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Sample records for basic leucine zipper

  1. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of basic leucine zipper transcription factor families in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza saliva and Populus trichocarpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Qian; ZHANG Liang-sheng; WANG Yi-fei; WANG Jian

    2009-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors form a large gene family that is important in pathogen defense, light and stress signaling, etc. The Completed whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza saliva) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) constitute a valuable resource for genome-wide analysis and genomic comparative analysis, as they are representatives of the two major evolutionary lineages within the angiosperms: the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons. In this study, bioinformatics analysis identified 74, 89 and 88 bZIP genes respectively in Arabidopsis, rice and poplar. Moreover, a comprehensive overview of this gene family is presented, including the gene structure, phylogeny, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs. As a result, the plant bZIPs were organized into 10 subfamilies on basis of phylogenetic relationship. Gene duplication events during the family evolution history were also investigated. And it was further concluded that chromosomal/segmental duplication might have played a key role in gene expansion of bZIP gene family.

  3. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  4. MLK-3: identification of a widely-expressed protein kinase bearing an SH3 domain and a leucine zipper-basic region domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Y L; Leung, I W; Heng, H H; Tsui, L C; Lassam, N J

    1994-06-01

    We have identified a novel protein kinase, designated MLK-3, from human thymus using RT-PCR and cDNA library screening. The deduced open reading frame, derived from sequencing a 3.5 kb MLK-3 cDNA, encodes a protein of 847 amino acids with several interesting structural features. These include an SH3 domain in the absence of an SH2 domain, a region containing two leucine zippers with an adjacent carboxy-terminal basic region, and a proline rich region. This kinase shows homology with the mixed-lineage family of protein kinases (MLK) and shares the unusual leucine zipper-basic motif found in previously identified MLK kinases. By northern analysis, MLK-3 mRNA was detected in a wide variety of normal and transformed human cell lines and tissue specimens. The gene encoding MLK-3 has been mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 11 q13.1-13.3, a region frequently altered in human malignancies.

  5. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

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    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  6. The protein ORF80 from the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus binds highly site-specifically to double-stranded DNA and represents a novel type of basic leucine zipper protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Ibanez, Pablo; Stroessenreuther, Thomas; Hekimian, Katya; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    The cryptic high copy number plasmid pRN1 from the thermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus islandicus shares three conserved open reading frames with other S.islandicus plasmids. One of the open reading frames, namely orf80, encodes a 9.5 kDa protein that has no homology to any characterised protein. Recombinant ORF80 purified from Escherichia coli binds to double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner as suggested by EMSA experiments and DNase I footprints. Two highly symmetrical binding sites separated by ∼60 bp were found upstream of the orf80 gene. Both binding sites contain two TTAA motifs as well as other conserved bases. Fluorescence measurements show that short duplex DNAs derived from a single binding site sequence are bound with submicromolar affinity and moderate cooperativity by ORF80. On DNA fragments carrying both binding sites, a rather large protein–DNA complex is formed in a highly cooperative manner. ORF80 contains an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a highly basic domain at its C-terminus. Compared to all known basic leucine zipper proteins the order of the domains is reversed in ORF80. ORF80 may therefore constitute a new subclass of basic leucine zipper DNA-binding proteins. PMID:11812827

  7. Pregnenolone sulfate activates basic region leucine zipper transcription factors in insulinoma cells: role of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Isabelle; Rössler, Oliver G; Thiel, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    The neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate activates a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells involving activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and enhanced expression of the transcription factor Egr-1. Here, we show that pregnenolone sulfate stimulation leads to a significant elevation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in insulinoma cells. Expression of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos is up-regulated in insulinoma cells and pancreatic β-cells in primary culture after pregnenolone sulfate stimulation. Up-regulation of a chromatin-embedded c-Jun promoter/luciferase reporter gene transcription in pregnenolone sulfate-stimulated insulinoma cells was impaired when the AP-1 binding sites were mutated, indicating that these motifs function as pregnenolone sulfate response elements. In addition, phosphorylation of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein is induced and transcription of a CRE-controlled reporter gene is stimulated after pregnenolone sulfate treatment, indicating that the CRE functions as a pregnenolone sulfate response element as well. Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that both L-type Ca(2+) channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) channels are essential for connecting pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced AP-1 activity and bZIP-mediated transcription in insulinoma cells. In contrast, pregnenolone sulfate stimulation did not enhance AP-1 activity or c-Jun and c-Fos expression in pituitary corticotrophs that express functional L-type Ca(2+) channels but only trace amounts of TRPM3. We conclude that expression of L-type Ca(2+) channels is not sufficient to activate bZIP-mediated gene transcription by pregnenolone sulfate. Rather, additional expression of TRPM3 or depolarization of the cells is required to connect pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced gene transcription.

  8. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  9. Modulation of replication efficacy of the hepatitis C virus replicon Con1 by site-directed mutagenesis of an NS4B aminoterminal basic leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, M-W; Susser, S; Welsch, C; Perner, D; Füller, C; Kronenberger, B; Herrmann, E; Zeuzem, S; Sarrazin, C

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is assumed to function as a membrane anchor and protein hub for the viral replication complex. The aim of the current work was to modulate HCV replication efficacy in the subgenomic Con1 replicon by mutations of specific sites within the aminoterminal-located basic leucine zipper (bZIP), a candidate motif for protein-protein interactions involving NS4B. Mutational sites and amino acid substitutes were determined by in-silico sequence analyses of the NS4B-bZIP motif in 357 isolates of HCV genotype 1b from the euHCVdB and LosAlamos database and consecutive analysis of conserved physico-chemical properties at bZIP specific positions. Mutants with predicted minor, medium or major reduction of replication efficacy were tested in the pFKI389neo/NS3-3'/ET plasmid replicon model. Four sites (L25, T29, V39 and W43) of crucial importance for bZIP-mediated protein interaction with predicted apolarity of respective amino acid positions were selected for mutational studies. Substitutes with physico-chemical properties matching the predicted requirements either well (T29A), moderately (L25W, V39W), or insufficiently (T29E, W43E) were associated with slightly improved, moderate and marked decreased replication efficacy, respectively. Spontaneous (T29G) and adaptive (A28G, E40G) mutations occurred in the T29E mutation isolate only and were associated with marked reduction of replication efficacy. The bZIP motif region of NS4B is crucial for RNA replication in the subgenomic Con1 replicon system. RNA replication efficacy can be modulated by site-directed mutagenesis at specific bZIP functional sites. New adaptive amino acid mutations were identified within the HCV NS4B protein.

  10. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  11. SdAb heterodimer formation using leucine zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog-Lee, P. Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAb) are variable domains cloned from camel, llama, or shark heavy chain only antibodies, and are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments. SdAb derived from immunized llamas are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. We hypothesized that the ability to produce heterodimeric sdAb would enable reagents with the robust characteristics of component sdAb, but with dramatically improved overall affinity through increased avidity. Previously we had constructed multimeric sdAb by genetically linking sdAb that bind non-overlapping epitopes on the toxin, ricin. In this work we explored a more flexible approach; the construction of multivalent binding reagents using multimerization domains. We expressed anti-ricin sdAb that recognize different epitopes on the toxin as fusions with differently charged leucine zippers. When the initially produced homodimers are mixed the leucine zipper domains will pair to produce heterodimers. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to confirm heterodimer formation. Surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and fluid array assays were used to characterize the multimer constructs, and evaluate their utility in toxin detection.

  12. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  13. The leucine zipper domains of the transcription factors GCN4 and c-Jun have ribonuclease activity.

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    Yaroslav Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP proteins are one of the largest transcription factor families that regulate a wide range of cellular functions. Owing to the stability of their coiled coil structure leucine zipper (LZ domains of bZIP factors are widely employed as dimerization motifs in protein engineering studies. In the course of one such study, the X-ray structure of the retro-version of the LZ moiety of yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 suggested that this retro-LZ may have ribonuclease activity. Here we show that not only the retro-LZ but also the authentic LZ of GCN4 has weak but distinct ribonuclease activity. The observed cleavage of RNA is unspecific, it is not suppressed by the ribonuclease A inhibitor RNasin and involves the breakage of 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds with formation of 2',3'-cyclic phosphates as the final products as demonstrated by HPLC/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Several mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper are catalytically inactive, providing important negative controls and unequivocally associating the enzymatic activity with the peptide under study. The leucine zipper moiety of the human factor c-Jun as well as the entire c-Jun protein are also shown to catalyze degradation of RNA. The presented data, which was obtained in the test-tube experiments, adds GCN4 and c-Jun to the pool of proteins with multiple functions (also known as moonlighting proteins. If expressed in vivo, the endoribonuclease activity of these bZIP-containing factors may represent a direct coupling between transcription activation and controlled RNA turnover. As an additional result of this work, the retro-leucine zipper of GCN4 can be added to the list of functional retro-peptides.

  14. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

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    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of the homeodomain-leucine zipper IV transcription factor family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rao; Liu, Wei; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-07-01

    The class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip IV) proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors known to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this study, 11 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) HD-Zip IV genes were identified in the version 2 cucumber genome and found to be distributed unevenly across the chromosomes. The CsHDZIV (Cucumis sativus homeodomain-leucine zipper IV) gene family is smaller than in other studied species (except for rice) because of the absence of gene duplication events. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HD-Zip IV genes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato, cotton, maize, and rice could be classified into five subgroups. All CsHDZIV genes appear to be derived from a basic module containing 11 exons in the coding region. Two conserved motifs of 21 and 19 nucleotides were found in the 3'-untranslated regions of six CsHDZIV genes, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation may play a role in regulation of CsHDZIV genes. In addition, 6 of 11 CsHDZIV genes were found to undergo alternative splicing events. Reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that all CsHDZIV genes (except one) were expressed and showed preferential expression in reproductive organs.

  16. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

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    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  17. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  18. Contributions of a Position Amino Acid Residues to the Conformational Stability of GCN4 Leucine Zipper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiang; ZENG Xian'gang; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    The stability of GCN4 leucine zipper and its four mutants in guanidine hydrochloride was detected to verify the contributions of different a position amino acid residues in polypeptide sequences to the forming and stability of parallel coiled coils. The changes of the circular dichroism spectra show that the displacement of the a position polar asparagine and the increase of asparagine in the GCN4 leucine zipper can reduce the α-helix content of the coiled coil structure. The mutants are less stable than the natural peptide in guanidine hydrochloride. The results show that the interaction between the polar asparagine contributes to the conformational stability of the coiled coil. Both the conformation and the number of polar residues in the coiled coil also affect the α-helix content and its resistance to the denaturant. The conclusions provide evidence describing the folding process of proteins including coiled coils in vivo.

  19. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

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    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  20. A Hamiltonian replica exchange method for building protein-protein interfaces applied to a leucine zipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Leucine zippers consist of alpha helical monomers dimerized (or oligomerized) into alpha superhelical structures known as coiled coils. Forming the correct interface of a dimer from its monomers requires an exploration of configuration space focused on the side chains of one monomer that must interdigitate with sites on the other monomer. The aim of this work is to generate good interfaces in short simulations starting from separated monomers. Methods are developed to accomplish this goal based on an extension of a previously introduced [Su and Cukier, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 9595, (2009)] Hamiltonian temperature replica exchange method (HTREM), which scales the Hamiltonian in both potential and kinetic energies that was used for the simulation of dimer melting curves. The new method, HTREM_MS (MS designates mean square), focused on interface formation, adds restraints to the Hamiltonians for all but the physical system, which is characterized by the normal molecular dynamics force field at the desired temperature. The restraints in the nonphysical systems serve to prevent the monomers from separating too far, and have the dual aims of enhancing the sampling of close in configurations and breaking unwanted correlations in the restrained systems. The method is applied to a 31-residue truncation of the 33-residue leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The monomers are initially separated by a distance that is beyond their capture length. HTREM simulations show that the monomers oscillate between dimerlike and monomerlike configurations, but do not form a stable interface. HTREM_MS simulations result in the dimer interface being faithfully reconstructed on a 2 ns time scale. A small number of systems (one physical and two restrained with modified potentials and higher effective temperatures) are sufficient. An in silico mutant that should not dimerize because it lacks charged residues that provide electrostatic stabilization of the dimer

  1. A hamiltonian replica exchange method for building protein-protein interfaces applied to a leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Robert I

    2011-01-28

    Leucine zippers consist of alpha helical monomers dimerized (or oligomerized) into alpha superhelical structures known as coiled coils. Forming the correct interface of a dimer from its monomers requires an exploration of configuration space focused on the side chains of one monomer that must interdigitate with sites on the other monomer. The aim of this work is to generate good interfaces in short simulations starting from separated monomers. Methods are developed to accomplish this goal based on an extension of a previously introduced [Su and Cukier, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 9595, (2009)] hamiltonian temperature replica exchange method (HTREM), which scales the hamiltonian in both potential and kinetic energies that was used for the simulation of dimer melting curves. The new method, HTREM_MS (MS designates mean square), focused on interface formation, adds restraints to the hamiltonians for all but the physical system, which is characterized by the normal molecular dynamics force field at the desired temperature. The restraints in the nonphysical systems serve to prevent the monomers from separating too far, and have the dual aims of enhancing the sampling of close in configurations and breaking unwanted correlations in the restrained systems. The method is applied to a 31-residue truncation of the 33-residue leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The monomers are initially separated by a distance that is beyond their capture length. HTREM simulations show that the monomers oscillate between dimerlike and monomerlike configurations, but do not form a stable interface. HTREM_MS simulations result in the dimer interface being faithfully reconstructed on a 2 ns time scale. A small number of systems (one physical and two restrained with modified potentials and higher effective temperatures) are sufficient. An in silico mutant that should not dimerize because it lacks charged residues that provide electrostatic stabilization of the dimer

  2. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Caggiano, Monica Pia

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-...

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in immuno suppression: master regulator or bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppstädter, Jessica; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) by glucocorticoids has been reported to be essential for their anti-inflammatory actions. At the same time, GILZ is actively downregulated under inflammatory conditions, resulting in an enhanced pro-inflammatory response. Two papers published in the recent past showed elevated GILZ expression in the late stage of an inflammation. Still, the manuscripts suggest seemingly contradictory roles of endogenous GILZ: one of them suggested compensatory actions by elevated corticosterone levels in GILZ knockout mice, while our own manuscript showed a distinct phenotype upon GILZ knockout in vivo. Herein, we discuss the role of GILZ in inflammation with a special focus on the influence of endogenous GILZ on macrophage responses and suggest a cell-type specific action of GILZ as an explanation for the conflicting results as presented in recent reports. PMID:26498359

  4. Homeodomain leucine-zipper proteins and their role in synchronizing growth and development with the environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronny Brandt; Marc Cabedo; Yakun Xie; Stephan Wenkel

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) genome encodes for four distinct classes of homeodomain leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors (HD-ZIPI to HD-ZIPIV), which are all organized in multi-gene families. HD-ZIP transcription factors act as sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are able to control the expression level of target genes. While HD-ZIPI and HD-ZIPII proteins are mainly associated with environmental responses, HD-ZIPIII and HD-ZIPIV are primarily known to act as patterning factors. Recent studies have challenged this view. It appears that several of the different HD-ZIP families interact genetically to align both morphogenesis and environmental responses, most likely by modulating phytohormone-signal-ing networks.

  5. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  6. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  7. Salt bridges destabilize a leucine zipper designed for maximized ion pairing between helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Paul; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Jelesarov, Ilian; Marti, Daniel N; Warwicker, James; Bosshard, Hans Rudolf

    2002-03-05

    Interhelical salt bridges are common in leucine zippers and are thought to stabilize the coiled coil conformation. Here we present a detailed thermodynamic investigation of the designed, disulfide-linked leucine zipper AB(SS) whose high-resolution NMR structure shows six interhelical ion pairs between heptad positions g of one helix and e' of the other helix but no ion pairing within single helices. The average pK(a) value of the Glu side chain carboxyl groups of AB(SS) is slightly higher than the pK(a) of a freely accessible Glu in an unfolded peptide [Marti, D. N., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 12804-12818]. This indicates that the salt bridges are destabilizing, a prediction we now have confirmed by determining the pH +/- stability profile of AB(SS). Circular dichroism-monitored unfolding by urea and by heating and differential scanning calorimetry show that the coiled coil conformation is approximately 5 kJ/mol more stable when salt bridges are broken by protonation of the carboxyl side chains. Using guanidinium chloride as the denaturant, the increase in the free energy of unfolding on protonation of the carboxyl side chains is larger, approximately 17 kJ/mol. The discrepancy between urea and guanidinium chloride unfolding can be ascribed to the ionic nature of guanidinium chloride, which screens charge-charge interactions. This work demonstrates the difficulty of predicting the energetic contribution of salt bridges from structural data alone even in a case where the ion pairs are seen in high-resolution NMR structures. The reason is that the contribution to stability results from a fine balance between energetically favorable Coulombic attractions and unfavorable desolvation of charges and conformational constraints of the residues involved in ion pairing. The apparent discrepancy between the results presented here and mutational studies indicating stabilization by salt bridges is discussed and resolved. An explanation is

  8. Leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly inhibits the anchorage-independent growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Satoshi; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Uchida, Daisuke; Begum, Nasima-Mila; Yoshida, Hideo; Sato, Mitsunobu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    Several investigators have demonstrated that TGF-beta stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) regulates cell growth and differentiation, and cell death. TSC-22 is a putative transcriptional regulator containing a leucine zipper-like structure and a nuclear export signal. We previously showed the cytoplasmic localization of TSC-22 and the nuclear translocation of TSC-22 concomitant with induction of apoptosis in salivary gland cancer cells. In the present study, we attempted to identify the active domain of TSC-22 protein that regulated the biological functions of TSC-22. We constructed three mammalian expression vectors, which could produce full length TSC-22 only in cytoplasm, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and the leucine zipper structure only in nucleus. Then, we transfected a salivary gland cancer cell line, HSG with these expression vectors, and investigated the growth profile of the transfectants. None of the TSC-22 constructs inhibited the monolayer growth and the anchorage-dependent colony formation of HSG cells. However, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 markedly inhibited the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells (pway ANOVA). Full length TSC-22 also suppressed the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells, although the effect of full length TSC-22 was much lower than those of the leucine zipper constructs. These observations suggest that the leucine zipper structure in TSC-22 protein is an active domain that negatively regulates the growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

  9. Controlled localization of functionally active proteins to inclusion bodies using leucine zippers.

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    Su-Lim Choi

    Full Text Available Inclusion bodies (IBs are typically non-functional particles of aggregated proteins. However, some proteins in fusion with amyloid-like peptides, viral coat proteins, and cellulose binding domains (CBDs generate IB particles retaining the original functions in cells. Here, we attempted to generate CBD IBs displaying functional leucine zipper proteins (LZs as bait for localizing cytosolic proteins in E. coli. When a red fluorescent protein was tested as a target protein, microscopic observations showed that the IBs red-fluoresced strongly. When different LZ pairs with KDs of 8-1,000 µM were tested as the bait and prey, the localization of the red fluorescence appeared to change following the affinities between the LZs, as observed by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. This result proposed that LZ-tagged CBD IBs can be applied as an in vivo matrix to entrap cytosolic proteins in E. coli while maintaining their original activities. In addition, easy detection of localization to IBs provides a unique platform for the engineering and analyses of protein-protein interactions in E. coli.

