27268300

  1. Molecular interactions of the γ-clade homeodomain-leucine zipper class I transcription factors during the wheat response to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John C; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Taylor, Mathew; Bazanova, Natalia; Baumann, Ute; Lovell, Ben; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The γ-clade of class I homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) constitute members which play a role in adapting plant growth to conditions of water deficit. Given the importance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as a global food crop and the impact of water deficit upon grain yield, we focused on functional aspects of wheat drought responsive HD-Zip I TFs. While the wheat γ-clade HD-Zip I TFs share significant sequence similarities with homologous genes from other plants, the clade-specific features in transcriptional response to abiotic stress were detected. We demonstrate that wheat TaHDZipI-3, TaHDZipI-4, and TaHDZipI-5 genes respond differentially to a variety of abiotic stresses, and that proteins encoded by these genes exhibit pronounced differences in oligomerisation, strength of DNA binding, and trans-activation of an artificial promoter. Three-dimensional molecular modelling of the protein-DNA interface was conducted to address the ambiguity at the central nucleotide in the pseudo-palindromic cis-element CAATNATTG that is recognised by all three HD-Zip I proteins. The co-expression of these genes in the same plant tissues together with the ability of HD-Zip I TFs of the γ-clade to hetero-dimerise suggests a role in the regulatory mechanisms of HD-Zip I dependent transcription. Our findings highlight the complexity of TF networks involved in plant responses to water deficit. A better understanding of the molecular complexity at the protein level during crop responses to drought will enable adoption of efficient strategies for production of cereal plants with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:26803501

  2. SNARE zippering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaochu; Shin, Yeon-Kyun

    2016-06-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly conserved set of membrane-associated proteins that mediate intracellular membrane fusion. Cognate SNAREs from two separate membranes zipper to facilitate membrane apposition and fusion. Though the stable post-fusion conformation of SNARE complex has been extensively studied with biochemical and biophysical means, the pathway of SNARE zippering has been elusive. In this review, we describe some recent progress in understanding the pathway of SNARE zippering. We particularly focus on the half-zippered intermediate, which is most likely to serve as the main point of regulation by the auxiliary factors. PMID:27154457

  3. Zipper Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  4. Characteristic expression of HTLV-1 basic zipper factor (HBZ transcripts in HTLV-1 provirus-positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Yasuaki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Although there have been many studies on the oncogenesis of the viral protein Tax, the precise oncogenic mechanism remains to be elucidated. Recently, a new viral factor, HTLV-1 basic Zip factor (HBZ, encoded from the minus strand mRNA was discovered and the current models of Tax-centered ATL cell pathogenesis are in conflict with this discovery. HBZs consisting of non-spliced and spliced isoforms (HBZ-SI are thought to be implicated in viral replication and T-cell proliferation but there is little evidence on the HBZ expression profile on a large scale. Results To investigate the role of HBZ-SI in HTLV-1 provirus-positive cells, the HBZ-SI and Tax mRNA loads in samples with a mixture of infected and non-infected cells were measured and then adjusted by dividing by the HTLV-I proviral load. We show here that the HBZ-SI mRNA level is 4-fold higher than non-spliced HBZ and is expressed by almost all cells harboring HTLV-1 provirus with variable intensity. The proviral-adjusted HBZ-SI and Tax quantification revealed a characteristic imbalanced expression feature of high HBZ and low Tax expression levels in primary ATL cells or high HBZ and very high Tax levels in HTLV-1-related cell lines (cell lines compared with a standard expression profile of low HBZ and low Tax in infected cells. Interestingly, according to the mutual Tax and HBZ expression status, HTLV-1-related cell lines were subcategorized into two groups, an ATL cell type with high HBZ and low Tax levels and another type with high Tax and either high or low HBZ, which was closely related to its cell origin. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the mutual expression profile of HBZ and Tax in provirus-positive cells, revealing that there are quantitative and relative characteristic features among infected cells, primary ATL cells, and cell lines.

  5. Modeling of DNA zipper reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Preston; Sanchez, Casey; Mo, Alexander; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    DNA zippers are a thermodynamically driven system consisting of three DNA oligonucleotides. Two of the strands are designed to create a small helix the third is designed to invade and separated the helix. A zipper system consisting of a normal strand (N), a weak strand (W), and an opening strand (O). N is made up of normal DNA bases, while W is engineered with inosine bases substituted for guanine. Inosine forms one less hydrogen bond with cytosine than guanine. By varying the number and order of inosine, W is engineered to provide less than natural bonding affinities to N in forming the [N:W] helix. When O is introduced (a natural complement of N), it competitively displaces W from [N:W] and forms [N:O]. DNA zippers have been used to create new DNA devices such as springs and tweezers and to create functionalized DNA origami structures. Currently, The basic principles and interactions of DNA zippers are not well understood. Here we will report the results on an investigation of several different DNA zipper constructs designed to aid in the creation of a mathematical prediction of the reaction rate for DNA zippers.

  6. Genome-wide Expansion and Expression Divergence of the Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors in Higher Plants with an Emphasis on Sorghum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jizhou Wang; Junxia Zhou; Baolan Zhang; Jeevanandam Vanitha; Srinivasan Ramachandran; Shu-Ye Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Plant bZIP transcription factors play crucial roles in multiple biological processes. However,little is known about the sorghum bZIP gene family although the sorghum genome has been completely sequenced. In this study,we have carried out a genome-wide identification and characterization of this gene family in sorghum.Our data show that the genome encodes at least 92 bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP genes have been expanded mainly by segmental duplication. Such an expansion mechanism has also been observed in rice,arabidopsis and many other plant organisms,suggesting a common expansion mode of this gene family in plants. Further investigation shows that most of the bZIP members have been present in the most recent common ancestor of sorghum and rice and the major expansion would occur before the sorghum-rice split era. Although these bZIP genes have been duplicated with a long history,they exhibited limited functional divergence as shown by nonsynonymous substitutions (Ka)/synonymous substitutions (Ks) analyses. Their retention was mainly due to the high percentages of expression divergence. Our data also showed that this gene family might play a role in multiple developmental stages and tissues and might be regarded as important regulators of various abiotic stresses and sugar signaling.

  7. Alanine zipper-like coiled-coil domains are necessary for homotypic dimerization of plant GAGA-factors in the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierk Wanke

    Full Text Available GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms.

  8. Alanine Zipper-Like Coiled-Coil Domains Are Necessary for Homotypic Dimerization of Plant GAGA-Factors in the Nucleus and Nucleolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Ulrich; Hecker, Andreas; Elgass, Kirstin; Hummel, Sabine; Hahn, Achim; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms. PMID:21347358

  9. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. : Non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain

    OpenAIRE

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn,; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis

    2012-01-01

    International audience The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and sever...

  10. Measuring complexity with zippers

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, A; Loreto, V; Baronchelli, Andrea; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Physics concepts have often been borrowed and independently developed by other fields of science. In this perspective a significant example is that of entropy in Information Theory. The aim of this paper is to provide a short and pedagogical introduction to the use of data compression techniques for the estimate of entropy and other relevant quantities in Information Theory and Algorithmic Information Theory. We consider in particular the LZ77 algorithm as case study and discuss how a zipper can be used for information extraction.

  11. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hearing loss. Twelve pat...

  12. Surface salt bridges stabilize the GCN4 leucine zipper.

    OpenAIRE

    Spek, E. J.; Bui, A. H.; Lu, M.; Kallenbach, N R

    1998-01-01

    We present a study of the role of salt bridges in stabilizing a simplified tertiary structural motif, the coiled-coil. Changes in GCN4 sequence have been engineered that introduce trial patterns of single and multiple salt bridges at solvent exposed sites. At the same sites, a set of alanine mutants was generated to provide a reference for thermodynamic analysis of the salt bridges. Introduction of three alanines stabilizes the dimer by 1.1 kcal/mol relative to the wild-type. An arrangement c...

  13. The industrial water footprint of zippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Wu, Xiong Ying; Wang, Lai Li; Ding, Xue Mei

    2014-01-01

    Industrial production of apparel consumes large quantity of freshwater and discharges effluents that intensify the problem of freshwater shortage and water pollution. The industrial water footprint (IWF) of a piece of apparel includes the water footprint (WF) of the fabric, apparel accessories (e.g. zipper, fastener, sewing thread) and industrial production processes. The objective of this paper is to carry out a pilot study on IWF accounting for three kinds of typical zipper (i.e. metal zipper, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) zipper and polyoxymethylene copolymer (Co-POM) zipper) that are commonly used for apparel production. The results reveal that product output exerts a remarkable influence on zipper's average IWF. Metal zipper has the largest IWF and followed by Co-POM zipper and PET zipper. Painting, dyeing and primary processing are the top three water-consuming processes and contribute about 90% of the zipper's IWF. Painting consumes the largest amount of freshwater among all processes and occupies more than 50% of the zipper's IWF. In addition, the grey water footprint (WFgrey) provides the greatest contribution, more than 80%, to the zipper's IWF. Based on these results, this paper also provides several strategies aimed at water economization and pollution reduction during industrial production of zipper. PMID:25259491

  14. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  15. Scattering zippers and their spectral theory

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A scattering zipper is a system obtained by concatenation of scattering events with equal even number of incoming and out going channels. The associated scattering zipper operator is the unitary equivalent of Jacobi matrices with matrix entries and generalizes Blatter-Browne and Chalker-Coddington models and CMV matrices. Weyl discs are analyzed and used to prove a bijection between the set of semi-infinite scattering zipper operators and matrix valued probability measures on the unit circle. Sturm-Liouville oscillation theory is developed as a tool to calculate the spectra of finite and periodic scattering zipper operators.

  16. Electrostatically tunable optomechanical "zipper" cavity laser

    CERN Document Server

    Perahia, Raviv; Meenehan, Sean; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A tunable nanoscale "zipper" laser cavity, formed from two doubly clamped photonic crystal nanobeams, is demonstrated. Pulsed, room temperature, optically pumped lasing action at a wavelength of 1.3 micron is observed for cavities formed in a thin membrane containing InAsP/GaInAsP quantum-wells. Metal electrodes are deposited on the ends of the nanobeams to allow for micro-electro-mechanical actuation. Electrostatic tuning and modulation of the laser wavelength is demonstrated at a rate of 0.25nm/V^2 and a frequency as high as 6.7MHz, respectively.

  17. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  18. Flat Zipper-Unfolding Pairs for Platonic Solids

    CERN Document Server

    O'Rourke, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We show that four of the five Platonic solids' surfaces may be cut open with a Hamiltonian path along edges and unfolded to a polygonal net each of which can "zipper-refold" to a flat doubly covered parallelogram, forming a rather compact representation of the surface. Thus these regular polyhedra have particular flat "zipper pairs." No such zipper pair exists for a dodecahedron, whose Hamiltonian unfoldings are "zip-rigid." This report is primarily an inventory of the possibilities, and raises more questions than it answers.

  19. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CLASSIFICATION ZIPPERS USED IN INDUSTRY FOOTWEAR AND LEATHER GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALCOCI Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Now customary accessory companies of all leather garments, zipper began to enjoy popularity only after 80 years of its invention. The first is considered the inventor of the zipper Elias Howe. Essentially involves fashion, change, innovation, originality, creativity and is defined as a succession of trends or fads, short. Create fashionable leather confections from home means accepting a contract with the producer and / or consumer, showing a profit motivating all at the right time. Continuous which require the exercise involves creative skills of fashion design, leading to a wide range of products. Current zipper is composed of: slider, teeth, strips shooter stops. Currently there is possibility to customize shooters to customer requirements, and even to form their own zippers. The present work presents the classification criteria zippers. They are after construction fastener after destination zippers, after the role they fulfill zippers, after the presentation at the procurement zippers, after finishing module of the metallic elements, as visibility zipper in the product, by type of teeth, by nature material strip zipper, after the type of materials they are made pullers, after the nature of the materials they are made of sliders and stops after the oxidation of metal components after finishing module teeth after shaped zipper, after slider type, by mode of ornamentation zippers. Knowing appearance zippers, elements of which it is composed, and their classification criteria allow us to correlate the shape of the product and destination.

  20. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yoosoo [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kweon, Dae-Hyuk, E-mail: dhkweon@skku.edu [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo.

  1. In Planta Single-Molecule Pull-Down Reveals Tetrameric Stoichiometry of HD-ZIPIII:LITTLE ZIPPER Complexes[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Aman Y.; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ha, Taekjip; Timmermans, Marja C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering complex biological processes markedly benefits from approaches that directly assess the underlying biomolecular interactions. Most commonly used approaches to monitor protein-protein interactions typically provide nonquantitative readouts that lack statistical power and do not yield information on the heterogeneity or stoichiometry of protein complexes. Single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) uses single-molecule fluorescence detection to mitigate these disadvantages and can quantitatively interrogate interactions between proteins and other compounds, such as nucleic acids, small molecule ligands, and lipids. Here, we establish SiMPull in plants using the HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER III (HD-ZIPIII) and LITTLE ZIPPER (ZPR) interaction as proof-of-principle. Colocalization analysis of fluorophore-tagged HD-ZIPIII and ZPR proteins provides strong statistical evidence of complex formation. In addition, we use SiMPull to directly quantify YFP and mCherry maturation probabilities, showing these differ substantially from values obtained in mammalian systems. Leveraging these probabilities, in conjunction with fluorophore photobleaching assays on over 2000 individual complexes, we determined HD-ZIPIII:ZPR stoichiometry. Intriguingly, these complexes appear as heterotetramers, comprising two HD-ZIPIII and two ZPR molecules, rather than heterodimers as described in the current model. This surprising result raises new questions about the regulation of these key developmental factors and is illustrative of the unique contribution SiMPull is poised to make to in planta protein interaction studies. PMID:27385814

  2. The Single Needle Lockstitch Machine. [Setting Zippers.] Module 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on setting zippers, one in a series on the single needle lockstitch sewing machine for student self-study, contains five sections. Each section includes the following parts: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, student self-check, check-out activities, and an instructor's final checklist.…

  3. Spontaneous zipper merging of self-driven particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the flux of self-driven particles (SDPs) in spontaneous zipper configuration merging at the junction of an open two-lane lattice. Particles are simulated by a cellular automaton model with a slow-to-start (SlS) rule. Spontaneous merging is induced by a local rule that the hopping probability of particles moving in one lane decreases with the approach of particles from the other lane. By means of numerical simulations, we show that, by varying the rate of injection of particles, the SlS rules and the hopping probabilities, the particle flux is improved as a result of the spontaneous zipper merging even if each SDP decreases its hopping probability during the zipper merging. We also investigate asymmetric interactions between particles moving in one lane while ignoring particles in the other lane. We find that asymmetric interactions are unsuitable for improving the particle flux except for the onset of congestion. Lastly, we estimate an approximate particle flux by a mean-field analysis, which confirms the improvement in particle flux, and is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations

  4. Leucine metabolism in rats with cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the pathogenesis of reduced plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine in cirrhosis. Methods: Cirrhosis was induced by intragastric administration of 36 doses of carbon tetrachloride in olive oil over a period of 12 weeks. Rats treated with oil alone served as controls. The rates of leucine turnover, clearance, oxidation and incorporation into proteins were evaluated using [1-14C]leucine, [4,5-3H]leucine and α-keto[1-14C]isocaproate 3 days after the last intragastric treatment in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Results: In animals with cirrhosis we observed a profound fall in plasma branched-chain amino acid levels and significant decreases in leucine turnover, oxidation and incorporation into tissue proteins. A more pronounced fall in leucine incorporation in proteins resulted in a significant increase in the oxidized leucine fraction in rats with cirrhosis as compared to controls. Leucine clearance was higher in the cirrhosis group. Concomitant to the fall of whole body leucine turnover, decreases of leucine incorporation into protein and a ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation were observed in the isolated perfused liver of rats with cirrhosis. However, leucine oxidation was increased compared with control rats. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the predominant mechanism of the decrease in plasma leucine levels in rats with cirrhosis is an increase in the oxidized leucine fraction associated with a decrease in leucine turnover. An increase in leucine oxidation in the cirrhotic liver is one of the mechanisms involved. (au) 48 refs

  5. Leucine in Obesity: Therapeutic Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kang; Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-08-01

    Obesity develops from an imbalance of energy homeostasis and is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in white adipose tissues (WAT). Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many obesity-induced disorders including insulin resistance and diabetes. Increasing evidence has shown that dietary leucine supplementation positively affects the parameters associated with obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders. The beneficial effects include increased loss of body weight, reduced WAT inflammation, improved lipid and glucose metabolism, enhanced mitochondrial function, and preserved lean body mass. Although these beneficial effects have not been clearly established, dietary leucine supplementation, either alone or as part of a therapeutic regimen, may be a good nutritional tool in the prevention and management of obesity and obesity-induced metabolic disorders. PMID:27256112

  6. A petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower senescence is mediated in part by changes of plant hormones, such as ethylene, cytokinin and abscisic acid (ABA). Ethylene is known to control flower senescence in many species, especially ethylene sensitive flowers, like petunia, carnation and rose. During flower senescence in petunia and ot...

  7. Silencing of the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper improves the immunogenicity of clinical-grade dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Met, Özcan; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    expression of several activation markers, such as CD83, the co-stimulation molecules CD80, CD86 and CD40 and the chemokine receptor involved in DC homing in lymph nodes CCR7, the DC immune stimulatory function in vivo contrasts with this mature phenotype, and good clinical outcomes in patients with cancer...

  8. Differential transport properties of D-leucine and L-leucine in the archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Mukohata, Y; Yuasa, S

    2000-04-01

    The transport of D-leucine was compared with that of L-leucine in Halobacterium salinarum. When a high-outside/low-inside Na+ gradient was imposed, D-leucine as well as L-leucine accumulated in envelope vesicles, supporting the hypothesis that D-leucine is transported via a symport system along with Na+. Kinetic analyses, including inhibition experiments, indicated that both enantiomers are transported via a common carrier. However, a Hill plot indicated a single binding site for Na+ during L-leucine transport, but dual binding sites for Na+ during D-leucine transport. Furthermore, D-leucine transport was dependent on electrical membrane potential, suggesting that a transporter bound with D-leucine is positively charged. L-leucine transport was slightly, if at all, dependent on membrane potential, suggesting that a transporter bound with L-leucine is electrically neutral. These results indicate that the leucine carrier in Halobacterium salinarum translocates two moles of Na+ per mole of D-leucine, and one mole of Na+ per mole of L-leucine. PMID:10779875

  9. Zipper model for the melting of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairunnisa, Shafira; Akbar, Fathan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative model to Lindemann’s criterion for melting that explains the melting of thin films on the basis of a molecular zipper-like mechanism. Using this model, a unique criterion for melting is obtained. We compared the results of the proposed model with experimental data of melting points and heat of fusion for many materials and obtained interesting results. The interesting thing reported here is how complex physics problems can sometimes be modeled with simple objects around us that seemed to have no correlation. This kind of approach is sometimes very important in physics education and should always be taught to undergraduate or graduate students.

  10. Leucine residues in conserved region of 33K protein of bovine adenovirus - 3 are important for binding to major late promoter and activation of late gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Vikas; Islam, Azharul; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-09-01

    The L6 region of bovine adenovirus 3 (BAdV-3) encode 33K (spliced) and 22K (unspliced) proteins. Earlier, anti-33K serum detected five major and three minor proteins in BAdV-3 infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that anti-sera raised against L6-22K protein detected two proteins of 42 and 37 kDa in BAdV-3 infected cells and one protein of 42 kDa in transfected cells expressing splice-site variant 22K protein (pC.22K containing substituted splice acceptor/donor sequence). Unlike 22K, 33K stimulated the transcription from the major late promoter (MLP) by binding to the downstream sequence elements (DE). Analysis of the variant proteins demonstrated that amino acids 201-240 of the conserved C-terminus of 33K containing the potential leucine zipper and RS repeat are required for the activation of MLP. Furthermore, amino acid substitution analysis demonstrated that unlike arginine residues of RS repeat, the leucine residues (217, 224, 232 and 240) of the conserved leucine zipper appear required for the binding of 33K to the MLP. PMID:25974868

  11. Radioimmunoassay of Leucine-Enkephalin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radioimmunological method for the measurement of Leucine-Enkephalin like immunoreactivity (LLI) in human plasma is described. The method requires peptide extraction from plasma by the use of a reverse-phase chromatographic system. Peptide enzymatic degradation during sample collection and storage is hampered by the use of HCl and L-Tryptophan hydroxamate. Measurement of plasma LLI in 11 normal male subjects averaged 45.2 pg/ml +- 11.6 SEM. A concomitant increase of plasmatic LLI and adrenaline concentrations was observed in 1 out of 5 subjects submitted to a standardized mental exercise

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL092W, YDR259C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ey (1) YDR259C YAP6 Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithium...ption Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithi...um tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of expression of

  13. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primed continuous infusion of [15N, 1-13C]leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet [0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)]. An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO2 enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy

  14. Effects of leucine, isoleucine, or threonine infusion on leucine metabolism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leucine and/or its α-keto acid, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC), have been reported to spare protein in humans. To determine whether specific amino acid infusions affect whole-body protein metabolism as estimated by changes in leucine flux and oxidation, five groups of normal subjects were infused with saline, leucine, isoleucine, or threonine. Independent estimates of leucine metabolism were obtained using simultaneous infusions of [3H]-leucine and α-[14C]ketoisocaproate. Nearly identical results were obtained using either tracer compared with the saline controls. Compared with the saline controls, leucine infusion (1) had no effect on estimated rates of appearance of endogenous leucine, (2) stimulated leucine oxidation, (3) decreased plasma concentrations of other amino acids, and (4) stimulated nonoxidized leucine disappearance in a dose-dependent fashion. In contrast, isoleucine and threonine infusions had no effect on leucine metabolism. Assuming the validity of the isotope model employed, these data suggest that the purported anabolic effect of leucine infusion on whole-body protein metabolism is mediated via stimulation of protein synthesis rather than decreased proteolysis

  15. Syntheses and Self-assembling Behaviors of Pentagonal Conjugates of Tryptophane Zipper-Forming Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pentagonal conjugates of tryptophane zipper-forming peptide (CKTWTWTE with a pentaazacyclopentadecane core (Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip and Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip were synthesized and their self-assembling behaviors were investigated in water. Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip self-assembled into nanofibers with the width of about 5 nm in neutral water (pH 7 via formation of tryptophane zipper, which irreversibly converted to nanoribbons by heating. In contrast, Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip formed irregular aggregates in water.

  16. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CLASSIFICATION ZIPPERS USED IN INDUSTRY FOOTWEAR AND LEATHER GOODS

    OpenAIRE

    MALCOCI Marina; PASCARI Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Now customary accessory companies of all leather garments, zipper began to enjoy popularity only after 80 years of its invention. The first is considered the inventor of the zipper Elias Howe. Essentially involves fashion, change, innovation, originality, creativity and is defined as a succession of trends or fads, short. Create fashionable leather confections from home means accepting a contract with the producer and / or consumer, showing a profit motivating all at the right time. Continuou...

  17. Effects of [15N]leucine infused at low rates on leucine metabolism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies were carried out to determine whether infusions of [15N]leucine at low rates affect estimates of leucine oxidation and of proteolysis and protein synthesis in humans. Three groups of normal subjects were infused for 3 h with either [15N]leucine at a rate of 0.16 or 0.26 mumol X kg-1 X min-1 or saline using [3H]leucine and alpha-[14C]ketoisocaproate as isotopic tracers of leucine metabolism. Data were analyzed at steady state using both single- and dual-isotope models. Preliminary studies were carried out to characterize the dual-isotope model in humans using infusions of [3H]leucine and alpha-[14C]ketoisocaproate. In the postabsorptive state estimates of leucine appearance, disappearance, and oxidation derived from the two isotope models were in good agreement. Infusion of stable isotope up to approximately 10% of the leucine carbon flux do not have a significant effect on leucine metabolism, but the data derived from such studies must be properly controlled and interpreted with care because these tracers are not massless

  18. Zippered release from polymer-gated carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2012-01-01

    A thermosensitive drug delivery system based on polymer-gated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is herein reported. The development of carbon nanotubes for various biomedical applications is the research focus of many research groups and holds great promise. The major drawback of these materials is the toxicity that is associated with conjugated carbon systems. Functionalization of CNTs with polymers has proved very successful in lowering the toxicity and improving the pharmacokinetic profile. In this work, CNTs are coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) via the "zipper effect" that provides both support and control over drug release. PEI/PVA provides excellent support to increase DOX loading on the nanocarrier. The system is controlled by changes in temperature due to the complexation (low temperature) and decomplexation (high temperature) of PEI and PVA via hydrogen bonding. The release of DOX was tested in three cell lines (Lung fibroblast (LF), Breast Adenocarcinoma (BA), and HeLa). It was further tested in primary cell lines (Human Dermal Fibroblast adult (HDFa) and Human Dermal Fibroblast neonatal (HDFn)). When the bonds between PEI and PVA are decomplexed at high temperature (≥40 °C), drug release was observed as verified by fluorescence microscopy. There was no drug release at room temperature (25 °C) and a slow release at normal body temperature (37 °C). This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in future controlled release applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Changes in leucine kinetics during meal absorption: effects of dietary leucine availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body leucine and α/-ketoisocaproate (KIC) metabolism were estimated in mature dogs fed a complete meal, a meal devoid of branched-chain amino acids, and a meal devoid of all amino acids. Using a constant infusion of [4,5-3H]leucine and α-[1-14C]ketoisocaproate (KIC), combined with dietary [5,5,5-2H3]leucine, the rate of whole-body proteolysis, protein synthesis, leucine oxidation, and interconversion leucine and KIC were estimated along with the rate of leucine absorption. Digestion of the complete meal resulted in a decrease in the rate of endogenous proteolysis, a small increase in the estimated rate of leucine entering protein, and a twofold increase in the rate of leucine oxidation. Ingestion of either the meal devoid of branched-chain amino acids or devoid of all amino acids resulted in a decrease in estimates of whole-body rates of proteolysis and protein synthesis, decreased leucine oxidation, and a decrease in the interconversion of leucine and KIC. The decrease in whole-body proteolysis was closely associated with the rise in plasma insulin concentrations following meal ingestion. Together these data suggest that the transition from tissue metabolism to anabolism is the result, at least in part, of decreased whole-body proteolysis. This meal-related decrease in proteolysis is independent of the dietary amino acid composition or content. In contrast, the rate of protein synthesis was sustained only when the meal complete in all amino acids was provided, indicating an overriding control of protein synthesis by amino acid availability

  20. Interconversion of valine and leucine by Clostridium sporogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Monticello, D J; Costilow, R N

    1982-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes has been found to require L-leucine and L-valine for growth in a minimal medium, although valine can be replaced by isobutyrate and leucine by isovalerate. Cells grown in minimal media incorporated significant 14C from [14C]valine into leucine and from [14C]leucine into valine. Growth with [4,5-3H]leucine also resulted in the incorporation of 3H into valine. These results indicate that these bacteria can interconvert leucine and valine.

  1. Directed evolution of leucine dehydrogenase for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-07-01

    L-tert-Leucine and its derivatives are used as synthetic building blocks for pharmaceutical active ingredients, chiral auxiliaries, and ligands. Leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) is frequently used to prepare L-tert-leucine from the α-keto acid precursor trimethylpyruvate (TMP). In this study, a high-throughput screening method for the L-tert-leucine synthesis reaction based on a spectrophotometric approach was developed. Directed evolution strategy was applied to engineer LeuDH from Lysinibacillus sphaericus for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis. After two rounds of random mutagenesis, the specific activity of LeuDH on the substrate TMP was enhanced by more than two-fold, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme, while the activity towards its natural substrate, leucine, decreased. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) of the best mutant enzyme, H6, on substrates TMP and NADH were all enhanced by more than five-fold as compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis by mutant H6 was significantly improved. A productivity of 1170 g/l/day was achieved for the mutant enzyme H6, compared with 666 g/l/day for the wild-type enzyme. PMID:26898942

  2. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Massazo Utiyama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. METHODS: we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years; 11 patients were male, and four were female. RESULTS: forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. CONCLUSION: the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  3. Relationship between plasma and tissue parameters of leucine metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a primed continuous infusion of [1-14C] leucine, the authors investigated parameters of leucine metabolism in plasma, expired air, and tissues of fed and 48-hour starved rats. The ratios of muscle/plasma specific activity of α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) in fed and starved rats, respectively were not significantly different from one (1.07 +/- 0.14 and 0.97 +/- 0.10, mean +/- SE, 7 rats). The ratio of muscle/plasma specific activity of leucine was also not significantly different from one (0.86 +/- 0.11) in fed rats, but was significantly lower than one (0.80 +/- 0.07) in starved rats. The rate of leucine oxidation was approximately 32% higher when calculated based on plasma KIC rather than leucine specific activity. However, starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation with either specific activity. The rate of leucine incorporation into whole body protein was unaffected by starvation (32.7 +/- 3.5 vs 36.1 +/- 2.5 μmol/100 g/h), but the incorporation into total protein of liver (1350 +/- 140 vs 780 +/- 33 nmol) and of skeletal muscle (1940 +/- 220 vs 820 +/- 60 nmol) was significantly decreased. The authors conclude that a) leucine or KIC specific activity in muscle is better predicted by plasma KIC than leucine specific activity, and b) the tracer infusion technique is valid for the study of leucine oxidation but not for leucine incorporation into whole body protein

  4. Kinetics of sequential metabolism from D-leucine to L-leucine via alpha-ketoisocaproic acid in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Takao

    2002-12-01

    D-Leucine is considered to be converted into the L-enantiomer by two steps: oxidative deamination to form alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and subsequent stereospecific reamination of KIC. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of leucine enantiomers and KIC in rats to evaluate how deamination of D-leucine, reamination of KIC, and decarboxylation of KIC were affected to the overall extent that converted D-leucine into the L-enantiomer. After intravenous administrations of D-[(2)H(7)]leucine, L-[(2)H(7)]leucine, or [(2)H(7)]KIC, their plasma concentrations together with endogenous L-leucine and KIC were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The rapid appearances of [(2)H(7)]KIC and L-[(2)H(7)]leucine were observed after administration of D-[(2)H(7)]leucine, whereas no detectable amount of D-[(2)H(7)]leucine was found after administrations of [(2)H(7)]KIC or L-[(2)H(7)]leucine. The fraction of conversion from D-[(2)H(7)]leucine into [(2)H(7)]KIC (F(D-->KIC)) was estimated by using the area under the curve (AUC) of [(2)H(7)]KIC on the D-[(2)H(7)]leucine administration [AUC(KIC(D))] and that of [(2)H(7)]KIC on the [(2)H(7)]KIC administration (AUC(KIC)) to yield 70.1%. The fraction of conversion from [(2)H(7)]KIC to L-[(2)H(7)]leucine (F(KIC-->L)) was 40.2%. The fraction of conversion from D-leucine to the L-enantiomer (F(D-->L)) was considered to be the product of F(D-->KIC) and F(KIC-->L), indicating that 28.2% of D-[(2)H(7)]leucine was metabolized to L-[(2)H(7)]leucine via [(2)H(7)]KIC. These results suggested that the relatively low conversion of D-leucine into the L-enantiomer might depend on irreversible decarboxylation of KIC. Regardless of [(2)H(7)]KIC, F(D-->L) was also calculated directly using AUC(L(D)) and AUC(L) to yield 27.5%. There were no differences between the two F(D-->L) values, suggesting that almost all of the formation of L-[(2)H(7)]leucine from D-[(2)H(7)]leucine occurred via [(2)H(7)]KIC as an intermediate. PMID:12433816

  5. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    CERN Document Server

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 6.0x10^4 and an effective mode volume Vmode of 0.66{\\lambda}^3 when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. We found that this Q/V_mode value is five times higher than can be obtained with a single nanocavity design. The mechanical Q (Q_m) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0x10^6 in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g_OM is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  6. Leucine supplementation protects from insulin resistance by regulating adiposity levels

    OpenAIRE

    Elke Binder; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J.; Caroline André; Melissa Elie; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Thierry Leste-Lasserre; Ilaria Belluomo; Adeline Duchampt; Samantha Clark; Agnes Aubert; Marco Mezzullo; Flaminia Fanelli; Uberto Pagotto; Sophie Layé; Gilles Mithieux, &

    2013-01-01

    Background[br/] Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed.[br/] [br/] Methodology/Principal Findings[br/] Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed...

  7. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes. PMID:26054437

  8. a1/EBP: a leucine zipper protein that binds CCAAT/enhancer elements in the avian leukosis virus long terminal repeat enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, W J; Ruddell, A

    1992-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces bursal lymphoma in chickens after integration of proviral long terminal repeat (LTR) enhancer sequences next to the c-myc proto-oncogene. Labile LTR-binding proteins appear to be essential for c-myc hyperexpression, since both LTR-enhanced transcription and the activities of LTR-binding proteins are specifically decreased after inhibition of protein synthesis (A. Ruddell, M. Linial, W. Schubach, and M. Groudine, J. Virol. 62:2728-2735, 1988). This lability i...