  10. Two-state conformational equilibrium in the Par-4 leucine zipper domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Martin; Dutta, Kaushik; Libich, David S; Venugopal, Hariprasad; Claridge, Jolyon K; Gell, David A; Mackay, Joel P; Edwards, Patrick J B; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-15

    Prostate apoptosis response factor-4 (Par-4) is a pro-apoptotic and tumor-suppressive protein. A highly conserved heptad repeat sequence at the Par-4 C-terminus suggests the presence of a leucine zipper (LZ). This C-terminal region is essential for Par-4 self-association and interaction with various effector proteins. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to fully assign the chemical shift resonances of a peptide comprising the LZ domain of Par-4 at neutral pH. Further, we have investigated the properties of the Par-4 LZ domain and two point mutants under a variety of conditions using NMR, circular dichroism (CD), light scattering, and bioinformatics. Results indicate an environment-dependent conformational equilibrium between a partially ordered monomer (POM) and a predominantly coiled coil dimer (CCD). The combination of techniques used allows the time scales of the equilibrium to be probed and also helps to identify features of the amino acid sequence that may influence the equilibrium.

  11. Bimodal control of dendritic and axonal growth by the dual leucine zipper kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the separation of dendritic and axonal compartments is not only crucial for understanding the assembly of neural circuits, but also for developing strategies to correct defective dendrites or axons in diseases with subcellular precision. Previous studies have uncovered regulators dedicated to either dendritic or axonal growth. Here we investigate a novel regulatory mechanism that differentially directs dendritic and axonal growth within the same neuron in vivo. We find that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK signaling pathway in Drosophila, which consists of Highwire and Wallenda and controls axonal growth, regeneration, and degeneration, is also involved in dendritic growth in vivo. Highwire, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, restrains axonal growth but acts as a positive regulator for dendritic growth in class IV dendritic arborization neurons in the larva. While both the axonal and dendritic functions of highwire require the DLK kinase Wallenda, these two functions diverge through two downstream transcription factors, Fos and Knot, which mediate the axonal and dendritic regulation, respectively. This study not only reveals a previously unknown function of the conserved DLK pathway in controlling dendrite development, but also provides a novel paradigm for understanding how neuronal compartmentalization and the diversity of neuronal morphology are achieved.

  12. Distinct functions of the dual leucine zipper kinase depending on its subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Duque Escobar, Jorge; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Blume, Roland; Schröder, Sabine; Kruegel, Jenny; Maedler, Kathrin; Kluth, Oliver; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Miosge, Nicolai; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The dual leucine zipper kinase DLK induces β-cell apoptosis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity conferred by the β-cell protective transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein CREB. This action might contribute to β-cell loss and ultimately diabetes. Within its kinase domain DLK shares high homology with the mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3, which is activated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and interleukin (IL)-1β, known prediabetic signals. In the present study, the regulation of DLK in β-cells by these cytokines was investigated. Both, TNFα and IL-1β induced the nuclear translocation of DLK. Mutations within a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) prevented basal and cytokine-induced nuclear localization of DLK and binding to the importin receptor importin α, thereby demonstrating a functional NLS within DLK. DLK NLS mutants were catalytically active as they phosphorylated their down-stream kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase to the same extent as DLK wild-type but did neither inhibit CREB-dependent gene transcription nor transcription conferred by the promoter of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-xL. In addition, the β-cell apoptosis-inducing effect of DLK was severely diminished by mutation of its NLS. In a murine model of prediabetes, enhanced nuclear DLK was found. These data demonstrate that DLK exerts distinct functions, depending on its subcellular localization and thus provide a novel level of regulating DLK action. Furthermore, the prevention of the nuclear localization of DLK as induced by prediabetic signals with consecutive suppression of β-cell apoptosis might constitute a novel target in the therapy of diabetes mellitus.

  13. Dexamethasone inhibits repair of human airway epithelial cells mediated by glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ.

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    Jingyue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids (GCs are a first-line treatment for asthma for their anti-inflammatory effects, but they also hinder the repair of airway epithelial injury. The anti-inflammatory protein GC-induced leucine zipper (GILZ is reported to inhibit the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway, which promotes the repair of airway epithelial cells around the damaged areas. We investigated whether the inhibition of airway epithelial repair imposed by the GC dexamethasone (DEX is mediated by GILZ. METHODS: We tested the effect of DEX on the expressions of GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein and the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells, via RT-PCR and Western blot. We further evaluated the role of GILZ in mediating the effect of DEX on the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway and in airway epithelium repair by utilizing small-interfering RNAs, MTT, CFSE labeling, wound-healing and cell migration assays. RESULTS: DEX increased GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein levels in a human airway epithelial cell line. Furthermore, DEX inhibited the phosphorylation of Raf-1, Mek1/2, Erk1/2 (components of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. However, the inhibitory effect of DEX was mitigated in cells when the GILZ gene was silenced. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of epithelial injury repair by DEX is mediated in part by activation of GILZ, which suppressed activation of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. Our study implicates the involvement of DEX in this process, and furthers our understanding of the dual role of GCs.

  14. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zhuang [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zou, Xinle [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liao, Kan, E-mail: kliao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1.

  15. Structural insight into maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) conformation and inhibition toward structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Giulia; Re Depaolini, Stefania; Cucchi, Ulisse; Bertrand, Jay A; Casale, Elena; Perrera, Claudia; Forte, Barbara; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Felder, Eduard R

    2013-09-17

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is upregulated in several types of tumor, including breast, prostate, and brain tumors. Its expression is generally associated with cell survival, cell proliferation, and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, the potential of MELK inhibitors as therapeutic agents is recently attracting considerable interest. Here we report the first structures of MELK in complex with AMP-PNP and with nanomolar inhibitors. Our studies shed light on the role of the MELK UBA domain, provide a characterization of the kinase active site, and identify key residues for achieving high potency, laying the groundwork for structure-based drug design efforts.

  16. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R;

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...... proliferation after interleukin 3 withdrawal at a rate equal to maximally stimulated wild type GHR-expressing cells. Activation of STAT 5b was also observed in Fos-Jun-GHR-expressing cells at a level equal to that in chronically GH-treated GHR-expressing cells. Thus, forced dimerization of the transmembrane...... and cytoplasmic domains of the GHR in the absence of the extracellular domain can lead to the constitutive activation of known GH signaling end points, supporting the view that proximity of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinases is the essential element in signaling. Such constitutively active GH receptors may have...

  17. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Pia Caggiano, Monica; Ohno, Carolyn; Ott, Felix; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz; Cho, Seok Keun; Yang, Seong Wook; Wenkel, Stephan; Heisler, Marcus G

    2016-10-18

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors are key mediators in the regulation of adaxial-abaxial patterning. Their expression is restricted adaxially during early development by the abaxially expressed microRNA (MIR)165/166, yet the mechanism that restricts MIR165/166 expression to abaxial leaf tissues remains unknown. Here, we show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets.

  18. A Petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Chang

    Full Text Available Flower senescence is initiated by developmental and environmental signals, and regulated by gene transcription. A homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, PhHD-Zip, is up-regulated during petunia flower senescence. Virus-induced gene silencing of PhHD-Zip extended flower life by 20% both in unpollinated and pollinated flowers. Silencing PhHD-Zip also dramatically reduced ethylene production and the abundance of transcripts of genes involved in ethylene (ACS, ACO, and ABA (NCED biosynthesis. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29 was also dramatically reduced in the silenced flowers. Over-expression of PhHD-Zip accelerated petunia flower senescence. Furthermore, PhHD-Zip transcript abundance in petunia flowers was increased by application of hormones (ethylene, ABA and abiotic stresses (dehydration, NaCl and cold. Our results suggest that PhHD-Zip plays an important role in regulating petunia flower senescence.

  19. Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase (MELK: A Novel Regulator in Cell Cycle Control, Embryonic Development, and Cancer

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    Pengfei Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK functions as a modulator of intracellular signaling and affects various cellular and biological processes, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, spliceosome assembly, gene expression, embryonic development, hematopoiesis, and oncogenesis. In these cellular processes, MELK functions by binding to numerous proteins. In general, the effects of multiple protein interactions with MELK are oncogenic in nature, and the overexpression of MELK in kinds of cancer provides some evidence that it may be involved in tumorigenic process. In this review, our current knowledge of MELK function and recent discoveries in MELK signaling pathway were discussed. The regulation of MELK in cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target were also described.

  20. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DRUG DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS FOR ANTICANCER TARGET GENE MELK (MATERNAL EMBRYONIC LEUCINE ZIPPER KINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha. K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK, a member of the AMP serine/threonine kinase family, exhibits multiple features consistent with the potential utility of this gene as an anticancer target. Reports show that MELK functions as a cancer-specific protein kinase, and that down-regulation of MELK results in growth suppression of breast cancer cells. There are many inhibitors which bind to kinases and are in clinical trials too. In our study we have taken a library of different inhibitors and docked those using GLIDE Induced Fit. From docking result we can conclude that Syk inhibitor II, Rho kinase inhibitor IV, p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor III, HA 1004, Dihydrochloride and IKK -2 inhibitor VI have good binding affinity towards MELK and may have anticancer activity.

  1. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase is stabilized in mitosis by phosphorylation and is partially degraded upon mitotic exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badouel, Caroline; Chartrain, Isabelle; Blot, Joelle [CNRS UMR 6061 Genetique et Developpement, Universite de Rennes 1, IFR140 GFAS, Faculte de medecine, 2 avenue du Professeur Leon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Tassan, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.tassan@univ-rennes1.fr [CNRS UMR 6061 Genetique et Developpement, Universite de Rennes 1, IFR140 GFAS, Faculte de medecine, 2 avenue du Professeur Leon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2010-08-01

    MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase) is a cell cycle dependent protein kinase involved in diverse cell processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and mRNA processing. Noticeably, MELK expression is increased in cancerous tissues, upon cell transformation and in mitotically-blocked cells. The question of how MELK protein level is controlled is therefore important. Here, we show that MELK protein is restricted to proliferating cells derived from either cancer or normal tissues and that MELK protein level is severely decreased concomitantly with other cell cycle proteins in cells which exit the cell cycle. Moreover, we demonstrate in human HeLa cells and Xenopus embryos that approximately half of MELK protein is degraded upon mitotic exit whereas another half remains stable during interphase. We show that the stability of MELK protein in M-phase is dependent on its phosphorylation state.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of cavity creating mutations in an engineered leucine zipper and energetics of glycerol-induced coiled coil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, E; Jelesarov, I

    2000-04-18

    Protein stability in vitro can be influenced either by introduction of mutations or by changes in the chemical composition of the solvent. Recently, we have characterized the thermodynamic stability and the rate of folding of the engineered dimeric leucine zipper A(2), which has a strengthened hydrophobic core [Dürr, E., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 870-880]. Here we report on the energetic consequences of a cavity introduced by Leu/Ala substitution at the tightly packed dimeric interface and how addition of 30% glycerol affects the folding thermodynamics of A(2) and the cavity mutants. Folding could be described by a two-state transition from two unfolded monomers to a coiled coil dimer. Removal of six methylene groups by Leu/Ala substitutions destabilized the dimeric coiled coil by 25 kJ mol(-1) at pH 3.5 and 25 degrees C in aqueous buffer. Destabilization was purely entropic at around room temperature and became increasingly enthalpic at elevated temperatures. Mutations were accompanied by a decrease of the unfolding heat capacity by 0.5 kJ K(-1) mol(-1). Addition of 30% glycerol increased the free energy of folding of A(2) and the cavity mutants by 5-10 kJ mol(-1) and lowered the unfolding heat capacity by 25% for A(2) and by 50% for the Leu/Ala mutants. The origin of the stabilizing effect of glycerol varied with temperature. Stabilization of the parent leucine zipper A(2) was enthalpic with an unfavorable entropic component between 0 and 100 degrees C. In the case of cavity mutants, glycerol induced enthalpic stabilization below 50 degrees C and entropic stabilization above 50 degrees C. The effect of glycerol could not be accounted for solely by the enthalpy and entropy of transfer or protein surface from water to glycerol/water mixture. We propose that in the presence of glycerol the folded coiled coil dimer is better packed and displays less intramolecular fluctuations, leading to enhanced enthalpic interactions and to an

  3. Dimerization via tandem leucine zippers is essential for the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase, MLK-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I W; Lassam, N

    1998-12-04

    Mixed lineage kinase-3 (MLK-3) is a mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase that mediates stress-activating protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. MLK-3 and other MLK family kinases are characterized by the presence of multiple protein-protein interaction domains including a tandem leucine/isoleucine zipper (LZs) motif. Leucine zippers are known to mediate protein dimerization raising the possibility that the tandem leucine/isoleucine zippers may function as a dimerization motif of MLK-3. Using both co-immunoprecipitation and nonreducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we demonstrated that MLK-3 forms disulfide bridged homo-dimers and that the LZs motif is sufficient for MLK-3 homodimerization. We next asked whether MLK-3 utilizes a dimerization-based activation mechanism analogous to that of receptor tyrosine kinases. We found that dimerization via the LZs motif is a prerequisite for MLK-3 autophosphorylation. We then demonstrated that co-expression of Cdc42 lead to a substantial increase in MLK-3 dimerization, indicating that binding by this GTPase may induce MLK-3 dimerization. Moreover, the LZs minus form of MLK-3 failed to activate the downstream target SAPK, and expression of a MLK-3 LZs polypeptide was found to block SAPK activation by wild type MLK-3. Taken together, these findings indicate that dimerization plays a pivotal role in MLK-3 activation.

  4. Homeodomain leucine zipper proteins bind to the phosphate response domain of the soybean VspB tripartite promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z; Sadka, A; Morishige, D T; Mullet, J E

    2001-02-01

    The soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Williams 82) genes VspA and VspB encode vacuolar glycoprotein acid phosphatases that serve as vegetative storage proteins during seed fill and early stages of seedling growth. VspB expression is activated by jasmonates (JAs) and sugars and down-regulated by phosphate and auxin. Previous promoter studies demonstrated that VspB promoter sequences between -585 and -535 mediated responses to JA, and sequences between -535 and -401 mediated responses to sugars, phosphate, and auxin. In this study, the response domains were further delineated using transient expression of VspB promoter-beta-glucuronidase constructs in tobacco protoplasts. Sequences between -536 and -484 were identified as important for phosphate responses, whereas the region from -486 to -427 mediated sugar responses. Gel-shift and deoxyribonuclease-I footprinting assays revealed four DNA-binding sites between -611 and -451 of the soybean VspB promoter: one in the JA response domain, two in the phosphate response domain, and one binding site in the sugar response domain. The sequence CATTAATTAG present in the phosphate response domain binds soybean homeodomain leucine zipper proteins, suggesting a role for these transcription factors in phosphate-modulated gene expression.

  5. Identification of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper as a key regulator of tumor cell proliferation in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Hervé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the molecules that contribute to tumor progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, currently a leading cause of mortality from gynecological malignancies. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ, an intracellular protein widely expressed in immune tissues, has been reported in epithelial tissues and controls some of key signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis. However, there has been no report on GILZ in EOC up to now. The objectives of the current study were to examine the expression of GILZ in EOC and its effect on tumor cell proliferation. Results GILZ expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining in tissue sections from 3 normal ovaries, 7 benign EOC and 50 invasive EOC. GILZ was not detected on the surface epithelium of normal ovaries and benign tumors. In contrast, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 80% EOC specimens. GILZ immunostaining scores correlated positively to the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Spearman test in univariate analysis, P P Conclusion The present study is the first to identify GILZ as a molecule produced by ovarian cancer cells that promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation. Our findings clearly indicate that GILZ activates AKT, a crucial signaling molecule in tumorigenesis. GILZ thus appears as a potential key molecule in EOC.

  6. Leucine zipper-containing WRKY proteins widen the spectrum of immediate early elicitor-induced WRKY transcription factors in parsley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormack, Robert S; Eulgem, Thomas; Rushton, Paul J; Köchner, Petra; Hahlbrock, Klaus; Somssich, Imre E

    2002-06-07

    Two new WRKY transcription factors from parsley (Petroselinum crispum), WRKY4 and WRKY5, were isolated using the yeast one-hybrid system. In yeast, both proteins interacted sequence-specifically with W boxes (TTGACC) and activated transcription. They appear to contain functional leucine zippers, which increase their affinities for W boxes. Co-transfection experiments in parsley protoplasts confirmed their in vivo-binding specificity for W boxes. Elicitor-mediated expression of the WRKY5 gene, the first parsley member of the group III family of WRKY proteins, is extremely transient, with high mRNA levels occurring within a time window of less than 1 h. WRKY4 and -5, as well as the previously identified parsley transcription factors WRKY1 and -3, are encoded by immediate early elicitor-activated genes that differ in their sensitivity to cycloheximide (CHX) and their activation kinetics. We propose that a number of the pathways activated during the plant defense response require the induction of several distinct WRKY transcription factors with different DNA binding-site preferences to fine-tune the activation of a wide spectrum of target genes.

  7. Micro-trichome as a class I homeodomain-leucine zipper gene regulates multicellular trichome development in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Pan, Jun-Song; Guan, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Bie, Bei-Bei; Wang, Yun-Li; He, Huan-Le; Lian, Hong-Li; Cai, Run

    2015-11-01

    Plant trichomes serve as a highly suitable model for investigating cell differentiation at the single-cell level. The regulatory genes involved in unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana have been intensively studied, but genes regulating multicellular trichome development in plants remain unclear. Here, we characterized Cucumis sativus (cucumber) trichomes as representative multicellular and unbranched structures, and identified Micro-trichome (Mict), using map-based cloning in an F2 segregating population of 7,936 individuals generated from a spontaneous mict mutant. In mict plants, trichomes in both leaves and fruits, are small, poorly developed, and denser than in the wild type. Sequence analysis revealed that a 2,649-bp genomic deletion, spanning the first and second exons, occurred in a plant-specific class I homeodomain-leucine zipper gene. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that Mict is strongly expressed in the trichome cells. Transcriptome profiling identified potential targets of Mict including putative homologs of genes known in other systems to regulate trichome development, meristem determinacy, and hormone responsiveness. Phylogenic analysis charted the relationships among putative homologs in angiosperms. Our paper represents initial steps toward understanding the development of multicellular trichomes.

  8. Brassica napus L. Homeodomain Leucine-Zipper Gene BnHB6 Responds to Abiotic and Biotic Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Wu YU; Li-Da ZHANG; Kai-Jing ZUO; Dong-Qin TANG; Xiao-Fen SUN; Ke-Xuan TANG

    2005-01-01

    Ahomeodomain leucine-zipper(HD-Zip) gene BnHB6 (GenBank accession No. AY336103) was isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) following drought treatment through rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of BnHB6 was 1 611 bp and contained a 936-bp open reading frame encoding 311 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated that BnHB6 belonged to the HD-Zip I subfamily.High-stringency Southern boltting analysis showed that BnHB6 appeared in rape as a single copy but had homologous genes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that BnHB6 was expressed in several tissues tested under control conditions, but that expression was significantly upregulated in shoots by mannitol, NaCl, cold treatment, anaerobic culture, wounding, H2O2, abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA) treatments, but not by ultraviolet treatment. Further RTPCR analysis revealed that BnHB6 was a late-responsive gene, the expression of which was not activated by NaCl, cold treatment, H2O2, ABA, and SA at an early time point (20 min) of treatment in the shoot. However, after a certain period of treatment, the induced expression culminated and then declined until the next peak occurred. Tissue-specific analysis revealed that BnHB6 was expressed at certain levels in the roots, shoots, and flowers, and the roots were found to respond to the osmotic stimuli more rapidly than shoots to increase the expression of BnHB6. The present study implies that BnHB6 plays a positive role as a regulator of biotic and abiotic stresses on growth during seedling establishment.

  9. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ regulates testicular FOXO1 activity and spermatogonial stem cell (SSC function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Ngo

    Full Text Available Spermatogonia stem cell (SSC self-renewal and differentiation are tightly regulated processes that ensure a continued production of mature sperm throughout male adulthood. In the present study, we investigated the role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ in maintenance of the male germline and spermatogenesis. GILZ was detectable in germ cells of wild type mice on the day of birth, suggesting a role for GILZ in prospermatogonia and SSC pool formation. Gilz KO mice were generated and adult males were azoospermic and sterile. During the first wave of spermatogenesis in Gilz KO mice, spermatogenesis arrested part way through pachytene of meiosis I. Subsequent waves resulted in a progressive depletion of germ cells through apoptosis to ultimately produce a Sertoli cell-only phenotype. Further, in contrast to wild type littermates, PLZF(+ cells were detected in the peri-luminal region of Gilz KO mice at day 6 post-natal, suggesting a defect in prospermatogonia migration in the absence of GILZ. At age 30 days, transient accumulation of PLZF(+ cells in a subset of tubules and severely compromised spermatogenesis were observed in Gilz KO mice, consistent with defective SSC differentiation. GILZ deficiency was associated with an increase in FOXO1 transcriptional activity, which leads to activation of a selective set of FOXO1 target genes, including a pro-apoptotic protein, BIM. On the other hand, no evidence of a heightened immune response was observed. Together, these results suggest that GILZ suppresses FOXO1 nuclear translocation, promotes SSC differentiation over self-renewal, and favours germ cell survival through inhibition of BIM-dependent pro-apoptotic signals. These findings provide a mechanism for the effects of GILZ on spermatogenesis and strengthen the case for GILZ being a critical molecule in the regulation of male fertility.

  10. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  11. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-11

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex.

  12. Molecular recognition in helix-loop-helix and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper domains. Design of repertoires and selection of high affinity ligands for natural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarapica, Roberta; Rosati, Jessica; Cesareni, Gianni; Nasi, Sergio

    2003-04-04

    Helix-loop-helix (HLH) and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (HLHZip) are dimerization domains that mediate selective pairing among members of a large transcription factor family involved in cell fate determination. To investigate the molecular rules underlying recognition specificity and to isolate molecules interfering with cell proliferation and differentiation control, we assembled two molecular repertoires obtained by directed randomization of the binding surface in these two domains. For this strategy we selected the Heb HLH and Max Zip regions as molecular scaffolds for the randomization process and displayed the two resulting molecular repertoires on lambda phage capsids. By affinity selection, many domains were isolated that bound to the proteins Mad, Rox, MyoD, and Id2 with different levels of affinity. Although several residues along an extended surface within each domain appeared to contribute to dimerization, some key residues critically involved in molecular recognition could be identified. Furthermore, a number of charged residues appeared to act as switch points facilitating partner exchange. By successfully selecting ligands for four of four HLH or HLHZip proteins, we have shown that the repertoires assembled are rather general and possibly contain elements that bind with sufficient affinity to any natural HLH or HLHZip molecule. Thus they represent a valuable source of ligands that could be used as reagents for molecular dissection of functional regulatory pathways.

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox 12 (ATHB12), a homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, regulates leaf growth by promoting cell expansion and endoreduplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yoon-Sun; Um, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Sunghan; Kim, Kyunga; Park, Hee-Jung; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Woo-Young; Jun, Sang Eun; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Lim, Jun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Kim, Donggiun; Park, Jongbum; Kim, Gyung-Tae; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox 12 (ATHB12), a homeodomain-leucine zipper class I (HD-Zip I) gene, is highly expressed in leaves and stems, and induced by abiotic stresses, but its role in development remains obscure. To understand its function during plant development, we studied the effects of loss and gain of function. Expression of ATHB12 fused to the EAR-motif repression domain (SRDX) - P35 S ::ATHB12SRDX (A12SRDX) and PATHB 12 ::ATHB12SRDX - slowed both leaf and root growth, while the growth of ATHB12-overexpressing seedlings (A12OX) was accelerated. Microscopic examination revealed changes in the size and number of leaf cells. Ploidy was reduced in A12SRDX plants, accompanied by decreased cell expansion and increased cell numbers. By contrast, cell size was increased in A12OX plants, along with increased ploidy and elevated expression of cell cycle switch 52s (CCS52s), which are positive regulators of endoreduplication, indicating that ATHB12 promotes leaf cell expansion and endoreduplication. Overexpression of ATHB12 led to decreased phosphorylation of Arabidopsis thaliana ribosomal protein S6 (AtRPS6), a regulator of cell growth. In addition, induction of ATHB12 in the presence of cycloheximide increased the expression of several genes related to cell expansion, such as EXPANSIN A10 (EXPA10) and DWARF4 (DWF4). Our findings strongly suggest that ATHB12 acts as a positive regulator of endoreduplication and cell growth during leaf development.

  14. Application of HB17, an Arabidopsis class II homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, to regulate chloroplast number and photosynthetic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymus, Graham J; Cai, Suqin; Kohl, Elizabeth A; Holtan, Hans E; Marion, Colleen M; Tiwari, Shiv; Maszle, Don R; Lundgren, Marjorie R; Hong, Melissa C; Channa, Namitha; Loida, Paul; Thompson, Rebecca; Taylor, J Philip; Rice, Elena; Repetti, Peter P; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Reuber, T Lynne; Creelman, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Transcription factors are proposed as suitable targets for the control of traits such as yield or food quality in plants. This study reports the results of a functional genomics research effort that identified ATHB17, a transcription factor from the homeodomain-leucine zipper class II family, as a novel target for the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity. It was shown that ATHB17 is expressed natively in the root quiescent centre (QC) from Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings. Analysis of the functional composition of genes differentially expressed in the QC from a knockout mutant (athb17-1) compared with its wild-type sibling revealed the over-representation of genes involved in auxin stimulus, embryo development, axis polarity specification, and plastid-related processes. While no other phenotypes were observed in athb17-1 plants, overexpression of ATHB17 produced a number of phenotypes in Arabidopsis including enhanced chlorophyll content. Image analysis of isolated mesophyll cells of 35S::ATHB17 lines revealed an increase in the number of chloroplasts per unit cell size, which is probably due to an increase in the number of proplastids per meristematic cell. Leaf physiological measurements provided evidence of improved photosynthetic capacity in 35S::ATHB17 lines on a per unit leaf area basis. Estimates of the capacity for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-saturated and -limited photosynthesis were significantly higher in 35S::ATHB17 lines.

  15. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency.

  16. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun-Mo [Department of Dermatology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jong-Sun, E-mail: kangj01@skku.edu [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, Myong-Joon, E-mail: hahnmj@skku.edu [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  17. Human leucine zipper protein sLZIP induces migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells via expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyereen; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Ko, Jesang

    2011-12-01

    Extracellular proteolysis mediates tissue homeostasis. In cancer, altered proteolysis leads to abnormal tumor growth, inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) represents one of the most prominent proteinases associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis. The recently identified human transcription factor sLZIP is a member of the leucine zipper transcription factor family. Although sLZIP is known to function in ligand-induced transactivation of the glucocorticoid receptor, its exact functions and target genes are not known. In this study, we investigated the role of sLZIP in MMP-9 expression and its involvement in cervical cancer development. Our results show that sLZIP increased the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in HeLa and SiHa cells. sLZIP also increased the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by binding directly to the cAMP-responsive element of the MMP-9 promoter region. Involvement of sLZIP in MMP-9 expression was further supported by the fact that ME-180 cells expressing sLZIP siRNA were refractory to MMP-9 expression. Results from wound healing and invasion assays showed that sLZIP enhanced both the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. The increased migration and invasion of HeLa and SiHa cells that were induced by sLZIP were abrogated by inhibition of the proteolytic activity of MMP-9. These results indicate that sLZIP plays a critical role in MMP-9 expression and is probably involved in invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer.

  18. Molecular interactions of the γ-clade homeodomain-leucine zipper class I transcription factors during the wheat response to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John C; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Taylor, Mathew; Bazanova, Natalia; Baumann, Ute; Lovell, Ben; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The γ-clade of class I homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) constitute members which play a role in adapting plant growth to conditions of water deficit. Given the importance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as a global food crop and the impact of water deficit upon grain yield, we focused on functional aspects of wheat drought responsive HD-Zip I TFs. While the wheat γ-clade HD-Zip I TFs share significant sequence similarities with homologous genes from other plants, the clade-specific features in transcriptional response to abiotic stress were detected. We demonstrate that wheat TaHDZipI-3, TaHDZipI-4, and TaHDZipI-5 genes respond differentially to a variety of abiotic stresses, and that proteins encoded by these genes exhibit pronounced differences in oligomerisation, strength of DNA binding, and trans-activation of an artificial promoter. Three-dimensional molecular modelling of the protein-DNA interface was conducted to address the ambiguity at the central nucleotide in the pseudo-palindromic cis-element CAATNATTG that is recognised by all three HD-Zip I proteins. The co-expression of these genes in the same plant tissues together with the ability of HD-Zip I TFs of the γ-clade to hetero-dimerise suggests a role in the regulatory mechanisms of HD-Zip I dependent transcription. Our findings highlight the complexity of TF networks involved in plant responses to water deficit. A better understanding of the molecular complexity at the protein level during crop responses to drought will enable adoption of efficient strategies for production of cereal plants with enhanced drought tolerance.

  19. The identification of Cucumis sativus Glabrous 1 (CsGL1) required for the formation of trichomes uncovers a novel function for the homeodomain-leucine zipper I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Cao, Chenxing; Zhang, Cunjia; Zheng, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zenghui; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2015-05-01

    The spines and bloom of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit are two important quality traits related to fruit market value. However, until now, none of the genes involved in the formation of cucumber fruit spines and bloom trichomes has been identified. Here, the characterization of trichome development in wild-type (WT) cucumber and a spontaneous mutant, glabrous 1 (csgl1) controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, with glabrous aerial organs, is reported. Via map-based cloning, CsGL1 was isolated and it was found that it encoded a member of the homeodomain-leucine zipper I (HD-Zip I) proteins previously identified to function mainly in the abiotic stress responses of plants. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that CsGL1 was strongly expressed in trichomes and fruit spines. In addition, CsGL1 was a nuclear protein with weak transcriptional activation activity in yeast. A comparative analysis of the digital gene expression (DGE) profile between csgl1 and WT leaves revealed that CsGL1 had a significant influence on the gene expression profile in cucumber, especially on genes related to cellular process, which is consistent with the phenotypic difference between csgl1 and the WT. Moreover, two genes, CsMYB6 and CsGA20ox1, possibly involved in the formation of cucumber trichomes and fruit spines, were characterized. Overall, the findings reveal a new function for the HD-Zip I gene subfamily, and provide some candidate genes for genetic engineering approaches to improve cucumber fruit external quality.

  20. Characteristic expression of HTLV-1 basic zipper factor (HBZ transcripts in HTLV-1 provirus-positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Yasuaki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Although there have been many studies on the oncogenesis of the viral protein Tax, the precise oncogenic mechanism remains to be elucidated. Recently, a new viral factor, HTLV-1 basic Zip factor (HBZ, encoded from the minus strand mRNA was discovered and the current models of Tax-centered ATL cell pathogenesis are in conflict with this discovery. HBZs consisting of non-spliced and spliced isoforms (HBZ-SI are thought to be implicated in viral replication and T-cell proliferation but there is little evidence on the HBZ expression profile on a large scale. Results To investigate the role of HBZ-SI in HTLV-1 provirus-positive cells, the HBZ-SI and Tax mRNA loads in samples with a mixture of infected and non-infected cells were measured and then adjusted by dividing by the HTLV-I proviral load. We show here that the HBZ-SI mRNA level is 4-fold higher than non-spliced HBZ and is expressed by almost all cells harboring HTLV-1 provirus with variable intensity. The proviral-adjusted HBZ-SI and Tax quantification revealed a characteristic imbalanced expression feature of high HBZ and low Tax expression levels in primary ATL cells or high HBZ and very high Tax levels in HTLV-1-related cell lines (cell lines compared with a standard expression profile of low HBZ and low Tax in infected cells. Interestingly, according to the mutual Tax and HBZ expression status, HTLV-1-related cell lines were subcategorized into two groups, an ATL cell type with high HBZ and low Tax levels and another type with high Tax and either high or low HBZ, which was closely related to its cell origin. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the mutual expression profile of HBZ and Tax in provirus-positive cells, revealing that there are quantitative and relative characteristic features among infected cells, primary ATL cells, and cell lines.

  1. Genome-wide Expansion and Expression Divergence of the Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors in Higher Plants with an Emphasis on Sorghum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jizhou Wang; Junxia Zhou; Baolan Zhang; Jeevanandam Vanitha; Srinivasan Ramachandran; Shu-Ye Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Plant bZIP transcription factors play crucial roles in multiple biological processes. However,little is known about the sorghum bZIP gene family although the sorghum genome has been completely sequenced. In this study,we have carried out a genome-wide identification and characterization of this gene family in sorghum.Our data show that the genome encodes at least 92 bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP genes have been expanded mainly by segmental duplication. Such an expansion mechanism has also been observed in rice,arabidopsis and many other plant organisms,suggesting a common expansion mode of this gene family in plants. Further investigation shows that most of the bZIP members have been present in the most recent common ancestor of sorghum and rice and the major expansion would occur before the sorghum-rice split era. Although these bZIP genes have been duplicated with a long history,they exhibited limited functional divergence as shown by nonsynonymous substitutions (Ka)/synonymous substitutions (Ks) analyses. Their retention was mainly due to the high percentages of expression divergence. Our data also showed that this gene family might play a role in multiple developmental stages and tissues and might be regarded as important regulators of various abiotic stresses and sugar signaling.