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR259C, YLR423C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion increases sodium and lithium tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of expressi...tative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithium toleran

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL181W, YDR259C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rexpression increases sodium and lithium tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of ...gene name YAP6 Prey description Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithiu

  11. Protein and leucine metabolism in maple syrup urine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant infusions of [13C]leucine and [2H5]phenylalanine were used to trace leucine and protein kinetics, respectively, in seven children with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and eleven controls matched for age and dietary protein intake. Despite significant elevations of plasma leucine (mean 351 mumol/l, range 224-477) in MSUD subjects, mean whole body protein synthesis [3.78 +/- 0.42 (SD) g.kg-1. 24 h-1] and catabolism (4.07 +/- 0.46) were similar to control values (3.69 +/- 0.50 and 4.09 +/- 0.50, respectively). The relationship between phenylalanine and leucine fluxes was also similar in MSUD subjects (mean phenylalanine-leucine flux ratio 0.35 +/- 0.07) and previously reported adult controls (0.33 +/- 0.02). Leucine oxidation was undetectable in four of the MSUD subjects and very low in the other three (less than 4 mumol.kg-1.h-1; controls 13-20). These results show that persistent elevation in leucine concentration has no effect on protein synthesis. The marked disturbance in leucine metabolism in MSUD did not alter the relationship between rates of catabolism of protein to phenylalanine and leucine, which provides further support for the validity of the use of a single amino acid to trace whole body protein metabolism. The minimal leucine oxidation in MSUD differs from findings in other inborn metabolic errors and indicates that in patients with classical MSUD there is no significant route of leucine disposal other than through protein synthesis

  12. The Perennial Ryegrass GenomeZipper – Targeted Use of Genome Resources for Comparative Grass Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben;

    2013-01-01

    (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to...... assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The...

  13. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 100 incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 μCi 1-14C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and 14CO2 collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect

  14. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  15. Fetoplacental deamination and decarboxylation of leucine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal and placental metabolism of leucine (Leu) and ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) were studied in seven fetal lambs at 132 +/- 1.3-days gestation. Fetal infusions of [1-13C]Leu, [1-14C]Leu, and antipyrine were carried out for 4 h. Uterine and umbilical blood flows were measured using the antipyrine steady-state diffusion technique. Leu and KIC concentrations, [14C]Leu-specific activities, 14CO2, [13C]Leu, and [13C]KIC enrichment (mole percent enrichment) were measured in the maternal artery, uterine vein, and umbilical artery and vein to calculate net fluxes of tracee and tracer molecules between fetus and placenta and between the uteroplacenta and the maternal circulation. There were net Leu and KIC fluxes into the fetus from the placenta with the KIC flux equal to approximately 19% of the combined Leu plus KIC flux. In addition, there was a net KIC flux into the uterine circulation. The fraction of infused tracer Leu escaping the placenta into the mother was small (approximately 6%). By contrast, there was a rapid exchange of tracer Leu carbon between placenta and fetus resulting in a significant flux of labeled KIC from placenta to fetus. Approximately 20% of the infused tracer carbon was converted to CO2 within the fetus. This rate of conversion was greater than 80% of the total fetoplacental conversion rate and significantly higher than the flux of KIC tracer carbon from placenta to fetus. Fetal KIC decarboxylation rate, calculated from the fetal KIC enrichment data, was 2.83 +/- 0.40 mumol.min-1.kg fetus-1 and approximately 60% of the combined net Leu and KIC flux into the fetus from the placenta

  16. Host epithelial cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni: trigger or zipper mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg eÓ Cróinín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative pathogen, is a highly frequent cause of gastrointestinal foodborne illness in humans worldwide. Clinical outcome of C. jejuni infections ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease, and some other complications including reactive arthritis and Guillain–Barré syndrome. This review article highlights various C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, host cell determinants and proposed signaling mechanisms involved in human host cell invasion and their potential role in the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. A model is presented which outlines the various important interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium, and we discuss the pro’s and con’s for the zipper over the trigger mechanism of invasion. Future work should clarify the contradictory role of some previously identified factors, and should identify and characterize novel virulence determinants, which are crucial to provide fresh insights into the diversity of strategies employed by this pathogen to cause disease.

  17. Cryo-EM reveals the steric zipper structure of a light chain-derived amyloid fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Annamalai, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Matthias; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-05-31

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous aggregates associated with diseases in humans and animals. The fibrils are defined by intermolecular interactions between the fibril-forming polypeptide chains, but it has so far remained difficult to reveal the assembly of the peptide subunits in a full-scale fibril. Using electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM), we present a reconstruction of a fibril formed from the pathogenic core of an amyloidogenic immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain. The fibril density shows a lattice-like assembly of face-to-face packed peptide dimers that corresponds to the structure of steric zippers in peptide crystals. Interpretation of the density map with a molecular model enabled us to identify the intermolecular interactions between the peptides and rationalize the hierarchical structure of the fibril based on simple chemical principles. PMID:27185936

  18. Circadian secretion patterns of ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. de Wet

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin are neuropeptides with potent opioid activity. In a study to investigate the circadian secretion patterns of the above-mentioned, blood samples were collected hourly from 12 healthy males who were subjected to the experiment for 24 hours. Radioimmunoassays were used in the analysis of plasma samples for ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin. Peak concentrations of ß-endorphin were demonstrated from 08:00-09:00, while peak concentrations of leucine enkephalin occured from 23:00-07:00. Trough concentrations of ß-endorphin occurred from 24:00-05:00, while trough con­centrations of leucine enkephalin were demonstrated from 09:00-12:00. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for ß-endorphin simulates the well-known circadian rhythm of cortisol. The answer to this may be in the fact that ß-endorphin and corticotropin stem from the same precursor. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for leucine enkephalin simulates that of melatonin. The reason for this is unclear.

  19. MicroRNA-27a is induced by leucine and contributes to leucine-induced proliferation promotion in C2C12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Daiwen; Yang, Ting; Liu, Guangmang

    2013-01-01

    Leucine, a branched chain amino acid, is well known to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. However, the role of leucine in myoblast proliferation remains unclear. In this study, we found that leucine could promote proliferation of C2C12 cells. Moreover, expressions of miR-27a and myostatin (a bona fide target of miR-27a) were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, following leucine treatment. We also found that miR-27a loss-of-function by transfection of a miR-27a inhibitor suppressed the promotion of myoblast proliferation caused by leucine. Our results suggest that miR-27a is induced by leucine and contributes to leucine-induced proliferation promotion of myoblast. PMID:23880856

  20. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight [IBW]) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-[15N, 1-13C] leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-[15N, 1-13C], L-[1-13C] and L-[15N] leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of 13CO2 in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X0) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis

  1. Analytical investigation of fluorescent complexes of leucine-8-hydroxyquinaldine and leucine-8-hydroxyquinoline in aqueous phase using spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed by preparing complexes involving condensation of Leucine with 8-hydroxyquinaldine and 8-hydroxyquinoline separately. The products so obtained are being investigated for identification and quantitative estimation using different spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence activity of newly synthesized complexes. The method adopted in our laboratory is rapid, versatile, reproducible and provides excellent results for adoption by analytical, agriculture and biomedical laboratories to estimate amino acids and metals in composite matrix at economical costs. Identification of amino acids in nano mole quantities has become possible by fluorescence activity of leucine- 8-hydroxyquinaldine and leucine-8-hydroxyquinoline complexes involving different excitation and emission wavelengths. This fluorescence activity of the complexes is 100 to 1000 times higher than assay method involving ninhydrin and amino acid analyzer. (author)

  2. Application of zipper-fracturing of horizontal cluster wells in the Changning shale gas pilot zone, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available After several years of exploration practices in the Changning-Weiyuan national shale gas pilot zone, the industrial production has been achieved in a number of vertical and horizontal wells completed by SRV fracturing, and a series of independent shale gas reservoir stimulation technologies have come into being. Next, it is necessary to consider how to enhance the efficiency of fracturing by a factory-mode operation. This paper presents the deployment of Changning Well Pad A, the first cluster horizontal shale gas well group, and proposes the optimal design for the factory operation mode of this Pad according to the requirements of wellpad fracturing stimulation technologies and the mountainous landform in the Sichuan Basin. Accordingly, a zipper-fracturing mode was firstly adopted in the factory fracturing on wellpad. With the application of standardized field process, zipper operation, assembly line work, staggered placement of downhole fractures, and microseismic monitoring in real time, the speed of fracturing reached 3.16 stages a day on average, and the stimulated reservoir volume was maximized, which has fully revealed how the factory operation mode contributes to the large-scale SRV fracturing of horizontal shale gas cluster wells on wellpads in the aspect of speed and efficiency. Moreover, the fracturing process, operation mode, surface facilities and post-fracturing preliminary evaluation of the zipper-fracturing in the well group were examined comprehensively. It is concluded from the practice that the zipper-fracturing in the two wells enhanced the efficiency by 78% and stimulated reservoir volume by 50% compared with the single-well fracturing at the preliminary stage in this area.

  3. Finding a Leucine in a Haystack: Searching the Proteome for ambigous Leucine-Aspartic Acid motifs

    KAUST Repository

    Arold, Stefan T.

    2016-01-25

    Leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs involved in cell motility, survival and communication. LD motif interactions are also implicated in cancer metastasis and are targeted by several viruses. LD motifs are notoriously difficult to detect because sequence pattern searches lead to an excessively high number of false positives. Hence, despite 20 years of research, only six LD motif–containing proteins are known in humans, three of which are close homologues of the paxillin family. To enable the proteome-wide discovery of LD motifs, we developed LD Motif Finder (LDMF), a web tool based on machine learning that combines sequence information with structural predictions to detect LD motifs with high accuracy. LDMF predicted 13 new LD motifs in humans. Using biophysical assays, we experimentally confirmed in vitro interactions for four novel LD motif proteins. Thus, LDMF allows proteome-wide discovery of LD motifs, despite a highly ambiguous sequence pattern. Functional implications will be discussed.

  4. Specific carbon-13 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone specifically 13C-labelled in the carbonyl positions of all 26 leucine residues has been obtained by recombiant DNA techniques using 13C-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, on the whole, the labelling is specific with no significant mislabelling as would have been the case had the 13C-labelled leucine been metabolized. (au)

  5. Relation between plasma and tissue parameters of leucine metabolism in fed and starved rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By use of a primed continuous infusion of [1-14C]leucine, the authors investigated parameters of leucine metabolism in plasma, expired air, and tissues of fed and 48-h starved rats. The ratios of muscle to plasma specific activity of α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) in fed and starved rats were not significantly different from 1. The ratio of muscle to plasma specific activity of leucine was also not significantly different from 1 in fed rats, but was significantly lower than 1 in starved rats. The rate of leucine oxidation was 28-34% higher when calculation was based on plasma KIC rather than leucine specific activity. However, starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation with either specific activity. The rates of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein, calculated as the difference between plasma leucine turnover and oxidation, were unaffected by starvation, but the incorporations into total protein measured directly were significantly decreased in liver and muscle. They conclude that a) leucine or KIC specific activity in muscle is better predicted by plasma KIC than leucine specific activity, and b) the difference between rates of plasma leucine turnover and oxidation does not appear to be a valid measurement of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  9. Backpack Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Backpack Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Backpack Basics Print A ... it can cause back problems or even injury. Backpacks Are Best Backpacks can't be beat for ...

  10. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics Print A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  11. Hygiene Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hygiene Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Hygiene Basics Print A A A Text Size What's ... smell, anyway? Read below for information on some hygiene basics — and learn how to deal with greasy ...

  12. Vibrational absorption and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of leucine in water under different pH conditions: Hydrogen-bonding interactions with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Zhu, Peiyan; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2012-11-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy have been used to study leucine, a flexible branched-chain amino acid, in aqueous solution. The VA spectra in the range of 1800-1250 cm-1 of leucine in D2O under three representative pHs from strongly acidic (pH = 1), near neutral (pH = 6), to strongly basic (pH = 13), have been measured. The related VCD spectrum has been obtained under near neutral condition. Searches have been carried out to identify the most stable conformers of the Zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of leucine in water. The geometry optimization, harmonic frequency calculations, and VA and VCD intensities have been computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with the implicit polarizable continuum solvation model. While the observed VA spectra under three pHs can be well interpreted with the inclusion of the implicit solvation model, both implicit and explicit solvation models have been found to be crucial for the adequate interpretation of the complex VCD features observed. Molecular dynamics simulations and radial distribution functions have been used to aid the modeling of the leucine-(water)N clusters. It has been recognized that the insertion of a water molecule between the COO- and NH3+ functional groups in the explicit solvated clusters is critical to reproduce the VCD signatures observed. Furthermore, the inclusion of the implicit bulk water environment has been found to be essential to lock water molecules, which are directly hydrogen bonded to leucine, into the positions expected in solution. The application of the explicit and implicit solvation models simultaneously allows new insights into the hydrogen bonding network surrounding leucine in aqueous solution and the role of the surrounding bulk water in stabilizing such hydrogen-bonding network.

  13. Bistable forespore engulfment in Bacillus subtilis by a zipper mechanism in absence of the cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ojkic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To survive starvation, the bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. The initial step of sporulation is asymmetric cell division, leading to a large mother-cell and a small forespore compartment. After division is completed and the dividing septum is thinned, the mother cell engulfs the forespore in a slow process based on cell-wall degradation and synthesis. However, recently a new cell-wall independent mechanism was shown to significantly contribute, which can even lead to fast engulfment in [Formula: see text] 60 [Formula: see text] of the cases when the cell wall is completely removed. In this backup mechanism, strong ligand-receptor binding between mother-cell protein SpoIIIAH and forespore-protein SpoIIQ leads to zipper-like engulfment, but quantitative understanding is missing. In our work, we combined fluorescence image analysis and stochastic Langevin simulations of the fluctuating membrane to investigate the origin of fast bistable engulfment in absence of the cell wall. Our cell morphologies compare favorably with experimental time-lapse microscopy, with engulfment sensitive to the number of SpoIIQ-SpoIIIAH bonds in a threshold-like manner. By systematic exploration of model parameters, we predict regions of osmotic pressure and membrane-surface tension that produce successful engulfment. Indeed, decreasing the medium osmolarity in experiments prevents engulfment in line with our predictions. Forespore engulfment may thus not only be an ideal model system to study decision-making in single cells, but its biophysical principles are likely applicable to engulfment in other cell types, e.g. during phagocytosis in eukaryotes.

  14. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  15. Leucine incorporation into mixed skeletal muscle protein in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractional mixed skeletal muscle protein synthesis (FMPS) was estimated in 10 postabsorptive healthy men by determining the increment in the abundance of [13C]-leucine in quadriceps muscle protein during an intravenous infusion of L-[1-13C]leucine. Whole-body muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was calculated based on the estimation of muscle mass from creatinine excretion and compared with whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) calculated from the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux. A significant correlation was found between MPS. The contribution of MPS to WBPS was 27 ± 1%, which is comparable to the reports in other species. Morphometric analyses of adjacent muscle samples in eight subjects demonstrated that the biopsy specimens consisted of 86.5 ± 2% muscular as opposed to other tissues. Because fiber type composition varies between biopsies, the authors examined the relationship between proportions of each fiber type and FMPS. Variation in the composition of biopsies and in fiber-type proportion did not affect the estimation of muscle protein synthesis rate. They conclude that stable isotope techniques using serial needle biopsies permit the direct measurement of FMPS in humans and that this estimation is correlated with an indirect estimation of WBPS

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  20. BASIC Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  2. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the "zipper") that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  3. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  9. Brain Basics

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  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... However, recent research points to a possible new class of antidepressants that can relieve symptoms of the ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the ... disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, ... Plan in 2016 August 31, 2016, 2:00-3:00 PM ET Recovery Month September 2016 National ...

  15. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  16. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  18. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  5. Body Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Health & Education Mental Health Information Publications Educational Resources Clinical Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction ...

  7. Specific nitrogen-15 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone (hGH) specifically 15N labelled in the leucine residues has been obtained by recombinant DNA technology, using 15N-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, despite the possibility of minor transaminase activity, the labelling on the whole is specific, and that the two-dimensional 1H-15N correlation NMR spectra of hGH can be greatly simplified by this methodology. (au)

  8. Potential antiproteolytic effects of L-leucine: observations of in vitro and in vivo studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lancha Antonio H; Nicastro Humberto; Zanchi Nelo E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of present review is to describe the effect of leucine supplementation on skeletal muscle proteolysis suppression in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Most studies, using in vitro methodology, incubated skeletal muscles with leucine with different doses and the results suggests that there is a dose-dependent effect. The same responses can be observed in in vivo studies. Importantly, the leucine effects on skeletal muscle protein synthesis are not always connected to the ...

  9. Role of renal D-amino-acid oxidase in pharmacokinetics of D-leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Konno, Ryuichi; Hashimoto, Takao

    2004-07-01

    d-Amino acids are now recognized to be widely present in mammals. Renal d-amino-acid oxidase (DAO) is associated with conversion of d-amino acids to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, but its contribution in vivo is poorly understood because the alpha-keto acids and/or l-amino acids formed are indistinguishable from endogenous compounds. First, we examined whether DAO is indispensable for conversion of d-amino acids to their alpha-keto acids by using the stable isotope tracer technique. After a bolus intravenous administration of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to mutant mice lacking DAO activity (ddY/DAO(-)) and normal mice (ddY/DAO(+)), elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine and formation of alpha-[(2)H(7)]ketoisocaproic acid ([(2)H(7)]KIC) and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine in plasma were determined. The ddY/DAO(-) mice, in contrast to ddY/DAO(+) mice, failed to convert d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to [(2)H(7)]KIC and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine. This result clearly revealed that DAO was indispensable for the process of chiral inversion of d-leucine. We further investigated the effect of renal mass reduction by partial nephrectomy on elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine and formation of [(2)H(7)]KIC and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine. Renal mass reduction slowed down the elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine. The fraction of conversion of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to [(2)H(7)]KIC in sham-operated rats was 0.77, whereas that in five-sixths-nephrectomized rats was 0.25. The elimination behavior of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine observed in rats suggested that kidney was the principal organ responsible for converting d-leucine to KIC. PMID:15026304

  10. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein...

  11. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello Maria

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein: pregnant (N, tumor-bearing (WN, pair-fed rats (Np. Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine: leucine (L, tumor-bearing (WL and pair-fed with leucine (Lp. Non pregnant rats (C, which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Results Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Conclusions Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones.

  12. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein): pregnant (N), tumor-bearing (WN), pair-fed rats (Np). Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine): leucine (L), tumor-bearing (WL) and pair-fed with leucine (Lp). Non pregnant rats (C), which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones

  13. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  14. Comparative analysis of pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine (Tanganil) and its two isomers (N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine) on vestibular compensation: Behavioral investigation in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighilet, Brahim; Leonard, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Lacour, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Head roll tilt, postural imbalance and spontaneous nystagmus are the main static vestibular deficits observed after an acute unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). In the UVL cat model, these deficits are fully compensated over 6 weeks as the result of central vestibular compensation. N-Acetyl-dl-leucine is a drug prescribed in clinical practice for the symptomatic treatment of acute UVL patients. The present study investigated the effects of N-acetyl-dl-leucine on the behavioral recovery after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the cat, and compared the effects of each of its two isomers N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine. Efficacy of these three drug treatments has been evaluated with respect to a placebo group (UVN+saline water) on the global sensorimotor activity (observation grids), the posture control (support surface measurement), the locomotor balance (maximum performance at the rotating beam test), and the spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (recorded in the light). Whatever the parameters tested, the behavioral recovery was strongly and significantly accelerated under pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine and N-acetyl-L-leucine. In contrast, the N-acetyl-D-leucine isomer had no effect at all on the behavioral recovery, and animals of this group showed the same recovery profile as those receiving a placebo. It is concluded that the N-acetyl-L-leucine isomer is the active part of the racemate component since it induces a significant acceleration of the vestibular compensation process similar (and even better) to that observed under treatment with the racemate component only. PMID:26607469

  15. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  17. Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luparelli, Augustus N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These four articles focus on developing basic reading, science, and job search skills: "Reading Program for Vocational Classes" by Augustus Luparelli; "Why Teach Employability Skills?" by Larry Siefferman; "Improving Vocabulary and Reading Skills" by Edythe Conway; and "Science in Everyday Life" by Virginia Eleazer and George Carney. (SK)

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  20. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  1. Basic Backwardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  2. A convenient procedure for the preparation of high specific activity tritiated α - amino acids : L - leucine - T (G) and L - iso - leucine - T (G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a convenient procedure for the synthesis of high specific activity tritiated amino acids, L- leucine-T (G) and L- iso - leucine - T (G) is presented. The method can very well be adopted for the synthesis of other amino acids. The experimental details of the synthesis carried out to obtain a product of high specific activity of 70 - 85 Ci / m mole (2590 - 3145 GBq / m mole) are described. (author)

  3. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. Howe...

  4. Catabolism of leucine to branched-chain fatty acids in Staphylococcus xylosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, A M; Lauritsen, F R

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is an important starter culture in the production of flavours from the branched-chain amino acids leucine, valine and isoleucine in fermented meat products. The sensorially most important flavour compounds are the branched-chain aldehydes and acids derived from the correspo...... corresponding amino acids and this paper intends to perspectivate these flavour compounds in the context of leucine metabolism....

  5. L-leucine methyl ester stimulates insulin secretion and islet glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, P; Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A;

    1983-01-01

    Column perifusion of collagenase-isolated mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the dynamics of insulin release in experiments lasting for several hours. The methyl esters of L-leucine and L-arginine were synthesized. Whereas L-arginine methyl ester (L-arginine OMe) had no effect, L-leucine O...

  6. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, a Chinese l-leucine producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yongli; Ma, Yuechao; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Xie, Xixian; Chen, Ning

    2016-02-20

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, an industrial l-leucine producing strain in China. The whole genome consists of a circular chromosome and a plasmid. The comparative genomics analysis shows that there are many mutations in the key enzyme coding genes relevant to l-leucine biosynthesis compared to C. glutamicum ATCC 13032. PMID:26784991

  7. Leucine-based receptor sorting motifs are dependent on the spacing relative to the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Dietrich, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1998-01-01

    amino acid, is constitutively active. In this study, we have investigated how the spacing relative to the plasma membrane affects the function of both types of leucine-based motifs. For phosphorylation-dependent leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 7 residues between the plasma membrane and the...... phospho-acceptor was required for phosphorylation and thereby activation of the motifs. For constitutively active leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 6 residues between the plasma membrane and the acidic residue was required for optimal activity of the motifs. In addition, we found that the acidic......Many integral membrane proteins contain leucine-based motifs within their cytoplasmic domains that mediate internalization and intracellular sorting. Two types of leucine-based motifs have been identified. One type is dependent on phosphorylation, whereas the other type, which includes an acidic...

  8. Chiral conducting surfaces via electrochemical oxidation of L-leucine-oligothiophenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, Christopher D; Omri, Karim; Chahma, M'hamed

    2010-09-17

    Polythiophenes bearing a specific chiral center such as L-leucine have been prepared via the electrochemical oxidation of a series of L-leucine functionalized oligothiophenes (monothiophenes and terthiophenes). These oligothiophenes have been prepared through the condensation of L-leucine methyl ester and the corresponding thiophene monomers in the presence of hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt) and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) followed by hydrolysis of the esters. The electroactive polymers are electrochemically stable and exhibit excellent adhesive properties on electrode surfaces (platinum, gold, and glassy carbon) as well as interesting optical properties in both doped and undoped states. Hydrogen bonds between a free amino acid (L-leucine, D-leucine, L-alanine, D-alanine, and D/L-alanine) and the L-leucine based polythiophenes (chiral conducting surface) were probed using cyclic voltammetry. Preliminary results show that the capacitive current of a modified L-leucine-polythiophene electrode decreases as a result of the formation of a hydrogen bond barrier on the surface of the chiral conducting surface accompanied with a shift of the oxidation potential. Cyclic voltammetry responses resulting from the interaction of the chiral conducting surface with L and Dfree amino acid isomers are similar. The formation of hydrogen bonds between the chiral conducting surfaces and the free amino acids was characterized by (1)H NMR. A chemical shift was observed for the N-H group in monomer 6 as a result of the hydrogen bond formation between the L-leucine methyl ester (D-leucine methyl ester, D/L-leucine methyl ester) and monomer 6. PMID:20718451

  9. Leucine and HMB differentially modulate proteasome system in skeletal muscle under different sarcopenic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L Baptista

    Full Text Available In the present study we have compared the effects of leucine supplementation and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB on the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the PI3K/Akt pathway during two distinct atrophic conditions, hindlimb immobilization and dexamethasone treatment. Leucine supplementation was able to minimize the reduction in rat soleus mass driven by immobilization. On the other hand, leucine supplementation was unable to provide protection against soleus mass loss in dexamethasone treated rats. Interestingly, HMB supplementation was unable to provide protection against mass loss in all treatments. While solely fiber type I cross sectional area (CSA was protected in immobilized soleus of leucine-supplemented rats, none of the fiber types were protected by leucine supplementation in rats under dexamethasone treatment. In addition and in line with muscle mass results, HMB treatment did not attenuate CSA decrease in all fiber types against either immobilization or dexamethasone treatment. While leucine supplementation was able to minimize increased expression of both Mafbx/Atrogin and MuRF1 in immobilized rats, leucine was only able to minimize Mafbx/Atrogin in dexamethasone treated rats. In contrast, HMB was unable to restrain the increase in those atrogenes in immobilized rats, but in dexamethasone treated rats, HMB minimized increased expression of Mafbx/Atrogin. The amount of ubiquitinated proteins, as expected, was increased in immobilized and dexamethasone treated rats and only leucine was able to block this increase in immobilized rats but not in dexamethasone treated rats. Leucine supplementation maintained soleus tetanic peak force in immobilized rats at normal level. On the other hand, HMB treatment failed to maintain tetanic peak force regardless of treatment. The present data suggested that the anti-atrophic effects of leucine are not mediated by its metabolite HMB.

  10. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  11. Regression Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Kahane, Leo H

    2007-01-01

    Using a friendly, nontechnical approach, the Second Edition of Regression Basics introduces readers to the fundamentals of regression. Accessible to anyone with an introductory statistics background, this book builds from a simple two-variable model to a model of greater complexity. Author Leo H. Kahane weaves four engaging examples throughout the text to illustrate not only the techniques of regression but also how this empirical tool can be applied in creative ways to consider a broad array of topics. New to the Second Edition Offers greater coverage of simple panel-data estimation:

  12. Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in high-fat diet fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Wei Yuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have reported the favorable effect of leucine supplementation on insulin resistance or insulin sensitivity. However, whether or not leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity remains unclear. Design: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a high-fat diet (HFD or HFD supplemented with 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5% leucine for 16 weeks. At the end of the experiment, serum leptin level was measured by ELISA, and leptin receptor (ObR in the hypothalamus was examined by immunohistochemistry. The protein expressions of ObR and leptin-signaling pathway in adipose tissues were detected by western blot. Results: No significant differences in body weight and food/energy intake existed among the four groups. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower, and ObR expression in the hypothalamus and adipose tissues was significantly higher in the three leucine groups than in the control group. These phenomena suggested that leptin sensitivity was improved in the leucine groups. Furthermore, the expressions of JAK2 and STAT3 (activated by ObR were significantly higher, and that of SOCS3 (inhibits leptin signaling was significantly lower in the three leucine groups than in the control group. Conclusions: Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in rats on HFD likely by promoting leptin signaling.

  13. Structure and dissolution of L-leucine-coated salbutamol sulphate aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raula, Janne; Seppälä, Jukka; Malm, Jari; Karppinen, Maarit; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2012-06-01

    L-Leucine formed different crystalline coatings on salbutamol sulphate aerosol particles depending on the saturation conditions of L-leucine. The work emphasizes a careful characterization of powders where structural compartments such as crystal size and particle coating may affect the performance of drug when administered. The sublimation of L-leucine from the aerosol particles took place 90°C lower temperature than the bulk L-leucine which was attributed to result from the sublimation of L-leucine from nano-sized crystalline domains. The dissolution slowed down and initial dissolution rate decreased with increasing L-leucine content. Decreasing crystalline domains to nano-scale improve heat and mass transfer which was observed as the lowered decomposition temperature of the drug salbutamol sulphate and the sublimation temperature of surface material L-leucine as well as the altered dissolution characteristics of the drug. The structure of the coated drug particles was studied by means of thermal analysis techniques (DSC and TG), and the dissolution of salbutamol sulphate was studied as an on-line measurement in a diffusion cell. PMID:22562614

  14. Leucine Supplementation Accelerates Connective Tissue Repair of Injured Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo G. Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA. Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day; then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05 from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05. Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n (p < 0.05, increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05 and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases.

  15. Some non-anomerically C-C-linked carbohydrate amino acids related to leucine-synthesis and structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Bohumil; Micová, Júlia; Koós, Miroslav; Langer, Vratislav; Gyepesová, Dalma

    2003-06-23

    (5'R)-5'-Isobutyl-5'-[methyl (4R)-2,3-O-isopropylidene-beta-L-erythrofuranosid-4-C-yl]-imidazolidin-2',4'-dione was synthesised starting from methyl 2,3-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-lyxo-pentodialdo-1,4-furanoside via methyl 6-deoxy-6-isopropyl-2,3-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-lyxo-hexofuranosid-5-ulose applying the Bucherer-Bergs reaction. Its 5'-R configuration was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Corresponding alpha-amino acid-methyl (5R)-5-amino-5-C-carboxy-5,6-dideoxy-6-isopropyl-alpha-D-lyxo-hexofuranoside (alternative name: 2-[methyl (4R)-beta-L-erythrofuranosid-4-C-yl]-D-leucine) was obtained from the above hydantoin by acid hydrolysis of the isopropylidene group followed by basic hydrolysis of the hydantoin ring. Analogous derivatives with 5S configuration, formed in a minority, were also isolated and characterised. PMID:12801708

  16. Exogenous Valine Reduces Conversion of Leucine to 3-Methyl-1-Butanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that require branched-chain amino acids must be supplemented with large concentrations (up to 10 mM) of these amino acids to satisfy their nutritional requirement. The utilization of one branched-chain amino acid, leucine, was examined in several leul strains of yeast grown aerobically in a glucose-ammonium salts minimal medium containing a limiting concentration (0.2 mM) of leucine. In this medium, the leucine requirement of the auxotrophi...

  17. Involvement of Protein Kinase C Activation in L-Leucine-Induced Stimulation of Protein Synthesis in L6 Myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki, Naoko; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2003-01-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in L6 myotubes. The incorporation of [3H]tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an index of protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted L6 myotubes, leucine and its keto acid, α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipases A2 and C, canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis. Neither indomethacin, an inhib...

  18. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials

  19. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-03-14

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  20. HISTOCHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION OF LEUCINE AMINOPEPTIDASE (LAP-ase)IN THE YOUNG RABBIT INTESTINE

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatakou, O.; Xylouri-Frangiadaki, E.; Paraskevakou, E.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract not available. Sabatakou, O.; Xylouri-Frangiadaki, E.; Paraskevakou, E. (2000). HISTOCHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION OF LEUCINE AMINOPEPTIDASE (LAP-ase)IN THE YOUNG RABBIT INTESTINE. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/10176.

  1. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  2. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello Maria; Ventrucci Gislaine; Gomes-Marcondes Maria

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein): pregnant (N), tumor-bearing (WN), pair-fed rat...

  3. Isovalerianeacidæmi--en sjælden og alvorlig defekt i nedbrydningen af leucin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ann-Britt Kiholm; Lund, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) is an organic acidemia caused by deficient metabolism of the essential amino acid leucine. We describe the biochemistry, diagnostics, and treatment of IVA, and present the known Danish patients.......Isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) is an organic acidemia caused by deficient metabolism of the essential amino acid leucine. We describe the biochemistry, diagnostics, and treatment of IVA, and present the known Danish patients....

  4. Midgut epithelial responses of different mosquito–Plasmodium combinations: The actin cone zipper repair mechanism in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Han, Yeon Soo; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-01-01

    In vivo responses of midgut epithelial cells to ookinete invasion of three different vector–parasite combinations, Aedes aegypti–Plasmodium gallinaceum, Anopheles stephensi–Plasmodium berghei, and A. stephensi–P. gallinaceum, were directly compared by using enzymatic markers and immunofluorescence stainings. Our studies indicate that, in A. aegypti and A. stephensi ookinetes traverse the midgut via an intracellular route and inflict irreversible damage to the invaded cells. These two mosquito species differ, however, in their mechanisms of epithelial repair. A. stephensi detaches damaged cells by an actin-mediated budding-off mechanism when invaded by either P. berghei or P. gallinaceum. In A. aegypti, the midgut epithelium is repaired by a unique actin cone zipper mechanism that involves the formation of a cone-shaped actin aggregate at the base of the cell that closes sequentially, expelling the cellular contents into the midgut lumen as it brings together healthy neighboring cells. Invasion of A. stephensi by P. berghei induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and peroxidase activities, which mediate tyrosine nitration. These enzymes and nitrotyrosine, however, were not induced in the other two vector–parasite combinations examined. These studies indicate that the epithelial responses of different mosquito–parasite combinations are not universal. The implications of these observations to validate animal experimental systems that reflect the biology of natural vectors of human malarias are discussed. PMID:15753303

  5. Midgut epithelial responses of different mosquito-Plasmodium combinations: the actin cone zipper repair mechanism in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Han, Yeon Soo; Pimenta, Paulo F P; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-03-15

    In vivo responses of midgut epithelial cells to ookinete invasion of three different vector-parasite combinations, Aedes aegypti-Plasmodium gallinaceum, Anopheles stephensi-Plasmodium berghei, and A. stephensi-P. gallinaceum, were directly compared by using enzymatic markers and immunofluorescence stainings. Our studies indicate that, in A. aegypti and A. stephensi ookinetes traverse the midgut via an intracellular route and inflict irreversible damage to the invaded cells. These two mosquito species differ, however, in their mechanisms of epithelial repair. A. stephensi detaches damaged cells by an actin-mediated budding-off mechanism when invaded by either P. berghei or P. gallinaceum. In A. aegypti, the midgut epithelium is repaired by a unique actin cone zipper mechanism that involves the formation of a cone-shaped actin aggregate at the base of the cell that closes sequentially, expelling the cellular contents into the midgut lumen as it brings together healthy neighboring cells. Invasion of A. stephensi by P. berghei induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and peroxidase activities, which mediate tyrosine nitration. These enzymes and nitrotyrosine, however, were not induced in the other two vector-parasite combinations examined. These studies indicate that the epithelial responses of different mosquito-parasite combinations are not universal. The implications of these observations to validate animal experimental systems that reflect the biology of natural vectors of human malarias are discussed. PMID:15753303

  6. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Water in the Neck-Zipper Region of Kinesin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Bin; Pan, Zhang; Zhang, Hui; An, Li; Kong, De-Xin; Ji, Qing

    2009-07-01

    Neck linker (NL) is one of the most important mechanical elements of kinesin motors. The zipping up process of the neck-zipper (NZ) formed by NL and the related secondary structure elements is one of the major parts of kinesin's power stroke. All the weak interactions that are responsible for the formation of NZ are sensitive to or dependent on water. To investigate the role of water in the NZ region, a molecular dynamics (MD) model is set up with a crystal structure of kinesin 2KIN surrounded by a 10 Å water layer, and minimization is performed to determine the positions of hydrogen atoms and other atoms. It is revealed that water molecules can assist the docking process of NL by forming hydrogen bonds at those positions where direct hydrogen bonding between the two sides of NZ is hindered and then acts as a constructive component of NZ at the docked state of NL. This result may improve the understanding of the mechanism for the docking of NL of kinesin wherein the function of water has not been comprehended sufficiently.