  2. The basic leucine zipper stress response regulator Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by coordination of [2Fe-2S] clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietzschel, Nicole; Pierik, Antonio J; Bill, Eckhard; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential, yet at elevated concentrations toxic trace element. To date, the mechanisms of iron sensing by eukaryotic iron-responsive transcription factors are poorly understood. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap5, a member of the Yap family of bZIP stress response regulators, administrates the adaptive response to high-iron conditions. Despite the central role of the iron-sensing process for cell viability, the molecule perceived by Yap5 and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by two Fe/S clusters bound to its activator domain (Yap5-AD). The more stable iron-regulatory Fe/S cluster at the N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (n-CRD) of Yap5 is detected in vivo and in vitro. The second cluster coordinated by the C-terminal CRD can only be shown after chemical reconstitution, since it is bound in a labile fashion. Both clusters are of the [2Fe-2S] type as characterized by UV/visible (UV/Vis), circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe/S cluster binding to Yap5-AD induces a conformational change that may activate transcription. The cluster-binding motif of the n-CRD domain is highly conserved in HapX-like transcription factors of pathogenic fungi and thus may represent a general sensor module common to many eukaryotic stress response regulators.

  3. The basic helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper transcription factor USF2 integrates serum-induced PAI-1 expression and keratinocyte growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Higgins, Craig E; Higgins, Stephen P; Law, Brian K; Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a major regulator of the plasmin-dependent pericellular proteolytic cascade, is prominently expressed during the tissue response to injury although the factors that impact PAI-1 induction and their role in the repair process are unclear. Kinetic modeling using established biomarkers of cell cycle transit (c-MYC; cyclin D1; cyclin A) in synchronized human (HaCaT) keratinocytes, and previous cytometric assessments, indicated that PAI-1 transcription occurred early after serum-stimulation of quiescent (G0) cells and prior to G1 entry. It was established previously that differential residence of USF family members (USF1→USF2 switch) at the PE2 region E box (CACGTG) characterized the G0  → G1 transition period and the transcriptional status of the PAI-1 gene. A consensus PE2 E box motif (5'-CACGTG-3') at nucleotides -566 to -561 was required for USF/E box interactions and serum-dependent PAI-1 transcription. Site-directed CG → AT substitution at the two central nucleotides inhibited formation of USF/probe complexes and PAI-1 promoter-driven reporter expression. A dominant-negative USF (A-USF) construct or double-stranded PE2 "decoy" attenuated serum- and TGF-β1-stimulated PAI-1 synthesis. Tet-Off induction of an A-USF insert reduced both PAI-1 and PAI-2 transcripts while increasing the fraction of Ki-67(+) cells. Conversely, overexpression of USF2 or adenoviral-delivery of a PAI-1 vector inhibited HaCaT colony expansion indicating that the USF1 → USF2 transition and subsequent PAI-1 transcription are critical events in the epithelial go-or-grow response. Collectively, these data suggest that USF2, and its target gene PAI-1, regulate serum-stimulated keratinocyte growth, and likely the cadence of cell cycle progression in replicatively competent cells as part of the injury repair program.

  4. Modeling the global effect of the basic-leucine zipper transcription factor 1 (bZIP1 on nitrogen and light regulation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obertello Mariana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen and light are two major regulators of plant metabolism and development. While genes involved in the control of each of these signals have begun to be identified, regulators that integrate gene responses to nitrogen and light signals have yet to be determined. Here, we evaluate the role of bZIP1, a transcription factor involved in light and nitrogen sensing, by exposing wild-type (WT and bZIP1 T-DNA null mutant plants to a combinatorial space of nitrogen (N and light (L treatment conditions and performing transcriptome analysis. We use ANOVA analysis combined with clustering and Boolean modeling, to evaluate the role of bZIP1 in mediating L and N signaling genome-wide. Results This transcriptome analysis demonstrates that a mutation in the bZIP1 gene can alter the L and/or N-regulation of several gene clusters. More surprisingly, the bZIP1 mutation can also trigger N and/or L regulation of genes that are not normally controlled by these signals in WT plants. This analysis also reveals that bZIP1 can, to a large extent, invert gene regulation (e.g., several genes induced by N in WT plants are repressed by N in the bZIP1 mutant. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the bZIP1 mutation triggers a genome-wide de-regulation in response to L and/or N signals that range from i a reduction of the L signal effect, to ii unlocking gene regulation in response to L and N combinations. This systems biology approach demonstrates that bZIP1 tunes L and N signaling relationships genome-wide, and can suppress regulatory mechanisms hypothesized to be needed at different developmental stages and/or environmental conditions.

  5. Alanine zipper-like coiled-coil domains are necessary for homotypic dimerization of plant GAGA-factors in the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierk Wanke

    Full Text Available GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms.

  6. Truncation of merozoite surface protein 3 disrupts its trafficking and that of acidic-basic repeat protein to the surface of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kerry E; Pearce, J Andrew; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F

    2002-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3), an important vaccine candidate, is a soluble polymorphic antigen associated with the surface of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites. The MSP3 sequence contains three blocks of heptad repeats that are consistent with the formation of an intramolecular coiled-coil. MSP3 also contains a glutamic acid-rich region and a putative leucine zipper sequence at the C-terminus. We have disrupted the msp3 gene by homologous recombination, resulting in the expression of a truncated form of MSP3 that lacks the putative leucine zipper sequence but retains the glutamic acid-rich region and the heptad repeats. Here, we show that truncated MSP3, lacking the putative leucine zipper region, does not localize to the parasitophorous vacuole or interact with the merozoite surface. Furthermore, the acidic-basic repeat antigen (ABRA), which is present on the merozoite surface, also was not localized to the merozoite surface in parasites expressing the truncated form of MSP3. The P. falciparum merozoites lacking MSP3 and ABRA on the surface show reduced invasion into erythrocytes. These results suggest that MSP3 is not absolutely essential for blood stage growth and that the putative leucine zipper region is required for the trafficking of both MSP3 and ABRA to the parasitophorous vacuole.

  7. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  8. Research Progress on the Relationship between Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper and Inflam-matory Reaction%糖皮质激素诱导的亮氨酸拉链蛋白与炎症反应关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏国(综述); 梁杰(审校)

    2015-01-01

    糖皮质激素诱导的亮氨酸拉链蛋白(GILZ)广泛地表达于各种细胞及组织中,有助于发挥糖皮质激素的抗炎效应和免疫抑制作用。 GILZ可抑制核因子κB、转录激活因子1及丝裂原活化蛋白激酶的激酶/细胞外信号调节激酶等炎症相关信号通路的活性,对巨噬细胞、树突细胞、内皮细胞、T淋巴细胞等炎性细胞的活性具有抑制作用。在慢性炎症反应中,GILZ的上调可抑制细胞因子和趋化因子的表达、白细胞的聚集和活化,并与类风湿关节炎等自身免疫性疾病密切相关。近年来对GILZ的研究众多,该文对GILZ与炎症反应相关的信号通路、细胞及相关疾病进行综述。%Glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper(GILZ) is widely expressed in various kinds of cells and tissues,and it promotes the anti-inflammatory and immune inhibitory effect of glucocorticoid .GILZ can inhibit the activity of inflammation-related signaling pathways,such as nuclear factor κB,AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases kinases/extracellular regulated protein kinases.Besides,it can interfere with the activity of some inflammatory cells,such as the macrophages,dendritic cells, endothelial cells,T lymphocytes and so on.In chronic inflammation,the up-regulation of GILZ can inhibit the expression of cytokines and che-mokines,as well as the aggregation and activation of leukocyte.Furthermore,it is closely associated with auto-immune diseases,such as rheumatoid arthritis disease.There has been a lot of studies on GILZ in recent years,here is to make a review of the relationship between GILZ and the signal pathways,cells,diseases related with inflammation reactions.

  9. SNARE zippering and synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene C Prashad

    Full Text Available Synapses vary widely in the probability of neurotransmitter release. We tested the hypothesis that the zippered state of the trans-SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptor complex determines initial release probability. We tested this hypothesis at phasic and tonic synapses which differ by 100-1000-fold in neurotransmitter release probability. We injected, presynaptically, three Clostridial neurotoxins which bind and cleave at different sites on VAMP to determine whether these sites were occluded by the zippering of the SNARE complex or open to proteolytic attack. Under low stimulation conditions, the catalytic light-chain fragment of botulinum B (BoNT/B-LC inhibited evoked release at both phasic and tonic synapses and cleaved VAMP; however, neither BoNT/D-LC nor tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT-LC were effective in these conditions. The susceptibility of VAMP to only BoNT/B-LC indicated that SNARE complexes at both phasic and tonic synapses were partially zippered only at the N-terminal end to approximately the zero-layer with the C-terminal end exposed under resting state. Therefore, the existence of the same partially zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at both phasic and tonic synapses indicates that release probability is not determined solely by the zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at least to the zero-layer.

  10. Myelin architecture: zippering membranes tightly together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Mostafa; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael

    2014-04-01

    Rapid nerve conduction requires the coating of axons by a tightly packed multilayered myelin membrane. In the central nervous system, myelin is formed from cellular processes that extend from oligodendrocytes and wrap in a spiral fashion around an axon, resulting in the close apposition of adjacent myelin membrane bilayers. In this review, we discuss the physical principles underlying the zippering of the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes at the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflet. We propose that the interaction of the myelin basic protein with the cytoplasmic leaflet of the myelin bilayer triggers its polymerization into a fibrous network that drives membrane zippering and protein extrusion. In contrast, the adhesion of the extracellular surfaces of myelin requires the down-regulation of repulsive components of the glycocalyx, in order to uncover weak and unspecific attractive forces that bring the extracellular surfaces into close contact. Unveiling the mechanisms of myelin membrane assembly at the cytoplasmic and extracelluar sites may help to understand how the myelin bilayers are disrupted and destabilized in the different demyelinating diseases.

  11. Scattering zippers and their spectral theory

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A scattering zipper is a system obtained by concatenation of scattering events with equal even number of incoming and out going channels. The associated scattering zipper operator is the unitary equivalent of Jacobi matrices with matrix entries and generalizes Blatter-Browne and Chalker-Coddington models and CMV matrices. Weyl discs are analyzed and used to prove a bijection between the set of semi-infinite scattering zipper operators and matrix valued probability measures on the unit circle. Sturm-Liouville oscillation theory is developed as a tool to calculate the spectra of finite and periodic scattering zipper operators.

  12. Modulation of anti-endotoxin property of Temporin L by minor amino acid substitution in identified phenylalanine zipper sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Tandon, Anshika; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2016-11-01

    A 13-residue frog antimicrobial peptide Temporin L (TempL) possesses versatile antimicrobial activities and is considered a lead molecule for the development of new antimicrobial agents. To find out the amino acid sequences that influence the anti-microbial property of TempL, a phenylalanine zipper-like sequence was identified in it which was not reported earlier. Several alanine-substituted analogs and a scrambled peptide having the same composition of TempL were designed for evaluating the role of this motif. To investigate whether leucine residues instead of phenylalanine residues at 'a' and/or 'd' position(s) of the heptad repeat sequence could alter its antimicrobial property, several TempL analogs were synthesized after replacing these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues. Replacing phenylalanine residues with alanine residues in the phenylalanine zipper sequence significantly compromised the anti-endotoxin property of TempL. This is evident from the higher production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat bone-marrow-derived macrophage cells in the presence of its alanine-substituted analogs than TempL itself. However, replacement of these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues significantly augmented anti-endotoxin property of TempL. A single alanine-substituted TempL analog (F8A-TempL) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity but retained the antibacterial activity of TempL, while the two single leucine-substituted analogs (F5L-TempL and F8L-TempL), although exhibiting lower cytotoxicity, were able to retain the antibacterial activity of the parent peptide. The results demonstrate how minor amino acid substitutions in the identified phenylalanine zipper sequence in TempL could yield analogs with better antibacterial and/or anti-endotoxin properties with their plausible mechanism of action.

  13. Zipper-mediated oligomerization of the mixed lineage kinase SPRK/MLK-3 is not required for its activation by the GTPase cdc 42 but Is necessary for its activation of the JNK pathway. Monomeric SPRK L410P does not catalyze the activating phosphorylation of Thr258 of murine MITOGEN-ACTIVATED protein kinase kinase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacratsis, P O; Gallo, K A

    2000-09-08

    Src homology 3 domain-containing proline-rich kinase (SPRK)/mixed lineage kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has been identified as an upstream activator of the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. SPRK is capable of activating MKK4 by phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues, and mutant forms of MKK4 that lack the phosphorylation sites Ser(254) and Thr(258) block SPRK-induced JNK activation. A region of 63 amino acids following the kinase domain of SPRK is predicted to form a leucine zipper. The leucine zipper domain of SPRK has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for SPRK oligomerization, but its role in regulating activation of SPRK and downstream signaling remains unclear. In this study, we substituted a proposed stabilizing leucine residue in the zipper domain with a helix-disrupting proline to abrogate zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization. We demonstrate that constitutively activated Cdc42 fully activates this monomeric SPRK mutant in terms of both autophosphorylation and histone phosphorylation activity and induces the same in vivo phosphorylation pattern as wild type SPRK. However, this catalytically active SPRK zipper mutant is unable to activate JNK. Our data show that the monomeric SPRK mutant fails to phosphorylate one of the two activating phosphorylation sites, Thr(258), of MKK4. These studies suggest that zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization is not required for SPRK activation by Cdc42 but instead is critical for proper interaction and phosphorylation of a downstream target, MKK4.

  14. Electrostatically tunable optomechanical "zipper" cavity laser

    CERN Document Server

    Perahia, Raviv; Meenehan, Sean; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A tunable nanoscale "zipper" laser cavity, formed from two doubly clamped photonic crystal nanobeams, is demonstrated. Pulsed, room temperature, optically pumped lasing action at a wavelength of 1.3 micron is observed for cavities formed in a thin membrane containing InAsP/GaInAsP quantum-wells. Metal electrodes are deposited on the ends of the nanobeams to allow for micro-electro-mechanical actuation. Electrostatic tuning and modulation of the laser wavelength is demonstrated at a rate of 0.25nm/V^2 and a frequency as high as 6.7MHz, respectively.

  15. Differentiating leucine incorporation of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokokawa, T.; Sintes, E.; de Corte, D.; Olbrich, K.; Herndl, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance (based on catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybrid ization, CARD-FISH) and leucine incorporation rates of Archaea and Bacteria were determined throughout the water column in the eastern Atlantic. Bacteria dominated throughout the water column, although their contributi

  16. MicroRNA-135b Regulates Leucine Zipper Tumor Suppressor 1 in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit B Olasz

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC is the second most common skin malignancy and it presents a therapeutic challenge in organ transplant recipient patients. Despite the need, there are only a few targeted drug treatment options. Recent studies have revealed a pivotal role played by microRNAs (miRNAs in multiple cancers, but only a few studies tested their function in cSCC. Here, we analyzed differential expression of 88 cancer related miRNAs in 43 study participants with cSCC; 32 immunocompetent, 11 OTR patients, and 15 non-lesional skin samples by microarray analysis. Of the examined miRNAs, miR-135b was the most upregulated (13.3-fold, 21.5-fold; p=0.0001 in both patient groups. Similarly, the miR-135b expression was also upregulated in three cSCC cell lines when evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. In functional studies, inhibition of miR-135b by specific anti-miR oligonucleotides resulted in upregulation of its target gene LZTS1 mRNA and protein levels and led to decreased cell motility and invasion of both primary and metastatic cSCC cell lines. In contrast, miR-135b overexpression by synthetic miR-135b mimic induced further down-regulation of LZTS1 mRNA in vitro and increased cancer cell motility and invasiveness. Immunohistochemical evaluation of 67 cSCC tumor tissues demonstrated that miR-135b expression inversely correlated with LZTS1 staining intensity and the tumor grade. These results indicate that miR-135b functions as an oncogene in cSCC and provide new understanding into its pathological role in cSCC progression and invasiveness.

  17. Flat Zipper-Unfolding Pairs for Platonic Solids

    CERN Document Server

    O'Rourke, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We show that four of the five Platonic solids' surfaces may be cut open with a Hamiltonian path along edges and unfolded to a polygonal net each of which can "zipper-refold" to a flat doubly covered parallelogram, forming a rather compact representation of the surface. Thus these regular polyhedra have particular flat "zipper pairs." No such zipper pair exists for a dodecahedron, whose Hamiltonian unfoldings are "zip-rigid." This report is primarily an inventory of the possibilities, and raises more questions than it answers.

  18. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CLASSIFICATION ZIPPERS USED IN INDUSTRY FOOTWEAR AND LEATHER GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALCOCI Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Now customary accessory companies of all leather garments, zipper began to enjoy popularity only after 80 years of its invention. The first is considered the inventor of the zipper Elias Howe. Essentially involves fashion, change, innovation, originality, creativity and is defined as a succession of trends or fads, short. Create fashionable leather confections from home means accepting a contract with the producer and / or consumer, showing a profit motivating all at the right time. Continuous which require the exercise involves creative skills of fashion design, leading to a wide range of products. Current zipper is composed of: slider, teeth, strips shooter stops. Currently there is possibility to customize shooters to customer requirements, and even to form their own zippers. The present work presents the classification criteria zippers. They are after construction fastener after destination zippers, after the role they fulfill zippers, after the presentation at the procurement zippers, after finishing module of the metallic elements, as visibility zipper in the product, by type of teeth, by nature material strip zipper, after the type of materials they are made pullers, after the nature of the materials they are made of sliders and stops after the oxidation of metal components after finishing module teeth after shaped zipper, after slider type, by mode of ornamentation zippers. Knowing appearance zippers, elements of which it is composed, and their classification criteria allow us to correlate the shape of the product and destination.

  19. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yoosoo [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kweon, Dae-Hyuk, E-mail: dhkweon@skku.edu [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo.

  20. Meta-analysis of Arabidopsis KANADI1 direct target genes identifies basic growth-promoting module acting upstream of hormonal signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Yakun; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere;

    2015-01-01

    An intricate network of antagonistically acting transcription factors mediates formation of a flat leaf lamina of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. In this context, members of the class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factor family specify the adaxial domain (future upper side...

  1. A petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower senescence is mediated in part by changes of plant hormones, such as ethylene, cytokinin and abscisic acid (ABA). Ethylene is known to control flower senescence in many species, especially ethylene sensitive flowers, like petunia, carnation and rose. During flower senescence in petunia and ot...

  2. Genome-wide identification and expression profile of homeodomain-leucine zipper Class I gene family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fu, Rao; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-12-01

    The HD-Zip proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. HD-Zip genes have been grouped into four different classes: HD-Zip I to IV. In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of Class I HD-Zip genes in cucumber. A complete set of 13 HD-Zip I genes were identified in the cucumber genome using Blast search tools and phylogeny. The cucumber HD-Zip I family contained a smaller number of identified genes compared to other higher plants such as Arabidopsis and maize due to the absence of recent gene duplication events. Chromosomal location of these genes revealed that they are distributed unevenly across 5 of 7 chromosomes. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 13 cucumber HD-Zip I genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues, which suggested that cucumber HD-Zip I genes took part in many cellular processes. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic stress conditions (NaCl, ABA and low temperature treatments) identified a group of HD-Zip I genes that responded to one or more treatments.

  3. Silencing of the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper improves the immunogenicity of clinical-grade dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Met, Özcan; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    expression of several activation markers, such as CD83, the co-stimulation molecules CD80, CD86 and CD40 and the chemokine receptor involved in DC homing in lymph nodes CCR7, the DC immune stimulatory function in vivo contrasts with this mature phenotype, and good clinical outcomes in patients with cancer...

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL092W, YDR259C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ey (1) YDR259C YAP6 Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithium...ption Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithi...um tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of expression of

  5. A Zipper-Like On/Off-Switchable Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songjun; Ge, Yi; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Turner, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A zipper-like on/off-switchable molecularly imprinted polymer is reported. This unique imprinted polymer was composed of template-imprinted polymeric networks that incorporate zipper-like interactions between poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) and poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS). This polymer showed marginal recognition ability towards the imprint species under low temperature conditions, due to the interpolymer interaction between PAAm and PAMPS, which inhibited access to the i...

  6. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  7. Water in the Neck-Zipper Region of Kinesin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-Bin; PAN Zhang; ZHANG Hui; AN Li; KONG De-Xin; JI Qing

    2009-01-01

    Neck linker (NL) is one of the most important mechanical elements of kinesin motors. The zipping up process of the neck-zipper (NZ) formed by NL and the related secondary structure elements is one of the major parts of kinesin's power stroke. All the weak interactions that axe responsible for the formation of NZ are sensitive to or dependent on water. To investigate the role of water in the NZ region, a molecular dynamics (MD) model is set up with a crystal structure of kinesin 2KIN surrounded by a 10 A water layer, and minimization is performed to determine the positions of hydrogen atoms and other atoms. It is revealed that water molecules can assist the docking process of NL by forming hydrogen bonds at those positions where direct hydrogen bonding between the two sides of NZ is hindered and then acts as a constructive component of NZ at the docked state of NL. This result may improve the understanding of the mechanism for the docking of NL of kinesin wherein the function of water has not been comprehended sufficiently.

  8. Polyelectrolyte decomplexation via addition of salt: charge correlation driven zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2014-03-20

    We report the first atomic scale studies of polyelectrolyte decomplexation. The complex between DNA and polylysine is shown to destabilize and spontaneously open in a gradual, reversible zipper-like mechanism driven by an increase in solution salt concentration. Divalent CaCl2 is significantly more effective than monovalent NaCl in destabilizing the complex due to charge correlations and water binding capability. The dissociation occurs accompanied by charge reversal in which charge correlations and ion binding chemistry play a key role. Our results are in agreement with experimental work on complex dissociation but in addition show the underlying microstructural correlations driving the behavior. Comparison of our full atomic level detail and dynamics results with theoretical works describing the PEs as charged, rigid rods reveals that although charge correlation involved theories provide qualitatively similar responses, considering also specific molecular chemistry and molecular level water contributions provides a more complete understanding of PE complex stability and dynamics. The findings may facilitate controlled release in gene delivery and more in general tuning of PE membrane permeability and mechanical characteristics through ionic strength.

  9. Protein synthesis regulation by leucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Vianna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that high protein diets affect both protein synthesis and regulation of several cellular processes. The role of amino acids as substrate for protein synthesis has been established in the literature. However, the mechanism by which these amino acids modulate transcription and regulate the mRNA translation via mTOR-dependent signaling pathway has yet to be fully determined. It has been verified that mTOR is a protein responsible for activating a cascade of biochemical intracellular events which result in the activation of the protein translation process. Of the aminoacids, leucine is the most effective in stimulating protein synthesis and reducing proteolysis. Therefore, it promotes a positive nitrogen balance, possibly by favoring the activation of this protein. This amino acid also directly and indirectly stimulates the synthesis and secretion of insulin, enhancing its anabolic cellular effects. Therefore, this review aimed to identify the role of leucine in protein synthesis modulation and to discuss the metabolic aspects related to this aminoacid.Estudos in vivo e in vitro verificaram que dietas hiperprotéicas influenciam a síntese protéica e regulam vários processos celulares. O papel dos aminoácidos como substrato para a síntese de proteínas já está bem evidenciado na literatura, porém as formas como esses aminoácidos modulam a etapa da transcrição e regulam a tradução do RNAm, pela via de sinalização dependente da mTOR, ainda não estão totalmente esclarecidas. Tem-se verificado que a mTOR é uma proteína responsável por ativar uma cascata de eventos bioquímicos intracelulares que culminam na ativação do processo de tradução protéica. Dentre todos os aminoácidos, a leucina é a mais eficaz em estimular a síntese protéica, reduzir a proteólise e, portanto, favorecer o balanço nitrogenado positivo, possivelmente por favorecer a ativação desta proteína. Al

  10. Zippered release from polymer-gated carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2012-01-01

    A thermosensitive drug delivery system based on polymer-gated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is herein reported. The development of carbon nanotubes for various biomedical applications is the research focus of many research groups and holds great promise. The major drawback of these materials is the toxicity that is associated with conjugated carbon systems. Functionalization of CNTs with polymers has proved very successful in lowering the toxicity and improving the pharmacokinetic profile. In this work, CNTs are coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) via the "zipper effect" that provides both support and control over drug release. PEI/PVA provides excellent support to increase DOX loading on the nanocarrier. The system is controlled by changes in temperature due to the complexation (low temperature) and decomplexation (high temperature) of PEI and PVA via hydrogen bonding. The release of DOX was tested in three cell lines (Lung fibroblast (LF), Breast Adenocarcinoma (BA), and HeLa). It was further tested in primary cell lines (Human Dermal Fibroblast adult (HDFa) and Human Dermal Fibroblast neonatal (HDFn)). When the bonds between PEI and PVA are decomplexed at high temperature (≥40 °C), drug release was observed as verified by fluorescence microscopy. There was no drug release at room temperature (25 °C) and a slow release at normal body temperature (37 °C). This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in future controlled release applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Directed evolution of leucine dehydrogenase for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-07-01

    L-tert-Leucine and its derivatives are used as synthetic building blocks for pharmaceutical active ingredients, chiral auxiliaries, and ligands. Leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) is frequently used to prepare L-tert-leucine from the α-keto acid precursor trimethylpyruvate (TMP). In this study, a high-throughput screening method for the L-tert-leucine synthesis reaction based on a spectrophotometric approach was developed. Directed evolution strategy was applied to engineer LeuDH from Lysinibacillus sphaericus for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis. After two rounds of random mutagenesis, the specific activity of LeuDH on the substrate TMP was enhanced by more than two-fold, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme, while the activity towards its natural substrate, leucine, decreased. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) of the best mutant enzyme, H6, on substrates TMP and NADH were all enhanced by more than five-fold as compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis by mutant H6 was significantly improved. A productivity of 1170 g/l/day was achieved for the mutant enzyme H6, compared with 666 g/l/day for the wild-type enzyme.

  12. ZipperCream-CG’ and ‘WhiteAcre-DG’: Two New Cream-type Southernpea Cultivars with Persistent Green Seed Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to incorporate genes conditioning a persistent green seed phenotype into ‘Zipper Cream’ and ‘White Acre’ type backgrounds were completed with the official release of the new southernpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) cultivars ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG on 29 January 2008. ‘ZipperCream...

  13. Role of leucine in hepatic ketogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulaylat, M.N.; Frexes-Steed, M.; Geer, R.; Williams, P.E.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1988-03-01

    Isolated hepatocyte studies demonstrated that leucine can be a precursor of ketone bodies. In this study we examine the relative contribution of leucine to hepatic ketogenesis in vivo. Three groups of conscious dogs with long-term indwelling catheters in the femoral artery, hepatic vein, and portal vein were studied. Group I (n = 3) animals were fasted overnight for 24 hours, and those in groups II and III (n = 4, each) were fasted for 62 to 68 hours (designated 3-day fast). Groups I and III received intravenous saline solution (0.9%) and served as controls. In group II selective acute insulin deficiency (SAID) was induced by a peripheral intravenous somatostatin (SRIF) infusion and intraportal glucagon (0.55 ng/body weight/min). Net hepatic production (NHP) of ketone bodies (kb) and leucine (leu) was measured by the arteriovenous difference technique. Hepatic conversion of leucine to ketone bodies was measured by continuous infusion of L-U-(/sup 14/C)-leucine and by determination of the appearance of (/sup 14/C)-ketone bodies across the liver. In the group fasted overnight NHPleu was 0.02 +/- 0.01 mumol/kg/min, a value not different from zero. NHPkb was 3.1 +/- 0.1 mumol/kg/min and hepatic conversion of leucine to ketone bodies accounted for 3.5% of NHPkb. Insulin deficiency after 3 day's fasting resulted in a near 70% increase in NHPleu (from basal values of 0.31 +/- 0.1 mumol/kg/min to 0.52 +/- 0.06 mumol/kg/min during SAID, p less than 0.01). NHPkb increased from 11.0 +/- 1.0 to 15.5 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.05). The rate of leucine conversion to ketone bodies (L-C) increased from 1.1 +/- 0.25 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.01) with SAID.

  14. HapZipper: sharing HapMap populations just got easier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Pritam; Elhaik, Eran; Bader, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    The rapidly growing amount of genomic sequence data being generated and made publicly available necessitate the development of new data storage and archiving methods. The vast amount of data being shared and manipulated also create new challenges for network resources. Thus, developing advanced data compression techniques is becoming an integral part of data production and analysis. The HapMap project is one of the largest public resources of human single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), characterizing over 3 million SNPs genotyped in over 1000 individuals. The standard format and biological properties of HapMap data suggest that a dedicated genetic compression method can outperform generic compression tools. We propose a compression methodology for genetic data by introducing HapZipper, a lossless compression tool tailored to compress HapMap data beyond benchmarks defined by generic tools such as gzip, bzip2 and lzma. We demonstrate the usefulness of HapZipper by compressing HapMap 3 populations to <5% of their original sizes. HapZipper is freely downloadable from https://bitbucket.org/pchanda/hapzipper/downloads/HapZipper.tar.bz2.

  15. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Massazo Utiyama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. METHODS: we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years; 11 patients were male, and four were female. RESULTS: forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. CONCLUSION: the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  16. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL181W, YDR259C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rexpression increases sodium and lithium tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of ...gene name YAP6 Prey description Putative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithiu

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR259C, YLR423C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion increases sodium and lithium tolerance; computational analysis suggests a role in regulation of expressi...tative basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor; overexpression increases sodium and lithium toleran

  19. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    CERN Document Server

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 6.0x10^4 and an effective mode volume Vmode of 0.66{\\lambda}^3 when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. We found that this Q/V_mode value is five times higher than can be obtained with a single nanocavity design. The mechanical Q (Q_m) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0x10^6 in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g_OM is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  20. Hormonal regulation of leucine catabolism in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Feng, Dingyuan; Zhang, Yongliang; Dahanayaka, Sudath; Li, Xilong; Yao, Kang; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are actively taken up and catabolized by the mammary gland during lactation for syntheses of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Available evidence shows that the onset of lactation is associated with increases in circulating levels of cortisol, prolactin and glucagon, but decreases in insulin and growth hormone. This study determined the effects of physiological concentrations of these hormones on the catabolism of leucine (a representative BCAA) in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Cells were incubated at 37 °C for 2 h in Krebs buffer containing 3 mM D-glucose, 0.5 mM L-leucine, L-[1-14C]leucine or L-[U-14C]leucine, and 0-50 μU/mL insulin, 0-20 ng/mL growth hormone 0-200 ng/mL prolactin, 0-150 nM cortisol or 0-300 pg/mL glucagon. Increasing extracellular concentrations of insulin did not affect leucine transamination or oxidative decarboxylation, but decreased the rate of oxidation of leucine carbons 2-6. Elevated levels of growth hormone dose dependently inhibited leucine catabolism, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) production and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. In contrast, cortisol and glucagon increased leucine transamination, leucine oxidative decarboxylation, KIC production, the oxidation of leucine 2-6 carbons and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. Prolactin did not affect leucine catabolism in the cells. The changes in leucine degradation were consistent with alterations in abundances of BCAA transaminase and phosphorylated levels of branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase. Reductions in insulin and growth hormone but increases in cortisol and glucagon with lactation act in concert to stimulate BCAA catabolism for glutamate and glutamine syntheses. These coordinated changes in hormones may facilitate milk production in lactating mammals.

  1. 亮氨酸拉链结构蛋白基因的合成及其表达%Synthesis and Expression of Leucine-Zipper Protein Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬兰; Keisuke Makino

    2003-01-01

    为探讨亮氨酸拉链蛋白与DNA的结合机理,设计了含有GCN4亮氨酸拉链蛋白基区结合DNA的必需的35个氨基酸的折叠片段,并将其克隆到Escherichia coli BL21表达.以ZG1(+)、ZG1(-)、ZG2(+)、ZG2(-)、ZG3(+)、ZG3(-)寡聚核苷酸片段在PCR自动热循环系统连接得到亮氨酸拉链蛋白基因片段,将此片段克隆到pET3b质粒中,酶切后用2%琼脂糖电泳检测证明克隆成功,将这种重组质粒转化到E.coli DH5α,发现pET3b重组体在E.coli DH5α中表达成功,从转化子中分离得到重组质粒pET3b,序列分析证明插入序列为合成的亮氨酸拉链蛋白基因;将重组质粒pET3b在E.coli BL21于5 mL含有50 μg*mL-1氨苄青霉素和34 μg*mL-1氯霉素的LB液体培养基中以IPTG为诱导剂,37℃下表达,10%SDS-PAGE检测到外源基因蛋白质分子量为4000 Da左右;重组体在10 L含氨苄青霉素和氯霉素的LB液体培养基中、28℃时能大量表达.

  2. 亮氨酸拉链结构蛋白基因表达载体选择%Vector Selecting for Expression of Leucine-Zipper Protein Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬兰; Keisuke Makino

    2003-01-01

    以ZG1(+)、ZG1(-)、ZG2(+)、ZG2(-)、ZG3(+)、ZG3(-)寡聚核苷酸片段为材料,合成了含有GCN4亮氨酸拉链蛋白基区结合DNA必需的35个氨基酸的折叠片段,将此片段分别克隆到pET3b质粒和pBLZ质粒中,酶切后用2%琼脂糖电泳检测证明两者克隆成功.将这2种重组质粒分别转化到E.coli DH5α中,发现pET3b重组体在E.coli DH5α中表达成功,而pBLZ质粒重组体在E.coli DH5α中不能成功表达;从转化子中分离得到重组质粒pET3b,酶切和序列分析都证明插入序列为合成的亮氨酸拉链蛋白基因.

  3. SREBP-1 dimerization specificity maps to both the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains: use of a dominant negative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishi, Vikas; Gal, Jozsef; Krylov, Dmitry

    2004-01-01

    The mammalian SREBP family contains two genes that code for B-HLH-ZIP proteins that bind sequence-specific DNA to regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. We have designed a dominant negative (DN), termed A-SREBP-1, that inhibits the DNA binding of either SREBP protein. A...

  4. Toward the Validation of Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase: Discovery, Optimization of Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors, and Preliminary Biology Insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toure, B. Barry; Giraldes, John; Smith, Troy

    2016-01-01

    MELK kinase has been implicated in playing an important role in tumorigenesis. Our previous studies suggested that MELK is involved in the regulation of cell cycle and its genetic depletion leads to growth inhibition in a subset of high MELK-expressing basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Herein we...