  7. Nutritional efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate relative to leucine, assessed isotopically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate as a dietary substitute for leucine was assessed in rats by two techniques: first, the minimal dose of alpha-ketoisocaproate required, as a supplement to a leucine-free diet, to achieve a growth rate as great as animals receiving leucine was found to be between 2.2 and 4.4 times larger. Therefore the nutritional efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate lies between 0.23 and 0.46. Second, alpha-[1-14C]-ketoisocaproate and [3H]leucine were administered orally and the ratio of 14C/3H incorporated into the leucine of whole-body protein and fibrin was measured. This ratio, divided by the ratio 14C/3H injected, was the same in fibrin as in whole-body protein and averaged 0.39. Thus both techniques yield the same value, within the error of measurement, for the relative nutritional efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate. The authors also found that alpha-ketoisocaproate feeding at varying dosage did not alter this ratio in whole-body protein, suggesting that neither wide variations in growth rate nor exposure for 10 days to alpha-ketoisocaproate alters the relative rates of utilization (or oxidation) of alpha-ketoisocaproate vs. leucine

  8. Photosystem I and photophosphorylation-dependent leucine incorporation in the blue-green alga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    sub(L)-Leucine uptake and incorporation in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans were measured during illumination with monochromatic light of 630 and 717 nm. With near as well as far red light, an enhanced uptake of 14C-sub(L)-leucine was observed. In far red light, the leucine uptake depended on light intensity and pH value. After the first few minutes, the uptake remained constant for more than one hour. The rate of uptake in light was the same in air as in nitrogen. The incorporation of 14C-leucine in the soluble fraction decreased in the presence of chloramphenicol which prevents protein synthesis. In far red light, its incorporation was insensitive to DCMU (5 x 10-6 M) but was depressed by uncouplers like CCCP or desaspidin. These effects are taken as evidence that leucine incorporation under the conditions used is dependent on photosystem I reactions and cyclic photophosphorylation. DBMIB and KCN in high concentrations decrease the leucine incorporation in far red light and indicate that plastoquinone and plastocyanin are members of the cyclic electron flow also in intact cells of Anacystis. Antimycin A has no inhibitory effect. The inhibition by other less specific inhibitors like salicylaldoxime, desaspidin and DSPD is discussed. (author)

  9. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2014-05-29

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acidmotifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs. © 2014 Biochemical Society.

  10. Oral Leucine Supplementation Is Sensed by the Brain but neither Reduces Food Intake nor Induces an Anorectic Pattern of Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Thais T. Zampieri; Pedroso, João A. B.; Isadora C Furigo; Julio Tirapegui; Jose Donato

    2013-01-01

    Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine...

  11. Sequence Classification: 890088 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6320465|ref|NP_010545.1| Putative basic leucine zipper ( ... iption factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithium ... tolerance; Yap6p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pr ...

  12. Attenuation of Marek's disease virus lacking the Meq oncogene in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles the jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. Chickens vaccinated with ...

  13. Experiment list: SRX150655 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available to the cap'n'collar type of basic region leucine zipper factor family (CNC-bZip). The encoded protein conta...ins broad complex, tramtrack, bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger (BTB/POZ) domains, which is atypical of C

  14. Apparent decreased oxidation and turnover of leucine during infusion of medium-chain triglycerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A potential effector of the protein-sparing adaptation to fasting could be the increased availability of endogenous long-chain fatty acids. Were this hypothesis correct, infusion of medium-chain triglycerides to increase the plasma concentration of medium-chain fatty acids might also result in protein sparing. However, in most in vitro studies in rat muscle, octanoate increases the oxidation of the essential amino acid leucine. Therefore, leucine metabolism was assessed with infusions of [3H]leucine and a-[14C]ketoisocaproate ([14C]KIC) before and during an infusion of trioctanoin in conscious dogs. Plasma octanoate increased from less than 30 to 528 microM over the 3 h of infusion. Plasma leucine and KIC concentrations decreased by 65-70% (P less than 0.01) over the first 2 h of infusion. Leucine oxidation, estimated from the expired 14CO2 and the plasma [14C]KIC specific activity, as well as from an open two-pool model, decreased. By use of these isotope models, the rates of leucine coming from and going to protein decreased (P less than 0.05 to P less than 0.01). Interconversion of leucine and KIC estimated from the open two-pool model decreased by 80% (P less than 0.01). These changes were accompanied by a 36% decrease in the plasma concentration of total plasma amino acids. Within the confines of the isotope models employed, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that increased fatty acid oxidation decreases protein turnover and may spare essential amino acids

  15. Role and metabolism of free leucine in skeletal muscle in protein sparing action of dietary carbohydrate and fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feeding rats with either a carbohydrate meal or a fat meal to the previously fasted rats caused significant decrease in urinary output of urea and total nitrogen. The content of free leucine in skeletal muscle decreased in the rats fed either a carbohydrate meal or a fat meal. Feeding of either a carbohydrate meal or a fat meal stimulated incorporation of L-leucine-1-14C into protein fraction of skeletal muscle and reduced its oxidation to 14CO2. These results suggest that the metabolism of leucine is under nutritional regulation and that the decrease in content of free leucine in skeletal muscle might be caused by enhanced reutilization of leucine into protein by the feeding of a carbohydrate meal or a fat meal. The role of free leucine in skeletal muscle as a regulator of protein turnover in the tissue are discussed in relation to the metabolism of this branched chain amino acid. (auth.)

  16. Reviewing the Effects of l-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, João A. B.; Thais T. Zampieri; Jose Donato

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on...

  17. 'Zipper-rift': a tectonic model for Neoproterozoic glaciations during the breakup of Rodinia after 750 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Nicholas; Januszczak, Nicole

    2004-03-01

    The 'Snowball Earth' model of Hoffman et al. [Science 281 (1998) 1342] has stimulated renewed interest in the causes of glaciation in Earth history and the sedimentary, stratigraphic and geochemical response. The model invokes catastrophic global Neoproterozoic refrigerations when oceans froze, ice sheets covered the tropics and global temperatures plummeted to -50 °C. Each event is argued to be recorded by tillites and have lasted up to 10 million years. Planetary biological activity was arrested only to resume in the aftermath of abrupt and brutal volcanically generated 'greenhouse' deglaciations when global temperatures reached +50 °C. The 'Cambrian explosion' is regarded by some as a consequence of post-Snowball glacioeustatic flooding of continental shelves. We shall show by a systematic review of the model that it is based on many long standing assumptions of the character and origin of the Neoproterozoic glacial record, in particular, 'tillites', that are no longer valid. This paper focusses on the sedimentological and stratigraphic evidence for glaciation in the light of current knowledge of glacial depositional systems. By integrating this analysis with recent understanding of the tectonic setting of Neoproterozoic sedimentary basins, an alternative 'Zipper-rift' hypothesis for Neoproterozoic glaciations is developed. The 'Zipper-rift' model emphasises the strong linkage between the first-order reorganisation of the Earth's surface created by diachronous rifting of the supercontinent Rodinia, the climatic effects of uplifted rift flanks and the resulting sedimentary record deposited in newly formed rift basins. Initial fragmentation of Rodinia commenced after about 750 Ma (when the paleo-Pacific Ocean started to form along the western margin of Laurentia) and culminated sometime after 610 Ma (with the opening of the paleo-Atlantic Ocean on the eastern margin of Laurentia). Breakup is recorded by well-defined 'tectonostratigraphic' successions that were

  18. Leucine signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C Melnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy and meat consumption, staples of the Western diet, as major risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. This paper presents a new concept and comprehensive review of leucine-mediated cell signaling explaining the pathogenesis of T2D and obesity by leucine-induced over-stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1, a pivotal nutrient-sensitive kinase, promotes growth and cell proliferation in response to glucose, energy, growth factors and amino acids. Dairy proteins and meat stimulate insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling and provide high amounts of leucine, a primary and independent stimulator for mTORC1 activation. The downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase S6K1, induces insulin resistance by phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, thereby increasing the metabolic burden of β-cells. Moreover, leucine-mediated mTORC1-S6K1-signaling plays an important role in adipogenesis, thus increasing the risk of obesity-mediated insulin resistance. High consumption of leucine-rich proteins explains exaggerated mTORC1-dependent insulin secretion, increased β-cell growth and β-cell proliferation promoting an early onset of replicative β-cell senescence with subsequent β-cell apoptosis. Disturbances of β-cell mass regulation with increased β-cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as insulin resistance are hallmarks of T2D, which are all associated with hyperactivation of mTORC1. In contrast, the anti-diabetic drug metformin antagonizes leucine-mediated mTORC1 signaling. Plant-derived polyphenols and flavonoids are identified as natural inhibitors of mTORC1 and exert anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery in obesity reduces increased plasma levels of leucine and other branched-chain amino acids. Attenuation of leucine-mediated mTORC1 signaling by defining appropriate upper limits of the daily intake of leucine

  19. Rapid assay system for cytotoxicity tests using 14C-leucine incorporation into tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell viability under various conditions of cytotoxicity test was assessed by terminal labeling of tumor cells, T24 cell line derived from urinary bladder carcinoma, with 14C-leucine. Changes of 14C-leucine incorporation into the cells were fairly proportional to those of viable cell number measured by the trypan blue exclusion method, but a definite correlation between the two measurements was not always found following cytotoxic manipulations. When the cells were labeled immediately after drug treatments, 14C-leucine incorporation usually led to fluctuated and insensitive results presumably due to disturbed metabolic activities unrelated to cell viability and failed to indicate the degree of cell damage. It was shown, however, that the cytotoxicity test was satisfactorily determined by labeling tumor cells with 14C-leucine after recovery in fresh medium for 24 hr. Cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs with concentration- and time-dependency, hyperthermia and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes were demonstrated by the radioactivity incorporated into the target cells on day 2 after removal of the cytotoxic factors. The results indicate that the terminal labeling of tumor cells with 14C-leucine can be used as a rapid and reliable measure sensitivities to cell viability for an in vitro assay system. (author)

  20. Leucine Loading Test is Only Discriminative for 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria Due to AUH Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Sequeira, Silvia; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, six inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature are known. The "Primary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria," 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency or AUH defect, is a disorder of leucine catabolism. For all other subtypes, also denoted "Secondary 3-methylglutaconic acidurias" (TAZ defect or Barth syndrome, SERAC1 defect or MEGDEL syndrome, OPA3 defect or Costeff syndrome, DNAJC19 defect or DCMA syndrome, TMEM70 defect, "not otherwise specified (NOS) 3-MGA-uria"), the origin of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria remains enigmatic but is hypothesized to be independent from leucine catabolism. Here we show the results of leucine loading test in 21 patients with different inborn errors of metabolism who present with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. After leucine loading urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid levels increased only in the patients with an AUH defect. This strongly supports the hypothesis that 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is independent from leucine breakdown in other inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria and also provides a simple test to discriminate between primary and secondary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in regular patient care. PMID:24757000

  1. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.;

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...... hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe target duplexes (Delta T-m/modification up to +14.0 degrees C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z...

  2. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous incorporation of [3H]fucose and [1-14C]leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration

  3. Independent valine and leucine isotope labeling in Escherichia coli protein overexpression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenecker, Roman J., E-mail: roman.lichtenecker@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Austria); Weinhäupl, Katharina; Reuther, Lukas [University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria); Schörghuber, Julia; Schmid, Walther [University of Vienna, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Austria); Konrat, Robert [University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria)

    2013-09-28

    The addition of labeled α-ketoisovalerate to the growth medium of a protein-expressing host organism has evolved into a versatile tool to achieve concomitant incorporation of specific isotopes into valine- and leucine-residues. The resulting target proteins represent excellent probes for protein NMR analysis. However, as the side-chain resonances of these residues emerge in a narrow spectral range, signal overlap represents a severe limitation in the case of high-molecular-weight NMR probes. We present a protocol to eliminate leucine labeling by supplying the medium with unlabeled α-ketoisocaproate. The resulting spectra of a model protein exclusively feature valine signals of increased intensity, confirming the method to be a first example of independent valine and leucine labeling employing α-ketoacid precursor compounds.

  4. Leucine signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik, Bodo C.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy and meat consumption, staples of the Western diet, as major risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This paper presents a new concept and comprehensive review of leucine-mediated cell signaling explaining the pathogenesis of T2D and obesity by leucine-induced over-stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1, a pivotal nutrient-sensitive kinase, promotes growth and cell proliferation in response t...

  5. Influence of haloperidol on the 3H-leucine incorporation in incretory organs of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3H-leucine incorporation in proteins of incretory organs of the mouse, the exocrine pancreas, and the renal tubuli was studied autoradiographically after administration of therapylike doses of the neuroleptic drug Haloperidol. With exception of the pancreas, a dosage dependent increase of the 3H-leucine incorporation was observed in the treated animals. The results reveal an activation of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenocortical system due to a 10-days administration of Haloperidol. These results are in conformity with former ones in brain and liver. (author)

  6. Regulation of the gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli: how is a leucine-insensitive operon regulated by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein?

    OpenAIRE

    Ernsting, B R; Denninger, J W; Blumenthal, R M; Matthews, R G

    1993-01-01

    The regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) of Escherichia coli consists of over 40 genes and proteins whose expression is regulated, either positively or negatively, by Lrp. The gltBDF operon, encoding glutamate synthase, was originally identified as a member of the Lrp regulon through a two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of polypeptides from isogenic strains containing or lacking a functional Lrp protein. We have now demonstrated that Lrp regulates the tr...

  7. Measurement of L-[1-14C]leucine kinetics in splanchnic and leg tissues in humans. Effect of amino acid infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although whole-body leucine flux is widely measured to study body protein turnover in humans, the contribution of specific tissues to the total-body measurement remains unknown. By combining the organ-balance technique with the systemic infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine, we quantitated leucine production and disposal by splanchnic and leg tissues and by the whole body, simultaneously, in six normal men before and during amino acid infusion. At steady state, disposal of arterial leucine by splanchnic and leg tissues was calculated from the percent extraction (E) of L-[1-14C]leucine counts: uptake = E x [Leu]a x flow. Tissue release of cold leucine (from protein turnover) into vein was calculated as the difference between leucine uptake and the net tissue leucine balance. In the postabsorptive state, despite substantial (P less than .01) extraction of L-[1-14C]leucine by splanchnic (23 +/- 1%) and leg (18 +/- 2%) tissues, net leucine balance across both tissue beds was small, indicating active simultaneous disposal and production of leucine at nearly equivalent rates. Splanchnic tissues accounted for approximately 50% of the measured total-body leucine flux. During amino acid infusion, the net leucine balance across splanchnic and leg tissues became positive, reflecting not only an increase in leucine uptake but also a marked suppression (by approximately 50%, P less than .02) of cold leucine release. This reduction in splanchnic and leg leucine release was indicated by a sharp decline in whole-body endogenous leucine flux

  8. Interaction of glycine zipper fragments of Aβ-peptides with neuronal nitric oxide synthase: kinetic, thermodynamic and spectrofluorimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, E R; Whiteley, C G

    2013-06-01

    Five peptide fragments [Aβ(17-21); Aβ(25-29); Aβ(29-33); Aβ(33-37); Aβ(25-37)] of the toxic Aβ(1-40(42)) amyloid peptide were shown to bind with neuronal nitric oxide synthase by means of hydrophobic-hydrophobic forces. The enzyme has a single site for the amyloid peptide binding, which resulted in a quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the enzyme. Binding constants determined from Stern-Volmer analysis were between 9×10(-3) and 1.8×10(-2) μM(-1). As temperature increased these binding constants increased reflecting that the interaction of the amyloid peptides with nNOS was endothermic and the quenching was dynamic. Kinetic analysis revealed a non-competitive interaction of the amyloid peptides to the enzyme with inhibitor constants of 5.1 μM for Aβ(17-21) to about 8-12 μM for the other peptides. According to the van't Hoff relationship the thermodynamic parameters, ΔH, ΔS and ΔG for the interaction of the amyloid peptides were all positive and between 41.28 and 77.86 kJ mol(-1)K(-1), 104.92 and 220.82 J mol(-1)K(-1) and 9.92 and 13.13 kJ mol(-1)K(-1), respectively. This suggested that the transition state, created by the amyloid peptide-nNOS complex and generated during the initial stages of Aβ aggregation had to, initially, overcome an activation barrier. Since the ΔG values decreased as temperature increased it not only implied a non-spontaneous interaction but that hydrophobic forces were operative during the binding. By FRET analysis the distance between the donor enzyme and the acceptor amyloid peptide was between 2.7 and 2.8 nm. As the temperature increased from 298 K through 313 K (and higher) the fraction of these tryptophan residues that became exposed increased, to approach a value of 1. There was strong support for the initial interaction being through the glycine zipper regions of Aβ(25-37). PMID:23375441

  9. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics ...

  10. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord ...

  11. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Basics: Introduction Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Stem Cell Basics Introduction: What are stem cells, and why ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord ...

  13. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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    Full Text Available Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of ...

  14. The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron-Smith David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched-chain amino acid (BCAA leucine has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal muscle anabolism. Activation of anabolic signalling occurs via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR through an undefined mechanism. System A and L solute carriers transport essential amino acids across plasma membranes; however it remains unknown whether an exogenous supply of leucine regulates their gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic leucine stimulation of anabolic signalling and specific amino acid transporters, using cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells. Results Human myotubes were treated with leucine, insulin or co-treated with leucine and insulin for 30 min, 3 h or 24 h. Activation of mTOR signalling kinases were examined, together with putative nutrient sensor human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34 and gene expression of selected amino acid transporters. Phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K was transiently increased following leucine exposure, independently to insulin. hVps34 protein expression was also significantly increased. However, genes encoding amino acid transporters were differentially regulated by insulin and not leucine. Conclusions mTOR signalling is transiently activated by leucine within human myotubes independently of insulin stimulation. While this occurred in the absence of changes in gene expression of amino acid transporters, protein expression of hVps34 increased.

  15. Involvement of protein kinase C activation in L-leucine-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in l6 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki, Naoko; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2003-11-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in L6 myotubes. The incorporation of [(3)H]tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an index of protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted L6 myotubes, leucine and its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipases A(2) and C, canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis. Neither indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, nor caffeic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, diminished their stimulatory actions, suggesting no involvement of arachidonic acid metabolism. Conversely, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methylglycerol, an inhibitor of proteinkinase C, significantly canceled the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting an involvement of phosphatidylinositol degradation and activation of protein kinase C. L-Leucine caused a rapid activation of protein kinase C in both cytosol and membrane fractions of the cells. These results strongly suggest that both L-leucine and KIC stimulate protein synthesis in L6 myotubes through activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. PMID:19003213

  16. Ethanol extraction requirement for purification of protein labeled with [3H]leucine in aquatic bacterial production studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-insoluble fraction of water column bacteria labeled with [3H]leucine contained an ethanol-soluble fraction accounting for up to 44% of the label. A component of the ethanol-soluble fraction is [3H]leucine. Labeled-protein purification requires an ethanol wash step. Cold TCA can replace hot TCA for precipitation of labeled proteins

  17. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra;

    2016-01-01

    adult Danes. Dietary leucine intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years in men and women, aged 35-65 years, participating in the Danish cohort of the WHO-MONICA (Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) study (n 368). Changes in LBM over the 6 years were......Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older...... and physical activity, leucine intake was associated with LBM change in those older than 65 years (n 79), with no effect seen in those younger than 65 years. Older participants in the highest quartile of leucine intake (7·1 g/d) experienced LBM maintenance, whereas lower intakes were associated with LBM loss...

  18. Content of peroxide compounds and 14C-leucine incorporation in subcellular fractions of new embryos obtained from poultry fed with antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of peroxide compounds in feed mixtures and the poultry organism was investigated. Two groups of broilers were fed with whole fodder mixture. The controls received a basic diet, while the experimental group got in addition 125 ppm each of the ethoxyquin antioxidant. 14C leucine was applied to the 14-day embryos in the eggs air space in a 20 microcurie dose per embryo. The incorporation of the labelled precursor was determined on the 3rd hour after introduction of the isotope. The radiometric analysis was made by the filter method with a liquid scintillation counter. The relative distribution of labelled leucine in the liver subcellular fractions of the control embryos revealed a pattern characteristic of their protein synthesizing capacity. The relative distribution of the labelled precursor in the experimental group showed the same pattern. The greater precursor incorporation in the nuclei of the embryos in the experimental group, however, suggests that ethoxyquin might stimulate nuclear protein synthesis or the passage of more protein from the cytoplasm, which is then utilized by the nucleolus for the development of the ribosomal apparatus

  19. Whey and casein labeled with L-[1-13C]leucine and muscle protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitelseder, Søren; Agergaard, Jakob; Doessing, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    mass), or a noncaloric control drink was ingested immediately after exercise. l-[1-(13)C]leucine-labeled whey and casein were used while muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was assessed. Blood and muscle tissue samples were collected to measure systemic hormone and amino acid concentrations, tracer...

  20. Radiobiological half-lives for carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 leucine in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo estimates of protein metabolism in many are often made by oral or intravenous administration of leucine or its ∼-ketoacid, ∼-ketoisocaproate, labeled with 14C or 3H. Previous estimates of radiation dose from such tracers have been based on the measurement of 14CO2 in breath. Using measurements of the decay of 3H or 14C leucine from plasma proteins, longer biological half-lives for these compounds were obtained. The estimated total-body radiation absorbed dose is 0.97 mrad/uCi for [1-14C]KIC (or [1-14C]leucine) and 0.11 mrad/+Ci for ]4,5-3H]leucine (or [3H]KIC). Assuming administered doses of 100 μCi each, the total-body radiation absorbed dose is still well within the limits set by the FDA for Radioactive Drug Research Committees. 12 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  1. ACTION OF PROGESTERONE ON THE DEPOLARIZATION OF THE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN TOAD OOCYTES INDUCED BY LEUCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYu-Feng

    1989-01-01

    The depolarization of the membrane potential in toad oocytes induced by leucine was found in our previous experiment. In this paper, a possible action or progesterone in the process was further investigated. After oocytes had been incubated for 16 to 24 hours with

  2. Decarboxylation of [1-(13)C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitton, J; Tinardon, F; Lamrini, R; Lacan, P; Desage, M; Francina, A

    1998-08-01

    The decarboxylation of [1-13C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals was studied by using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) to follow the production of 13CO2. A Fenton reaction between a (Fe2+)-porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide under aerobic conditions yielded hydroxyl radicals. The decarboxylation rates (VLeu) measured by GC-IRMS were dependent on [1-13C]leucine, porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The 13CO2 production was also dependent on bicarbonate or carbon dioxide added in the reaction medium. Bicarbonate facilitated 13CO2 production, whereas carbon dioxide decreased 13CO2 production. Proton effects on some decarboxylation intermediates could explain bicarbonate or carbon dioxide effects. No effect on the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of the classical hydroxyl radicals scavengers dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, and uric acid. By contrast, a competitive effect with a strong decrease of the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of various amino acids: unlabeled leucine, valine, phenylalanine, cysteine, lysine, and histidine. Two reaction products, methyl-4 oxo-2 pentanoate and methyl-3 butanoate were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in comparison with standards. The present results suggest that [1-13C]leucine can participate to the coordination sphere of (Fe2+)-porphyrin, with a caged process of the hydroxyl radicals which cannot get out of the coordination sphere. PMID:9680180

  3. Selective single crystal complexation of L- or D-leucine by p-sulfonatocalix[6]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Jerry L; Dalgarno, Scott J; Hardie, Michaele J; Raston, Colin L

    2005-01-21

    p-Sulfonatocalix[6]arene, organised in the 'double cone' conformation, has multi-guest capability binding either L- or D-leucine in a single crystal in a bi-layer type arrangement from a racemic mixture of the amino acid. PMID:15645029

  4. Leucine kinetics during simultaneously administered insulin and dexamethasone in preterm infants with severe lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, RHT; Zimmermann, LJI; Vergunst, JG; van Keulen, JGV; Carnielli, VP; Wattimena, DJLD; van Goudoever, JB; Sauer, PJJ

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether insulin administration would prevent the well-documented catabolic effect of dexamethasone given to preterm infants with chronic lung disease. We studied leucine metabolism in 11 very-low-birth-weight infants before dexamethasone treatment and on

  5. Reduction in plasma leucine after sprint exercise is greater in males than in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjörnsson, M; Rooyackers, O; Norman, B; Rundqvist, H C; Nowak, J; Bülow, J; Simonsen, L; Jansson, E

    2012-06-01

    There is a pronounced gender difference in the accumulation of plasma ammonia after sprint exercise. Ammonia is a key intermediate in amino acid metabolism, which implies that gender-related differences in plasma and muscle amino acid concentrations after sprint exercise exist. To study this, three bouts of 30-s sprint exercise were performed by healthy females (n=8) and males (n=6). Blood leucine and muscle leucine were collected over the exercise period. Basal arterial plasma and skeletal muscle leucine were 40% higher in males than females (Pexercise and more so in males than females (g × t: P=0.025). Increase in ammonia was higher in males than females in both plasma and muscle (g × t: Pglutamine, where an increase was found in females (Pexercise in females seems to be explained by a lower accumulation of ammonia in skeletal muscle and by a buffering of ammonia in the form of glutamine in females. The greater reduction in plasma leucine in males seems to be related to their greater increase in muscle ammonia after sprint exercise. PMID:22612362

  6. Leucine minimizes denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of rats through akt/mtor signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Barbosa Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of leucine treatment (0.30 mM on muscle weight and signaling of myoproteins related to synthesis and degradation pathways of soleus muscle following seven days of complete sciatic nerve lesion.Wistar rats (n=24 of 3 to 4 months of age (192 ± 23 g were used. The animals were randomly distributed into four experimental groups (n=6/group: control, treated with leucine (L, denervated (D and denervated treated with leucine (DL.Dependent measures were proteins levels of AKT, AMPK, mTOR, and ACC performed by Western blot. Leucine induced a reduction in the phosphorylation of AMPK (p<0.05 by 16% in the L and by 68% in the DL groups as compared with control group. Denervation increased AMPK by 24% in the D group as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT was also modulated by denervation and leucine treatment, highlighted by the elevation of AKT phosphorylation in the D (65%, L (98% and DL (146% groups as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT phosphorylation was 49% higher in the D group as compared with the DL group.Furthermore, denervation decreased mTOR phosphorylation by 29% in the D group as compared with the control group. However, leucine treatment induced an increase of 49% in the phosphorylation of mTOR in the L group as compared with the control group, and an increase of 154% in the DL as compared with the D group ( p<0.05. ACC phosphorylation was 20% greater in the D group than the control group. Furthermore, ACC in the soleus was 22% lower in the in the L group and 50% lower in the DL group than the respective control group (p<0.05.In conclusion, leucine treatment minimized the deleterious effects of denervation on rat soleus muscle by increasing anabolic (AKT and mTOR and decreasing catabolic (AMPK pathways. These results may be interesting for muscle recovery following acute denervation, which may contribute to musculoskeletal rehabilitation after denervation.

  7. Synergistic effects of leucine and resveratrol on insulin sensitivity and fat metabolism in adipocytes and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckbauer Antje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirtuins are important regulators of glucose and fat metabolism, and sirtuin activation has been proposed as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. We have shown leucine to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation via Sirt1 dependent pathways. Resveratrol is a widely recognized activator of Sirt; however, the biologically-effective high concentrations used in cell and animal studies are generally impractical or difficult to achieve in humans. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether leucine would exhibit synergy with low levels of resveratrol on sirtuin-dependent outcomes in adipocytes and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Methods 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes were treated with Leucine (0.5 mM, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB (5 μM or Resveratrol (200 nM alone or in combination. In addition, diet-induced obese mice were treated for 6-weeks with low (2 g/kg diet or high (10 g/kg diet dose HMB, Leucine (24 g/kg diet; 200% of normal level or low (12.5 mg/kg diet or high (225 mg/kg diet dose resveratrol, alone or as combination with leucine-resveratrol or HMB-resveratrol. Results Fatty acid oxidation, AMPK, Sirt1 and Sirt3 activity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in muscle cells, were significantly increased by the combinations compared to the individual treatments. Similarly, 6-week feeding of low-dose resveratrol combined with either leucine or its metabolite HMB to DIO mice increased adipose Sirt1 activity, muscle glucose and palmitate uptake (measured via PET/CT, insulin sensitivity (HOMAIR, improved inflammatory stress biomarkers (CRP, IL-6, MCP-1, adiponectin and reduced adiposity comparable to the effects of high dose resveratrol, while low-dose resveratrol exerted no independent effect. Conclusion These data demonstrate that either leucine or its metabolite HMB may be combined with a low concentration of resveratrol to exert synergistic effects on Sirt1-dependent outcomes; this may result in more

  8. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting. PMID:27094036

  9. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application. PMID:24333966

  10. Cytotoxic Study of L-Leucine and Methotrexate Combination in Presence of Super-oxide Dismutase (SOD on EAC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopamudra Roy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the cyto-toxicity of combination of L-Leucine and Methotrexate in presence of SOD (Superoxide dismutase on EAC cells. Freshly collected EAC cells were sufficiently diluted and was incorporated to evaluate the cyto-toxicity of Methotrexate alone, Methotrexate and L-Leucine in combination and lastly to evaluate in vitro cyto-toxicity of Methotrexate, L-Leucine and SOD. The mechanism of action was investigated in terms of production of free radicals. IC50 value of Methotrexate was found to be as 95.34 ± 1.28 µg/ml whereas IC50 value of Methotrexate and L-Leucine combination 73.15 ± 0.98 µg/ml and IC50 value Methotrexate, L-Leucine and SOD was decreased to 47.08 ± 1.18 µg/ml. Due to the fact that Methotrexate is a toxic drug, it will increase the production of O2- in cell. Our research hypothesis is based on the fact that decrease of O2- by SOD in combination therapy with Methotrexate and L-Leucine may alter its combined cytotoxic effect. So, it can be concluded from the study that presence of SOD in combination therapy with Methotrexate and L-Leucine alters their combined cyto-toxic effects over EAC cells.

  11. Effect of a leucine-supplemented diet on body composition changes in pregnant rats bearing Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ventrucci

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients present high mobilization of host protein, with a decrease in lean body mass and body fat depletion occurring in parallel to neoplastic growth. Since leucine is one of the principal amino acids used by skeletal muscle for energy, we investigated the changes in body composition of pregnant tumor-bearing rats after a leucine-supplemented diet. Sixty pregnant Wistar rats divided into six groups were fed a normal protein diet (18%, N or a leucine-supplemented diet (3% L-leucine, L. The pregnant groups were: control (CN, Walker 256 carcinoma-bearing rats (WN, control rats pair-fed with tumor-bearing rats (pfN, leucine-supplemented (CL, leucine-supplemented tumor-bearing (WL, and leucine-supplemented rats pair-fed with tumor-bearing rats (pfL. At the end of pregnancy, all animals were sacrificed and body weight and tumor and fetal weight were determined. The carcasses were then analyzed for water, fat and total, collagen and non-collagen nitrogen content. Carcass weight was reduced in the WN, WL, pfN and pfL groups compared to control. The lean body mass and total carcass nitrogen were reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Despite tumor growth and a decrease in fetal weight, there was a slight decrease in collagen (7% and non-collagen nitrogen (8% in the WL group compared with the WN group which showed a decrease of 8 and 12%, respectively. Although the WL group presented severe tumor growth effects, total carcass nitrogen and non-collagen nitrogen were particularly higher in this leucine-supplemented group compared to the WN group. These data suggest that the leucine-supplemented diet had a beneficial effect, probably attenuating body wasting.

  12. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Günther; Roswitha Beck; Guoming Xiong; Heidrun Potschka; Klaus Jahn; Peter Bartenstein; Thomas Brandt; Mayank Dutia; Marianne Dieterich; Michael Strupp; Christian la Fougère; Andreas Zwergal

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular beha...

  13. l-Leucine Supplementation Worsens the Adiposity of Already Obese Rats by Promoting a Hypothalamic Pattern of Gene Expression that Favors Fat Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais T. Zampieri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several studies showed that l-leucine supplementation reduces adiposity when provided before the onset of obesity. We studied rats that were exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD for 10 weeks before they started to receive l-leucine supplementation. Fat mass was increased in l-leucine-supplemented rats consuming the HFD. Accordingly, l-leucine produced a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation. In conclusion, l-leucine supplementation worsened the adiposity of rats previously exposed to HFD possibly by central mechanisms.

  14. Central ions and lateral asparagine/glutamine zippers stabilize the post-fusion hairpin conformation of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coronavirus spike glycoprotein is a class I membrane fusion protein with two characteristic heptad repeat regions (HR1 and HR2) in its ectodomain. Here, we report the X-ray structure of a previously characterized HR1/HR2 complex of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein. As expected, the HR1 and HR2 segments are organized in antiparallel orientations within a rod-like molecule. The HR1 helices form an exceptionally long (120 A) internal coiled coil stabilized by hydrophobic and polar interactions. A striking arrangement of conserved asparagine and glutamine residues of HR1 propagates from two central chloride ions, providing hydrogen-bonding 'zippers' that strongly constrain the path of the HR2 main chain, forcing it to adopt an extended conformation at either end of a short HR2 α-helix

  15. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  16. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics Print ... advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  17. Climate Change: Basic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here: EPA Home Climate Change Basic Information Climate Change: Basic Information On This Page Climate change ... We can make a difference How is the climate changing in the U.S.? Observations across the United ...

  18. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library Print A A A Text Size Did you ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  19. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  20. Papain-Catalyzed Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Telechelic Polypeptides Using Bis(Leucine Ethyl Ester) Initiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-07-01

    In order to construct unique polypeptide architectures, a novel telechelic-type initiator with two leucine ethyl ester units is designed for chemoenzymatic polymerization. Glycine or alanine ethyl ester is chemoenzymatically polymerized using papain in the presence of the initiator, and the propagation occurs at each leucine ethyl ester unit to produce the telechelic polypeptide. The formation of the telechelic polypeptides is confirmed by (1) H NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopies. It is revealed by AFM observation that long nanofibrils are formed from the telechelic polyalanine, whereas a conventional linear polyalanine with a similar degree of polymerization shows granule-like structures. The telechelic polyglycine and polyalanine show the crystalline structures of Polyglycine II and antiparallel β-sheet, respectively. It is demonstrated that this method to synthesize telechelic-type polypeptides potentially opens up a pathway to construct novel hierarchical structures by self-assembly. PMID:26947148

  1. Study on the interaction between leucine-enkephalin and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the possible interaction between leucine enkephalin and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Methods: Mice models of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism were produced. Serum thyroid hormonal levels (T3, T4, TSH, TRH), the leucine enkephalin content of the whole brain and 5-HT of the hypothalamus were determined in the animals sacrificed on different days after the animal models were established. Results: In hyperthyroid rats, the levels of T3, T4 increased progressively (P 3, T4 levels were persistent lower (P < 0.001) along with gradually increasing of serum TSH and TRH levels while pituitary TSh hypothalamus TRH content decreased gradually (P < 0.01), but rose back when reaching the nadir, Besides, LEK elevated and 5-HT decreased (P<0.01). Conclusion: The thyroid functional hormonal changes are not necessarily accompanied by a corresponding increase or decrease of brain LEK

  2. Further observations on incorporation of the 14C-leucine into proteins by freshly secreted milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using freshly secreted bovine milk, no incorporation of DL (1-14C)-leucine was observed in the total milk proteins and acid precipitated casein, when these protein fractions were isolated from skim milk. A significant portion of the radioactivity however, remained associated with the heat coagulable whey proteins and proteose-peptone fractions. This association was shown to be due to non enzymatic physical sequestering of the radioactive amino acid or its metabolites with these proteins. Most of the radioactivity was associated with the cream layer proteins and the cellular fraction. The results obtained using filtered milk, incubated milk and certain antibiotics also indicated that the incorporation of 14C leucine into proteins by freshly secreted milk may be a purely microbial process and physical sequestering of an amino acids with milk proteins. (author)

  3. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one

  4. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one.

  5. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Azizi

    Full Text Available Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs. This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs, MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates

  6. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations and Parkinson’s disease: three questions

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Mark R.; Elisa Greggio

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) were first identified in 2004 and have since been shown to be the single most common cause of inherited Parkinson’s disease. The protein is a large GTP-regulated serine/threonine kinase that additionally contains several protein–protein interaction domains. In the present review, we discuss three important, but unresolved, questions concerning LRRK2. We first ask: what is the normal function of LRR...

  7. Heterogeneity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Mutations: Genetics, Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, Iakov N; Cookson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Variation within and around the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we discuss the prevalence of LRRK2 substitutions in different populations and their association with PD, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms of pathologically relevant LRRK2 mutations. Kinase activation was proposed as a universal molecular mechanism for all pathogenic LRRK2 mutations, but later reports revealed heterogeneity in the effect...

  8. LRR Conservation Mapping to Predict Functional Sites within Protein Leucine-Rich Repeat Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Helft, Laura; Reddy, Vignyan; Chen, Xiyang; Koller, Teresa; Federici, Luca; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Gupta, Rishabh; Bent, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Computational prediction of protein functional sites can be a critical first step for analysis of large or complex proteins. Contemporary methods often require several homologous sequences and/or a known protein structure, but these resources are not available for many proteins. Leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) are ligand interaction domains found in numerous proteins across all taxonomic kingdoms, including immune system receptors in plants and animals. We devised Repeat Conservation Mapping (RCM...

  9. Systemic D-Phenylalanine and D-Leucine for Effective Treatment of Pain in the Horse

    OpenAIRE

    McKibbin, L. S.; Cheng, R. S. S.

    1982-01-01

    This study showed that subcutaneous injection of a solution of D-amino acids produced effective analgesia in horses. It is postulated that systemic D-phenylalanine and D-leucine may become one of the safe, effective and nonaddictive drugs for acute and chronic pain treatment. These D-amino acids cause analgesia by presumably preserving brain endorphins. They may bind reversibly to enkephalinases and prevent enzymatic degradation of enkephalins.

  10. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J.; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  11. Unusual activity pattern of leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors based on phosphorus containing derivatives of methionine and norleucine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pícha, Jan; Liboska, Radek; Buděšínský, Miloš; Jiráček, Jiří; Pawelczak, M.; Mucha, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2011), s. 155-161. ISSN 1475-6366 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1405; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : aminophosphonates * aminophospinates * methionine * norleucine * phosphorus containing dipeptides * cytosolic leucine aminopeptidase * inhibitors Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.617, year: 2011

  12. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaochun; Zhao, Lingling; Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed ...

  13. Regulation of transaminase C synthesis in Escherichia coli: conditional leucine auxotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, D; Umbarger, H E

    1974-11-01

    The regulation of synthesis of the valine-alanine-alpha-aminobutyrate transaminase (transaminase C) was studied in Escherichia coli mutants lacking the branched-chain amino acid transaminase (transaminase B). An investigation was made of two strains, CU2 and CU2002, each carrying the same transaminase B lesion but exhibiting different growth responses on a medium supplemented with branched-chain amino acids. Both had the absolute isoleucine requirement characteristic of ilvE auxotrophs, but growth of strain CU2 was stimulated by valine, whereas that of strain CU2002 was markedly inhibited by valine. Strain CU2002 behaved like a conditional leucine auxotroph in that the inhibition by valine was reversed by leucine. Results of enzymatic studies showed that synthesis of transaminase C was repressed by valine in strain CU2002 but not in strain CU2. Inhibition by valine in strain CU2002 appears to be the combined effect of repression on transaminase C synthesis and valine-dependent feedback inhibition of alpha-acetohydroxy acid synthase activity, causing alpha-ketoisovalerate (and hence leucine) limitation. The ilvE markers of strains CU2 and CU2002 were each transferred by transduction to a wild-type genetical background. All ilvE recombinants from both crosses resembled strain CU2002 and were inhibited by valine in the presence of isoleucine. Thus, strain CU2 carries an additional lesion that allows it to grow on a medium containing isoleucine plus valine. It is concluded that conditional leucine auxotrophy is characteristic of mutants carrying an ilvE lesion alone. PMID:4616947

  14. Photoinduced fragmentation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the VUV range

    OpenAIRE

    Canon, Francis; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljevic, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we report new results for action spectroscopy of protonated peptide Leucine enkephalin (YGGFL). By coupling a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation beamline, we investigate photofragmentation pattern of this peptide, through the analysis of tandem mass spectra recorded over a range of VUV photon energies, below and above the ionization energy. The obtained fragmentation patterns are discussed and compared to previous results.

  15. Sunlight Effects on the Osmotrophic Uptake of DMSP-Sulfur and Leucine by Polar Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Galí, Martí; Sintes, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Gasol, Josep M.; Simó, Rafel

    2012-01-01

    Even though the uptake and assimilation of organic compounds by phytoplankton has been long recognized, very little is still known about its potential ecological role in natural marine communities and whether it varies depending on the light regimes the algae experience. We combined measurements of size-fractionated assimilation of trace additions of 3H-leucine and 35S-dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) with microautoradiography to assess the extent and relevance of osmoheterotrophy in summer ...

  16. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar. PMID:25592549

  17. Estimation of whole body protein synthesis from oxidation of infused [1-14C]leucine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rats infused with NaH14CO3, 14CO2 exhalation approached an asymptotic rate equal to 96.0 +/- 1.3 (SD) % of the infusion rate of 14C in a monoexponential manner with a half-time of 20 min. In rats infused with [1-14C]leucine, 14CO2 exhalation (/0.96) approached an asymptotic value, (1-F), of 16-25% of 14C infusion rate (mean 20.4%) in a monoexponential manner with a half-time of approximately 31 min. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated from 1-F and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = CF/(1-F). S was a uniform function of body weight in these rats, in six additional rats in which S was measured 6 h after single intravenous injection of [1-14C]leucine and also in previously reported rats given single injections. The relationship was S (mg.100 g-1.h-1) = 11-0.143 body wt (g) +/- 8.3. In six of these rats, S was also estimated from the plateau specific activity of plasma leucine or plasma 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC); the former estimate of S was significantly lower (by an average of 17%), but S was the same when specific activity of KIC was employed. These results support the validity of the expired 14CO2 technique for measuring S

  18. Dietary leucine--an environmental modifier of insulin resistance acting on multiple levels of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macotela, Yazmin; Emanuelli, Brice; Bång, Anneli M;

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors, such as the macronutrient composition of the diet, can have a profound impact on risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how a single, simple dietary factor--leucine--can modify insulin resistance by acting on multiple tissues and at mul......Environmental factors, such as the macronutrient composition of the diet, can have a profound impact on risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how a single, simple dietary factor--leucine--can modify insulin resistance by acting on multiple tissues...... and at multiple levels of metabolism. Mice were placed on a normal or high fat diet (HFD). Dietary leucine was doubled by addition to the drinking water. mRNA, protein and complete metabolomic profiles were assessed in the major insulin sensitive tissues and serum, and correlated with changes in glucose...... homeostasis and insulin signaling. After 8 weeks on HFD, mice developed obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory changes in adipose tissue and insulin resistance at the level of IRS-1 phosphorylation, as well as alterations in metabolomic profile of amino acid metabolites, TCA cycle intermediates, glucose...

  19. Beginning Visual Basic 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Thearon

    2010-01-01

    A focused, step-by-step approach to Visual Basic for new programmers. What better way to get started with Visual Basic than with this essential Wrox beginner's guide? Beginning Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 not only shows you how to write Windows applications, Web applications with ASP.NET, and Windows mobile and embedded CE apps with Visual Basic 2010, but you'll also get a thorough grounding in the basic nuts-and-bolts of writing good code. You'll be exposed to the very latest VB tools and techniques with coverage of both the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4 releases. Plus, the book walks you ste

  20. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by activating the vestibulocerebellum and deactivating the posterolateral thalamus. PMID:25803613

  1. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra; Bauer, Judy; Raymond, Kyle; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2016-05-01

    Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older adult Danes. Dietary leucine intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years in men and women, aged 35-65 years, participating in the Danish cohort of the WHO-MONICA (Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) study (n 368). Changes in LBM over the 6 years were measured by bioelectrical impedance using equations developed for this Danish population. The association between leucine and LBM changes was examined using multivariate linear regression and ANCOVA analyses adjusted for potential confounders. After adjustment for baseline LBM, sex, age, energy intake and physical activity, leucine intake was associated with LBM change in those older than 65 years (n 79), with no effect seen in those younger than 65 years. Older participants in the highest quartile of leucine intake (7·1 g/d) experienced LBM maintenance, whereas lower intakes were associated with LBM loss over 6 years (for trend: β=0·434, P=0·03). Sensitivity analysis indicated no effect modification of sex or the presence of CVD. Greater leucine intake in conjunction with adequate total protein intake was associated with long-term LBM retention in a healthy older Danish population. This study corroborates findings from laboratory investigations in relation to protein and leucine intakes and LBM change. A more diverse and larger sample is needed for confirmation of these results. PMID:26979049

  2. Leucine-rich diet alters the eukaryotic translation initiation factors expression in skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-cachexia induces a variety of metabolic disorders on protein turnorver, decreasing protein synthesis and increasing protein degradation. Controversly, insulin, other hormones, and branched-chain amino acids, especially leucine, stimulate protein synthesis and modulate the activity of translation initiation factors involved in protein synthesis. Since the tumour effects are more pronounced when associated with pregnancy, ehancing muscle-wasting proteolysis, in this study, the influence of a leucine-rich diet on the protein synthesis caused by cancer were investigated. Methods Pregnant rats with or without Walker 256 tumour were distributed into six groups. During 20 days of experiment, three groups were fed with a control diet: C – pregnant control, W – tumour-bearing, and P – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the W group; three other groups of pregnant rats were fed a leucine-rich diet: L – pregnant leucine, WL – tumour-bearing, and PL – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the WL group. Results The gastrocnemius muscle of WL rats showed increased incorporation of leucine in protein compared to W rats; the leucine-rich diet also prevented the decrease in plasma insulin normally seen in W. The expression of translation initiation factors increased when tumour-bearing rats fed leucine-rich diet, with increase of ~35% for eIF2α and eIF5, ~17% for eIF4E and 20% for eIF4G; the expression of protein kinase S6K1 and protein kinase C was also highly enhanced. Conclusion The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet increased the protein synthesis in skeletal muscle in tumour-bearing rats possibly through the activation of eIF factors and/or the S6kinase pathway.

  3. Leucine-rich diet alters the eukaryotic translation initiation factors expression in skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-cachexia induces a variety of metabolic disorders on protein turnorver, decreasing protein synthesis and increasing protein degradation. Controversly, insulin, other hormones, and branched-chain amino acids, especially leucine, stimulate protein synthesis and modulate the activity of translation initiation factors involved in protein synthesis. Since the tumour effects are more pronounced when associated with pregnancy, ehancing muscle-wasting proteolysis, in this study, the influence of a leucine-rich diet on the protein synthesis caused by cancer were investigated. Pregnant rats with or without Walker 256 tumour were distributed into six groups. During 20 days of experiment, three groups were fed with a control diet: C – pregnant control, W – tumour-bearing, and P – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the W group; three other groups of pregnant rats were fed a leucine-rich diet: L – pregnant leucine, WL – tumour-bearing, and PL – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the WL group. The gastrocnemius muscle of WL rats showed increased incorporation of leucine in protein compared to W rats; the leucine-rich diet also prevented the decrease in plasma insulin normally seen in W. The expression of translation initiation factors increased when tumour-bearing rats fed leucine-rich diet, with increase of ~35% for eIF2α and eIF5, ~17% for eIF4E and 20% for eIF4G; the expression of protein kinase S6K1 and protein kinase C was also highly enhanced. The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet increased the protein synthesis in skeletal muscle in tumour-bearing rats possibly through the activation of eIF factors and/or the S6kinase pathway

  4. Measurability of side chain rotational isomer populations: NMR and molecular mechanics of cobalt glycyl-leucine dipeptide model system

    OpenAIRE

    Haydock, Christopher; Juranić, Nenad; Prendergast, Franklyn G.; Macura, Slobodan; Likić, Vladimir A

    1999-01-01

    The cobalt glycyl-leucine dipeptide is a model system for studying the effects of Karplus equation calibration, molecular mechanics accuracy, backbone conformation, and thermal motions on the measurability of side chain rotational isomer populations. We analyze measurements of 8 vicinal coupling constants about the alpha to beta-carbon and beta to gamma-carbon bonds of the leucine side chain and of 10 NOESY cross relaxation rates across these bonds. Molecular mechanics and peptide and protein...

  5. Involvement of the Neutral Amino Acid Transporter SLC6A15 and Leucine in Obesity-Related Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Drgonova; Jacobsson, Josefin A.; Han, Joan C.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Robert Fredriksson; Claude Marcus; Schiöth, Helgi B; Uhl, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain pathways, including those in hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract, influence food intake, nutrient preferences, metabolism and development of obesity in ways that often differ between males and females. Branched chain amino acids, including leucine, can suppress food intake, alter metabolism and change vulnerability to obesity. The SLC6A15 (v7-3) gene encodes a sodium-dependent transporter of leucine and other branched chain amino acids that is expressed by neurons in hypothal...

  6. Rate of [15N] leucine incorporation and determination of nitrogenous fractions from gastro-jejunal secretion in fasting humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to quantify the nitrogen fraction flow rates in gastro-jejunal secretions in fasting humans and to determine the [15N] leucine incorporation into the secreted proteins. A double lumen intestinal perfusion method was used in 5 healthy volunteers. Plasma and gastro-jejunal juices were collected during a 15-h intravenous [15N] leucine infusion. Total, soluble and insoluble nitrogen, amino acids and [15N] leucine enrichment were measured. The total nitrogen flow rate was 7.2 ± 1.9 mmol.h-1 and 58% was ethanol soluble. The amino-acid composition remained constant and glycine was the most abundant. The plasma [15N] leucine enrichment at the isotopic plateau was 4.8 ± 0.9 mol% excess. The [15N] leucine enrichment in the intestinal chyme increased asymptotically to reach a plateau after 5h. The [15N] leucine enrichment at the plateau and the fractional synthesis rate of secreted proteins were 1.6 ±0.5 mol% excess and 21.5 ± 3.3% h-1, respectively. These results show that the composition of the basal gastro-jejunal secretion is very stable. A part of this secretion is composed of proteins with rapid synthesis rates. (authors). 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Discovery and application of new bacterial strains for asymmetric synthesis of L-tert-butyl leucine in high enantioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian-Zhong; Chang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Jie

    2011-06-01

    Discovery of new bacterial strains with fast identification in a miniaturized system was performed for the synthesis of optically active L-tert-butyl leucine. With tert-butyl leucine amide as nitrogen source, one bacterial strain with high conversion and high enantioselectivity was discovered among 120 isolated microorganisms from local soils and identified as Mycobacterium sp. JX009. Glucose and ammonium chloride were examined as the good carbon source and nitrogen source for the cells' growth separately. The cells grew better at 30 °C and at pH 7.5 with higher activity of 2,650 U/l in comparison with other conditions. Cells' stability was improved by immobilization on synthetic resin 0730 without pretreatment. Tert-butyl leucine amide (30 mM) was successfully hydrolyzed by immobilized cells and examined as the highest chemical concentration that cells could endure. After six reaction cycles, the immobilized cells retained 90% activity with production of L-tert-butyl leucine in 98% ee. The results firstly reported the application of new bacterial strain in the hydrolysis of tert-butyl leucine amide to produce optically active L-tert-butyl leucine in an efficient way with investigation in detail. PMID:21153891

  8. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown.

  9. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1(®) mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  10. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  11. Basics of Bayesian Learning - Basically Bayes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    Tutorial presented at the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing Workshop 2006, Maynooth, Ireland, September 8, 2006. The tutorial focuses on the basic elements of Bayesian learning and its relation to classical learning paradigms. This includes a critical discussion of the pros and cons. The...

  12. Oral leucine supplementation is sensed by the brain but neither reduces food intake nor induces an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais T Zampieri

    Full Text Available Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity.

  13. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  14. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  15. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  16. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  17. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  18. Exponentiation: A New Basic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brent

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the basic operations of school mathematics have been identified as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Notably, these operations are "basic," not because they are foundational to mathematics knowledge, but because they were vital to a newly industrialized and market-driven economy several hundred years…

  19. Turkey's Basic Education Programme

    OpenAIRE

    A. Remzi Sezgin

    2000-01-01

    In August 1997, the Government of Turkey greatly increased its efforts to implement eight-year obligatory education, through parliamentary approval of Law No. 4306 for Basic Education. The law mobilises significant resources for a major investment in school facilities through earmarked taxes, establishes a timetable for the Basic Education Programme and streamlines procedures to allow for swift action and implementation.

  20. Bracken Basic Concept Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Bardos, Achilles N.

    1990-01-01

    The Bracken Basic Concept Scale, for use with preschool and primary-aged children, determines a child's school readiness and knowledge of English-language verbal concepts. The instrument measures 258 basic concepts in such categories as comparisons, time, quantity, and letter identification. This paper describes test administration, scoring and…

  1. Basic Research Objectives Reaffirmed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ As a national institution for scientific research and a component of the national innovation system, CAS should and must make key contributions to the great national rejuvenation of the country. Keeping this in mind, CAS has developed four developmental targets for its basic research. This was revealed at a CAS conference on basic research held June 11-12 in Beijing.

  2. Phase Chemistry and Thermochemstry on Coordination Behavior of Zinc Chloride with Leucine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高胜利; 陈三平; 等

    2003-01-01

    The solubility property of the ZnCl2-Leu-H2O(Leu=L-a-leucine) system at 298.15K in the whole concentration range was investigatey by the semimicro-phase equilibrium method.The corresponding solubility diagram and refractive index diagram were constructed.The results indicated that there was one complex formed in this system.namely,Zn(Leu)Cl2.The complex is congruently soluble in water.Based on Phase equilibrium data,the complex was prepared.Its composition and properties were characterized by chemical analysis,elemental analysis,IR spectra,and TG-DTG.The thermochemical properties of coordination reaction of zinc chloride with L-a-leucine were investigated by a microcalorimeter.The enthalpies of solution of L-a-leucine in water and its zinc complex at infinite dilution and the enthalpy change of solid-liquid reaction wrer determined at 298.15K.The enthalpy change of soild phase reaction and the standard enthalpy of formation of zinc complex were claculated.On the basis of experimental and calculated results,three thermodynamic parameters(the activation enthalpy,the activation entropy and the activation free energy),the rate constant and three kinetic parameters(the activation energy,the preexponential constant and the reaction order) of the reaction,and the standard enthalpy of formation of Zn(Leu)2+(aq) were obtained.The results showed that the title reaction took place easily at studied temperature.

  3. Accumulation of D- vs. L-isomers of alanine and leucine in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, P.S.; Schmall, B.; Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Kleinert, E.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported that tumor tissue may accumulate some D-amino acids preferentially over the L-isomers. In order to investigate the potential use of carbon-11 labeled amino acid isomers for in vivo tumor studies with positron emission tomography in patients, the tissue distributions of alanine and leucine, substrates for the A-type and L-type amino acid transport systems, respectively, were studied in Copenhagen rates bearing the Dunning R3327G prostatic adenocarcinoma. The authors have previously reported differences in the accumulation of A-type vs. L-type amino acids in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissues. All compounds were labeled with C-14 in the carboxyl position with specific activities of 30.0-56.6 mCi/mmol. Higher levels of C-14 activity (Relative Concentration (RC)=dpm found per gm tissue + dpm inject per gm animal mass) were observed in tumor tissue using D-alanine (0.71) compared to L- (0.21) or DL-alanine (0.27) at 45 min post-injection. While tumor/prostate and tumor/liver ratios were above 2 for all three substrates, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle were above one for only the D-isomer. Comparisons made with D-, L-, and DL-leucine also demonstrated a higher level of RC in tumor tissue with the D-isomer (0.84) vs. the L-(0.66) and DL-leucine (0.63). In this case, however, tumor/blood, tumor/prostate, and tumor/muscle ratios were above one for all three substrates, while tumor/liver ratios were below one. These results support the observation of a preferential accumulation of D-amino acids in tumor tissue over the natural L-isomers. Observed differences in the accumulation of the isomers in normal tissues are discussed.

  4. The synaptotagmin 1 linker may function as an electrostatic zipper that opens for docking but closes for fusion pore opening

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ying; Lou, Xiaochu; Jho, YongSeok; Yoon, Tae-Young; Shin, Yeon-Kyun

    2013-01-01

    Syt1 (synaptotagmin 1), a major Ca2+ sensor for fast neurotransmitter release, contains tandem Ca2+-binding C2 domains (C2AB), a single transmembrane α-helix and a highly charged 60-residue-long linker in between. Using single-vesicle-docking and content-mixing assays we found that the linker region of Syt1 is essential for its two signature functions: Ca2+-independent vesicle docking and Ca2+-dependent fusion pore opening. The linker contains the basic-amino-acid-rich N-terminal region and t...

  5. Differential regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver of neonatal pigs by leucine through an mTORC1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Almonaci, Rosemarie D; Davis, Teresa A

    2012-02-28

    Neonatal growth is characterized by a high protein synthesis rate that is largely due to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in insulin and amino acids, especially leucine. The mechanism of leucine's action in vivo is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine infusion on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver of neonatal pigs. To evaluate the mode of action of leucine, we used rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex-1 (mTORC1). Overnight-fasted 7-day-old piglets were treated with rapamycin for 1 hour and then infused with leucine (400 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)) for 1 hour. Leucine infusion increased the rate of protein synthesis, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation in gastrocnemius and masseter muscles (P liver. The leucine-induced stimulation of protein synthesis and S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation were completely blocked by rapamycin, suggesting that leucine action is by an mTORC1-dependent mechanism. Neither leucine nor rapamycin had any effect on the activation of the upstream mTORC1 regulators, AMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase B, in skeletal muscle or liver. The activation of eIF2α and elongation factor 2 was not affected by leucine or rapamycin, indicating that these two pathways are not limiting steps of leucine-induced protein synthesis. These results suggest that leucine stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by inducing the activation of mTORC1 and its downstream pathway leading to mRNA translation. PMID:22675606

  6. Dose and Latency Effects of Leucine Supplementation in Modulating Glucose Homeostasis: Opposite Effects in Healthy and Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin-Resistance States

    OpenAIRE

    Nelo Eidy Zanchi; Lucas Guimarães-Ferreira; Mário Alves de Siqueira-Filho; Vitor Felitti; Humberto Nicastro; Carlos Bueno; Fábio Santos Lira; Marshall Alan Naimo; Patrícia Campos-Ferraz; Maria Tereza Nunes; Marília Seelaender; Carla Roberta de Oliveira Carvalho; François Blachier; Antonio Herbert Lancha

    2012-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEXA) is a potent immunosupressant and anti-inflammatory agent whose main side effects are muscle atrophy and insulin resistance in skeletal muscles. In this context, leucine supplementation may represent a way to limit the DEXA side effects. In this study, we have investigated the effects of a low and a high dose of leucine supplementation (via a bolus) on glucose homeostasis, muscle mass and muscle strength in energy-restricted and DEXA-treated rats. Since the leucine respons...

  7. Improvement of an l-Leucine-Producing Mutant of Brevibacterium lactofermentum 2256 by Genetically Desensitizing It to α-Acetohydroxy Acid Synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, Takayasu; Momose,Haruo

    1986-01-01

    Genetic improvement of l-leucine productivity in strain 218, an ile− 2-thiazolealanine-resistant mutant of Brevibacterium lactofermentum 2256, was attempted. In strain 218, which produced 28 mg of l-leucine per ml from 13% glucose, α-isopropylmalate synthetase was genetically desensitized and derepressed to the effect of l-leucine, whereas α-acetohydroxy acid synthetase remained unaltered, although it could be derepressed phenotypically by limiting the isoleucine concentration in the culture....

  8. Novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N inhibitors. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunhua; Cao, Jiangying; Liang, Xuewu; Huang, Yongxue; Wu, Ping; Li, Yingxia; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-01-27

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) over-expressed on tumor cells and tumor microenvironment, plays critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Here we described the design, synthesis and preliminary activity studies of novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) inhibitors. The results showed that compound 7a had the most potent inhibitory activity against APN with the IC50 value of 20 nM, which could be used for further anticancer agent research. PMID:26629857

  9. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap resul...

  10. Directed basic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its execution, and in the requirement of no other deliverables than knowledge generation, directed basic research is no different from conventional (self-directed) basic research. The selected areas are determined in a national perspective. Directed Basic Research may be in an area where the knowledge generation would benefit Indian Society in the long term, or it may be in an area where the results of the research would benefit Indian Industry or our strategic interests in the long term. India can become a global innovation leader provided we have technology foresight to make the right technology choices, provided we introduce coherent synergy (a phrase I coined a few years back in this context) in our science and technology related activities and provided we establish an effective innovation ecosystem. We must also selectively promote some technology areas through directed basic research. Sustainable economic development in the future requires strong and increased funding of basic research. While directed basic research should be encouraged, self-directed basic research should also receive substantially increased support. (author)

  11. Incorporation of [3H]Leucine and [3H]Valine into Protein of Freshwater Bacteria: Uptake Kinetics and Intracellular Isotope Dilution

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of [3H]leucine and [3H]valine into proteins of freshwater bacteria was studied in two eutrophic lakes. Incorporation of both amino acids had a saturation level of about 50 nM external concentration. Only a fraction of the two amino acids taken up was used in protein synthesis. At 100 nM, the bacteria respired 91 and 78% of leucine and valine taken up, respectively. Respiration of 3H and 14C isotopes of leucine gave similar results. Most of the nonrespired leucine was recovered i...

  12. Synthesis of Some Novel Optically Active Isocoumarin and 3,4-Dihydroisocoumarin Containing L-valine and L-leucine Moieties

    OpenAIRE

    ZAMANI, Khosrow; FAGHIHI, Khalil; EBRAHIMI, Satar

    2005-01-01

    Phthalic anhydride was reacted with L-Valine and L-Leucine in a mixture of acetic acid and pyridine at room temperature, and then was refluxed at 90-100 °C and N-phthaloyl-L-valine or N-phthaloyl-L-leucine were obtained in quantitative yields. The imide-acids were converted to N-phthaloyl-L-valine acid chloride and N-phthaloyl-L-leucine acid chloride by reaction with thionyl chloride. Then 2 new derivatives of the chiral isocoumarin with L-valine and L-leucine moieties were synthesis...

  13. Investigations on particle surface characteristics vs. dispersion behaviour of L-leucine coated carrier-free inhalable powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raula, Janne; Thielmann, Frank; Naderi, Majid; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2010-01-29

    Aerosol microparticles of salbutamol sulphate are gas-phase coated with an amino acid L-leucine. Depending of the saturated state of L-leucine, the coating is formed by the surface diffusion of L-leucine molecules within a droplet or by the physical vapour deposition (PVD) of L-leucine or by the combination thereof. The PVD coated particles showed excellent aerosolization characteristics in a carrier-free powder delivery from an inhaler. The aerosolization of the fine powders is compared with surface energy parameters analysed by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The dispersion testing is conducted by a Inhalation Simulator using a fast inhalation profile with inhalation flow rate of 67 l min(-1). It is found that the powder emission is affected by the morphology, surface roughness (asperity size and density) of the particles and acidity of particle surface. The latter affects the dispersion and dose repeatability of fine powder in a case if L-leucine content is high enough. However, there is no direct correlation between dispersive surface energies and aerosolization performances of the powders. Crucial factors for the improved aerosolization rely weakly on surface acid-base properties but strongly on particle morphology and fine-scale surface roughness. PMID:19879344

  14. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (Ppigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (Ppigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  15. Effect of hyperglucagonemia on whole-body leucine metabolism in immature pigs before and during a meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leucine metabolism was measured isotopically in 12 immature female pigs to assess the effect of acute hyperglucagonemia on leucine kinetics in both the fed and fasting states. After an overnight fast, immature pigs were infused with α-[3H]ketoisocaproate and [14C]leucine. After a 2-h equilibration period, an infusion of either saline or 7 pg · kg-1 · min-1 of glucagon was begun, which increased plasma glucagon from ∼140 to ∼640 pg/ml and doubled the insulin concentrations. Two hours later, pigs were fed small meals to which [5,5,5-2H3]leucine was added to trace absorption. By subtracting absorption from total leucine flux, an estimate of endogenous proteolysis during the meal was made. In the fasting state, glucagon increased proteolysis and increased oxidation. No significant glucagon-related changes in any other flux parameters occurred in the fasting state. Ingestion of the meals caused oxidation to increase 41% in control animals, whereas in glucagon-infused animals, oxidation increased 84%. Additional, animals infused with glucagon suppressed endogenous proteolysis 43% after the meal compared with 55% decrease in control animals. These data indicate that glucagon stimulates whole-body proteolysis in both the fasting and fed states

  16. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  17. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  18. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here . Basic Infertility Evaluation 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 40 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of ... Causes of Female Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 2 min 35 sec Dr. Roger Lobo, of ...

  19. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  20. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  1. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects...

  2. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Understanding Infertility - The Basics A series of patient ... Find a Health Care Provider Back to Top Home | About Us | Reproductive Health Topics | News & Publications | Resources ...