  5. Leucine Supplementation Protects from Insulin Resistance by Regulating Adiposity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Elke; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J.; André, Caroline; Elie, Melissa; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Belluomo, llaria; Duchampt, Adeline; Clark, Samantha; Aubert, Agnes; Mezzullo, Marco; Fanelli, Flaminia; Pagotto, Uberto; Layé, Sophie; Mithieux, Gilles; Cota, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. Methodology/Principal Findings Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group) was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3) in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation is lacking in

  6. Leucine supplementation protects from insulin resistance by regulating adiposity levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Binder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD, supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3 in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation

  7. Thermodynamic characteristics of the heparin-leucine-CaCl2 system in a diluted physiological solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, L. S.; Belov, G. V.; Rulev, Yu. A.; Semenov, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    Chemical equilibria in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight heparin (Na4hep) and leucine (HLeu) are calculated through the mathematical modeling of chemical equilibria based on representative experimental pH titration data. In addition, chemical equilibria in the CaCl2-Na4hep-HLeu-H2O-NaCl system in the presence of 0.154M NaCl background electrolyte at a temperature of 37°C in the range of 2.30 ≤ pH ≤ 10.50 and initial concentrations of basic components n × 10-3 M ( n ≤ 4).

  8. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper: targeted use of genome resources for comparative grass genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben; Mayer, Klaus F X; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Byrne, Stephen; Frei, Ursula; Studer, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper is an ordered, information-rich genome scaffold, facilitating map-based cloning and genome assembly in perennial ryegrass and closely related Poaceae species. It also represents a milestone in describing synteny between perennial ryegrass and fully sequenced model grass genomes, thereby increasing our understanding of genome organization and evolution in the most important temperate forage and turf grass species.

  9. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the aging skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Bi, Y; Ameye, L

    2006-01-01

    Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglyans (SLRPs) are major skeletal extracellular matrix (ECM) components that comprise a family of 13 members containing repeats of a leucine-rich motif. To examine SLRP function, we generated mice deficient in one or more member and analyzed them at the tissue, cell and m...... and molecular levels. This review outlines the novel research findings uncovered using these new animal models....

  10. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  11. Charge-driven and reversible assembly of ultra-dense polymer brushers: Formation and antifouling properties of a zipper brush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Meijer, G.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a new type of polymer brushes: the zipper brush. By adsorbing a diblock-copolymer with one charged block and one neutral block to an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte brush, a neutral polymer brush is formed on top of an almost neutral complex layer of polyelectrolytes. This neutral

  12. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  13. Photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herburger, Andreas; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K

    2017-02-24

    Protonated leucine enkephalin (YGGFL) was studied by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) from 225 to 300 nm utilizing an optical parametric oscillator tunable wavelength laser system (OPO). Fragments were identified by absolute mass measurement in a 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). Bond cleavage was preferred in the vicinity of the two aromatic residues, resulting in high ion abundances for a4, a1, b3, y2 and y1 fragments. a, b and y ions dominated the mass spectrum, and full sequence coverage was achieved for those types. Photodissociation was most effective at the short wavelength end of the studied range, which is assigned to the onset of the La π-π* transition of the tyrosine chromophore, but worked well also at the Lb π-π* chromophore absorption maxima in the 35 000-39 000 cm(-1) region. Several side-chain and internal fragments were observed. H atom loss is observed only above 41 000 cm(-1), consistent with the requirement of a curve crossing to a repulsive (1)πσ* state. It is suggested that the photochemically generated mobile H atom plays a role in further backbone cleavages, similar to the mechanism for electron capture dissociation. The b4 fragment is most intense at the Lb chromophore absorptions, undergoing additional fragmentation at higher photon energies. The high resolution of the FT-ICR MS revealed that out of all x and z-type fragments only x3 and x4 were formed, with low intensity. Other previously reported x- and z-fragments were re-assigned to internal fragments, based on exact mass measurement.

  14. Influence of Fabric Property on the Seam Shrinkage Rate of Zipper Sewing%面料性能对棉织物拉链缝纫缝缩率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娟; 王娇

    2012-01-01

    The influences of fabric structure parameter on seam shrinkage rate of zipper sewing were studied. The basic structure parameters of fifteen kinds of typical cotton fabric were measured and combined with non-woven lining fabric to perform zipper seam shrinkage experiment. Through the grey relational analysis experiment by tested data, the influence correlation degree of seam shrink- age rate was achieved sorted the main effect factors according correlation degree. Finally, cluster analysis for various types of fabric according to sewing quality evaluation index was proceeded.%探讨了织物结构参数对棉织物拉链缝纫缝缩率的影响。选择15种典型棉织物对其基本结构参数进行测量,同时将其与普通无纺衬布组合进行拉链缝缩实验;利用灰色关联分析试验所得数据,按照关联度大小进行排序得到影响缝缩率因素的关联程度,并按照缝纫质量评价指标对各类面料进行聚类分析。

  15. Flux-Rope Twist in Eruptive Flares and CMEs: Due to Zipper and Main-Phase Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, E. R.; Longcope, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of three-dimensional reconnection when a twisted flux tube erupts during an eruptive flare or coronal mass ejection is considered. The reconnection has two phases: first of all, 3D "zipper reconnection" propagates along the initial coronal arcade, parallel to the polarity inversion line (PIL); then subsequent quasi-2D "main-phase reconnection" in the low corona around a flux rope during its eruption produces coronal loops and chromospheric ribbons that propagate away from the PIL in a direction normal to it. One scenario starts with a sheared arcade: the zipper reconnection creates a twisted flux rope of roughly one turn (2π radians of twist), and then main-phase reconnection builds up the bulk of the erupting flux rope with a relatively uniform twist of a few turns. A second scenario starts with a pre-existing flux rope under the arcade. Here the zipper phase can create a core with many turns that depend on the ratio of the magnetic fluxes in the newly formed flare ribbons and the new flux rope. Main phase reconnection then adds a layer of roughly uniform twist to the twisted central core. Both phases and scenarios are modeled in a simple way that assumes the initial magnetic flux is fragmented along the PIL. The model uses conservation of magnetic helicity and flux, together with equipartition of magnetic helicity, to deduce the twist of the erupting flux rope in terms the geometry of the initial configuration. Interplanetary observations show some flux ropes have a fairly uniform twist, which could be produced when the zipper phase and any pre-existing flux rope possess small or moderate twist (up to one or two turns). Other interplanetary flux ropes have highly twisted cores (up to five turns), which could be produced when there is a pre-existing flux rope and an active zipper phase that creates substantial extra twist.

  16. Intein-Fused Lucine Zippers Increase Plasma Coagulation Activity by Improving Protein Trans-Splicing in Dual-Vector Factor Ⅷ Gene Delivered Mice%亮氨酸拉链提高小鼠血浆中剪接的凝血因子Ⅷ凝血活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱甫祥; 刘泽隆; 缪静; 屈慧鸽; 迟晓艳

    2012-01-01

    培养细胞实验表明,亮氨酸拉链通过改善内含肽(intein)的蛋白质剪接效率,提高双载体转B区缺失型凝血因子Ⅷ(BDD-FⅧ)基因细胞剪接FⅧ蛋白的分泌量和活性.本文从C57BL/6小鼠门静脉注射含亮氨酸拉链和Ssp DnaB内含肽融合的BDD-FⅧ的重链和轻链基因双表达载体,48 h后,检测到血浆的重链分泌量和FⅧ活性分别为(298±67) μg/L和(1.15±0.29) U/mL,明显高于不含亮氨酸拉链的双载体转BDD-FⅧ基因对照小鼠((179±59) μg/L和(0.58±0.19) U/mL).结果表明,亮氨酸拉链通过改善蛋白质反式剪接,提高基于蛋白质剪接的双载体转BDD-FⅧ基因小鼠血浆的凝血活性,为进一步双腺相关病毒(AAV)载体转BDD-FⅧ基因的甲型血友病基因治疗研究提供了依据.%We previously demonstrated that leucine zippers fused to intein could increase secretion of spliced B-domain-deleted coagulation factor Ⅷ (BDD-FⅧ) protein and activity by dual-vector based BDD-Ⅷ gene transfected cell in vitro through improving protein trans -splicing. In this study, a pair of plasmid vectors expressing human BDD-FⅧ heavy and light chain fused with lucine zipper and split Ssp DnaB intein was co-injected into C57BL/6 mice via the portal vein. Fourty-eight hours post-injection, the level of heavy chain and FⅧ coagulation activity in collected plasma were determined and shown as (298±67)μg/L and (1.15±0.29) U/ml respectively, greater than that of control mice injected with both vectors without leucine zippers ((179±59) μg/L and (0.58±0.19) U/ml). It demonstrated that leucine zippers fused intein could increase FⅧ coagulation activity in plasma of mice with intein-based dual-vector BDD-FⅧ gene delivery through improved protein trans -splicing. It provided evidence for ongoing hemophilia A gene therapy using dual-AAV vecors.

  17. Host epithelial cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni: trigger or zipper mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg eÓ Cróinín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative pathogen, is a highly frequent cause of gastrointestinal foodborne illness in humans worldwide. Clinical outcome of C. jejuni infections ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease, and some other complications including reactive arthritis and Guillain–Barré syndrome. This review article highlights various C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, host cell determinants and proposed signaling mechanisms involved in human host cell invasion and their potential role in the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. A model is presented which outlines the various important interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium, and we discuss the pro’s and con’s for the zipper over the trigger mechanism of invasion. Future work should clarify the contradictory role of some previously identified factors, and should identify and characterize novel virulence determinants, which are crucial to provide fresh insights into the diversity of strategies employed by this pathogen to cause disease.

  18. Luminescent Europium(III) Coordination Zippers Linked with Thiophene-Based Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-09-19

    Novel Eu(III) coordination polymers [Eu(hfa)3 (dpt)]n (dpt: 2,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)thiophene) and [Eu(hfa)3 (dpedot)]n (dpedot: 2,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)ethylenedioxythiophene) with hydrogen-bonded zipper structures are reported. The coordination polymers are composed of Eu(III) ions, hexafluoroacetylacetonato ligands, and thiophene-based phosphine oxide bridges. The zig-zag orientation of single polymer chains induced the formation of densely packed coordination structures with multiple intermolecular interactions, resulting in thermal stability above 300 °C. They exhibit a high intrinsic emission quantum yield (ca. 80 %) due to their asymmetrical and low-vibrational coordination structures around Eu(III) ions. Furthermore, the characteristic alternative orientation of substituents also contributes to the dramatically high ligand-to-metal energy transfer efficiencies of up to 80 % in the solid state.

  19. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume B E Stewart-Jones

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, which comprised the fusion (F glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen.

  20. Circadian secretion patterns of ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. de Wet

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin are neuropeptides with potent opioid activity. In a study to investigate the circadian secretion patterns of the above-mentioned, blood samples were collected hourly from 12 healthy males who were subjected to the experiment for 24 hours. Radioimmunoassays were used in the analysis of plasma samples for ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin. Peak concentrations of ß-endorphin were demonstrated from 08:00-09:00, while peak concentrations of leucine enkephalin occured from 23:00-07:00. Trough concentrations of ß-endorphin occurred from 24:00-05:00, while trough con­centrations of leucine enkephalin were demonstrated from 09:00-12:00. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for ß-endorphin simulates the well-known circadian rhythm of cortisol. The answer to this may be in the fact that ß-endorphin and corticotropin stem from the same precursor. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for leucine enkephalin simulates that of melatonin. The reason for this is unclear.

  1. Effect of hyperammonemia on leucine and protein metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, M; Sprongl, L; Tichý, M

    2000-10-01

    The cause of muscle wasting and decreased plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), valine, leucine, and isoleucine in liver cirrhosis is obscure. Here we have evaluated the effect of hyperammonemia. Rats were infused with either an ammonium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, a sodium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, or saline for 320 minutes. The parameters of leucine and protein metabolism were evaluated in the whole body and in several tissues using a primed constant intravenous infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine. Ammonium infusion caused an increase in ammonia and glutamine levels in plasma, a decrease in BCAA and alanine in plasma and skeletal muscle, a significant decrease in whole-body proteolysis and protein synthesis, and an increase in leucine oxidized fraction. A significant decrease in protein synthesis after ammonium infusion was observed in skeletal muscle while a nonsignificant effect was observed in liver, gut, heart, spleen, and kidneys. We conclude that the decrease in plasma BCAA after ammonia infusion is associated with decreased proteolysis and increased leucine oxidized fraction.

  2. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies of new L-leucine and D-leucine complexes with chloranilic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, J.; Nowicka-Scheibe, J.; Maurin, Jan K.; Schilf, W.; Rozwadowski, Z.

    2017-04-01

    New molecular complexes of L-leucine and D-leucine with chloranilic acid have been synthesized. Crystal structures of these crystals have been solved; they crystallize in non-centrosymmetric monoclinic P21 space group. In the crystal, leucine molecules exist in protonated form (C6NO2H14+) and chloranilic acid molecules in deprotonated form (C6HCl2O4-). Electronic (UV-Vis) and vibrational absorption (VA) spectra for both materials were collected. Circular dichroism methods such as electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) were used to determine the absolute configuration of new complexes. In both methods a characteristic (-,+) Cotton patterns are observed. In ECD spectra absorption bands are observed at 212 nm for acetonitrile solution and at 202 nm for aqueous solution. VCD spectra (in DMSO-d6 solution) show (-,+) Cotton pattern with strong peaks at 1323 cm-1 (CH rocking mode). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) investigations were performed to explore thermal properties of new materials. In DSC curve the decomposition and combustion processes are observed in 220-227 °C. The decomposition process was described by use of TG method and quadruple mass spectrometer (QMS). NMR spectra of pure L-leucine and chloranilic acid as well as L-leucine - chloranilic acid complex in solutions (D2O and DMSO) and in solid state confirm the geometry of molecules in complex both in solution and in solid state.

  3. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics A A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  4. Dietary Leucine Requirement of Juvenile Japanese Seabass (Lateolabrax Japonicus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; CHENG Zhenyan; MAI Kangsen; AI Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to examine the dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass in sea-water floating net cages (1.5m×1.5m×2.0m). Six isonitrogenous (crude protein 40%) and isoenergetic (gross energy 20kJg−1) diets were formulated to contain different concentrations of leucine (0.9%, 1.49%, 2.07%, 2.70%, 3.30% and 3.88% of dry matter). Crys-talline L-amino acids were supplemented to simulate the whole body amino acid pattern of Japanese seabass except for leucine. Three groups (30 fish individuals each, 8.0g±0.20g in initial weight) were fed to apparent satiation at 5:00 and 17:30 every day. During the experimental period, the water temperature ranged from 26 to 32℃ and salinity from 26 to 30, and the dissolved oxygen was maintained at 7mgL−1. The results showed that weight gain (WG), nitrogen retention (NR), feed efficiency (FE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were significantly increased when dietary leucine was increased from 0.90% to 2.70% of dry matter, and then declined.WG was the highest when fish were fed D4 containing 2.70% of leucine. No significant differences were observed in body composition among dietary treatments (P>0.05). Considering the change ofWG, the optimum dietary leucine requirement of juve-nile Japanese seabass was either 2.39% of dry matter or 5.68% of dietary protein.

  5. Application of zipper-fracturing of horizontal cluster wells in the Changning shale gas pilot zone, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available After several years of exploration practices in the Changning-Weiyuan national shale gas pilot zone, the industrial production has been achieved in a number of vertical and horizontal wells completed by SRV fracturing, and a series of independent shale gas reservoir stimulation technologies have come into being. Next, it is necessary to consider how to enhance the efficiency of fracturing by a factory-mode operation. This paper presents the deployment of Changning Well Pad A, the first cluster horizontal shale gas well group, and proposes the optimal design for the factory operation mode of this Pad according to the requirements of wellpad fracturing stimulation technologies and the mountainous landform in the Sichuan Basin. Accordingly, a zipper-fracturing mode was firstly adopted in the factory fracturing on wellpad. With the application of standardized field process, zipper operation, assembly line work, staggered placement of downhole fractures, and microseismic monitoring in real time, the speed of fracturing reached 3.16 stages a day on average, and the stimulated reservoir volume was maximized, which has fully revealed how the factory operation mode contributes to the large-scale SRV fracturing of horizontal shale gas cluster wells on wellpads in the aspect of speed and efficiency. Moreover, the fracturing process, operation mode, surface facilities and post-fracturing preliminary evaluation of the zipper-fracturing in the well group were examined comprehensively. It is concluded from the practice that the zipper-fracturing in the two wells enhanced the efficiency by 78% and stimulated reservoir volume by 50% compared with the single-well fracturing at the preliminary stage in this area.

  6. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  7. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Robert A; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-09-20

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2-interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine [Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID, 5DJ4] and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket that alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID, 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. On the basis of this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. We show that simple analysis of the reported "apo"-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported apo-structure with leucine eliminated the large Fobs-Fcalc difference density at this position and improved the working and free R factors of the model. Consistent with this result, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contained electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive.

  8. Specific carbon-13 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, T.; Jensen, E.B.; Junker, F.; Dalboege, H. (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark)); Abildgaard, F.; Led, J.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, The H.C. Oersted Institute (Denmark))

    1992-01-01

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone specifically {sup 13}C-labelled in the carbonyl positions of all 26 leucine residues has been obtained by recombiant DNA techniques using {sup 13}C-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, on the whole, the labelling is specific with no significant mislabelling as would have been the case had the {sup 13}C-labelled leucine been metabolized. (au).

  9. Finding a Leucine in a Haystack: Searching the Proteome for ambigous Leucine-Aspartic Acid motifs

    KAUST Repository

    Arold, Stefan T.