  3. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free mailed brochure Cómo Prevenir un Accidente Cerebrovascular Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke Request free mailed brochure Table ... Americans are protecting their most important asset—their brain. Are you? Stroke ranks as the fourth leading ...

  4. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basic Infertility Evaluation 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 40 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of the ... Coping With Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 31 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of the ...

  5. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Understanding Infertility - The Basics A series of ... Site Terms & Conditions of Use | Web Design and Development by The Berndt Group

  6. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos here . Basic Infertility Evaluation 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 40 sec Dr. Roger Lobo ... infertility. Causes of Female Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 2 min 35 sec Dr. Roger Lobo, ...

  7. EHR/PHR Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR EHR/PHR Basics Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of ... information to it. With an electronic health record (EHR) or electronic medical record (EMR), your doctor (or ...

  8. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  9. Basics of Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Vedral, Vlatko; Martin B. Plenio

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computers require quantum logic, something fundamentally different to classical Boolean logic. This difference leads to a greater efficiency of quantum computation over its classical counter-part. In this review we explain the basic principles of quantum computation, including the construction of basic gates, and networks. We illustrate the power of quantum algorithms using the simple problem of Deutsch, and explain, again in very simple terms, the well known algorithm of Shor for fac...

  10. Basic Concurrency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvengreen, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming.......In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming....

  11. Leucine aminopeptidase and transaminase activity of intestine epithelium of chickens fed on gamma-irradiated feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted with 4 groups of male broilers. From hatching to the age of 49 days the chickens were fed as follows: group 1 (control) - compound feed, group 2 - feed gamma treated at 0.35 Mrad, group 3 - at 0.7 Mrad, and group 4 - at 1.0 Mrad. In a homogenate of jejunum mucosa, isolated from 24 chickens, it was determined the activity of leucine aminopeptidase, glutamic oxalacetic transminase and glutamic pyruvic transminase as well as the content of protein. Data obtained showed that activity of leucine aminopeptidase in the intestinal mucosa decreased at most twofold in chickens receiving feed treated at 0.7 Mrad. Irradiation at 1.0 Mrad also led to a significant lowering of enzime activity; at 0.35 Mrad there was of no impact on the activity of this hydrolase in the jejunal mucosa of chickens fed on such feed. Glutamic oxalacetic transminase activity increased significantly only when treated at 0.7 Mrad. Glutamic pyruvic transminase activity was not effected by the applied gamma ray radiation in this experiment

  12. A novel D-leucine-containing Conus peptide: diverse conformational dynamics in the contryphan family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R B; Jimenez, E C; De la Cruz, R G; Gray, W R; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1999-08-01

    A Conus peptide family (the contryphans) is noteworthy because of the presence of a post-translationally modified D-amino acid in all members of the family. A new contryphan peptide, Leu-contryphan-P, was isolated from the venom of Conus purpurascens; the sequence of this peptide is: Gly-Cys-Val-D-Leu-Leu-Pro-Trp-Cys-OH. This is the first known occurrence of D-leucine in a Conus peptide. The discovery of Leu-contryphan-P suggests that there may be branches of the contryphan peptide family that diverge much more in sequence than previously anticipated. Several natural contryphans provide dramatic examples of interconversion between multiple conformational states in small constrained peptides. The contryphans that have 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan in positions 3 and 4, respectively, exhibit two peaks under reverse-phase HPLC conditions, indicating interconversion between two discrete conformations. However, [L-Trp4]contryphan-Sm (with L-Trp substituted for D-Trp) exhibits a single, broad peak that elutes later than the natural peptide, suggesting that D-Trp stabilizes a conformation in which hydrophobic residues are buried. Leucontryphan-P which has valine and D-leucine instead of 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan shows only a single peak that elutes much later than the other contryphans. PMID:10461743

  13. Positive selection in the leucine-rich repeat domain of Gro1 genes in Solanum species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valentino Ruggieri; Angelina Nunziata; Amalia Barone

    2014-12-01

    In pathogen resistant plants, solvent-exposed residues in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are thought to mediate resistance by recognizing plant pathogen elicitors. In potato, the gene Gro1-4 confers resistance to Globodera rostochiensis. The investigation of variablity in different copies of this gene represents a good model for the verification of positive selection mechanisms. Two datasets of Gro1 LRR sequences were constructed, one derived from the Gro1-4 gene, belonging to different cultivated and wild Solanum species, and the other belonging to paralogues of a resistant genotype. Analysis of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates $(K_{a}/K_{s})$ highlighted 14 and six amino acids with $K_{a}/K_{s} \\gt 1$ in orthologue and paralogue datasets, respectively. Selection analysis revealed that the leucine-rich regions accumulate variability in a very specific way, and we found that some combinations of amino acids in these sites might be involved in pathogen recognition. The results confirm previous studies on positive selection in the LRR domain of R protein in Arabidopsis and other model plants and extend these to wild Solanum species. Moreover, positively selected sites in the Gro1 LRR domain show that coevolution mainly occurred in two regions on the internal surface of the three-dimensional horseshoe structure of the domain, albeit with different evolutionary forces between paralogues and orthologues.

  14. Complex coacervates obtained from peptide leucine and gum arabic: formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulão, Eliana da S; de Souza, Clitor J F; Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E

    2016-03-01

    In this study, interactions between polypeptide-leucine (0.2% w/w) and gum arabic (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15% w/w) were examined at concentrations of NaCl (0, 0.01, 0.25, 0.3, 0.5mol/l) and at different pH values (from 1.0 to 12.0). Formation of insoluble complex coacervates was highest at pH 4.0. At pH 2.0, which is the pKa of the gum Arabic, the dissociation of precipitate occurred. The pHØ2 positively shifted with the addition of higher concentrations of salt. Samples containing 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA and no salt had higher turbidity and increased formation of precipitates showing greater turbidity and particle sizes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the complex coacervate formation of leucine and gum arabic, and rheological measurements suggest the elastic behavior of 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA complex. Overall, the study suggests that complex coacervates of PLs could be one feasible ways of incorporating amino acids in food products. PMID:26471607

  15. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  16. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  17. Determining endogenous amino acid losses in poultry using single injection of [3H] leucine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three sets of young hens and broilers received six diet treatments. The diets were on fast (FAS), and force-fed nitrogen-free diet (NFD), NFD + 3.20% enzyme hydrolysed casein (EHC), semi-synthesized diets with 5% and 20% crude protein (CP) in which soybean meal was the sole nitrogen source, and semi-synthesized diet with 20% CP in which cotton seed meal was the sole nitrogen source. After force-fed, 30 μCi[3H]Leu/kgBW was injected subcutaneously, the excreta in the following 48h were totally collected, and venous blood samples were taken at 5 min, 30 min, 4 h, 24 h, 36 h and 48 h. The study showed that the ratios between specific radioactivity (SR) of endogenous Leucine in excreta (SRe) and SR of free Leucine in plasma (SRp) kept constant, no matter what kinds of diets the birds ate. This made it possible to determine endogenous amino acid losses (EAAL) of practical diets when NFD was taken as the reference. (authors)

  18. Measurability of side chain rotational isomer populations NMR and molecular mechanics of cobalt glycyl-leucine dipeptide model system

    CERN Document Server

    Haydock, C; Likic, V A; Prendergast, F G; Macura, S; Haydock, Christopher; Juranic, Nenad; Likic, Vladimir A.; Prendergast, Franklyn G.; Macura, Slobodan

    1999-01-01

    The cobalt glycyl-leucine dipeptide is a model system for studying the effects of Karplus equation calibration, molecular mechanics accuracy, backbone conformation, and thermal motions on the measurability of side chain rotational isomer populations. We analyze measurements of 8 vicinal coupling constants about the alpha to beta-carbon and beta to gamma-carbon bonds of the leucine side chain and of 10 NOESY cross relaxation rates across these bonds. Molecular mechanics and peptide and protein crystallographic databases are an essential part of this analysis because they independently suggest that the trans gauche-plus and gauche-minus trans rotational isomers of the leucine side chain predominate. They also both suggest that puckering of the cobalt dipeptide ring system reduces the gauche-plus gauche-plus rotational isomer population to less than about 10%. At the present +/- 1 Hz calibration accuracy of Karplus equations for vicinal coupling constants, the predominant trans gauche-plus and gauche-minus trans...

  19. Incorporation of [3H]Leucine and [3H]Valine into Protein of Freshwater Bacteria: Field Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of leucine and valine into proteins of freshwater bacteria as a measure of bacterial production was tested in two eutrophic Danish lakes and was related to bacterial production measured by thymidine incorporation. In a depth profile (0 to 8 m) in Frederiksborg Castle Lake, incorporation of 100 nM leucine and valine gave similar rates of protein production. In terms of carbon, this production was about 50% lower than incorporation of 10 nM thymidine. In another depth profile in t...

  20. Novel insights into the regulation of the antioxidant response element mediated gene expression by electrophiles: induction of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 by NRF2

    OpenAIRE

    Jyrkkänen, Henna-Kaisa; Suvi M. Kuosmanen; Heinäniemi, Merja; Laitinen, Heidi; Kansanen, Emilia; Mella-Aho, Eero; Leinonen, Hanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Levonen, Anna-Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A central mechanism in cellular defence against oxidative or electrophilic stress is mediated by transcriptional induction of genes via the Antioxidant Response Element (ARE), a cis-acting sequence present in the regulatory regions of genes involved in the detoxification and elimination of reactive oxidants and electrophiles. The ARE binds different basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors, most notably NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2) that functions as a tran...

  1. Nrf2/ARE Signaling Pathway: Key Mediator in Oxidative Stress and Potential Therapeutic Target in ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Petri; Sonja Körner; Mahmoud Kiaei

    2012-01-01

    Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a basic region leucine-zipper transcription factor which binds to the antioxidant response element (ARE) and thereby regulates the expression of a large battery of genes involved in the cellular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defence as well as mitochondrial protection. As oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunctions have been identified as important pathomechanisms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), this signaling cascad...

  2. Alteration of TGA factor activity in rice results in enhanced tolerance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Heather A; Canlas, Patrick E.; Chern, Maw-Sheng; Ronald, Pamela C

    2005-01-01

    In dicotyledonous plants broad-spectrum resistance to pathogens is established after the induction of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response. In Arabidopsis the NPR1 protein can regulate SAR by interacting with members of the TGA class of basic, leucine-zipper transcription factors to alter pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression. Overexpression of (At)NPR1 in Arabidopsis enhances resistance to multiple pathogens. Similarly, overexpression of (At)NPR1 in rice enhances resistance to...

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana class-II TGA transcription factors are essential activators of jasmonic acid/ethylene-induced defense responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Mark; Camera, Sylvain La; Lamotte, Olivier; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Gatz, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The three closely related Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6 are required for the establishment of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent plant defense response systemic acquired resistance, which is effective against biotrophic pathogens. Here we show that the same transcription factors are essential for the activation of jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ET)-dependent defense mechanisms that counteract necrotrophic pathogens: the tga256 triple mutan...

  4. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lipu; Fobert, Pierre R.

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae . Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), f...

  5. Marek's disease virus Meq transforms chicken cells via the v-Jun transcriptional cascade: A converging transforming pathway for avian oncoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Alon M.; Gilad, Oren; Xia, Liang; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Choi, Jonathan; Tsalenko, Anya; Yakhini, Zohar; Witter, Richard; Lee, Lucy; Cardona, Carol J.; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2005-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly pathogenic and oncogenic herpesvirus of chickens. MDV encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, Meq (MDV EcoQ). The bZIP domain of Meq shares homology with Jun/Fos, whereas the transactivation/repressor domain is entirely different. Increasing evidence suggests that Meq is the oncoprotein of MDV. Direct evidence that Meq transforms chicken cells and the underlying mechanism, however, remain completely unknown. Taking advantage of the DF-1 chicken e...

  6. Marek's disease virus-encoded Meq gene is involved in transformation of lymphocytes but is dispensable for replication

    OpenAIRE

    Lupiani, Blanca; Lee, Lucy F.; Cui, Xiaoping; Gimeno, Isabel; Anderson, Amy; Morgan, Robin W.; Silva, Robert F.; Witter, Richard L.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Reddy, Sanjay M

    2004-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in T cell lymphomas in visceral organs and peripheral nerves. Earlier studies have determined that the repeat regions of oncogenic serotype 1 MDV encode a basic leucine zipper protein, Meq, which structurally resembles the Jun/Fos family of transcriptional activators. Meq is consistently expressed in MDV-induced tumor cells and has been suggested as the MDV-associated oncogene. To study the function...

  7. A key role for ATF3 in regulating mast cell survival and mediator release

    OpenAIRE

    Gilchrist, Mark; Henderson, William R.; Morotti, Andrew; Carrie D. Johnson; Nachman, Alex; Schmitz, Frank; Smith, Kelly D.; Aderem, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a regulatory role in inflammation, cell division, and apoptosis. Mast cells (MCs) initiate many inflammatory responses and have a central role in allergy and allergic diseases. We report here that ATF3 has a central role in MC development and function. Bone marrow–derived MC populations from ATF3-deficient mice are unresponsive to interleukin-3 (IL-3)–induced maturation signals, and this correla...

  8. The loss of circadian PAR bZip transcription factors results in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gachon F.; Fonjallaz P.; Damiola F; Gos P.; Kodama T.; Zakany J.; Duboule D.; Petit B.; Tafti M.; Schibler U.

    2004-01-01

    DBP (albumin D-site-binding protein), HLF (hepatic leukemia factor), and TEF (thyrotroph embryonic factor) are the three members of the PAR bZip (proline and acidic amino acid-rich basic leucine zipper) transcription factor family. All three of these transcriptional regulatory proteins accumulate with robust circadian rhythms in tissues with high amplitudes of clock gene expression, such as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the liver. However, they are expressed at nearly invariable level...

  9. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Chaudhuri; S Mallik; S Das Gupta

    2014-05-01

    We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment multiplicity, isotopic distribution and isoscaling. Extension of canonical thermodynamical model to a projectile fragmentation model is outlined. Application of the projectile fragmentation model for calculating average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of the largest cluster at different bound, differential charge distribution and cross-section of neutron-rich nuclei of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies are described. Application of nuclear multifragmentation reaction in basic research as well as in other domains is outlined.

  10. Basic Electromagnetism and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2007-01-01

    Basic Electromagnetism and Materials is the product of many years of teaching basic and applied electromagnetism. This textbook can be used to teach electromagnetism to a wide range of undergraduate science majors in physics, electrical engineering or materials science. However, by making lesser demands on mathematical knowledge than competing texts, and by emphasizing electromagnetic properties of materials and their applications, this textbook is uniquely suited to students of materials science. Many competing texts focus on the study of propagation waves either in the microwave or optical domain, whereas Basic Electromagnetism and Materials covers the entire electromagnetic domain and the physical response of materials to these waves. Professor André Moliton is Director of the Unité de Microélectronique, Optoélectronique et Polymères (Université de Limoges, France), which brings together three groups studying the optoelectronics of molecular and polymer layers, micro-optoelectronic systems for teleco...

  11. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  12. A route to anionic hydrophilic films of copolymers of l-leucine, l-aspartic acid and l-aspartic acid esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sederel, W.L.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.

    1975-01-01

    A series of copolymers of l-leucine and β-benzyl-l-aspartate [Leu/Asp(OBz)] covering the range 30–70 mol % of l-leucine, was synthesized by the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) method. The copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and viscometry. For all compositions high m

  13. T cell receptor zeta allows stable expression of receptors containing the CD3gamma leucine-based receptor-sorting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Geisler, C

    1998-01-01

    that the leucine-based motif in these complexes was inactive. In contrast, the CD4/CD3gamma chimeras did not associate with TCRzeta, and the leucine-based motif in these chimeras was constitutively active resulting in a high spontaneous internalization rate and low expression of the chimeras at the cell surface...

  14. Comprehensive basic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Veena, GR

    2005-01-01

    Salient Features As per II PUC Basic Mathematics syllabus of Karnataka. Provides an introduction to various basic mathematical techniques and the situations where these could be usefully employed. The language is simple and the material is self-explanatory with a large number of illustrations. Assists the reader in gaining proficiency to solve diverse variety of problems. A special capsule containing a gist and list of formulae titled ''REMEMBER! Additional chapterwise arranged question bank and 3 model papers in a separate section---''EXAMINATION CORNER''.

  15. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  16. Basic set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Azriel

    2002-01-01

    An advanced-level treatment of the basics of set theory, this text offers students a firm foundation, stopping just short of the areas employing model-theoretic methods. Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, it consists of two parts: the first covers pure set theory, including the basic motions, order and well-foundedness, cardinal numbers, the ordinals, and the axiom of choice and some of it consequences; the second deals with applications and advanced topics such as point set topology, real spaces, Boolean algebras, and infinite combinatorics and large cardinals. An

  17. Role of leucine in isoprenoid metabolism. Incorporation of (3-/sup 13/C)leucine and of (2-/sup 3/H,4-/sup 14/C)-. beta. ,. beta. -dimethyl-acrylic acid into phytosterols by tissue cultures of Andrographis paniculata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasis, P.; Freer, I.; Overton, K.; Rycroft, D.; Singh, S.B. (Glasgow Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-02-01

    (3-/sup 13/C)Leucine is incorporated into phytosterols by tissue cultures of Andrographis paniculata by breakdown to acetyl-CoA and its subsequent incorporation via (3S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) and mevalonic acid; (2-/sup 3/H,4-/sup 14/C)-..beta..,..beta..-dimethylacrylic acid also is not incorporated intact.

  18. Immobilazation of aerobic microorganisms on glassy sintered material, illustrated by the example of the production of L leucine using Corynebacterium glutamicum. Immobilisierung von aeroben Mikroorganismen an Glassintermaterial am Beispiel der L-Leucin-Produktion mit Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechs, J.

    1988-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the carrier fixation of aerobic microorganisms on open-pore sintered glass material. The fermentative production of L-leucine from {alpha} cetonic isocaproic acid with Corynebacterium glutamicum was chosen as an example of a microbial process with a high demand of oxygen. (orig.).

  19. L-leucine transport in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231): kinetics, regulation by estrogen and molecular identity of the transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shennan, D B; Thomson, J; Gow, I F; Travers, M T; Barber, M C

    2004-08-30

    The transport of L-leucine by two human breast cancer cell lines has been examined. L-leucine uptake by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was via a BCH-sensitive, Na+ -independent pathway. L-leucine uptake by both cell lines was inhibited by L-alanine, D-leucine and to a lesser extent by L-lysine but not by L-proline. Estrogen (17beta-estradiol) stimulated L-leucine uptake by MCF-7 but not by MDA-MB-231 cells. L-leucine efflux from MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was trans-stimulated by BCH in a dose-dependent fashion. The effect of external BCH on L-leucine efflux from both cell types was almost abolished by reducing the temperature from 37 to 4 degrees C. There was, however, a significant efflux of L-leucine under zero-trans conditions which was also temperature-sensitive. L-glutamine, L-leucine, D-leucine, L-alanine, AIB and L-lysine all trans-stimulated L-leucine release from MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. In contrast, D-alanine and L-proline had little or no effect. The anti-cancer agent melphalan inhibited L-leucine uptake by MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on L-leucine efflux. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that LAT1 mRNA was approximately 200 times more abundant than LAT2 mRNA in MCF-7 cells and confirmed that MDA-MB-231 cells express LAT1 but not LAT2 mRNA. LAT1 mRNA levels were higher in MCF-7 cells than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, LAT1 mRNA was more abundant than CD98hc mRNA in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The results suggest that system L is the major transporter for L-leucine in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. It is possible that LAT1 may be the major molecular correlate of system L in both cell types. However, not all of the properties of system L reflected those of LAT1/LAT2/CD98hc. PMID:15328053

  20. Late Cenozoic migration of the Caribbean-North America-Cocos triple junction: the zipper and pull-up models (Guatemala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authemayou, Christine; Brocard, Gilles; Teyssier, Christian; Simon-Labric, Thibaut; Noe Chiquín, E.; Guttiérrez, Axel; Morán, Sergio; Suski, Barbara; Cosenza, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Our study deals with the crustal deformation produced by the migration of a triple plate junction implying a subduction zone and a transform fault system separating two continental plates. We have chosen the Caribbean-North America-Cocos triple junction as a case study. The Polochic-Motagua fault system are part of the sinistral transform boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. To the west, these system interact with the subduction zone of the Cocos plate. The linearity of the subduction zone is explained by a mechanically strong oceanic plate that does not tear in the triple junction implying intra-continental deformation. Structural and geomorphic data allow us to propose two tectonic models involving the progressive capture of southern North American blocks by the trailing edge of the Caribbean plate (pull-up tectonics) and a progressive suturing of fault-bounded blocks to the trailing edge of the Caribbean plate associated with a continuous forearc sliver along the two continental plates (zipper model). As a result, the forearc sliver helps maintain a linear subduction zone along the trailing edge of the Caribbean plate. The Late Quaternary activity of the Polochic transform fault have been constrained by determining the active structure geometry and quantifying recent displacement rates. Slip rates have been estimated from offsets of Quaternary volcanic markers and alluvial fan using in situ cosmogenic 36Cl exposure dating. Holocene left-lateral slip rate and Mid-Pleistocene vertical slip-rate have been estimated to 4.8 ± 2.3 mm/y and 0.3 ± 0.06 mm/y, respectively, on the central part of the Polochic fault. The non-negligible vertical motion participates in the uplift of the block north of the fault in agreement with the proposed pull-up model.

  1. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Transitions for Children with ...

  2. Hindi Basic Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, J. Martin; And Others

    This reader is intended to accompany the Basic Course in Spoken Hindi. Following an outline of the Devanagari script, 20 lessons are presented. Each consists of a reading selection, several illustrative sentences in English and Hindi, and a series of questions. Most of the reading selections were adapted from the magazine "Bal-Bharati." (RM)

  3. Basic Drafting: Book One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ronald; And Others

    The first of a two-book course in drafting, this manual consists of 13 topics in the following units: introduction to drafting, general safety, basic tools and lines, major equipment, applying for a job, media, lettering, reproduction, drawing sheet layout, architect's scale usage, civil engineer's scale usage, mechanical engineer's scale usage,…

  4. Basic Tuberculosis Facts

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses basic TB prevention, testing, and treatment information.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  5. Portuguese Basic Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This basic course in Brazilian Portuguese consists of 75 lessons in six volumes. Volume I is in two parts, with the dialogs, questions and exercises presented in Portuguese in the first part, and the intonation patterns and English translations presented in the second. The general format follows the Defense Language Institute format, employing…

  6. Basic physics for all

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B N

    2012-01-01

    This is a simple, concise book for both student and non-physics students, presenting basic facts in straightforward form and conveying fundamental principles and theories of physics. This book will be helpful as a supplement to class teaching and to aid those who have difficulty in mastering concepts and principles.

  7. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  8. IGBO, BASIC COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWIFT, LLOYD B.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE WAS PREPARED ON THE SPEECH OF TWO MEMBERS OF THE EZINEHITE GROUP OF IGBOS IN EASTERN NIGERIA. THE ESSENTIAL PHONOLOGICAL AND GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES OF IGBO ARE PRESENTED WITHIN A SMALL VOCABULARY OF APPROXIMATELY 600 ITEMS. THE COURSE MATERIALS CONSIST OF (1) TONE DRILLS, (2) 24 UNITS OF DIALOGS, NOTES, AND DRILLS, (3) SIX UNITS OF…

  9. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems and to...

  10. Characterization of the conglomerate form of acetyl-DL-leucine by thermal analysis and solubility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estime, N.; Pena, R.; Teychené, S.; Autret, J. M.; Biscans, B.

    2012-03-01

    Starting from a mixture of enantiomers in solution, crystallization can generate different types of crystals. In order to determine which type of crystal is obtained in the case of acetyl leucine, an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), analytical methods have been used to partially elucidate the binary and ternary phase diagrams of the system composed of the two enantiomers and water. The melting temperature phase diagram of this compound has been obtained by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyzes. The results show that it is characteristic of a conglomerate. This mode of crystallization has also been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. Solubility measurements of enantiomerical mixtures in water enabled the determination of the ternary diagram of solubility. The empiric Meyerhoffer double solubility rule has been modified, due to the characterization of interactions between enantiomers.

  11. Characterization of Activity of a Potential Food-Grade Leucine Aminopeptidase from Kiwifruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. A. Premarathne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase (AP activity in ripe but firm fruit of Actinidia deliciosa was characterized using L-leucine-p-nitroanilide as a substrate. The enzyme activity was the highest under alkaline conditions and was thermolabile. EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, iodoacetamide, and Zn2+ had inhibitory effect while a low concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT had stimulatory effect on kiwifruit AP activity. However, DTT was not essential for the enzyme activity. The results obtained indicated that the kiwifruit AP was a thiol-dependent metalloprotease. Its activity was the highest in the seeds, followed by the core and pericarp tissues of the fruit. The elution profile of the AP activity from a DEAE-cellulose column suggested that there were at least two AP isozymes in kiwifruit: one unadsorbed and one adsorbed fractions. It is concluded that useful food-grade aminopeptidases from kiwifruit could be revealed using more specific substrates.

  12. Characterization of Activity of a Potential Food-Grade Leucine Aminopeptidase from Kiwifruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premarathne, A. A. A.; Leung, David W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aminopeptidase (AP) activity in ripe but firm fruit of Actinidia deliciosa was characterized using L-leucine-p-nitroanilide as a substrate. The enzyme activity was the highest under alkaline conditions and was thermolabile. EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, iodoacetamide, and Zn2+ had inhibitory effect while a low concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) had stimulatory effect on kiwifruit AP activity. However, DTT was not essential for the enzyme activity. The results obtained indicated that the kiwifruit AP was a thiol-dependent metalloprotease. Its activity was the highest in the seeds, followed by the core and pericarp tissues of the fruit. The elution profile of the AP activity from a DEAE-cellulose column suggested that there were at least two AP isozymes in kiwifruit: one unadsorbed and one adsorbed fractions. It is concluded that useful food-grade aminopeptidases from kiwifruit could be revealed using more specific substrates. PMID:21076540

  13. Leucine replaced by methionine at 273 position in chronic myeloid leukemia: Knowns and unknowns…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Harsh Thanky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal bone marrow stem cell disorder characterized by the presence of Philadelphia chromosome t(9;22(q34;q11 leading to fusion oncogene BCR-ABL. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs act by competitively inhibiting BCR-ABL oncoprotein with significant response rates. However, up to 30% of patients fail to achieve complete cytogenetic remission on 1st line TKI imatinib, one of the reasons being mutations in BCR-ABL kinase domain leading to imatinib resistance. Over 80 such mutations have been documented in the literature; however, some of the rare mutations still remain to be studied for their impact in development of resistance and their responsiveness to currently available therapeutic options. Here, we report one such case of a rare mutation leucine replaced by methionine at 273 position and its clinical implications.

  14. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  15. The enzymatic degradation and transport of leucine-enkephalin and 4-imidazolidinone enkephalin prodrugs at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L.; Bak, A.; Friis, G.J.; Hovgaard, L.; Christrup, Lona Louring

    In this study, the stability in and transport across a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is investigated for leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin) and four 4-imidazolidinone prodrugs of Leu-enkephalin. The results show that Leu-enkephalin is degraded in the cell culture model of t...

  16. Crystal Structure of the Leucine Aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida Reveals the Molecular Basis for its Enantioselectivity and Broad Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kale, Avinash; Pijning, Tjaard; Sonke, Theo; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Guss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The zinc-dependent leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida (ppLAP) is an important enzyme for the industrial production of enantiomerically pure amino acids. To provide a better understanding of its structure function relationships, the enzyme was studied by X-ray crystallography. Crystal str

  17. In vitro conditions for 14C-leucine incorporation into the protein of cultured ovaries of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitellogenic ovaries of silkworm pupae were incubated in vitro in different media based on the Wyatt's medium to establish an adequate condition for culture of silkworm ovaries. Incorporation of 14C-leucine into protein fraction was determined to assess the biochemical activity of the ovary. When ovaries were incubated in vitro for a short time by 6 hr, a saturation kinetics of incorporation of the labelled leucine was shown. Sequential substitution of K+ ion to Na+ ion in the medium had no effect on the incorporation of 14C-leucine, but Mg2+ ion appeared to stimulate synthetic activity at more than 10 mM. The activity was not affected at pH range 5.0-7.2. Neither different sugars, nor vitellogenin nor lipoprotein prepared from silkworm haemolymph affected the incorporation of 14C-leucine, when added into the medium. The synthesis of protein depended upon the developmental stages of the cultured ovaries and was most active in 6-day-old ovary. Ovaries developing in pupal body showed comparable changes in synthetic activity. It is concluded that the chemical composition of the medium does not exert a strict effect on synthetic activity of protein in short-term cultures and the ovaries cultured in vitro maintain the activity comparable with those found in in situ condition. (author)

  18. Determination of proteolytic activity using L-[4,5-3H]leucine-labelled globin as a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive method for the assay of proteolytic enzyme activity is described. This is based on the digestion of L-[4,5-3H]leucine globin by proteolytic enzymes and radioactivity measurement of the trichloroacetic acid soluble cleavage products. (Auth.)

  19. The extracellular Leucine-Rich Repeat superfamily; a comparative survey and analysis of evolutionary relationships and expression patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Miller Suzanne FC; Okafuji Tatsuya; O'Keeffe Sean; Hokamp Karsten; Alsbury Samantha; Walshe Karen; Dolan Jackie; Tear Guy; Mitchell Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Correction to Dolan J, Walshe K, Alsbury S, Hokamp K, O'Keeffe S, Okafuji T, Miller SF, Tear G, Mitchell KJ: The extracellular leucine-rich repeat superfamily; a comparative survey and analysis of evolutionary relationships and expression patterns. BMC Genomics 2007, 8:320.

  20. The extracellular Leucine-Rich Repeat superfamily; a comparative survey and analysis of evolutionary relationships and expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Suzanne FC

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Dolan J, Walshe K, Alsbury S, Hokamp K, O'Keeffe S, Okafuji T, Miller SF, Tear G, Mitchell KJ: The extracellular leucine-rich repeat superfamily; a comparative survey and analysis of evolutionary relationships and expression patterns. BMC Genomics 2007, 8:320.

  1. Copolymers based on N-acryloyl-L-leucine and urea methacrylate with pyridine moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buruiana Emil C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using free radical polymerization of (N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea (MAcPU and N-acryloyl-L-leucine (AcLeu, an optically active copolymer, poly[(N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea-co-N-acryloyl-L-leucine], MAcPU-co-AcLeu (1.86:1 molar ratio was prepared and subsequently functionalized at the pyridine-N with (1R/S-(−/+-10-camphorsulfonic acid (R/S-CSA and at carboxyl group with (R-(+-α-ethylbenzylamine (R-EBA or trans-4-stilbene methanol (t-StM. The structures, chemical composition and chiroptical activity of the monomers and the copolymers were characterized by spectral analysis (FTIR, 1H (13C-NMR, 1H,1H-COSY, UV/vis, thermal methods (TGA, DSC, fluorescence spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography and specific rotation measurements. Influence of the optical activity of monomer and modifier on modified copolymers suggested a good correlation between the experimental data obtained (23[α]589=+12.5° for AcLeu and MAcPU-co-AcLeu, 23[α]589=0°+27.5° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R/S-CSA, 23[α]589=+25° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R-EBA, and 23[α]589 = 0° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St. In addition, the photobehavior of the stilbene copolymer (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St in film was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching of the stilbene species in the presence of aliphatic/aromatic amine in DMF solution was evaluated, more efficiently being 4,4′−dipyridyl (detection limit: 7.2 x 10-6 mol/L.

  2. Characterization of an N-glycosylated Bacillus subtilis leucine aminopeptidase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hongxing; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Nandi; Zhou, Zhemin; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Aminopeptidase is an important flavorsome especially in protein hydrolysate debittering by removing hydrophobic amino acid residue at the N-terminal end. Besides, it is also applied to preparation of active peptides and analysis of protein sequence. In this study, leucine aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris, a widely used heterologous protein expression host. Then it was purified and characterized. After methanol induction for 96 h, the aminopeptidase activity in culture supernatant reached 28.4 U ml(À1) , which was 7.1 times that of wild strain B. subtilis Zj016. The optimal temperature and pH of the purified recombinant enzyme were 60 °C and 8.5, respectively. The purified aminopeptidase was stable within 30-60 °C and pH 8.0-9.0. It was intensively inhibited by Ni(2β) , Ca(2β) , DL-dithiothreitol (DTT) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), but activated by Co(2β) . The Km toward leucine-p-nitroanilines (Leu-pNA) of the enzyme was 0.97 mM. The sequence analysis of aminopeptidase indicated three potential N-glycosylation sites and it was further verified via MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Consequently, the N-glycosylated aminopeptidase exhibited higher thermostability and catalytic efficiency. The purified enzyme exhibited two bands through sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) while a single band can be identified when the enzyme was deglycosylated. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of recombinant aminopeptidase was similar to the wild-type. PMID:25389014

  3. Metabolism of L-leucine-U-14C in young rats fed excess glycine diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As reported previously, while the growth-depressing effect of excess glycine was prevented by supplementing L-arginine and L-methionine, the degradation of glycine-U-(SUP 14)C into expired carbon dioxide was not accelerated by the supplement of both amino acids. However, it was found that the incorporation of the isotope into the lipids of livers and carcasses increased in the rats fed the excess glycine diet containing both amino acids. The lipid synthesis utilizing excess glycine may be accelerated by adding both amino acids to the 10% casein diet containing excess glycine. In the present experiment, the metabolic fate of L-leucine-U-(SUP 14)C was studied with the rats fed the excess glycine diet with or without L-arginine and L-methionine. 10% casein (10C), 10% casein diet containing 7% glycine (10C7G), or 10C7G Supplemented with 1.4% L-arginine-HCL and 0.9% L-methionine (10C7GArgMet) was fed to each rat, and the diet suspension containing 4 sup(μ)Ci of L-leucine-U-(SUP 14)C per 100 g of body weight was fed forcibly after 12 hr fast. The radioactivity in expired carbon dioxide, TCA soluble fraction, protein, glycogen, lipids and urine, and the concentration of free amino acids in blood plasma, livers and urine were measured. The body weight gain and food intake of the 10C7G group were much smaller than those of the other groups. The recovery of (SUP 14)C-radioactivity in expired carbon dioxide was much lower in the 10C7GArgMet group than that of the other groups. (Kako, I.)

  4. The atu and liu Clusters Are Involved in the Catabolic Pathways for Acyclic Monoterpenes and Leucine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Zavala, A. N.; Díaz-Pérez, C.; Cervantes, C.; Díaz-Pérez, A. L.; Campos-García, J.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 gnyRDBHAL cluster, which is involved in acyclic isoprenoid degradation (A. L. Díaz-Pérez, N. A. Zavala-Hernández, C. Cervantes, and J. Campos-García, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70:5102-5110, 2004), corresponds to the liuRABCDE cluster (B. Hoschle, V. Gnau, and D. Jendrossek, Microbiology 151:3649-3656, 2005). A liu (leucine and isovalerate utilization) homolog cluster was found in the PAO1 genome and is related to the catabolism of acyclic monoterpenes of the citronellol family (AMTC); it was named the atu cluster (acyclic terpene utilization), consisting of the atuCDEF genes and lacking the hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (CoA) lyase (HMG-CoA lyase) homolog. Mutagenesis of the atu and liu clusters showed that both are involved in AMTC and leucine catabolism by encoding the enzymes related to the geranyl-CoA and the 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA pathways, respectively. Intermediary metabolites of the acyclic monoterpene pathway, citronellic and geranic acids, were accumulated, and leucine degradation rates were affected in both atuF and liuD mutants. The alpha subunit of geranyl-CoA carboxylase and the alpha subunit of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (α-MCCase), encoded by the atuF and liuD genes, respectively, were both induced by citronellol, whereas only the α-MCCase subunit was induced by leucine. Both citronellol and leucine also induced a LacZ transcriptional fusion at the liuB gene. The liuE gene encodes a probable hydroxy-acyl-CoA lyase (probably HMG-CoA lyase), an enzyme with bifunctional activity that is essential for both AMTC and leucine degradation. P. aeruginosa PAO1 products encoded by the liuABCD cluster showed a higher sequence similarity (77.2 to 79.5%) with the probable products of liu clusters from several Pseudomonas species than with the atuCDEF cluster from PAO1 (41.5%). Phylogenetic studies suggest that the atu cluster from P. aeruginosa could be the result of horizontal transfer from

  5. Leucine-sensitive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in patients with loss of function mutations in 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heslegrave Amanda J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of function mutations in 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (HADH cause protein sensitive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH. HADH encodes short chain 3-hydroxacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, an enzyme that catalyses the penultimate reaction in mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids. Mutations in GLUD1 encoding glutamate dehydrogenase, also cause protein sensitive HH (due to leucine sensitivity. Reports suggest a protein-protein interaction between HADH and GDH. This study was undertaken in order to understand the mechanism of protein sensitivity in patients with HADH mutations. Methods An oral leucine tolerance test was conducted in controls and nine patients with HADH mutations. Basal GDH activity and the effect of GTP were determined in lymphoblast homogenates from 4 patients and 3 controls. Immunoprecipitation was conducted in patient and control lymphoblasts to investigate protein interactions. Results Patients demonstrated severe HH (glucose range 1.7–3.2 mmol/l; insulin range 4.8-63.8 mU/l in response to the oral leucine load, this HH was not observed in control patients subjected to the same leucine load. Basal GDH activity and half maximal inhibitory concentration of GTP was similar in patients and controls. HADH protein could be co-immunoprecipitated with GDH protein in control samples but not in patient samples. Conclusions We conclude that GDH and HADH have a direct protein-protein interaction, which is lost in patients with HADH mutations causing leucine induced HH. This is not associated with loss of inhibitory effect of GTP on GDH (as in patients with GLUD1 mutations.

  6. Synergistic effects of polyphenols and methylxanthines with Leucine on AMPK/Sirtuin-mediated metabolism in muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Bruckbauer

    Full Text Available The AMPK-Sirt1 pathway is an important regulator of energy metabolism and therefore a potential target for prevention and therapy of metabolic diseases. We recently demonstrated leucine and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB to synergize with low-dose resveratrol (200 nM to activate sirtuin signaling and stimulate energy metabolism. Here we show that leucine exerts a direct effect on Sirt1 kinetics, reducing its Km for NAD(+ by >50% and enabling low doses of resveratrol to further activate the enzyme (p = 0.012. To test which structure elements of resveratrol are necessary for synergy, we assessed potential synergy of structurally similar and dissimilar polyphenols as well as other compounds converging on the same pathways with leucine using fatty acid oxidation (FAO as screening tool. Dose-response curves for FAO were constructed and the highest non-effective dose (typically 1-10 nM was used with either leucine (0.5 mM or HMB (5 µM to treat adipocytes and myotubes for 24 h. Significant synergy was detected for stilbenes with FAO increase in adipocytes by 60-70% (p2000% (p1 µM and exhibited little or no synergy. Thus, the six-carbon ring structure bound to a carboxylic group seems to be a necessary element for leucine/HMB synergy with other stilbenes and hydroxycinnamic acids to stimulate AMPK/Sirt1 dependent FAO; these effects occur at concentrations that produce no independent effects and are readily achievable via oral administration.

  7. Comparison of deuterated leucine, valine, and lysine in the measurement of human apolipoprotein A-I and B-100 kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production rates of apolipoprotein (apo)B-100 in very low density lipoprotein and in low density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A-I in high density lipoprotein were determined using a primed-constant infusion of [5,5,5,-2H3]leucine, [4,4,4,-2H3]valine, and [6,6-2H2,1,2-13C2]lysine. The three stable isotope-labeled amino acids were administered simultaneously to determine whether absolute production rates calculated using a stochastic model were independent of the tracer species utilized. Three normolipidemic adult males were studied in the constantly fed state over a 15-h period. The absolute production rates of very low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were 11.4 +/- 5.8 (leucine), 11.2 +/- 6.8 (valine), and 11.1 +/- 5.4 (lysine) mg per kg per day (mean +/- SDM). The absolute production rates for low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were 8.0 +/- 4.7 (leucine), 7.5 +/- 3.8 (valine), and 7.5 +/- 4.2 (lysine) mg per kg per day. The absolute production rates for high density lipoprotein apoA-I were 9.7 +/- 0.2 (leucine), 9.4 +/- 1.7 (valine), and 9.1 +/- 1.3 (lysine) mg per kg per day. There were no statistically significant differences in absolute synthetic rates of the three apolipoproteins when the plateau isotopic enrichment values of very low density lipoprotein apoB-100 were used to define the isotopic enrichment of the intracellular precursor pool. Our data indicate that deuterated leucine, valine, or lysine provided similar results when used for the determination of apoA-I and apoB-100 absolute production rates within plasma lipoproteins as part of a primed-constant infusion protocol

  8. Emulsion Science Basic Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    Emulsions are generally made out of two immiscible fluids like oil and water, one being dispersed in the second in the presence of surface-active compounds.They are used as intermediate or end products in a huge range of areas including the food, chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, paint, and coating industries. Besides the broad domain of technological interest, emulsions are raising a variety of fundamental questions at the frontier between physics and chemistry. This book aims to give an overview of the most recent advances in emulsion science. The basic principles, covering aspects of emulsions from their preparation to their destruction, are presented in close relation to both the fundamental physics and the applications of these materials. The book is intended to help scientists and engineers in formulating new materials by giving them the basics of emulsion science.

  9. Basic electronic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, P M

    1980-01-01

    In the past, the teaching of electricity and electronics has more often than not been carried out from a theoretical and often highly academic standpoint. Fundamentals and basic concepts have often been presented with no indication of their practical appli­ cations, and all too frequently they have been illustrated by artificially contrived laboratory experiments bearing little relationship to the outside world. The course comes in the form of fourteen fairly open-ended constructional experiments or projects. Each experiment has associated with it a construction exercise and an explanation. The basic idea behind this dual presentation is that the student can embark on each circuit following only the briefest possible instructions and that an open-ended approach is thereby not prejudiced by an initial lengthy encounter with the theory behind the project; this being a sure way to dampen enthusiasm at the outset. As the investigation progresses, questions inevitably arise. Descriptions of the phenomena encounte...

  10. Basics of statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller-Kirsten, Harald J W

    2013-01-01

    Statistics links microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, and requires for this reason a large number of microscopic elements like atoms. The results are values of maximum probability or of averaging. This introduction to statistical physics concentrates on the basic principles, and attempts to explain these in simple terms supplemented by numerous examples. These basic principles include the difference between classical and quantum statistics, a priori probabilities as related to degeneracies, the vital aspect of indistinguishability as compared with distinguishability in classical physics, the differences between conserved and non-conserved elements, the different ways of counting arrangements in the three statistics (Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein), the difference between maximization of the number of arrangements of elements, and averaging in the Darwin-Fowler method. Significant applications to solids, radiation and electrons in metals are treated in separate chapters, as well as Bose-Eins...

  11. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  12. Basic linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S

    2002-01-01

    Basic Linear Algebra is a text for first year students leading from concrete examples to abstract theorems, via tutorial-type exercises. More exercises (of the kind a student may expect in examination papers) are grouped at the end of each section. The book covers the most important basics of any first course on linear algebra, explaining the algebra of matrices with applications to analytic geometry, systems of linear equations, difference equations and complex numbers. Linear equations are treated via Hermite normal forms which provides a successful and concrete explanation of the notion of linear independence. Another important highlight is the connection between linear mappings and matrices leading to the change of basis theorem which opens the door to the notion of similarity. This new and revised edition features additional exercises and coverage of Cramer's rule (omitted from the first edition). However, it is the new, extra chapter on computer assistance that will be of particular interest to readers:...

  13. Basics of Computer Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Robertazzi, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Springer Brief Basics of Computer Networking provides a non-mathematical introduction to the world of networks. This book covers both technology for wired and wireless networks. Coverage includes transmission media, local area networks, wide area networks, and network security. Written in a very accessible style for the interested layman by the author of a widely used textbook with many years of experience explaining concepts to the beginner.

  14. Decision support basics

    CERN Document Server

    Power, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    This book is targeted to busy managers and MBA students who need to grasp the basics of computerized decision support. Some of the topics covered include: What is a DSS? What do managers need to know about computerized decision support? And how can managers identify opportunities to create innovative DSS? Overall the book addresses 35 fundamental questions that are relevant to understanding computerized decision support.

  15. Risk communication basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, P.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information.

  16. Risk communication basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information

  17. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects......: business entities, the transformation process, types of businesses, stakeholders, legislation, the annual report, the VAT system, double-entry bookkeeping, inventories, and year-end cast flow analysis....

  18. Basic concepts in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic concepts in oceanography include major wind patterns that drive ocean currents, and the effects that the earth's rotation, positions of land masses, and temperature and salinity have on oceanic circulation and hence global distribution of radioactivity. Special attention is given to coastal and near-coastal processes such as upwelling, tidal effects, and small-scale processes, as radionuclide distributions are currently most associated with coastal regions. (author)

  19. Assessment of the metabolic chiral inversion of D-leucine in rat by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with a stable isotope dilution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, H; Matsukawa, T; Shinohara, Y; Hashimoto, T

    2000-08-01

    The stereoselective pharmacokinetics of leucine enantiomers in rats has been investigated to evaluate the inversion of D-leucine to L-enantiomer. After a bolus i.v. administration of D- or L-[2H7]leucine to rats, blood samples were obtained over 6 h after administration and analyzed by a stereoselective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Racemic [2H3]leucine was used as an internal standard. The method involved methyl esterification and subsequent chiral derivatization with (+)-alpha-methoxy-alpha-trifluoromethylphenylacetyl chloride to form the diastereomeric amide. The derivatization made possible the separation of leucine enantiomers with good gas chromatographic behavior. Plasma concentration of both D- and L-[2H7]leucine declined biexponentially, with elimination half-lives of 60 and 14 min, respectively. In contrast to the L-enantiomer, the D-enantiomer had a lower systemic clearance. When D-[2H7]leucine was administered, the L-enantiomer was found to rapidly appear in plasma. About 30% of an administered dose of the D-isomer was stereospecifically inverted to the L-enantiomer. There was no measurable inversion of the L- to D-enantiomer. This methodology has made it possible to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of each enantiomer of amino acids and estimate of chiral inversion after administration of D-amino acids. PMID:10901701

  20. A study of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine transport in the perfused rat mammary gland: possible involvement of LAT1 and LAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shennan, D B; Calvert, D T; Travers, M T; Kudo, Y; Boyd, C A R

    2002-08-19

    The transport of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine by the perfused lactating rat mammary gland has been examined using a rapid, paired-tracer dilution technique. The clearances of all three amino acids by the mammary gland consisted of a rising phase followed by a rapid fall-off, respectively, reflecting influx and efflux of the radiotracers. The peak clearance of L-leucine was inhibited by BCH (65%) and D-leucine (58%) but not by L-proline. The inhibition of L-leucine clearance by BCH and D-leucine was not additive. L-leucine inhibited the peak clearance of radiolabelled L-leucine by 78%. BCH also inhibited the peak clearance of L-phenylalanine (66%) and L-alanine (33%) by the perfused mammary gland. Lactating rat mammary tissue was found to express both LAT1 and LAT2 mRNA. The results suggest that system L is situated in the basolateral aspect of the lactating rat mammary epithelium and thus probably plays a central role in neutral amino acid uptake from blood. The finding that L-alanine uptake by the gland was inhibited by BCH suggests that LAT2 may make a significant contribution to neutral amino acid uptake by the mammary epithelium. PMID:12101005

  1. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 (α2β2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex

  2. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  3. Corroboration of the predominant localization of radioactivity on the dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of linalool biosynthesized from radioisotopically labeled leucine by higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tange, K.; Okita, H.; Nakao, Y.; Hirata, T.; Suga, T. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    The co-feeding experiment of leucine-4,5-/sup 3/H and mevalonic-2-/sup 14/C acid corroborated the preferential localization of radioactivity on the 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of linalool in its biosynthesis from radioisotopically labeled leucine by Cinnamomum Camphora Sieb. var. linalooliferum Fujita, in contrast to the predominant location of the activity on its isopentenyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety in the biosynthesis from mevalonic acid. Also, it was established that the imbalance in the localization of radioactivity is not influenced by exogenous administration of leucine or inhibition of isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase.

  4. Age and sex affect protein metabolism at protein intakes that span the range of adequacy: comparison of leucine kinetics and nitrogen balance data☆

    OpenAIRE

    Conley, Travis B.; McCabe, George P; Lim, Eunjung; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Johnson, Craig A; Campbell, Wayne W

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that changes in leucine oxidation (leuox) with feeding may reflect adult protein requirements. We evaluated this possibility by assessing the effects of age, sex, and different protein intakes on whole-body leucine kinetics and nitrogen balance. Thirty-four young (n = 18, 22–46 years) and old (n= 16, 63–81 years) men and women completed three 18-day trials with protein intakes of 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 g protein·kg body weight−1·d−1. Fasting and fed-state leucine kinetics were ...

  5. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  6. Back to BASICs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The world economy is in a state of flux. While most OECD countries struggle to minimize the damage of the global financial crisis, a few countries maintain positive economic growth rates and are thus changing global power configurations. Among the most important emerging economies for international...... development are the BASIC countries: Brazil, South Africa, India and China. This article analyses why these countries have rejuvenated development cooperation, what they actually do in Africa, and how they do it. It argues that the most important aspect of the rejuvenation of non-traditional donors...

  7. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  8. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  9. Electrical installation calculations basic

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for basic electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practice. A step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3Fo

  10. Basic Verbs of Possession

    OpenAIRE

    Viberg, Åke

    2010-01-01

    Verbs of possession such as HAVE and GIVE have been extensively studied both typologically and from a cognitive linguistic perspective. The present study presents an analysis of possession verbs as a semantic field with a focus on the most basic verbs. It combines a corpus-based contrastive analysis with a sketch of a general lexical typology of possession verbs. The contrastive part consists of an analysis primarily of the Swedish verbs ge ‘give’, få ‘get’ and ta ‘take’ and their corresponde...

  11. Back to basics audio

    CERN Document Server

    Nathan, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Back to Basics Audio is a thorough, yet approachable handbook on audio electronics theory and equipment. The first part of the book discusses electrical and audio principles. Those principles form a basis for understanding the operation of equipment and systems, covered in the second section. Finally, the author addresses planning and installation of a home audio system.Julian Nathan joined the audio service and manufacturing industry in 1954 and moved into motion picture engineering and production in 1960. He installed and operated recording theaters in Sydney, Austra

  12. Machine shop basics

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rex

    2004-01-01

    Use the right tool the right wayHere, fully updated to include new machines and electronic/digital controls, is the ultimate guide to basic machine shop equipment and how to use it. Whether you're a professional machinist, an apprentice, a trade student, or a handy homeowner, this fully illustrated volume helps you define tools and use them properly and safely. It's packed with review questions for students, and loaded with answers you need on the job.Mark Richard Miller is a Professor and Chairman of the Industrial Technology Department at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, T

  13. Basic research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs under the cognizance of the Office of Energy Research (OER) are directed toward discovery of natural laws and new knowledge, and to improved understanding of the physical and biological sciences as related to the development, use, and control of energy. The ultimate goal is to develop a scientific underlay for the overall DOE effort and the fundamental principles of natural phenomena so that these phenomena may be understood, and new principles, formulated. The DOE-OER outlay activities include three major programs: High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, and Basic Energy Sciences. Taken together, these programs represent some 30 percent of the Nation's Federal support of basic research in the energy sciences. The research activities of OER involve more than 6,000 scientists and engineers working in some 17 major Federal Research Centers and at more than 135 different universities and industrial firms throughout the United States. Contract holders in the areas of high-energy physics, nuclear physics, materials sciences, nuclear science, chemical sciences, engineering, mathematics geosciences, advanced energy projects, and biological energy research are listed. Funding trends for recent years are outlined

  14. Basic scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of lectures on basic scattering theory were given as part of a course for postgraduate high energy physicists and were designed to acquaint the student with some of the basic language and formalism used for the phenomenological description of nuclear reactions and decay processes used for the study of elementary particle interactions. Well established and model independent aspects of scattering theory, which are the basis of S-matrix theory, are considered. The subject is considered under the following headings; the S-matrix, cross sections and decay rates, phase space, relativistic kinematics, the Mandelstam variables, the flux factor, two-body phase space, Dalitz plots, other kinematic plots, two-particle reactions, unitarity, the partial-wave expansion, resonances (single-channel case), multi-channel resonances, analyticity and crossing, dispersion relations, the one-particle exchange model, the density matrix, mathematical properties of the density matrix, the density matrix in scattering processes, the density matrix in decay processes, and the helicity formalism. Some exercises for the students are included. (U.K.)

  15. Basic research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The research programs under the cognizance of the Office of Energy Research (OER) are directed toward discovery of natural laws and new knowledge, and to improved understanding of the physical and biological sciences as related to the development, use, and control of energy. The ultimate goal is to develop a scientific underlay for the overall DOE effort and the fundamental principles of natural phenomena so that these phenomena may be understood, and new principles, formulated. The DOE-OER outlay activities include three major programs: High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, and Basic Energy Sciences. Taken together, these programs represent some 30 percent of the Nation's Federal support of basic research in the energy sciences. The research activities of OER involve more than 6,000 scientists and engineers working in some 17 major Federal Research Centers and at more than 135 different universities and industrial firms throughout the United States. Contract holders in the areas of high-energy physics, nuclear physics, materials sciences, nuclear science, chemical sciences, engineering, mathematics geosciences, advanced energy projects, and biological energy research are listed. Funding trends for recent years are outlined. (RWR)

  16. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  17. Basics and application of PSpice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteenth chapters, which introduces basics and application of PSpice. The contents of this book are PSpice?, PSpice introduction, PSpice simulation, DC analysis, parametric analysis, Transient analysis, parametric analysis and measurements, Monte Carlo analysis, changing of device characteristic, ABM application. The elementary laws of circuit, R.L.C. basic circuit, Diode basic cc circuit, Transistor and EET basic circuit, OP-Amp basic circuit, Digital basic circuit, Analog, digital circuit practice, digital circuit application and practice and ABM circuit application and practice.

  18. Formation of isoamyl alcohol and isoamyl acetate from L-leucine by cellular suspensions of Cladosporium cladosporioides No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of isoamyl alcohol and isoamyl acetate from L-leucine by cellular suspensions of the strain No. 9 of C. cladosporioides and several culture conditions of the microorganism---effect of pH, reaction time, aeration, activity of washed cells and composition of reaction medium---were examined. The incorporation of 14C in L-leucine-U-14C into the fermentation products, especially into isoamyl alcohol and isoamyl acetate was also studied. The relative radioactivities of 14C in the carbon dioxide split off during fermentation, in the cells and in the neutral aroma compounds were respectively 33.1, 16.3 and 48.2 per cent. The radioactivities of isoamyl alcohol and isoamyl acetate in the neutral aroma compounds fraction were equally 50 per cent of the radioactivity of this fraction, and they were detected only in the alcohol moiety of isoamyl acetate. (auth.)

  19. The Plant Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase PSY1R from Head to Toe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, Christian Berg

    PSY1R belongs to the family of plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that play important roles in processes such as growth regulation and plant immunity response. PSY1R was proposed to be the receptor of the plant peptide hormone PSY1 which promotes cell expansion. PSY1R was furthermore...... activated. This work provides the first study of the direct interaction between PSY1R and the peptide ligand PSY1. The binding was evaluated both for full length PSY1R expressed in plants and for the isolated extracellular domain expressed in insect cells. PSY1 binds to the extracellular domain of PSY1R...... Thr963. Thr959 and Thr963 are conserved among related plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases whereas Ser951 is unique for PSY1R which suggests that it may serve a specialized function in regulation of PSY1R kinase activity....

  20. Incorporation of l-14C-leucine in rat liver and spleen tissue after methyl palmitate action on RES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rats, Wistar strain, after i.v. injection of an emulsion of methyl palmitate (0.4 g methyl palmitate per animal), using 740 kBq l-14C-leucine, proteosynthesis in liver and spleen homogenates and trichloroacetate precipitates was investigated. After 2-hour and 24-hour intervals following methyl palmitate administration an insignificantly raised leucine incorporation was observed in the liver and spleen. In the liver it can be explained by increased formation of enzymes needed for more intensive metabolic processes associated with the breakdown of palmitate. In the spleen it could be due to a more rapid replication of lymphocytes or enhanced formation of specific proteins, i.e., immunoglobulins. The return of these values to normal during subsequent intervals suggests, however, that only temporary changes are involved. (author)

  1. Leucine alleviates dexamethasone-induced suppression of muscle protein synthesis via synergy involvement of mTOR and AMPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao J; Yang, Xin; Wang, Ru X; Jiao, Hong C; Zhao, Jing P; Song, Zhi G; Lin, Hai

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are negative muscle protein regulators that contribute to the whole-body catabolic state during stress. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-signalling pathway, which acts as a central regulator of protein metabolism, can be activated by branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). In the present study, the effect of leucine on the suppression of protein synthesis induced by GCs and the pathway involved were investigated. In vitro experiments were conducted using cultured C2C12 myoblasts to study the effect of GCs on protein synthesis, and the involvement of mTOR pathway was investigated as well. After exposure to dexamethasone (DEX, 100 μmol/l) for 24 h, protein synthesis in muscle cells was significantly suppressed (P0.05) but was increased by leucine supplementation at a dose of 5 mmol/l (P<0.05). PMID:27129299

  2. The role of leucine and its metabolites in protein and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Li, Yinghui; Tang, Yulong; Kong, Xiangfeng; Feng, Zemeng; Anthony, Tracy G; Watford, Malcolm; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Leucine (Leu) is a nutritionally essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) in animal nutrition. It is usually one of the most abundant amino acids in high-quality protein foods. Leu increases protein synthesis through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and placental cells. Leu promotes energy metabolism (glucose uptake, mitochondrial biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation) to provide energy for protein synthesis, while inhibiting protein degradation. Approximately 80 % of Leu is normally used for protein synthesis, while the remainder is converted to α-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC) and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) in skeletal muscle. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that some of the functions of Leu are modulated by its metabolites. Both α-KIC and HMB have recently received considerable attention as nutritional supplements used to increase protein synthesis, inhibit protein degradation, and regulate energy homeostasis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. Leu and its metabolites hold great promise to enhance the growth and health of animals (including humans, birds and fish). PMID:26255285

  3. Regulation of taste-active components of meat by dietary leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, M; Kadowaki, M; Fujimura, S

    2007-04-01

    1. Regulation of meat taste is one effective method for improvement of meat quality. In this study, effects of dietary leucine (Leu) content on taste-active components, especially free glutamate (Glu), in meat were investigated. 2. Broiler chickens (28 d old) were fed on diets with graded dietary Leu content (100, 130 or 150% of Leu requirement in NRC, 1994) for 10 d before marketing. Taste-active components of meat (free amino acids and ATP metabolites) and sensory score of meat soup were estimated. 3. Free Glu content, the main taste-active component of meat, was significantly increased by dietary Leu. Compared with the Leu 130% group, free Glu was increased by 17% in the Leu 100% group. Free Glu of meat tended to decrease in the Leu 150% group. In contrast, inosine monophosphate content in meat did not change among all groups. 4. Sensory evaluation of meat soup from the Leu 100 and 150% groups showed that they had different meat tastes. Sensory scores of overall preference, umami taste and chicken-like taste were significantly higher in the Leu 100% group. 5. These results suggest that dietary Leu content is a regulating factor of free Glu in meat. Decreasing dietary Leu induces an increase in the free Glu content of meat and improves meat taste. PMID:17453808

  4. Branched-chain Amino Acid Biosensing Using Fluorescent Modified Engineered Leucine/Isoleucine/Valine Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescence sensing system for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAswas developed based on engineered leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding proteins (LIVBPsconjugated with environmentally sensitive fluorescence probes. LIVBP was cloned fromEscherichia coli and Gln149Cys, Gly227Cys, and Gln254Cys mutants were generated bygenetic engineering. The mutant LIVBPs were then modified with environmentallysensitive fluorophores. Based on the fluorescence intensity change observed upon thebinding of the ligands, the MIANS-conjugated Gln149Cys mutant (Gln149Cys-M showedthe highest and most sensitive response. The BCAAs Leu, Ile, and Val can each bemonitored at the sub-micromolar level using Gln149Cys-M. Measurements were alsocarried out on a mixture of BCAFAs and revealed that Gln149Cys-M-based measurementis not significantly affected by the change in the molar ratio of Leu, Ile and Val in thesample. Its high sensitivity and group-specific molecular recognition ability make the newsensing system ideally suited for the measurement of BCAAs and the determination of theFischer ratio, an indicator of hepatic disease involving metabolic dysfunction.

  5. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations and Parkinson’s disease: three questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Cookson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) were first identified in 2004 and have since been shown to be the single most common cause of inherited Parkinson’s disease. The protein is a large GTP-regulated serine/threonine kinase that additionally contains several protein–protein interaction domains. In the present review, we discuss three important, but unresolved, questions concerning LRRK2. We first ask: what is the normal function of LRRK2? Related to this, we discuss the evidence of LRRK2 activity as a GTPase and as a kinase and the available data on protein–protein interactions. Next we raise the question of how mutations affect LRRK2 function, focusing on some slightly controversial results related to the kinase activity of the protein in a variety of in vitro systems. Finally, we discuss what the possible mechanisms are for LRRK2-mediated neurotoxicity, in the context of known activities of the protein.

  6. Identification and characterization of a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 consensus phosphorylation motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja P Pungaliya

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 have been identified as major genetic determinants of Parkinson's disease (PD. The most prevalent mutation, G2019S, increases LRRK2's kinase activity, therefore understanding the sites and substrates that LRRK2 phosphorylates is critical to understanding its role in disease aetiology. Since the physiological substrates of this kinase are unknown, we set out to reveal potential targets of LRRK2 G2019S by identifying its favored phosphorylation motif. A non-biased screen of an oriented peptide library elucidated F/Y-x-T-x-R/K as the core dependent substrate sequence. Bioinformatic analysis of the consensus phosphorylation motif identified several novel candidate substrates that potentially function in neuronal pathophysiology. Peptides corresponding to the most PD relevant proteins were efficiently phosphorylated by LRRK2 in vitro. Interestingly, the phosphomotif was also identified within LRRK2 itself. Autophosphorylation was detected by mass spectrometry and biochemical means at the only F-x-T-x-R site (Thr 1410 within LRRK2. The relevance of this site was assessed by measuring effects of mutations on autophosphorylation, kinase activity, GTP binding, GTP hydrolysis, and LRRK2 multimerization. These studies indicate that modification of Thr1410 subtly regulates GTP hydrolysis by LRRK2, but with minimal effects on other parameters measured. Together the identification of LRRK2's phosphorylation consensus motif, and the functional consequences of its phosphorylation, provide insights into downstream LRRK2-signaling pathways.

  7. In ovo Administration of Ghrelin and Subsequent Intestinal Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP Activity in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ghiasi Ghaleh-kandi,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to investigation on effect of in ovo administration of ghrelin on subsequent Leucine Aminopeptidase (LAP activity in broiler chickens. In this experiment 250 fertilized eggs were collected from commercial breeder flock. The eggs were divided into five experimental groups; control T1 (without injection, group T2 (in ovo injected with solution, group T3 (in ovo injected with 50 μg/egg ghrelin, group T4 (in ovo injected with 100 μg/egg ghrelin and group T5 (in ovo injected with 150 μg/egg ghrelin. All of groups were incubated. In ovo injection was done at day 7 of incub ation. in ovo administration of 150 μg/egg ghrelin in embryonic period, could stimulate LAP activity at 21-day- old chicks in 10, 30 and 50% of intestine with 3520.4, 266.9, 4595.6 IU/g protein, also in ovo injected 50 and 150 μg/egg ghrelin could stimulate LAP activity in 1, 50 and 70% of intestine with 3071.4, 4779.3 and 5013.4 IU/g. In 42-day-old chicks, in ovo injected 50 μg/egg ghrelin could stimulate LAP activity in 1, 10, 30, 40, 70, and 90% percent of intestine. These findings demonstrated stimulatory effects of ghrelin in low doses (50 μg in chicken intestine LAP activity.

  8. LRRML: a conformational database and an XML description of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine-rich repeats (LRRs are present in more than 6000 proteins. They are found in organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes and play an important role in protein-ligand interactions. To date, more than one hundred crystal structures of LRR containing proteins have been determined. This knowledge has increased our ability to use the crystal structures as templates to model LRR proteins with unknown structures. Since the individual three-dimensional LRR structures are not directly available from the established databases and since there are only a few detailed annotations for them, a conformational LRR database useful for homology modeling of LRR proteins is desirable. Description We developed LRRML, a conformational database and an extensible markup language (XML description of LRRs. The release 0.2 contains 1261 individual LRR structures, which were identified from 112 PDB structures and annotated manually. An XML structure was defined to exchange and store the LRRs. LRRML provides a source for homology modeling and structural analysis of LRR proteins. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the database we modeled the mouse Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 by multiple templates homology modeling and compared the result with the crystal structure. Conclusion LRRML is an information source for investigators involved in both theoretical and applied research on LRR proteins. It is available at http://zeus.krist.geo.uni-muenchen.de/~lrrml.