    2016-01-25

    Leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs involved in cell motility, survival and communication. LD motif interactions are also implicated in cancer metastasis and are targeted by several viruses. LD motifs are notoriously difficult to detect because sequence pattern searches lead to an excessively high number of false positives. Hence, despite 20 years of research, only six LD motif–containing proteins are known in humans, three of which are close homologues of the paxillin family. To enable the proteome-wide discovery of LD motifs, we developed LD Motif Finder (LDMF), a web tool based on machine learning that combines sequence information with structural predictions to detect LD motifs with high accuracy. LDMF predicted 13 new LD motifs in humans. Using biophysical assays, we experimentally confirmed in vitro interactions for four novel LD motif proteins. Thus, LDMF allows proteome-wide discovery of LD motifs, despite a highly ambiguous sequence pattern. Functional implications will be discussed.

  10. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  12. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  15. Schizophrenia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Basic Information About Fluoride Benefits: Strong Teeth History of Fluoride in Water Cost: Saves Money, Saves Teeth Fluoride in the Water Today The mineral fluoride occurs naturally on earth and is released from rocks into the soil, ...

  19. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  2. Photolysis of rac-leucine with circularly polarized synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Meinert, Cornelia; Hoffmann, Søren V; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Nahon, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Amino acids that pass the RNA machinery in living organisms occur in L-configuration. The question on the evolutionary origin of this biomolecular asymmetry remains unanswered to this day. Amino acids were detected in artificially produced interstellar ices, and L-enantiomer-enriched amino acids were identified in CM-type meteorites. This hints at a possible interstellar/circumstellar origin of the amino acids themselves as well as their stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon the current knowledge about the occurrence of circularly-polarized electromagnetic radiation in interstellar environments, we subjected rac-leucine to far-UV circularly-polarized synchrotron radiation. Asymmetric photolysis was followed by an analysis in an enantioselective GC/MS system. Here, we report on an advanced photolysis rate of more than 99% for leucine. The results indicate that high photolysis rates can occur under the chosen conditions, favoring enantioselective photolysis. In 2014, the obtained results will be reexamined by cometary mission Rosetta.

  3. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  4. Glutamine, arginine, and leucine signaling in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc Rhoads, J; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Glutamine and leucine are abundant constituents of plant and animal proteins, whereas the content of arginine in foods and physiological fluids varies greatly. Besides their role in protein synthesis, these three amino acids individually activate signaling pathway to promote protein synthesis and possibly inhibit autophagy-mediated protein degradation in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, glutamine and arginine stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 (s6) kinase pathways, respectively, to enhance mucosal cell migration and restitution. Moreover, through the nitric oxide-dependent cGMP signaling cascade, arginine regulates multiple physiological events in the intestine that are beneficial for cell homeostasis and survival. Available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies shows that glutamine and arginine promote cell proliferation and exert differential cytoprotective effects in response to nutrient deprivation, oxidative injury, stress, and immunological challenge. Additionally, when nitric oxide is available, leucine increases the migration of intestinal cells. Therefore, through cellular signaling mechanisms, arginine, glutamine, and leucine play crucial roles in intestinal growth, integrity, and function.

  5. Identification and characterization of Paragonimus westermani leucine aminopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su-Min; Park, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jin; Kim, Suk-Il; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2008-09-01

    Paragonimus westermani is a tissue-invading trematode parasite that causes inflammatory lung disease as well as systemic infections including cerebral invasion in carnivorous mammals. While aminopeptidases play important roles in trematodes in the catabolism of host hemoglobin, an essential source of nutrient for the parasite, little is known about aminopeptidase in Paragonimus. Presently, we isolated a cDNA encoding a 58 kDa P. westermani leucine aminopeptidase (PwLAP). Deduced amino acid sequence of PwLAP exhibited significant sequence homology with LAP from Schistosoma spp. and Fasciola hepatica. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant PwLAP protein demonstrated preferential substrate specificity for Leu-NHMec and inhibition by EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, and bestatin, which are conserved characteristics of the M17 family of leucine aminopeptidase. PwLAP exhibited relatively higher enzyme activity in the presence of Mn2+ compared to Schistosoma mansoni LAP. Based on the biochemical properties and immunohistochemical analysis, PwLAP is concluded to represent a leucine aminopeptidase. The enzyme is most likely responsible for the catabolism of host hemoglobin, and, hence, represents a potential target of Paragonimus chemotherapy.

  6. Transcription attenuation in Salmonella typhimurium: the significance of rare leucine codons in the leu leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P W; Bartkus, J M; Calvo, J M

    1986-11-01

    The leucine operon of Salmonella typhimurium is controlled by a transcription attenuation mechanism. Four adjacent leucine codons within a 160-nucleotide leu leader RNA are thought to play a central role in this mechanism. Three of the four codons are CUA, a rarely used leucine codon within enteric bacteria. To determine whether the nature of the leucine codon affects the regulation of the leucine operon, we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to first convert one CUA of the leader to CUG and then convert all three CUA codons to CUG. CUG is the most frequently used leucine codon in enteric bacteria. A mutant having (CUA)2CUGCUC in place of (CUA)3CUC has an altered response to leucine limitation, requiring a slightly higher degree of limitation to effect derepression. Changing (CUA)3CUC to (CUG)3CUC has more dramatic effects upon operon expression. First, the basal level of expression is lowered to the point that the mutant grows more slowly than the parent in a minimal medium lacking leucine. Second, the response of the mutant to a leucine limitation is dramatically altered such that even a strong limitation elicits only a modest degree of derepression. If the mutant is grown under conditions of leucyl-tRNA limitation rather than leucine limitation, complete derepression can be achieved, but only at a much higher degree of limitation than for the wild-type operon. These results provide a clear-cut example of codon usage having a dramatic effect upon gene expression.

  7. The Effect of Oral Leucine on Protein Metabolism in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson ThomasA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lack of insulin results in a catabolic state in subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus which is reversed by insulin treatment. Amino acid supply, especially branched chain amino acids such as leucine, enhances protein synthesis in both animal and human studies. This small study was undertaken to assess the acute effect of supplemental leucine on protein metabolism in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. L-[1-13C] Leucine was used to assess whole-body protein metabolism in six adolescent females (16–18 yrs with type 1 diabetes during consumption of a basal diet (containing 58 μmoles leucine/kg/h and the basal diet with supplemental leucine (232 μmoles leucine/kg/h. Net leucine balance was significantly higher with supplemental leucine ( μmoles leucine/kg body weight/hr than with the basal diet (, due to reduced protein degradation ( μmoles leucine/kg body weight/hr compared to the basal diet (, .

  8. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  9. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Body Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System Heart and Circulatory System Immune ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit ... final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other ...

  12. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are You At Risk? Diabetes Basics Living with Diabetes Food & Fitness In My ... Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy ...

  13. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello Maria

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein: pregnant (N, tumor-bearing (WN, pair-fed rats (Np. Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine: leucine (L, tumor-bearing (WL and pair-fed with leucine (Lp. Non pregnant rats (C, which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Results Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Conclusions Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones.

  14. Wavelet basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Since the study of wavelets is a relatively new area, much of the research coming from mathematicians, most of the literature uses terminology, concepts and proofs that may, at times, be difficult and intimidating for the engineer. Wavelet Basics has therefore been written as an introductory book for scientists and engineers. The mathematical presentation has been kept simple, the concepts being presented in elaborate detail in a terminology that engineers will find familiar. Difficult ideas are illustrated with examples which will also aid in the development of an intuitive insight. Chapter 1 reviews the basics of signal transformation and discusses the concepts of duals and frames. Chapter 2 introduces the wavelet transform, contrasts it with the short-time Fourier transform and clarifies the names of the different types of wavelet transforms. Chapter 3 links multiresolution analysis, orthonormal wavelets and the design of digital filters. Chapter 4 gives a tour d'horizon of topics of current interest: wave...

  15. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  16. "Leucine aminopeptidase" (neutral arylamidase) in sheep sera: improved resolution with gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, C; Baker, C M

    1986-01-01

    Electrophoretic resolution of the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is greatly improved by the use of gradients of acrylamide polymer, together with enzyme localisation involving L-alanyl beta-naphthylamide and cobaltous ion. The improved resolution contradicts an earlier claim of the existence of only two patterns of individual variation in the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase", with one pattern completely dominant to the other. While the sheep enzyme is unusual among mammalian serum "leucine aminopeptidases" in its complex heterogeneity, it does conform to the typical mammalian pattern of codominant individual variation. The complexity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is useful in the study of sheep evolution.

  17. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  18. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  19. Regression Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Kahane, Leo H

    2007-01-01

    Using a friendly, nontechnical approach, the Second Edition of Regression Basics introduces readers to the fundamentals of regression. Accessible to anyone with an introductory statistics background, this book builds from a simple two-variable model to a model of greater complexity. Author Leo H. Kahane weaves four engaging examples throughout the text to illustrate not only the techniques of regression but also how this empirical tool can be applied in creative ways to consider a broad array of topics. New to the Second Edition Offers greater coverage of simple panel-data estimation:

  20. Catabolism of leucine to branched-chain fatty acids in Staphylococcus xylosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, A M; Lauritsen, F R

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is an important starter culture in the production of flavours from the branched-chain amino acids leucine, valine and isoleucine in fermented meat products. The sensorially most important flavour compounds are the branched-chain aldehydes and acids derived from the correspo...... the corresponding amino acids and this paper intends to perspectivate these flavour compounds in the context of leucine metabolism....

  1. L-leucine methyl ester stimulates insulin secretion and islet glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, P; Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A

    1983-01-01

    Column perifusion of collagenase-isolated mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the dynamics of insulin release in experiments lasting for several hours. The methyl esters of L-leucine and L-arginine were synthesized. Whereas L-arginine methyl ester (L-arginine OMe) had no effect, L-leucine OMe...

  2. Leucine Modulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and SIRT1-AMPK Signaling in C2C12 Myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzi Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrate that dietary leucine protects against high fat diet-induced mitochondrial impairments and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and energy partitioning from adipocytes to muscle cells through SIRT1-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB, a metabolite of leucine, has been reported to activate AMPK synergistically with resveratrol in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, we hypothesize that leucine-induced activation of SIRT1 and AMPK is the central event that links the upregulated mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Thus, C2C12 myotubes were treated with leucine (0.5 mM, alanine (0.5 mM, valine (0.5 mM, EX527 (SIRT1 inhibitor, 25 μM, and Compound C (AMPK inhibitor, 25 μM alone or in combination to determine the roles of AMPK and SIRT1 in leucine-modulation of energy metabolism. Leucine significantly increased mitochondrial content, mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes expression, fatty acid oxidation, SIRT1 activity and gene expression, and AMPK phosphorylation in C2C12 myotubes compared to the controls, while EX527 and Compound C markedly attenuated these effects. Furthermore, leucine treatment for 24 hours resulted in time-dependent increases in cellular NAD+, SIRT1 activity, and p-AMPK level, with SIRT1 activation preceding that of AMPK, indicating that leucine activation of SIRT1, rather than AMPK, is the primary event.

  3. Retrieval of specimens in laparoscopy using reclosable zipper-type plastic bags: a simple, cheap, and useful method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A; Vázquez, J A; Valencia, S; Cueto, J

    1998-12-01

    Surgical specimens must often be extracted during laparoscopic surgery. Although the technologic advances in this field are amazing, simple measures may sometimes work even better than very sophisticated instruments. This is true of the reclosable plastic bags with zipper-type closure that we use for retrieving surgical specimens from the abdominal cavity in order to protect it as well as the abdominal wall. The bags are cheap, offer no problems for sterilization, are easy to obtain, and are available in many sizes. They are very simple to handle, making it easy to slip in the specimen and then extract it from the abdominal cavity. We describe our experience with these bags and a technique for manipulating them.

  4. Inflation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  5. Inflation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  6. Experiment list: SRX190204 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ncode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby forming the transcr...s encode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby forming the tran

  7. ERT basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butters, M. [MBC Energy and Environment, Ottawa, ON (Canada)]|[National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    ERT is an economic instrument which helps power companies achieve emission reduction compliance cost-effectively. This paper presents the basics of ERT with reference to trading concepts, types of systems and types of emissions. The paper also describes the state of the Canadian energy market regarding greenhouse gases (GHG), nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and volatile organic compounds. The association between ERT and district energy is also explained. By 2010, the global market for GHG trading is expected to be worth $10 billion to $3 trillion U.S. Canada has committed to reducing its GHG to 6 per cent below 1990 levels by 2012, but currently emits 705 Mt per year. This is expected to increase to 770 Mt by 2010. Therefore, in order to meet its commitment, GHGs will have to be reduced 200 Mt per year. Canada is currently considering ratifying the Kyoto agreement and a trading system is being developed. There are several abatement technologies currently under consideration for district energy systems, including adding scrubbers, improving efficiency, and fuel switching. The marginal cost of abatement was also discussed. tabs., figs.

  8. Regulation of the JNK signaling pathway by dual leucine zipper kinase DLK%双亮氨酸拉链激酶DLK对JNK信号通路的调控作用及机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仙珏; 薛雷

    2010-01-01

    c-Jun氨基末端激酶(c-Jun NH2-ternimal kinase,JNK)属于进化上相当保守的促分裂原活化蛋白激酶(Mitogen-activated protein kinase,MAPK)超家族.大量的研究揭示,JNK在细胞增殖、分化、迁移、凋亡和形态建成中起着关键作用,并与多种人类疾病的发生与发展密切相关.双亮氨酸拉链激酶(DLK)在结构上属于MLK(Mixed lineage kinase)家族,功能上则是MAPKKK(MAP kinase kinase kinase)中一员,可通过MAPKK(MAPk inase kinase)对JNK的活性进行调节,从而参与细胞凋亡、迁移、分化等一系列重要细胞反应.文章结合DLK与JNK的研究历史与最新进展,就DLK-JNK通讯所参与的细胞凋亡、迁移及分化等活动做一简要综述.

  9. Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in high-fat diet fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Wei Yuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have reported the favorable effect of leucine supplementation on insulin resistance or insulin sensitivity. However, whether or not leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity remains unclear. Design: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a high-fat diet (HFD or HFD supplemented with 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5% leucine for 16 weeks. At the end of the experiment, serum leptin level was measured by ELISA, and leptin receptor (ObR in the hypothalamus was examined by immunohistochemistry. The protein expressions of ObR and leptin-signaling pathway in adipose tissues were detected by western blot. Results: No significant differences in body weight and food/energy intake existed among the four groups. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower, and ObR expression in the hypothalamus and adipose tissues was significantly higher in the three leucine groups than in the control group. These phenomena suggested that leptin sensitivity was improved in the leucine groups. Furthermore, the expressions of JAK2 and STAT3 (activated by ObR were significantly higher, and that of SOCS3 (inhibits leptin signaling was significantly lower in the three leucine groups than in the control group. Conclusions: Leucine supplementation improves leptin sensitivity in rats on HFD likely by promoting leptin signaling.

  10. L-Leucine for gold nanoparticles synthesis and their cytotoxic effects evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Olenic, Liliana; Katona, Gabriel; Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Vulcu, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the preparation of water-soluble leucine capped gold nanoparticles by two single-step synthesis methods. The first procedure involves a citrate reduction approach where the citrate is used as reducing agent and leucine as capping/stabilizing agent. Different sizes of gold nanoparticles, citrate reduced and stabilized by leucine, Leu-AuNPs-C, with the mean diameters in the range of 21-56 nm, were obtained by varying the macroscopic parameters such as: concentration of the gold precursor solution, Au (III):citrate molar ratio and leucine pH. In the second procedure, leucine acts both as reducing and stabilizing agent, allowing us to obtain spherical gold nanoparticles, Leu-AuNPs, with a majority of 80 % (with the mean diameter of 63 nm). This proves that leucine is an appropriate reductant for the formation of water-soluble and stable gold nanoparticles colloids. The characterization of the leucine coated gold nanoparticles was carried out by TEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR analysis. The cytotoxic effect of Leu-AuNPs-C and Leu-AuNPs was also evaluated.

  11. Leucine Supplementation Accelerates Connective Tissue Repair of Injured Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo G. Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA. Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day; then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05 from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05. Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n (p < 0.05, increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05 and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases.

  12. Leucine-based receptor sorting motifs are dependent on the spacing relative to the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Dietrich, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1998-01-01

    amino acid, is constitutively active. In this study, we have investigated how the spacing relative to the plasma membrane affects the function of both types of leucine-based motifs. For phosphorylation-dependent leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 7 residues between the plasma membrane...... and the phospho-acceptor was required for phosphorylation and thereby activation of the motifs. For constitutively active leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 6 residues between the plasma membrane and the acidic residue was required for optimal activity of the motifs. In addition, we found that the acidic...

  13. Reduction in plasma leucine after sprint exercise is greater in males than in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, M; Rooyackers, O; Norman, B;

    2012-01-01

    There is a pronounced gender difference in the accumulation of plasma ammonia after sprint exercise. Ammonia is a key intermediate in amino acid metabolism, which implies that gender-related differences in plasma and muscle amino acid concentrations after sprint exercise exist. To study this, three...... bouts of 30-s sprint exercise were performed by healthy females (n=8) and males (n=6). Blood leucine and muscle leucine were collected over the exercise period. Basal arterial plasma and skeletal muscle leucine were 40% higher in males than females (P...