  9. Sustained delivery by leucine-modified chitosan spray-dried respirable powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learoyd, Tristan P; Burrows, Jane L; French, Eddie; Seville, Peter C

    2009-05-01

    The controlled co-delivery of multiple agents to the lung offers potential benefits to patients. This study investigated the preparation and characterisation of highly respirable spray-dried powders displaying the sustained release of two chemically distinct therapeutic agents. Spray-dried powders were produced from 30% (v/v) aqueous ethanol formulations that contained hydrophilic (terbutaline sulphate) and hydrophobic (beclometasone dipropionate) model drugs, chitosan (as a drug release modifier) and leucine (aerosolisation enhancer). The influence of chitosan molecular weight on spray-drying thermal efficiency, aerosol performance and drug release profile was investigated. Resultant powders were physically characterised: with in vitro aerosolisation performance and drug release profile investigated by the Multi-Stage Liquid Impinger and modified USP II dissolution apparatus, respectively. It was found that increased chitosan molecular weight gave increased spray-drying thermal efficiency. The powders generated were of a suitable size for inhalation-with emitted doses over 90% and fine particle fractions up to 72% of the loaded dose. Sustained drug release profiles were observed in dissolution tests for both agents: increased chitosan molecular weight associated with increased duration of drug release. The controlled co-delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic entities underlines the capability of spray drying to produce respirable particles with sustained release for delivery to the lung. PMID:19429272

  10. Quantitative role of the splanchnic bed in whole body leucine metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the splanchnic bed in the economy of whole body leucine (leu) metabolism was assessed in 5 chronically catheterized conscious fasting mongrel dogs. Using primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-[15N, 1-13C]-leu and L-1-14C-leu the metabolic fate of leu carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the splanchnic region was compared with that in the body as a whole, by measurement of isotope and substrate balance across gut and liver. Sampling was from the portal and hepatic veins and arch of aorta. Blood flow estimation was made by dye dilution. Whole body leu N and C fluxes and oxidation were (Mean +/- SEM); 453 +/ 47, 197 +/- 37 and 41 +/- 5 μmol kg-1.h-1, respectively. The splanchnic bed accounted for (% of whole body) 36 +/- 13 of leu disappearance into proteins (liver 14%; gut 22%); 24 +/- 7 of leu appearance via protein breakdown (liver 8%; gut 16%) 12 +/- 2% of leu transamination to α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) (liver 7%; gut 5%); 12 +/- 3 of KIC reamination to leu (liver 7%; gut 5%) and 11 +/- 3 of leu oxidation (liver 2%; gut 9%). Hence, in the fasting state the splanchnic region accounts for a small proportion of whole body leu-KIC interconversion and oxidation, but a more significant proportion of whole body of leu for protein synthesis

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na+ and leucine transport by LeuT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na+ and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na+ binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na+ binding and release. In Cl−-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl− ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na+ and substrate transport as well as Cl−-independence of LeuT. - Highlights: • Ion binding site involving Glu290 is identified in the outward- and inward-open LeuT. • Sodium is released from inward-open LeuT once the side chain of Glu290 is protonated. • Protonation state of Glu290 regulates sodium binding and transport in LeuT

  12. Activity of leucine aminopeptidase of Telchin licus licus: an important insect pest of sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jorge W Arboleda; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi; Jiménez, Arnubio Valencia

    2014-06-01

    The enzymatic activity of leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) from the intestinal tract of sugarcane giant borer (Telchin licus licus) was assayed by using a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric assay that uses L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide as substrate. In this assay, L-leucyl-2-naphthylamide is hydrolyzed to produce 2-naphthylamine and Lleucine. The product 2-naphthylamine reacts with Fast Black K and can be monitored using a continuous spectrophotometric measurement at 590 nm. The data on the kinetic parameters indicates that the Km for the L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide at pH 7.0 was found to be lower than those found for other LAP substrates. The Km and Vmax for the LAP were determined to be 84.03 µM and 357.14 enzymatic units mg(-1), respectively. A noticeable difference of LAP activity between the two insect orders tested was observed. This method could be used to screen for natural LAP inhibitors. PMID:24410745

  13. Increased leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin- like domains 1 expression enhances chemosensitivity in glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baohui Liu; Shenqi Zhang; Dong Ruan; Xiaonan Zhu; Zhentao Guo; Huimin Dong; Mingmin Yan; Qianxue Chen; Daofeng Tian; Liquan Wu; Junmin Wang; Qiang Cai; Heng Shen; Baowei Ji; Long Wang

    2011-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is an anti-oncogene.LRIG1 is correlated with Bcl-2 in ependymomas.Decreased Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression can improve the chemosensitivity of glioma.In the present study, a tissue microarray of human brain astrocytomas was constructed.To investigate the relationship of LRIG1 with Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase, LRIG1, Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression in our tissue microarray was determined using immunohistochemistry.In addition, we constructed the LRIG1-U251 cell line, and its responses to doxorubicin and temozolomide were detected using the MTT assay.Results showed that LRIG1 expression was significantly negatively correlated with Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression in glioma.Also, proliferation of LRIG1-U251 cells exposed to doxorubicin or temozolomide was significantly inhibited, i.e.in the LRIG1-U251 cell line, the chemosensitivity to doxorubicin and temozolomide was increased.This indicates that increased LRIG1 expression produces a chemosensitivity in glioma.

  14. Additive insulinogenic action of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin extract and leucine after exercise in healthy males

    OpenAIRE

    Deldicque, Louise; Van Proeyen, Karen; Ramaekers, Monique; Pischel, Ivo; Sievers, Hartwig; Hespel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral intake of a specific extract of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin (OpunDia™) (OFI) has been shown to increase serum insulin concentration while reducing blood glucose level for a given amount of glucose ingestion after an endurance exercise bout in healthy young volunteers. However, it is unknown whether OFI-induced insulin stimulation after exercise is of the same magnitude than the stimulation by other insulinogenic agents like leucine as well as whether OFI can in...

  15. A Pyrococcus homolog of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein, LrpA, inhibits transcription by abrogating RNA polymerase recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlke, Isabell; Thomm, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The genomes of Archaea harbor homologs of the global bacterial regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp). Archaeal Lrp homologs are helix–turn–helix DNA-binding proteins that specifically repress the transcription of their own genes in vitro. Here, we analyze the interaction of Pyrococcus LrpA with components of the archaeal transcriptional machinery at the lrpA promoter. DNA–protein complexes can be isolated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays that contain both LrpA and the ...

  16. Comparative Genome Analysis Reveals an Absence of Leucine-Rich Repeat Pattern-Recognition Receptor Proteins in the Kingdom Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Soanes, Darren M.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In plants and animals innate immunity is the first line of defence against attack by microbial pathogens. Specific molecular features of bacteria and fungi are recognised by pattern recognition receptors that have extracellular domains containing leucine rich repeats. Recognition of microbes by these receptors induces defence responses that protect hosts against potential microbial attack. Methodology/Principal Findings A survey of genome sequences from 101 species, representing a ...

  17. Effects of leucine and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, D J; Hossain, T.; Hill, D S; Phillips, B. E.; Crossland, H.; Williams, J; Loughna, P.; Churchward-Venne, T.A.; Breen, L; Phillips, S.M.; Etheridge, T.; Rathmacher, J A; Smith, K.; Szewczyk, N.J.; Atherton, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is contingent upon the dynamic equilibrium (fasted losses–fed gains) in protein turnover. Of all nutrients, the single amino acid leucine (Leu) possesses the most marked anabolic characteristics in acting as a trigger element for the initiation of protein synthesis. While the mechanisms by which Leu is ‘sensed’ have been the subject of great scrutiny, as a branched-chain amino acid, Leu can be catabolized within muscle, thus posing the possibility that meta...

  18. Polymorphisms in leucine-rich repeat genes are associated with autism spectrum disorder susceptibility in populations of European ancestry

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa Inês; Clark Taane G; Holt Richard; Pagnamenta Alistair T; Mulder Erik J; Minderaa Ruud B; Bailey Anthony J; Battaglia Agatino; Klauck Sabine M; Poustka Fritz; Monaco Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders which are characteristically comprised of impairments in social interaction, communication and restricted interests/behaviours. Several cell adhesion transmembrane leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are highly expressed in the nervous system and are thought to be key regulators of its development. Here we present an association study analysing the roles of four promising candidate...

  19. Postprandial leucine and insulin responses and toxicological effects of a novel whey protein hydrolysate-based supplement in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toedebusch Ryan G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was: aim 1 compare insulin and leucine serum responses after feeding a novel hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH-based supplement versus a whey protein isolate (WPI in rats during the post-absorptive state, and aim 2 to perform a thorough toxicological analysis on rats that consume different doses of the novel WPH-based supplement over a 30-day period. In male Wistar rats (~250 g, n = 40, serum insulin and leucine concentrations were quantified up to 120 min after one human equivalent dose of a WPI or the WPH-based supplement. In a second cohort of rats (~250 g, n = 20, we examined serum/blood and liver/kidney histopathological markers after 30 days of feeding low (1human equivalent dose, medium (3 doses and high (6 doses amounts of the WPH-based supplement. In aim 1, higher leucine levels existed at 15 min after WPH vs. WPI ingestion (p = 0.04 followed by higher insulin concentrations at 60 min (p = 0.002. In aim 2, liver and kidney histopathology/toxicology markers were not different 30 days after feeding with low, medium, high dose WPH-based supplementation or water only. There were no between-condition differences in body fat or lean mass or circulating clinical chemistry markers following the 30-day feeding intervention in aim 2. In comparison to WPI, acute ingestion of a novel WPH-based supplement resulted in a higher transient leucine response with a sequential increase in insulin. Furthermore, chronic ingestion of the tested whey protein hydrolysate supplement appears safe.

  20. D-histidine utilization in Salmonella typhimurium is controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp).

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, K; Zhang, S.; Klopotowski, T; Ames, G F

    1996-01-01

    A new class of D-histidine-utilizing mutants which carry mutations in the gene encoding the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been identified in Salmonella typhimurium. The lrp mutations arise as suppressors of mutations in the genes encoding the histidine permease which drastically decrease the level of histidine transport activity. However, the suppressor effect is not exerted by elevating the level of the permease. Rather, the properties of the suppressor mutants are consiste...

  1. Obese women on a low energy rice and bean diet: effects of leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation on protein turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Marchini

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation in adult obese patients (body mass index of 33 ± 4 kg/m² consuming a Brazilian low energy and protein diet (4.2 MJ/day and 0.6 g protein/kg affects protein and amino acid metabolism. After four weeks adaptation to this diet, each subject received supplements of these amino acids (equivalent to 0.2 g protein kg-1 day-1 in random order. On the seventh day of each amino acid supplementation, a single-dose 15N-glycine study was carried out. There were no significant differences in protein flux, synthesis or breakdown. The protein flux (grams of nitrogen, gN/9 h was 55 ± 24 during the nonsupplemented diet intake and 39 ± 10, 44 ± 22 and 58 ± 35 during the leucine-, glycine- and arginine-supplemented diet intake, respectively; protein synthesis (gN/9 h was 57 ± 24, 36 ± 10, 41 ± 22 and 56 ± 36, respectively; protein breakdown (gN/9 h was 51 ± 24, 34 ± 10, 32 ± 28 and 53 ± 35, respectively; kinetic balance (gN/9 h was 3.2 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 1.7, 3.4 ± 2.9 and 3.9 ± 1.6. There was no difference in amino acid profiles due to leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation. The present results suggest that 0.6 g/kg of dietary protein is enough to maintain protein turnover in obese women consuming a reduced energy diet and that leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation does not change kinetic balance or protein synthesis.

  2. Effects of resource availability and bacterivory on leucine incorporation in different groups of freshwater bacterioplankton, assessed using microautoradiography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horňák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Nedoma, Jiří; Gasol, J.M.; Šimek, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2006), s. 277-289. ISSN 0948-3055 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/05/0007 Grant ostatní: FRVŠ(CZ) 1062/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : leucine incorporation * bacterial structure * bacterial function Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2006

  3. Effects of Leucin-Enkephalins on Surface Characteristics and Morphology of Model Membranes Composed of Raft-Forming Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanova, Asya; Jordanova, A; Lalchev, Z

    2016-06-01

    During the last decades opioid peptides, like enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) are subject to extensive studies due to their antinociceptive action in organism. According to the membrane catalysis theory, in order to adopt a proper conformation for binding to their receptors, opioid peptides interact with the lipid phase of the membrane receptor surrounding. With this regard, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of synthetic leucine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalinamide on surface characteristics and morphology of lipid monolayers, composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol alone and with their mixtures. The lipids were chosen to represent a model of a membrane raft, since it is known that G-protein-coupled receptors, including opioid receptors, are located preferably in membrane rafts. By using Langmuir's monolayer method, the change in surface pressure of the model membranes before and after the addition of the synthetic enkephalins was studied, and the compressional moduli of the lipids and lipid-peptides monolayers were determined. In addition, by Brewster angle microscopy, the surface morphology of the lipid monolayers alone and after the injection of both enkephalins was monitored. Our results showed that both leucine-enkephalins affected the lipid monolayers surface characteristics, and led to an increase in surface density of the mixed surface lipids/enkephalins films at loose lipid packing. This effect was more pronounced for the enkephalinamide, suggesting a different mechanism of interaction for the amidated enkephalin with the lipid phase, as compared to leucine-enkephalin. PMID:26661722

  4. Leucine or carbohydrate supplementation reduces AMPK and eEF2 phosphorylation and extends postprandial muscle protein synthesis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Gabriel J; Layman, Donald K.; Moulton, Christopher J; Norton, Layne E.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Proud, Christopher G.; Rupassara, S. Indu; Garlick, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) increases after consumption of a protein-containing meal but returns to baseline values within 3 h despite continued elevations of plasma amino acids and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1) signaling. This study evaluated the potential for supplemental leucine (Leu), carbohydrates (CHO), or both to prolong elevated MPS after a meal. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (~270 g) trained to consume three meals daily were food deprived for 12 h, and then blood and gastrocne...

  5. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    St Clair Dina A; Morgante Michele; West Marilyn AL; Kozik Alexander; Meyers Blake C; Tan Xiaoping; Bent Andrew F; Michelmore Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of...

  6. Cloud computing basics

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing Basics covers the main aspects of this fast moving technology so that both practitioners and students will be able to understand cloud computing. The author highlights the key aspects of this technology that a potential user might want to investigate before deciding to adopt this service. This book explains how cloud services can be used to augment existing services such as storage, backup and recovery. Addressing the details on how cloud security works and what the users must be prepared for when they move their data to the cloud. Also this book discusses how businesses could prepare for compliance with the laws as well as industry standards such as the Payment Card Industry.

  7. Magnetism basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanita, Carmen-Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    This textbook is aimed at engineering students who are likely to come across magnetics applications in their professional practice. Whether designing lithography equipment containing ferromagnetic brushes, or detecting defects in aeronautics, some basic knowledge of 21st century magnetism is needed. From the magnetic tape on the pocket credit card to the read head in a personal computer, people run into magnetism in many products. Furthermore, in a variety of disciplines tools of the trade exploit magnetic principles, and many interdisciplinary laboratory research areas cross paths with magnetic phenomena that may seem mysterious to the untrained mind. Therefore, this course offers a broad coverage of magnetism topics encountered more often in this millenium, revealing key concepts on which many practical applications rest. Some traditional subjects in magnetism are discussed in the first half of the book, followed by areas likely to spark the curiosity of those more interested in today’s technological achi...

  8. Basic trauma life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  9. Basic mathematics for economists

    CERN Document Server

    Rosser, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Economics students will welcome the new edition of this excellent textbook. Mathematics is an integral part of economics and understanding basic concepts is vital. Many students come into economics courses without having studied mathematics for a number of years. This clearly written book will help to develop quantitative skills in even the least numerate student up to the required level for a general Economics or Business Studies course. This second edition features new sections on subjects such as: matrix algebra part year investment financial mathematics Improved pedagogical features, such as learning objectives and end of chapter questions, along with the use of Microsoft Excel and the overall example-led style of the book means that it will be a sure fire hit with both students and their lecturers.

  10. Basic real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrab, Houshang H

    2014-01-01

    This expanded second edition presents the fundamentals and touchstone results of real analysis in full rigor, but in a style that requires little prior familiarity with proofs or mathematical language. The text is a comprehensive and largely self-contained introduction to the theory of real-valued functions of a real variable. The chapters on Lebesgue measure and integral have been rewritten entirely and greatly improved. They now contain Lebesgue’s differentiation theorem as well as his versions of the Fundamental Theorem(s) of Calculus. With expanded chapters, additional problems, and an expansive solutions manual, Basic Real Analysis, Second Edition, is ideal for senior undergraduates and first-year graduate students, both as a classroom text and a self-study guide. Reviews of first edition: The book is a clear and well-structured introduction to real analysis aimed at senior undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The prerequisites are few, but a certain mathematical sophistication is required. ....

  11. 15. Basic economic indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clear value of economic data and analysis to decisionmakers has motivated them to mandate the creation of extensive global economic data sets. This chapter contains a set of these basic economic data, which provides the context for understanding the causes and the consequences of many of the decisions that affect the world's resources. Many traditional economic indicators fail to account for the depletion or deterioration of natural resources, the long-term consequences of such depletion, the equitable distribution of income within a country, or the sustainability of current economic practices. The type of measurement shown here, however, is still useful in showing the great differences between the wealthiest and the poorest countries. Tables are given on the following: Gross national product and official development assistance 1969-89; External debt indicators 1979-89; Central government expenditures; and World commodity indexes and prices 1975-89

  12. Improved muscle function and quality after diet intervention with leucine-enriched whey and antioxidants in antioxidant deficient aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Miriam; Dijk, Francina J.; Bunschoten, Annelies; van Dartel, Dorien A.M.; van Norren, Klaske; Walrand, Stephane; Jourdan, Marion; Verlaan, Sjors; Luiking, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant (AOX) deficiencies are commonly observed in older adults and oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to sarcopenia. Here we investigate if 1) low levels of dietary antioxidants had a negative impact on parameters of muscle mass, function and quality, and 2) to study if nutritional interventions with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein could improve these muscle parameters in aged mice. 18-months-old mice were fed a casein-based antioxidant-deficient (lowox) diet or a casein-based control-diet (CTRL) for 7 months. During the last 3 months, lowox-mice were subjected to either: a) continued lowox, b) supplementation with vitamin A/E, Selenium and Zinc (AOX), c) substitution of casein with leucine-enriched whey protein (PROT) or d) a combination of both AOX and PROT (TOTAL). After 7 months lowox-mice displayed lower muscle strength and more muscle fatigue compared to CTRL. Compared to lowox-mice, PROT-mice showed improved muscle power, grip strength and less muscle fatigue. AOX-mice showed improved oxidative status, less muscle fatigue, improved grip strength and mitochondrial dynamics compared to lowox-mice. The TOTAL-mice showed the combined effects of both interventions compared to lowox-mice. In conclusion, nutritional intervention with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein can play a role in improving muscle health in a AOX-deficient mouse model. PMID:26943770

  13. Elaboration of biscuits with oatmeal and fat palm with added L-leucine and calcium for sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Elita Bertolin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of oatmeal and palm fat in the elaboration of biscuits with added L-leucine and calcium in order to develop a product for sarcopenia in the elderly. The biscuits, or cookies, were elaborated applying a central composite rotational design with surface response methodology, and the significant linear, quadratic and interaction terms were used in the second order mathematical model. Physical, physicochemical and sensory analyses were performed by a trained panel. Based on the best results obtained, three cookie formulations were selected for sensory evaluation by the target group and physicochemical determinations. The formulations with the highest sensory scores for appearance and texture and medium scores for color and expansion index were selected. The addition of calcium and leucine increased significantly the concentration of these components in the biscuits elaborated resulting in a cookie with more than 30% of DRI (Dietary Reference Intake for calcium and leucine. The formulations selected showed high acceptance by the target group; therefore, they can be included in the diet of elderly with sarcopenia as a functional food.

  14. Improved muscle function and quality after diet intervention with leucine-enriched whey and antioxidants in antioxidant deficient aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Miriam; Dijk, Francina J; Bunschoten, Annelies; van Dartel, Dorien A M; van Norren, Klaske; Walrand, Stephane; Jourdan, Marion; Verlaan, Sjors; Luiking, Yvette

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidant (AOX) deficiencies are commonly observed in older adults and oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to sarcopenia. Here we investigate if 1) low levels of dietary antioxidants had a negative impact on parameters of muscle mass, function and quality, and 2) to study if nutritional interventions with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein could improve these muscle parameters in aged mice. 18-months-old mice were fed a casein-based antioxidant-deficient (lowox) diet or a casein-based control-diet (CTRL) for 7 months. During the last 3 months, lowox-mice were subjected to either: a) continued lowox, b) supplementation with vitamin A/E, Selenium and Zinc (AOX), c) substitution of casein with leucine-enriched whey protein (PROT) or d) a combination of both AOX and PROT (TOTAL). After 7 months lowox-mice displayed lower muscle strength and more muscle fatigue compared to CTRL. Compared to lowox-mice, PROT-mice showed improved muscle power, grip strength and less muscle fatigue. AOX-mice showed improved oxidative status, less muscle fatigue, improved grip strength and mitochondrial dynamics compared to lowox-mice. The TOTAL-mice showed the combined effects of both interventions compared to lowox-mice. In conclusion, nutritional intervention with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein can play a role in improving muscle health in a AOX-deficient mouse model. PMID:26943770

  15. Involvement of the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A15 and leucine in obesity-related phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Drgonova

    Full Text Available Brain pathways, including those in hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract, influence food intake, nutrient preferences, metabolism and development of obesity in ways that often differ between males and females. Branched chain amino acids, including leucine, can suppress food intake, alter metabolism and change vulnerability to obesity. The SLC6A15 (v7-3 gene encodes a sodium-dependent transporter of leucine and other branched chain amino acids that is expressed by neurons in hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract. We now report that SLC6A15 knockout attenuates leucine's abilities to reduce both: a intake of normal chow and b weight gain produced by access to a high fat diet in gender-selective fashions. We identify SNPs in the human SLC6A15 that are associated with body mass index and insulin resistance in males. These observations in mice and humans support a novel, gender-selective role for brain amino acid compartmentalization mediated by SLC6A15 in diet and obesity-associated phenotypes.

  16. Insomnia Treatments (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education: Daytime sleepiness (The Basics) Patient education: Jet lag (The Basics) Patient education: What is a sleep ... use by UpToDate, but only for the clinical, educational or research purposes of the Institution. Further, access ...

  17. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Mojibola, Adeolu; Dongmo-Momo, Gilles; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanopart...

  18. Peptide synthesis by enzymatic catalysis: new application to the total radiosynthesis of the tritiated leucine-enkephalin hormone, using Y carboxypeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of enzymatic labelling of peptide hormones is described. The enzyme used, a protease, Y carboxypeptidase is able, in some conditions, to catalyze the formation of peptide bounds. This property has been used for the synthesis of a pentapeptide, the tritiated leucine-enkephalin, with the incorporation of every radioactive amino acid. The specific radioactivity of the labelled molecule is 139 Ci/mmole and its biological properties (receptor binding and immunoreactivity) are identical with native leucine-enkephalin properties

  19. Leucine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum: enzyme activities, structure of leuA, and effect of leuA inactivation on lysine synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Pátek, M; Krumbach, K.; Eggeling, L; Sahm, H

    1994-01-01

    Enzymes and genes of the isopropylmalate pathway leading to leucine in Corynebacterium glutamicum were studied, and assays were performed to unravel their connection to lysine oversynthesis. The first enzyme of the pathway is inhibited by leucine (Ki = 0.4 mM), and all three enzyme activities of the isopropylmalate pathway are reduced upon addition of this amino acid to the growth medium. Three different DNA fragments were cloned, each resulting in an oversynthesis of one of the three enzymes...

  20. A Proline/Arginine-Rich End Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein (PRELP) Variant Is Uniquely Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Mikaelsson; Anders Österborg; Mahmood Jeddi-Tehrani; Parviz Kokhaei; Mahyar Ostadkarampour; Reza Hadavi; Mehran Gholamin; Mehdi Akhondi; Fazel Shokri; Hodjattallah Rabbani; Håkan Mellstedt

    2013-01-01

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1). As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze...

  1. Differential regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver of neonatal pigs by leucine through an mTORC1-dependent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryawan Agus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neonatal growth is characterized by a high protein synthesis rate that is largely due to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in insulin and amino acids, especially leucine. The mechanism of leucine's action in vivo is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine infusion on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver of neonatal pigs. To evaluate the mode of action of leucine, we used rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1. Overnight-fasted 7-day-old piglets were treated with rapamycin for 1 hour and then infused with leucine (400 μmol·kg-1·h-1 for 1 hour. Leucine infusion increased the rate of protein synthesis, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1 and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1 phosphorylation in gastrocnemius and masseter muscles (P

  2. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling. PMID:27426920

  3. Excessive Leucine-mTORC1-Signalling of Cow Milk-Based Infant Formula: The Missing Link to Understand Early Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased protein supply by feeding cow-milk-based infant formula in comparison to lower protein content of human milk is a well-recognized major risk factor of childhood obesity. However, there is yet no conclusive biochemical concept explaining the mechanisms of formula-induced childhood obesity. It is the intention of this article to provide the biochemical link between leucine-mediated signalling of mammalian milk proteins and adipogenesis as well as early adipogenic programming. Leucine has been identified as the predominant signal transducer of mammalian milk, which stimulates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. Leucine thus functions as a maternal-neonatal relay for mTORC1-dependent neonatal β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. The mTORC1 target S6K1 plays a pivotal role in stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into adipocytes and to induce insulin resistance. It is of most critical concern that infant formulas provide higher amounts of leucine in comparison to human milk. Exaggerated leucine-mediated mTORC1-S6K1 signalling induced by infant formulas may thus explain increased adipogenesis and generation of lifelong elevated adipocyte numbers. Attenuation of mTORC1 signalling of infant formula by leucine restriction to physiologic lower levels of human milk offers a great chance for the prevention of childhood obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases.

  4. Timing of gene expression from different genetic systems in shaping leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) meal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guo Lin Chen; Jian Guo Wu; Murali-Tottekkaad Variath; Chun Hai Shi

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) using a diallel design with nine parents: Youcai 601, Double 20-4, Huashuang 3, Gaoyou 605, Zhongyou 821, Eyouchangjia, Zhong R-888, Tower and Zheshuang 72. The seed developmental process was divided into five stages, namely initial (days 1–15 after flowering), early (days 16–22 after flowering), middle (days 23–29), late (days 30–36), and maturing (days 37–43) developmental stages. The variation of dynamic genetic effects for leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed meal was analysed at five developmental stages, across different environments using the genetic models with time-dependent measures. The results from unconditional and conditional analyses indicated that the expression of diploid embryo, cytoplasmic and diploid maternal plant genes were important for leucine and isoleucine contents at different developmental stages of rapeseed, particularly at the initial and early developmental stages. Among different genetic systems, nutrition quality traits were mainly controlled by the accumulative or net maternal main effects and their GE interaction effects, except at maturity when the net diploid embryo effects were larger. The expression of genes was affected by the environmental conditions on 15, 22, 29 or 36 days after flowering, but was more stable at mature stage. For the isoleucine content the narrow-sense heritabilities on 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 days after flowering were 43.0, 65.7, 60.1, 65.5 and 78.2%, respectively, while for the leucine content the corresponding narrow-sense heritabilities were relatively smaller. The interaction heritabilities were more important than the general heritabilities at the first three developmental times. The improvement for isoleucine content could be achieved by selection based on the higher narrow-sense heritabilities. Various genetic systems exhibited genetic correlations among the developmental times or leucine and isoleucine contents. A

  5. Basics of aerothermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschel, Ernst Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    This successful book gives an introduction to the basics of aerothermodynamics, as applied in particular to winged re-entry vehicles and airbreathing hypersonic cruise and acceleration vehicles. The book gives a review of the issues of transport of momentum, energy and mass, real-gas effects as well as inviscid and viscous flow phenomena. In this second, revised edition the chapters with the classical topics of aerothermodynamics more or less were left untouched. The access to some single topics of practical interest was improved. Auxiliary chapters were put into an appendix. The recent successful flights of the X-43A and the X-51A indicate that the dawn of sustained airbreathing hypersonic flight now has arrived. This proves that the original approach of the book to put emphasis on viscous effects and the aerothermodynamics of radiation-cooled vehicle surfaces was timely. This second, revised edition even more accentuates these topics. A new, additional chapter treats examples of viscous thermal surface eff...

  6. Nanodesign: some basic questions

    CERN Document Server

    Schommers, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that nanoscience will be the dominant direction for technology in this century, and that this science will influence our lives to a large extent as well as open completely new perspectives on all scientific and technological disciplines. To be able to produce optimal nanosystems with tailor-made properties, it is necessary to analyze and construct such systems in advance by adequate theoretical and computational methods. Since we work in nanoscience and nanotechnology at the ultimate level, we have to apply the basic laws of physics. What methods and tools are relevant here? The book gives an answer to this question. The background of the theoretical methods and tools is critically discussed, and also the world view on which these physical laws are based. Such a debate is not only of academic interest but is of highly general concern, and this is because we constantly move in nanoscience and nanotechnology between two extreme poles, between infinite life and total destruction . On the one ...

  7. Basic Data on Biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Renewable gases such as biogas and biomethane are considered as key energy carrier when the society is replacing fossil fuels with renewable alternatives. In Sweden, almost 80 % of the fossil fuels are used in the transport sector. Therefore, the focus in Sweden has been to use the produced biogas in this sector as vehicle gas. Basic Data on Biogas contains an overview of production, utilisation, climate effects etc. of biogas from a Swedish perspective. The purpose is to give an easy overview of the current situation in Sweden for politicians, decision makers and interested public. 1.4 TWh of biogas is produced annually in Sweden at approximately 230 facilities. The 135 wastewater treatment plants that produce biogas contribute with around half of the production. In order to reduce the sludge volume, biogas has been produced at wastewater treatment plants for decades. New biogas plants are mainly co-digestion plants and farm plants. The land filling of organic waste has been banned since 2005, thus the biogas produced in landfills is decreasing.

  8. Basic neutronics. Neutrons migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the basic neutronics necessary for the understanding of the operation of the different types of nuclear reactors: 1 - introduction to neutronics: principle of fission chain reactions, fast neutron reactors and thermal neutron reactors, capture, neutron status, variations with the reactor lattices; 2 - Boltzmann equation: neutrons population, neutrons migration, characterization of neutrons population and reactions, integral form of the Boltzmann equation, integral-differential form, equivalence between the two forms; 3 - reactor kinetics: fast neutrons and delayed neutrons, kinetic equations in punctual model, Nordheim equation, reactivity jumps, reactivity ramp; 4 - diffusion equation: local neutron status, Fick's law, diffusion equation, initial, boundary and interface conditions, nuclei in infinite and homogenous medium, some examples of solutions, developments in Eigenmodes; 5 - one-group theory: equation of the 'one-group - diffusion' theory, critical condition of the naked and homogenous reactor, critical condition of a reactor with reflectors, generalizations; 6 - neutrons moderation: different moderation mechanisms, elastic shock laws, moderation equation, some examples of solutions; 7 - resonance absorption of neutrons: advantage of the discontinuous moderation character, advantage of an heterogenous disposition, classical formula of the anti-trap factor in homogenous and heterogenous situation; 8 - neutrons thermalization: notions of thermalization mechanisms, thermalization equation, Maxwell spectrum, real spectrum, classical formula of the thermal utilisation factor, classical formula of the reproduction factor, moderation optimum. (J.S.)

  9. Back to basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    In an effort to educate the public about the long road from obscure experiment to life-changing discovery, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has been enlisting prominent researchers, science writers, and scientific organizations such as the AGU. More than two years in development, the NAS basic science initiative “Beyond Discovery: The Path From Research to Human Benefits” is an attempt to translate peer-review-quality science papers into general-interest science articles and booklets.As conceived by NAS vice-president Jack Halpern and a host of representatives from the scientific community, the Beyond Discovery initiative will “develop case studies that identify and trace the origins of important technological and medical advances.” These case studies will be written by scientists in a style publishable in a journal such as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. The articles are intended to be understandable to educators, college students, and the scientifically literate public. The case studies then will be further distilled by science writers into articles for a wider audience of policy makers and the general public.

  10. Basic operator theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gohberg, Israel

    2001-01-01

    rii application of linear operators on a Hilbert space. We begin with a chapter on the geometry of Hilbert space and then proceed to the spectral theory of compact self adjoint operators; operational calculus is next presented as a nat­ ural outgrowth of the spectral theory. The second part of the text concentrates on Banach spaces and linear operators acting on these spaces. It includes, for example, the three 'basic principles of linear analysis and the Riesz­ Fredholm theory of compact operators. Both parts contain plenty of applications. All chapters deal exclusively with linear problems, except for the last chapter which is an introduction to the theory of nonlinear operators. In addition to the standard topics in functional anal­ ysis, we have presented relatively recent results which appear, for example, in Chapter VII. In general, in writ­ ing this book, the authors were strongly influenced by re­ cent developments in operator theory which affected the choice of topics, proofs and exercises. One ...

  11. Bacterial production in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil evaluated by ³H-leucine incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Gonzalez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the necessary ³H-leucine concentration to estimate bacterial production in Guanabara Bay through saturation curves. A second aim was to collect preliminary data of bacterial production in two distinct sites corresponding to different water qualities: Urca inlet and Governador Island. Saturation curves were made with water samples taken at the main circulation channel of the bay, Paquetá Island, and the two sites mentioned before. The ³H-leucine curves showed similar pattern for all studied areas, indicating the ideal isotope concentration to be 10 nM. Bacterial biomass production ranged from 0.40 to 4.53 µgC L-1 h-1 in Urca and from 3.86 to 73.72 µgC L-1 h-1 in Governador Island indicating the relationship between nutrients and organic matter supply and bacterial productivity. This work is an important reference for studies on trophodynamics, biogeochemical cycles and modelling in Guanabara Bay.O objetivo desse trabalho foi realizar curvas de saturação a fim de otimizar a concentração de ³H-leucina necessária para avaliar produção bacteriana na Baía de Guanabara. Objetivou-se ainda a aquisição de dados preliminares de produção bacteriana em dois locais distintos em termos de qualidade de água : enseada da Urca e Ilha do Governador. As amostras para as curvas foram obtidas na região do Canal Central e na Ilha de Paquetá, além dos dois locais de coleta citados acima. Seguiu-se a metodologia descrita por Kirchman et al. (1985 e modificada por Smith & Azam (1992. As curvas de ³H-leucina mostraram um padrão semelhante para todas as áreas estudadas, indicando a concentração ótima de isótopo de 10 nM. A produção de biomassa bacteriana variou de 0,40 a 4,53 µgC L-1 h-1 na Urca e de 3,86 a 73,72 µgC L-1 h-1 na Ilha do Governador confirmando a relação entre a disponibilidade de nutrientes e matéria orgânica e o aumento da produtividade bacteriana. Essas análises poderão ser

  12. Inhibitory role of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niedworok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer. Despite surgical and chemotherapeutic treatment the prognosis is still poor once bladder cancer progresses to a muscle-invasive state. Discovery of new diagnostic markers and pathophysiologic effectors might help to contribute to novel diagnostic and therapeutic options. The extracellular matrix microenvironment shaped by the extracellular matrix critically affects tumor cell and stroma cell functions. Therefore, aim of the present study was to assess the possible implication of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan in progression of human urothelial bladder cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: For this purpose tumor biopsies of 76 bladder cancer patients with different tumor stages (pTa, pT1-T4 were investigated with respect to biglycan expression and correlated with a long-term (10 years clinical follow-up. Interestingly, higher biglycan mRNA expression was associated with higher tumor stages and muscle invasiveness. In vitro knock-down of endogenous biglycan in human urothelial carcinoma cells (J82 cells increased proliferation, whereas addition of recombinant biglycan and overexpression of biglycan inhibited tumor cell proliferation. In line with this growth-inhibitory effect of biglycan, transplantation of J82 cells after knock-down of biglycan resulted in significantly increased growth of subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with two anti-proliferative, multi-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors-sunitinib and sorafenib-strongly upregulated biglycan expression. Collectively, the experimental data suggest that high biglycan expression is associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation. In accordance, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed higher 10-year survival in patients with high biglycan mRNA expression in tumor biopsies. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present data suggest that biglycan is an endogenous inhibitor of bladder cancer cell

  13. Leucine-Rich repeat receptor kinases are sporadically distributed in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diévart Anne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs are receptor kinases that contain LRRs in their extracellular domain. In the last 15 years, many research groups have demonstrated major roles played by LRR-RLKs in plants during almost all developmental processes throughout the life of the plant and in defense/resistance against a large range of pathogens. Recently, a breakthrough has been made in this field that challenges the dogma of the specificity of plant LRR-RLKs. Results We analyzed ~1000 complete genomes and show that LRR-RK genes have now been identified in 8 non-plant genomes. We performed an exhaustive phylogenetic analysis of all of these receptors, revealing that all of the LRR-containing receptor subfamilies form lineage-specific clades. Our results suggest that the association of LRRs with RKs appeared independently at least four times in eukaryotic evolutionary history. Moreover, the molecular evolutionary history of the LRR-RKs found in oomycetes is reminiscent of the pattern observed in plants: expansion with amplification/deletion and evolution of the domain organization leading to the functional diversification of members of the gene family. Finally, the expression data suggest that oomycete LRR-RKs may play a role in several stages of the oomycete life cycle. Conclusions In view of the key roles that LRR-RLKs play throughout the entire lifetime of plants and plant-environment interactions, the emergence and expansion of this type of receptor in several phyla along the evolution of eukaryotes, and particularly in oomycete genomes, questions their intrinsic functions in mimicry and/or in the coevolution of receptors between hosts and pathogens.

  14. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 deficiency is protective in rhabdomyolysis-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Ravindra; Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Hu, Xianzhen; Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Kamal, Ahmed Ibrahim; Joseph, Reny; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam; Curtis, Lisa M; West, Andrew B

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, and LRRK2 is also linked to Crohn's and Hansen's disease. LRRK2 is expressed in many organs in mammals but is particularly abundant in the kidney. We find that LRRK2 protein is predominantly localized to collecting duct cells in the rat kidney, with much lower expression in other kidney cells. While genetic knockout (KO) of LRRK2 expression is well-tolerated in mice and rats, a unique age-dependent pathology develops in the kidney. The cortex and medulla of LRRK2 KO rat kidneys become darkly pigmented in early adulthood, yet aged animals display no overt signs of kidney failure. Accompanying the dark pigment we find substantial macrophage infiltration in LRRK2 KO kidneys, suggesting the presence of chronic inflammation that may predispose to kidney disease. Unexpectedly, the dark kidneys of the LRRK2 KO rats are highly resistant to rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury compared with wild-type rats. Biochemical profiling of the LRRK2 KO kidneys using immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses show a massive accumulation of hemoglobin and lipofuscin in renal tubules that account for the pigmentation. The proximal tubules demonstrate a corresponding up-regulation of the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is capable of mitigating acute kidney injury. The unusual kidney pathology of LRRK2 KO rats highlights several novel physiological roles for LRRK2 and provides indirect evidence for HO-1 expression as a protective mechanism in acute kidney injury in LRRK2 deficiency. PMID:25904107

  15. Identification and characterization of CaApe2--a neutral arginine/alanine/leucine-specific metallo-aminopeptidase from Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, Thomas; Rump, Andreas; Pönisch, Roman; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Klimm, Wolfgang; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    The proteolytic potential of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was evaluated by the identification and functional characterization of a peptidolytic enzyme isolated from the cell wall of the microorganism. Determination of basic structural and kinetic data identified a neutral arginine/alanine/leucine-specific metallo-aminopeptidase of unknown function termed CaApe2, which is encoded by ORF CaO19.5197 (GenBank RefSeq XM_705313). Mass spectrometric tryptic peptide analysis and N-terminal protein sequencing revealed serine-88 to represent the N-terminus of CaApe2. Taking into account the results of DNA and protein sequence analysis including inspection of the genomic region upstream of ORF CaO19.5197, the gene CaAPE2 is likely to consist of two exons linked by a phase-2 intron with exons 1 and 2 encoding a signal peptide and the amino acids 88-954 of ORF CaO19.5197, respectively. The isolated CaApe2 protein shares an equally high similarity with the gene products ScAap1 and ScApe2, suggesting duplication of a phylogenetically ancient precursor gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The observed failure to cleave human type-I and type-IV collagen in vitro challenges a direct role that secreted CaApe2 might play in the degradation of extracellular matrix components during host colonization, but does not exclude per se a contribution of the aminopeptidase to the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:18637841

  16. The bHLH transcription factor bHLH104 interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and modulates iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression. PMID:25794933

  17. Failure to Target RANKL Signaling Through p38-MAPK Results in Defective Osteoclastogenesis in the Microphthalmia Cloudy-Eyed Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Heather A; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Cabrera, Jennifer; Hildreth, Blake E; Cuitiño, Maria; Fu, Qi; Ahmad, Asrar; Toribio, Ramiro E; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sharma, Sudarshana M

    2016-03-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper family factor that is essential for terminal osteoclast differentiation. Previous work demonstrates that phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK downstream of Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL) signaling is necessary for MITF activation in osteoclasts. The spontaneous Mitf cloudy eyed (ce) allele results in production of a truncated MITF protein that lacks the leucine zipper and C-terminal end. Here we show that the Mitf(ce) allele leads to a dense bone phenotype in neonatal mice due to defective osteoclast differentiation. In response to RANKL stimulation, in vitro osteoclast differentiation was impaired in myeloid precursors derived from neonatal or adult Mitf(ce/ce) mice. The loss of the leucine zipper domain in Mitf(ce/ce) mice does not interfere with the recruitment of MITF/PU.1 complexes to target promoters. Further, we have mapped the p38 MAPK docking site within the region deleted in Mitf(ce). This interaction is necessary for the phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK. Site-directed mutations in the docking site interfered with the interaction between MITF and its co-factors FUS and BRG1. MITF-ce fails to recruit FUS and BRG1 to target genes, resulting in decreased expression of target genes and impaired osteoclast function. These results highlight the crucial role of signaling dependent MITF/p38 MAPK interactions in osteoclast differentiation. PMID:26218069

  18. The Cytotoxicity Test and Rejection Observation of Abdominal Zipper for Miniature Pigs%小型猪腹壁拉链装置的细胞毒性试验及排异反应观测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余琛琳; 汤球; 刘志学; 马雷; 徐晨; 蔡丽萍; 崔淑芳

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过体外细胞毒性试验和在体排异反应试验,评价小型猪腹壁拉链装置的安全性.方法 通过CCK-8法细胞毒性试验,评价小型猪腹壁拉链装置材料的细胞毒性;通过分别测定空白对照组(C组)、外科手术组(S组)和小型猪腹壁拉链模型组(M组)外科手术前(0d)及术后1d、3d、7d、14d和21d血清IL-1、IL-6、IL-10和TNF-a等免疫细胞因子的浓度变化,评价了小型猪腹壁拉链装置的安全性.结果 细胞毒性为0~Ⅰ级;IL-1、IL-6、IL-10和TNF-a值,M组和S组组间无显著性差异;M组和S组分别与C组相比较,术后1d和3d均显著升高、有极显著差异(P<0.01),术后7d、14 d、21 d组间无显著性差异.结论 小型猪腹壁拉链装置体外细胞毒性合格,符合生物材料的国家标准;在体排异反应试验表明生物拉链本身没有引起严重的排异反应或炎症反应,安全性良好,为小型猪腹壁拉链动物模型的建立和推广应用提供了良好的实验依据.%Objective To assess the safety of abdominal zippers of miniature pig by cytotoxicity test and rejection observation. Methods The safety of abdominal zippers of miniature pig were evaluated by CCK-8 cytotoxicity test. In the test of rejection observation, nine miniature pigs were randomly divided into three groups: control group(C group), surgical procedure group(S group) and the animal model of miniature pig with abdominal zipper group(M group), and IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-a in blood serum were detected before surgery (0 d), and during the day of 1d, 3 d, 7 d, 14 d and 21 d after surgery. Results The cytotoxicity grade was 0 or Ⅰ level, and the level of IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-a in S group and M group increased significantly at 1d and 3 d after surgery, but there was no difference between S group, M group and C group at 7 d, 14 d and 21 d after surgery. Conclusions The abdominal zipper for miniature pigs, which satisfies the national safety standard of

  19. Basic Education Reform in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chengzhi Wang; Quanhua Zhou

    2002-01-01

    China's recent basic education reform followed and, in a certain way, imitated its economic reform. The economic reform merged the experimental dual (planned and market) price systems into a free market economy and yielded phenomenal success. Basic education reform, however, has not succeeded in transforming the introductory dual-track (key school and regular school) systems into a universal one. This article briefly examines the general process and outcomes of basic education reform. It disc...

  20. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVenco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA, a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane, while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls.C19orf12 protein is a 17kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologues to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  1. Basic Education Reform in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhi Wang

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available China's recent basic education reform followed and, in a certain way, imitated its economic reform. The economic reform merged the experimental dual (planned and market price systems into a free market economy and yielded phenomenal success. Basic education reform, however, has not succeeded in transforming the introductory dual-track (key school and regular school systems into a universal one. This article briefly examines the general process and outcomes of basic education reform. It discusses the following questions: Is basic education reform also a story of success? What significant lessons can the Chinese reform experience offer to other comparable developing countries?

  2. Visual Basic 2012 programmer's reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive guide to Visual Basic 2012 Microsoft Visual Basic (VB) is the most popular programming language in the world, with millions of lines of code used in businesses and applications of all types and sizes. In this edition of the bestselling Wrox guide, Visual Basic expert Rod Stephens offers novice and experienced developers a comprehensive tutorial and reference to Visual Basic 2012. This latest edition introduces major changes to the Visual Studio development platform, including support for developing mobile applications that can take advantage of the Windows 8 operating system

  3. The Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) is primarily monomeric and unstructured in physiological solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Philo, John S.; Maluf, Nasib K.; Krueger, Susan; Buchko, Garry W.; Lin, Genyao; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-04-01

    Amelogenin proteins are critical to the formation of enamel in teeth and may have roles in promoting nucleation, controlling growth, and regulating microstructures of the intricately woven hydroxyapatite (HAP). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the N- and C-terminal charged regions of the full-length protein thought to control crystal growth. Although the quaternary structure of full-length amelogenin in solution has been well studied and can consist of self-assemblies of monomers called nanospheres, the quaternary structure of LRAP is not as well studied. Here, analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity (SV) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to study the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP over a range of pH values, ionic strengths, and concentrations. SV has advantages over other techniques in accurately quantifying protein speciation in polydisperse solutions. We found that the monomer was the dominant species of phosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(+P)) over a range of solution conditions (pH 2.7 to 3.9, pH 4.5 to 8, 50 mmol/L( mM) to 200 mM NaCl, 0.065 to 2 mg/mL). The monomer was also the dominant species for unphosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(-P)) at pH 7.4 and LRAP(+P) in the presence of 2.5 mM calcium at pH 7.4. LRAP aggregated in a narrow pH range near the isoelectric point (pH 4.1). We conclude that LRAP does not form nanospheres under physiological solution conditions. Both SV and SANS showed that the LRAP monomer has a radius of ~2.0 nm and adopts an extended structure which solution NMR studies show is intrinsically disordered. This work provides new insights into the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP and further evidence that the monomeric species is an important functional form of amelogenins

  4. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  5. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-01-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or...

  6. Polarographic investigations on the cadmium(II)-imidazole-amino acid systems (amino acid L-leucine or DL-serine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants of ternary complexes of cadmium(II) with imidazole (IM) as primary ligand and amino acids L-leucine (LE) or DL-serine (SE) as secondary ligand have been determined polarographically at 35 degC and μ=0.5M (KNO3). In each system, four mixed complexes, viz, Cd(IM)-(AA)+, Cd(IM)2-(AA)+, Cd(IM)(AA)2 and Cd(IM)2(AA)2, were formed. The relative stability of the ternary as compared to that of corresponding binary complexes has been expressed in terms of Δlog K and log X values. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Effects of a leucine and pyridoxine-containing nutraceutical on body weight and composition in obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemel MB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael B Zemel,1,2 Antje Bruckbauer11NuSirt Sciences Inc, 2Nutrition Department, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USABackground: We recently demonstrated leucine to modulate energy partitioning between adipose tissue and muscle. Further, leucine exhibits a synergy with B6, resulting in reduced adipocyte lipid storage coupled with increased muscle fat oxidation. Accordingly, a nutraceutical (NuShape™ containing 2.25 g leucine and 30 mg B6 increased fat oxidation by > 30 g/day in a 28-day randomized controlled trial. The present study evaluated the long-term efficacy of this combination in modulating body weight and composition.Methods: Two 24-week, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, one with weight maintenance (n = 20 and one hypocaloric (-500 kcal/day; n = 24, were conducted using the nutraceutical Nushape in obese subjects.Results: The supplement resulted in fat loss in the maintenance study (-1.12 ± 0.36 and -1.82 ± 0.70 kg at 12 and 24 weeks, P < 0.01 versus placebo while no change was found in the placebo group. In the hypocaloric study, the supplement group lost up to twice as much weight (6.18 ± 1.02 versus 3.40 ± 0.81 kg at 12 weeks and 8.15 ± 1.33 versus 5.25 ± 1.13 kg at 24 weeks, P < 0.01 and fat (4.96 ± 0.61 versus 2.31 ± 0.53 kg at 12 weeks and 7.00 ± 0.95 versus 4.22 ± 0.74 kg at 24 weeks, P < 0.01 than the placebo group.Conclusion: This nutraceutical combination results in significant fat loss in the absence of caloric restriction and markedly enhances weight and fat loss by 50%–80% over a 24-week period.Keywords: leucine, vitamin B6, pyridoxine, fat loss, weight loss, caloric restriction, adiposity, body composition

  8. Possible involvement of phospholipase C and protein kinase C in stimulatory actions of L-leucine and its keto acid, α-ketoisocaproic acid, on protein synthesis in RLC-16 hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki-Tsuji, Naoko; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2002-01-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in RLC-16 hepatocytes. The incorporation of [3H] tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an indexof protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted RLC-16 cells, L-leucineand its keto acid, α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipase A2 and C canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting a possible i...

  9. The California Basic Skills Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illowsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the evolution and implementation of the California Basic Skills Initiative (CA BSI), a statewide effort to address ongoing basic skills and ESL needs of community college students and of all campus faculty, administrators, and staff who support these students. CA BSI strategies include assisting every college in assessing…

  10. Children and Their Basic Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Debra Lindsey; Howard, Esther M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes obstacles presented by poverty in the fulfillment of the basic needs of children. Individually addresses Maslow's five basic needs with regard to children reared in poverty: (1) physiological needs; (2) safety needs; (3) belonging and love needs; (4) self-esteem needs; and (5) self-actualization needs. (Author/SD)

  11. In vivo and in vitro effects of growth hormone on the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein of liver and muscle of the eel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo administration of ovine GH (2 micrograms/g body wt) increased [14C]leucine incorporation into protein of the liver, skeletal muscle, and opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels. Addition of ovine GH into the medium slightly increased [14C]leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices during 5 hr in vitro incubation, but did not affect protein synthesis from [14C]leucine in opercular muscle. In vivo pretreatment with ovine GH 48 hr prior to tissue preparation clearly increased [14C]leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices in vitro. However, no statistically significant change was observed for in vitro incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein of opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels which had been previously treated with ovine GH. These results indicate that ovine GH has a protein anabolic action in the liver and muscle of the eel and that compared to mammals a rather long lag period is needed to elicit such protein anabolic actions of GH in these animals

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-leucine by alkaline diperiodatocuprate(III)—A free radical intervention, deamination and decarboxylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keerti M Naik; Sharanappa T Nandibewoor

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of L-leucine by diperiodatocuprate (III) (DPC) in aqueous alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.10mol dm-3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between L-leucine and DPC in alkaline medium exhibits 1:4 stoichiometry (L-leucine: DPC). The reaction is of first order in [DPC] and has less than unit order in both [L-leucine] and [alkali]. However, the order in [Lleucine] and [alkali] changes from first order to zero order as their concentration increase. Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. Increase in periodate concentration decreased the rate. The oxidation reaction in alkaline medium has been shown to proceed via a monoperiodatocuprate (III) - L-leucine complex, which decomposed slowly in a rate-determining step followed by other fast steps to give the products. The main oxidative products were identified by spot test and GC-MS. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanism were calculated.

  13. Transient Ischemic Attack (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and diagnosis (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient information: Hemorrhagic stroke treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient information: Ischemic ... symptoms and diagnosis (Beyond the Basics) Patient information: Hemorrhagic stroke treatment (Beyond the Basics) Patient information: Ischemic stroke ...

  14. Effect of leucine-to-methionine substitutions on the diffraction quality of histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ/INHAT crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of leucine-to-methionine substitutions and optimization of cryoconditions improved the resolution of histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ/INHAT crystals from around 5.5 to 2.3 Å without changing the crystallization conditions, allowing successful structure determination of SET/TAF-Iβ/INHAT by the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction method. One of the most frequent problems in crystallization is poor quality of the crystals. In order to overcome this obstacle several methods have been utilized, including amino-acid substitutions of the target protein. Here, an example is presented of crystal-quality improvement by leucine-to-methionine substitutions. A variant protein with three amino-acid substitutions enabled improvement of the crystal quality of the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ/INHAT when combined with optimization of the cryoconditions. This procedure improved the resolution of the SET/TAF-Iβ/INHAT crystals from around 5.5 to 2.3 Å without changing the crystallization conditions

  15. A 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the metabolism of leucine to isoamyl alcohol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism of leucine to isoamyl alcohol in yeast was examined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The product of leucine transamination, alpha-ketoisocaproate had four potential routes to isoamyl alcohol. The first, via branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase to isovaleryl-CoA with subsequent conversion to isovalerate by acyl-CoA hydrolase operates in wild-type cells where isovalerate appears to be an end product. This pathway is not required for the synthesis of isoamyl alcohol because abolition of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase activity in an lpd1 disruption mutant did not prevent the formation of isoamyl alcohol. A second possible route was via pyruvate decarboxylase; however, elimination of pyruvate decarboxylase activity in a pdc1 pdc5 pdc6 triple mutant did not decrease the levels of isoamyl alcohol produced. A third route utilizes alpha-ketoisocaproate reductase (a novel activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) but with no role in the formation of isoamyl alcohol from alpha-hydroxyisocaproate because cell homogenates could not convert alpha-hydroxyisocaproate to isoamyl alcohol. The final possibility was that a pyruvate decarboxylase-like enzyme encoded by YDL080c appears to be the major route of decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproate to isoamyl alcohol although disruption of this gene reveals that at least one other unidentified decarboxylase can substitute to a minor extent. (author)

  16. Temperature and solar radiation interactions on 3H-leucine incorporation by bacterioplankton in a subtropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Avery K; Jeffrey, Wade H

    2010-01-01

    Although the effects of UV radiation are thought to be temperature independent, the photoinhibition of aquatic bacteria may be temperature dependent owing to enzymatic repair kinetics, an important consideration for climate change analyses. We examined the interactions between temperature and solar radiation in water samples collected from the Blackwater River, Pensacola Bay, and the coastal Gulf of Mexico (Florida) in July 2008. Subsamples were incubated in the dark for 20 h at either the in situ temperature, +5 degrees C from in situ or -5 degrees C from in situ after which they were amended with (3)H-leucine and irradiated in full sunlight at their respective temperatures and compared to samples incubated simultaneously in the dark. Temperature and light significantly affected (3)H-leucine incorporation at all locations and interactive effects between temperature and sunlight were found for Pensacola Bay and the Gulf. Generally, warmer waters reduced photoinhibition. The -5 degrees C treatment was always significantly more inhibited than the +5 degrees C treatment, but the in situ temperature and +5 degrees C and -5 degrees C treatments were not always significantly different. Photoinhibition reduction at warmer temperatures suggests specific effects on photobiology not observed in general cellular activity may be important in determining interactive ecosystem effects of climate change. PMID:20158671

  17. Cryo-bioorganic chemistry: freezing effect on stereoselection of L- and DL-leucine cooligomerization in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, T; Hollósi, M

    2001-02-01

    The chirality of L-/DL-leucine (50-50%) cooligomerization was investigated in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions. Cooligomerization was carried out by carbonyldiimidazole activation without initiator at an ambient (+ 22 degrees C) and frozen (- 18 degrees C) temperature, respectively. The separated samples obtained after different time intervals of treatment were completely hydrolyzed (HCl) and the diastereomeric L- and D-leucine derivates of Marfey's reagent (1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-L-alanine amide) were then traced and evaluated by RP-HPLC analysis. After 9 days of oligomerization, the L-Leu content was slightly enhanced in the liquid (57%) and somewhat more enhanced in the frozen (64%) samples. After 17 days, however, the L-Leu content had decreased in the liquid (53%) and frozen (56%) conditions. These L-enantiomer amplifications indicate that an L-antipode is preferentially incorporated into the alpha-helical turn of the oligomer in the earlier stage of cooligomerization, while, later, the D-antipode is also incorporated. The role of ice in the improved stereoselection is discussed. This is the first recorded example of the effect of freezing on stereoselection. PMID:11289315

  18. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  19. Chiral HPLC Separation and Modeling of Four Stereomers of DL-Leucine-DL-Tryptophan Dipeptide on Amylose Chiral Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mohammed F; Hussain, Afzal; Suhail, Mohd; Mukhtar, Sofi Danish; Sahoo, Dibya Ranjan; Asnin, Leonid; Ali, Imran

    2016-09-01

    Chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and modeling of four stereomers of DL-leucine-tryptophan DL-dipeptide on AmyCoat-RP column are described. The mobile phase applied was ammonium acetate (10 mM)-methanol-acetonitrile (50:5:45, v/v). The flow rate of the mobile phases was 0.8 mL/min with UV detection at 230 nm. The values of retention factors for LL-, DD-, DL-, and LD- stereomers were 2.25, 3.60, 5.00, and 6.50, respectively. The values of separation and resolution factors were 1.60, 1.39, and 1.30 and 7.76, 8.05, and 7.19. The limits of detection and quantitation were ranging from 1.0-2.3 and 5.6-14.0 μg/mL. The simulation studies established the elution orders and the mechanism of chiral recognition. It was seen that π-π connections and hydrogen bondings were the main forces for enantiomeric resolution. The reported chiral HPLC method may be applied for the enantiomeric separation of DL-leucine-DL-tryptophan in unknown matrices. Chirality 28:642-648, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27474783

  20. Basic entwinements: unassuming analogue inserts in basic digital modeling (courses)

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous, basic digital modelling tools are currently deployed with relative ease in architecture schools during the course of first year studies. While these first architectural projects essays sometimes communicate matter with already quite impressive professional outlooks, a certain disparity between the various intentions and the student’s actual grasp of the many basic architectural element’s interplays of form and space can become apparent. To alleviate, calibrate and cognitively fine...

  1. Effects of "Bioactive" amino acids leucine, glutamate, arginine and tryptophan on feed intake and mRNA expression of relative neuropeptides in broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Songbo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Feed intake control is vital to ensuring optimal nutrition and achieving full potential for growth and development in poultry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of L-leucine, L-glutamate, L-tryptophan and L-arginine on feed intake and the mRNA expression levels of hypothalamic Neuropeptide involved in feed intake regulation in broiler chicks. Leucine, glutamate, tryptophan or arginine was intra-cerebroventricularly (ICV administrated to 4d-old broiler chicks respectively and the feed intake were recorded at various time points. Quantitative PCR was performed to determine the hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related protein (AgRP, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF. Our results showed that ICV administration of L-leucine (0.15 or 1.5  μmol significantly (P P 

  2. Solubility of proline-leucine dipeptide in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions from T = (288.15 to 313.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility of proline-leucine dipeptide, in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions, was measured at T = (288.15, 298.15, 308.15 and 313.15) K as a function of electrolyte concentration m = (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) mol . kg-1 of water. Solubility data has been evaluated from density measurements using a vibrating tube densimeter. It has been observed that sodium chloride renders the dipeptide proline-leucine more soluble in water. Salting-in coefficients and standard free energies of transfer of proline-leucine, from water to aqueous sodium chloride solutions, have been calculated from the solubility data. Standard enthalpies and entropies of transfer have also been estimated and interpreted in terms of electrostatic and hydrophobic perturbed domains in the hydration shells of the dipeptide and of the cation and anion of the salt, as a function of temperature and salt concentration

  3. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.J.; Wood, D.H.

    1983-09-01

    The original derivation of the basic theory governing the aerodynamics of both hovercraft and modern floatation ovens, requires the validity of some extremely crude assumptions. However, the basic theory is surprisingly accurate. It is shown that this accuracy occurs because the final expression of the basic theory can be derived by approximating the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly shows the limitations of the theory. These limitations are used in discussing the relatively small discrepancies between the theory and experiment, which may not be significant for practical purposes.

  4. A leucine-rich diet and exercise affect the biomechanical characteristics of the digital flexor tendon in rats after nutritional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Wesley Carvalho; Benevides, Gustavo Pereira; Alferes, Leda Maria Totti; Salomão, Emilianne Miguel; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Gomes, Laurecir

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the capacity of athletic performance depends on adequate nutrition, which ensures optimal function of the musculoskeletal system, including tendon stability. However, little is known about the status of tendons and extracellular matrix modifications during malnutrition and nutritional recovery when leucine is used in response to exercise conditioning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collagen content and biomechanical aspects of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) in malnourished rats submitted to nutritional recovery (control diet or leucine-rich diet) and aerobic physical activity. After 60 days of undernourishment (6% protein diet), the malnourished rats were subsequently nutritionally recovered with a control diet or leucine-rich diet and trained or not (swimming, without overload) for 5 weeks. The biomechanical analysis and quantification of hydroxyproline were assessed in the DDFT in all experimental groups. The leucine-rich diet increased hydroxyproline content in the tension region, independently of the training. In the compression region, hydroxyproline content was higher in the malnourished and leucine-trained groups. Biomechanical analysis showed a lower load in the malnourished and all-trained groups. The lowest stress was observed with control-trained animals. The nutritional-recovered groups showed higher strain values corresponding to control group, while the lowest values were observed in malnourished and trained groups. The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet stimulates collagen synthesis of the DDFT, especially when in combination with physical exercise, and seems to determine the increase of resistance and the biomechanical characteristics of tendons. PMID:21107621

  5. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens to ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain ...

  6. Bell's Palsy (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes caused by Bell's palsy will affect the appearance of your face, including how you smile. These ... are comfortable with some medical jargon. Patient information: Genital herpes (Beyond the Basics) Patient information: Shingles (Beyond ...

  7. Basic concept in plasma diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the basic concept of various plasma diagnostics used for the study of plasma characteristics in different plasma experiments ranging from low temperature to high energy density plasma.

  8. French Basic Course. Grammatical Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This index is intended for use with Volumes 1 through 8 of the French Basic Course. It facilitates the finding of grammatical references in those volumes. The items are cross-referenced and arranged in alphabetical order. (Author/AMH)

  9. Basic hypergeometry of supersymmetric dualities

    CERN Document Server

    Gahramanov, Ilmar

    2016-01-01

    We introduce several new identities combining basic hypergeometric sums and integrals. Such identities appear in the context of superconformal index computations for three-dimensional supersymmetric dual theories. We give both analytic proofs and physical interpretations of the presented identities.

  10. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Basic Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... HIV. Interested in learning more about CDC's HIV statistics? Terms, Definitions, and Calculations Used in CDC HIV ...

  11. Pancreatic Cancer (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Pancreatic cancer (Beyond the Basics) Author David P Ryan, MD ... pancreatic juice to the intestines. This type of pancreatic cancer, called "pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma," is discussed in this ...

  12. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  13. Basic statements of relativity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Muschik

    2010-01-01

    Some basic statements of relativity theory, starting out with geometry and observers up to Einstein's field equations, are collected in a systematical order without any proof, to serve as a short survey of tools and results.

  14. Starvation for ilvB operon leader amino acids other than leucine or valine does not increase acetohydroxy acid synthase activity in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, P; Freundlich, M

    1985-01-01

    Eleven different amino acids are encoded in the ilvB leader mRNA. Starvation for leucine or valine, but not for any of the other nine amino acids, resulted in high levels of acetohydroxy acid synthase I. These results are discussed in terms of a report (C.A. Hauser and G.W. Hatfield, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 81:76-79, 1984) which suggests that threonine and alanine, in addition to leucine and valine, are involved in the regulation of the ilvB operon.

  15. Complementary Basic Education in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Otsu, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses current development in the Complementary Basic Education program (COBET), which aims to contribute to the provision of alternative learning opportunities for out-of-school children, particularly girls in a non-formal setting. The Ministry of Education and Culture started the program as part of the Basic Education Master Plan (BEMP) in 1999. Unlike traditional primary schools, the COBET centers have no school fees, no uniforms, no corporal punishment and no child labou...

  16. Basic petroleum research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of projects in the field of basic petroleum research (PetroForsk) is presented. A brief presentation of some of the projects is included, as well as political comments on the value of these projects. The research program Basic Petroleum Research (PetroForsk) was established in 1998 and ended in 2004. The program has been part of the Research Council of Norway's long-term effort in petroleum research (ml)

  17. Visual Basic in easy steps

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Visual Basic in Easy Steps begins by describing the installation process, then introduces form controls, application properties, the programming language, and problem-solving techniques. It illustrates how to build and deploy a complete Windows application and how to create macros for Microsoft Office and web pages for Internet Explorer. By the end of this book, readers will have gained a sound understanding of Visual Basic - even without previous knowledge of programming languate - and be able to create their own interactive applications.

  18. Low-Frequency Radioastronomy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, P.

    2011-04-01

    With the many large instruments in construction or in project, the present epoch corresponds to a renewal of low-frequency radioastronomy. The field will attract new researchers and students not expert of the radioastronomy techniques. With this audience in mind, we present here a very brief introduction to radioastronomy basics, including propagation and polarization of low-frequency radio waves as well as instrumental aspects. Basic formulas are given. The references and internet links will allow the interested reader to go further.

  19. Method development for the determination of D- and L-isomers of leucine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and its application to animal plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with an electrospray ionization for the determination of D- and L-isomers of leucine in human plasma. Phosphate-buffered saline was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The extraction of D- and L-leucine in plasma samples (100 μL) was performed using cationic exchange solid-phase extraction. The enantiomer separation of D- and L-leucine was successfully achieved without derivatization using a CHIRALPAK ZWIX(-) with an isocratic mobile phase comprised of methanol/acetonitrile/1 mol/L ammonium formate/formic acid (500:500:25:2, v/v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. In addition, the discrimination of DL-leucine from structural isomers DL-isoleucine and DL-allo-isoleucine was performed using the unique precursor and product ion pair transition of DL-leucine (m/z 132.1 > 43.0) and DL-leucine-d 7 (m/z 139.2 > 93.0) in positive electrospray ionization mode. The standard curves were linear throughout the calibration range from 0.001 to 1 μg/mL for D-leucine and from 1 to 1000 μg/mL for L-leucine, respectively, with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The stability of D- and L-leucine in human plasma and solvents was confirmed. The endogenous level of D- and L-leucine in human plasma was 0.00197~0.00591 and 9.63~24.7 μg/mL, respectively. This method was also successfully applied to investigate the species difference in the ratios of D-leucine to total leucine from individual plasma concentrations in humans and various animals. The plasma D-leucine concentrations or their ratio to total leucine in rodents was much higher than that in humans. PMID:26345443

  20. Kinetics of Oxidation of L-Leucine by Mono-and Bimetallic Gold and Silver Nanoparticles in Hydrogen Peroxide Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.VENKATESAN; J.SANTHANALAKSHMI

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of surfactant stabilized mono- and bimetallic Au and Ag nanoparticles for the oxidation of an amino acid,L-leucine,was studied using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant.The Au and Ag nanoparticle catalysts exhibited very good catalytic activity and the kinetics of the reaction were found to be pseudo-first order with respect to the amino acid.The effects of several factors,such as oxidant concentration,ionic strength,pH,and catalyst concentration on the reaction,were also investigated.In particular,optimal oxidant and catalyst concentrations were determined.Very high concentrations of the metal nano-catalysts or the oxidant led to a dramatic increase in reaction rate.Moreover,bimetallic Au-Ag catalysts provided higher selectivity than pure Au or Ag.