  14. Leucine and protein metabolism in obese Zucker rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxiang She

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs are circulating nutrient signals for protein accretion, however, they increase in obesity and elevations appear to be prognostic of diabetes. To understand the mechanisms whereby obesity affects BCAAs and protein metabolism, we employed metabolomics and measured rates of [1-(14C]-leucine metabolism, tissue-specific protein synthesis and branched-chain keto-acid (BCKA dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC activities. Male obese Zucker rats (11-weeks old had increased body weight (BW, 53%, liver (107% and fat (∼300%, but lower plantaris and gastrocnemius masses (-21-24%. Plasma BCAAs and BCKAs were elevated 45-69% and ∼100%, respectively, in obese rats. Processes facilitating these rises appeared to include increased dietary intake (23%, leucine (Leu turnover and proteolysis [35% per g fat free mass (FFM, urinary markers of proteolysis: 3-methylhistidine (183% and 4-hydroxyproline (766%] and decreased BCKDC per g kidney, heart, gastrocnemius and liver (-47-66%. A process disposing of circulating BCAAs, protein synthesis, was increased 23-29% by obesity in whole-body (FFM corrected, gastrocnemius and liver. Despite the observed decreases in BCKDC activities per gm tissue, rates of whole-body Leu oxidation in obese rats were 22% and 59% higher normalized to BW and FFM, respectively. Consistently, urinary concentrations of eight BCAA catabolism-derived acylcarnitines were also elevated. The unexpected increase in BCAA oxidation may be due to a substrate effect in liver. Supporting this idea, BCKAs were elevated more in liver (193-418% than plasma or muscle, and per g losses of hepatic BCKDC activities were completely offset by increased liver mass, in contrast to other tissues. In summary, our results indicate that plasma BCKAs may represent a more sensitive metabolic signature for obesity than BCAAs. Processes supporting elevated BCAA]BCKAs in the obese Zucker rat include increased dietary intake, Leu and protein

  15. PCNN在金属拉链缺陷检测中的应用%Implementation on metal zipper scoops defects detection based on PCNN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张淼; 欧幸福; 唐雄民; 陈文凤

    2014-01-01

    针对传统金属拉链缺陷人工检测方法效率低、稳定性差、误检率高等缺点,提出一种基于脉冲耦合神经网络(Pulse Coupled Neural Networks,PCNN)和灰度跃变检测的金属拉链缺陷检测方法。针对拉链图像的特点,通过对传统PCNN进行改进以提高金属拉链图像二值分割处理速度;将传统PCNN和形态学理论相结合,提取链齿特征图像;采用区域像素统计与灰度跃变检测的方法实现金属拉链缺陷自动检测;完成检测系统的设计并进行实验研究。实验结果表明提出的检测方法快速、准确、可行。%Traditional manual method of metal zipper defects detection has the features of inefficiency, poor stability and high false positive rate. To these problems, this paper presents a new detection method based on Pulse Coupled Neural Network(PCNN)and gray mutation detection. Depending on the characteristics of metal zipper image, the processing speed of image segmentation will be increased by improving the traditional PCNN, which can extract the feature images of zipper scoops by combining with morphology. A new proposed method can automatically distinguish the metal zipper scoops defects through the region pixel statistics and gray mutation detection. A detection system is designed for this experi-mental study. Experiment results show the detection method of this paper is quick, accurate and feasible.

  16. Nuclear localization of HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) is mediated by three distinct motifs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hivin, P.; Frederic, M.; Arpin-Andre, C.; Basbous, J.; Gay, B.; Thebault, S.C.; Mesnard, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The genome of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) codes for a basic leucine zipper protein, HBZ, capable of repressing JUN activity and viral transcription. Transient expression in mammalian cells showed that HBZ was targeted to the nucleus, where it accumulated in nuclear speckles. By u

  17. Structure-Function Analysis of the v-Myc Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    transcription activation domain (TAD) and a carboxy-terminal basic helix-loop-helix/ leucine zipper (bHLH/LZ) motif (Henriksson and Luscher , 1996). Work by...U. (1996). Active repression mechanisms of eukaryotic transcription repressors. Trends in Genetics 12: 229-234. Henriksson, M. and Luscher , B. (1996

  18. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). Th

  19. Sucrose-induced translational repression of plant bZIP-type transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiese, A.; Elzinga, N.; Wobbes, B.; Smeekens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sugars as signalling molecules exert control on the transcription of many plant genes. Sugar signals also alter mRNA and protein stability. Increased sucrose concentrations specifically repress translation of the S-class basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factor AtbZIP11/ATB2. Thi

  20. Cell culture attenuation eliminates rMd5deltaMeq-induced bursal and thymic atrophy and renders the mutant virus as an effective and safe vaccine against Marek's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. The rMd5'meq virus provided s...

  1. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper (b

  2. Upregulation of the transcription factor TFEB in t(6;11)(p21;q13)-positive renal cell carcinomas due to promoter substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, RP; Schepens, M; Thijssen, J; van Asseldonk, M; van den Berg, E; Bridge, J; Schuuring, E; Schoenmakers, EFPM; van Kessel, AG

    2003-01-01

    The MITF/TFE subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper (bHLH-LZ) transcription factors consists of four closely related members, TFE3, TFEB, TFEC and MITF, which can form both homo- and heterodimers. Previously, we demonstrated that in t(X;1)(p11;q21)-positive renal cell carcinomas (RCCs),

  3. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Karin M; Church, Matthew J; Doggett, Joseph K; Karl, David M

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using (14)C-bicarbonate and (3)H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (E k) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of (14)C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar E k values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using (3)H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should

  4. Isovalerianeacidæmi--en sjælden og alvorlig defekt i nedbrydningen af leucin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ann-Britt Kiholm; Lund, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) is an organic acidemia caused by deficient metabolism of the essential amino acid leucine. We describe the biochemistry, diagnostics, and treatment of IVA, and present the known Danish patients.......Isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) is an organic acidemia caused by deficient metabolism of the essential amino acid leucine. We describe the biochemistry, diagnostics, and treatment of IVA, and present the known Danish patients....

  5. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  6. Light dependence of [3H]leucine incorporation in the oligotrophic North Pacific ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Matthew J; Ducklow, Hugh W; Karl, David M

    2004-07-01

    The influence of irradiance on bacterial incorporation of [(3)H]leucine was evaluated at Station ALOHA in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre. Six experiments were conducted on three cruises to Station ALOHA to examine how [(3)H]leucine incorporation varied as a function of irradiance. Two experiments were also conducted to assess the photoautotrophic response to irradiance (based on photosynthetic uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate) in both the upper and lower photic zones. Rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation responded to irradiance in a photosynthesis-like manner, increasing sharply at low light and then saturating and sometimes declining with increasing light intensity. The influence of irradiance on bacterial growth was evaluated in both the well-lit (5 to 25 m) and dimly lit regions of the upper ocean (75 to 100 m) to determine whether the bacterial response to irradiance differed along the depth-dependent light gradient of the photic zone. [(3)H]leucine incorporation rates were analyzed with a photosynthesis-irradiance model for a quantitative description of the relationships between [(3)H]leucine incorporation and irradiance. Maximum rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation in the upper photic zone increased 48 to 92% relative to those of dark-incubated samples, with [(3)H]leucine incorporation saturating at light intensities between 58 and 363 micromol of quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates of [(3)H]leucine incorporation in the deep photic zone were photostimulated 53 to 114% and were susceptible to photoinhibition, with rates declining at light intensities of >100 micromol of quanta m(-2) s(-1). The results of these experiments revealed that sunlight directly influences bacterial growth in this open-ocean ecosystem.

  7. Amino acid metabolism in the human fetus at term: leucine, valine, and methionine kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Chris H P; Schierbeek, Henk; Minderman, Gardi; Vermes, Andras; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M; Duvekot, Johannes J; Steegers, Eric A P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2011-12-01

    Human fetal metabolism is largely unexplored. Understanding how a healthy fetus achieves its fast growth rates could eventually play a pivotal role in improving future nutritional strategies for premature infants. To quantify specific fetal amino acid kinetics, eight healthy pregnant women received before elective cesarean section at term, continuous stable isotope infusions of the essential amino acids [1-13C,15N]leucine, [U-13C5]valine, and [1-13C]methionine. Umbilical blood was collected after birth and analyzed for enrichments and concentrations using mass spectrometry techniques. Fetuses showed considerable leucine, valine, and methionine uptake and high turnover rates. α-Ketoisocaproate, but not α-ketoisovalerate (the leucine and valine ketoacids, respectively), was transported at net rate from the fetus to the placenta. Especially, leucine and valine data suggested high oxidation rates, up to half of net uptake. This was supported by relatively low α-ketoisocaproate reamination rates to leucine. Our data suggest high protein breakdown and synthesis rates, comparable with, or even slightly higher than in premature infants. The relatively large uptakes of total leucine and valine carbon also suggest high fetal oxidation rates of these essential branched chain amino acids.

  8. Enhancement of binding activity of soluble human CD40 to CD40 ligand through incorporation of an isoleucine zipper motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of incorporation of all isoleucine zipper(IZ)motif into CD40 on binding activity of CD40 for the CD40 ligand (CD40L).Methods:Prokaryotic expression vectors for 2 soluble CD40 derivatives,shCD40His and shCD40IZ containing an IZ dowain,were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli.The recombinant proteins were purified to homogeneity after refolding from inclusion bodies.Their molecular weights in solution of shCD40His and shCD40IZ were compared by size-exclusion chromatography,and their binding activity for CD40L on Jurkat T cells was determined by flow cytometry.Results:shCD40His and shCD40IZ were generated.Both of them possessed significant binding activity for the cognate ligand CD40L expressed on the cell surface.shCD40IZ had much higher binding activity to its ligand(CD40L)than did shCD40His.Furthermore,size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that shCD40IZ existed in high molecular mass forms that were most likely to be trimers in solution.Conclusion:Incorporation of an IZ motif into CD40 enhances its binding activity for CD40L through trimerization of the CD40 derivative.

  9. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  10. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2014-05-29

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acidmotifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs. © 2014 Biochemical Society.

  11. Biomimetic Enamel Regeneration Mediated by Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, S Y; Litman, A; Margolis, H C; Yamakoshi, Y; Simmer, J P

    2017-01-01

    We report here a novel biomimetic approach to the regeneration of human enamel. The approach combines the use of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to control the onset and rate of enamel regeneration and the use of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP), a nonphosphorylated 56-amino acid alternative splice product of amelogenin, to regulate the shape and orientation of growing enamel crystals. This study builds on our previous findings that show LRAP can effectively guide the formation of ordered arrays of needle-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in vitro and on the known role mineralization inhibitors, like PPi, play in the regulation of mineralized tissue formation. Acid-etched enamel surfaces of extracted human molars, cut perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the enamel rods, were exposed to a PPi-stabilized supersaturated calcium phosphate (CaP) solution containing 0 to 0.06 mg/mL LRAP for 20 h. In the absence of LRAP, PPi inhibition was reversed by the presence of etched enamel surfaces and led to the formation of large, randomly distributed plate-like HA crystals that were weakly attached, regardless of rod orientation. In the presence of 0.04 mg/mL LRAP, however, densely packed mineral layers, comprising bundles of small needle-like HA crystals, formed on etched surfaces that were cut perpendicular to the enamel rods. These crystals were strongly attached, and their arrangement reflected to a significant degree the underlying enamel prism pattern. In contrast, under the same conditions with LRAP, little to no crystal formation was found on enamel surfaces that were cut parallel to the direction of the enamel rods. These results suggest that LRAP preferentially interacts with ab surfaces of mature enamel crystals, inhibiting their directional growth, thus selectively promoting linear growth along the c-axis of enamel crystals. The present findings demonstrate a potential for the development of a new approach to regenerate enamel structure and properties.

  12. Chronic leucine supplementation improves glycemic control in etiologically distinct mouse models of obesity and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jue

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine may function as a signaling molecule to regulate metabolism. We have previously shown that dietary leucine supplementation significantly improves glucose and energy metabolism in diet-induced obese mice, suggesting that leucine supplementation could potentially be a useful adjuvant therapy for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Since the underlying cause for obesity and type 2 diabetes is multifold, we further investigated metabolic effects of leucine supplementation in obese/diabetes mouse models with different etiologies, and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Leucine supplementation was carried out in NONcNZO10/LtJ (RCS10 - a polygenic model predisposed to beta cell failure and type 2 diabetes, and in B6.Cg-Ay/J (Ay - a monogenic model for impaired central melanocortin receptor signaling, obesity, and severe insulin resistance. Mice in the treatment group received the drinking water containing 1.5% leucine for up to 8 months; control mice received the tap water. Body weight, body composition, blood HbA1c levels, and plasma glucose and insulin levels were monitored throughout and/or at the end of the study period. Indirect calorimetry, skeletal muscle gene expression, and adipose tissue inflammation were also assessed in Ay mice. Results Leucine supplementation significantly reduced HbA1c levels throughout the study period in both RCS10 and Ay mice. However, the treatment had no long term effect on body weight or adiposity. The improvement in glycemic control was associated with an increased insulin response to food challenge in RCS10 mice and decreased plasma insulin levels in Ay mice. In leucine-treated Ay mice, energy expenditure was increased by ~10% (p y mice whereas the expression levels of MCP-1 and TNF-alpha and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue were significantly reduced. Conclusions Chronic leucine supplementation significantly improves glycemic control in multiple mouse models of

  13. Flow cytometric assessment of specific leucine incorporation in the open Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarmin, A.; van Wambeke, F.; Catala, P.; Courties, C.; Lebaron, P.

    2011-02-01

    The surface of the Mediterranean Sea is a low-phosphate-low-chlorophyll marine area where marine heterotrophic prokaryotes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of all biogenic elements such as carbon, notably through the mineralization of dissolved organic compounds. Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates were determined in early summer in the open stratified Mediterranean Sea. The bulk leucine incorporation rate was on average 5 ± 4 pmol leu l-1 h-1 (n=30). Cell-specific 3H-leucine incorporation rates were assayed using flow cytometry coupled to cell sorting. Heterotrophic prokaryotes (Hprok) were divided into cytometric groups according to their side scatter and green fluorescence properties: high nucleic acid containing cells (HNA) with high scatter (HNA-hs) and low scatter (HNA-ls) and low nucleic acid containing cells (LNA). Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates of these cytometric groups ranged from 2 to 54, 0.9 to 11, and 1 to 12 × 10-21 mol cell-1 h-1, respectively. LNA cells represented 45 to 63% of the Hprok abundance, and significantly contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation rates, from 12 to 43%. HNA/LNA ratios of cell-specific leucine incorporation were on average 2.0 ± 0.7 (n=30). In surface layers (from 0 m down to the deep chlorophyll depth, DCM), cell-specific rates of HNA-hs were elevated (7 and 13 times greater than LNA and HNA-ls, respectively). Nevertheless, on average HNA-hs (26%) and LNA (27%) equally contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation in these layers. Prochlorococcus cells were easily sorted near the DCM and displayed cell-specific leucine incorporation rates ranging from 3 to 55 × 10-21 mol leu cell-1 h-1, i.e. as high as HNA-hs'. These sorted groups could therefore be defined as key-players in the process of leucine incorporation into proteins. The mixotrophic features of certain photosynthetic prokaryotes and the high contribution of LNA cells to leucine incorporation within the microbial

  14. Flow cytometric assessment of specific leucine incorporation in the open Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Talarmin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the Mediterranean Sea is a low-phosphate-low-chlorophyll marine area where marine heterotrophic prokaryotes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of all biogenic elements such as carbon, notably through the mineralization of dissolved organic compounds. Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates were determined in early summer in the open stratified Mediterranean Sea. The bulk leucine incorporation rate was on average 5 ± 4 pmol leu l−1 h−1 (n=30. Cell-specific 3H-leucine incorporation rates were assayed using flow cytometry coupled to cell sorting. Heterotrophic prokaryotes (Hprok were divided into cytometric groups according to their side scatter and green fluorescence properties: high nucleic acid containing cells (HNA with high scatter (HNA-hs and low scatter (HNA-ls and low nucleic acid containing cells (LNA. Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates of these cytometric groups ranged from 2 to 54, 0.9 to 11, and 1 to 12 × 10-21 mol cell−1 h−1, respectively. LNA cells represented 45 to 63% of the Hprok abundance, and significantly contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation rates, from 12 to 43%. HNA/LNA ratios of cell-specific leucine incorporation were on average 2.0 ± 0.7 (n=30. In surface layers (from 0 m down to the deep chlorophyll depth, DCM, cell-specific rates of HNA-hs were elevated (7 and 13 times greater than LNA and HNA-ls, respectively. Nevertheless, on average HNA-hs (26% and LNA (27% equally contributed to the bulk leucine incorporation in these layers. Prochlorococcus cells were easily sorted near the DCM and displayed cell-specific leucine incorporation rates ranging from 3 to 55 × 10-21 mol leu cell−1 h−1, i.e. as high as HNA-hs'. These sorted groups could therefore be defined as key-players in the process of leucine incorporation into proteins. The

  15. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  16. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Experts \\ The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing ...

  17. Substrate binding and formation of an occluded state in the leucine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Leyla; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-03-01

    Translocation through the extracellular vestibule and binding of leucine in the leucine transporter (LeuT) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. More than 0.1 mus of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on different combinations of LeuT, bound substrate, and bound structural Na(+) ions to describe molecular events involved in substrate binding and in the formation of the occluded state and to investigate the dynamics of this state. Three structural features are found to be directly involved in the initial steps of leucine transport: a Na(+) ion directly coordinated to leucine (Na-1), two aromatic residues closing the binding site toward the extracellular vestibule (Tyr-108 and Phe-253), and a salt bridge in the extracellular vestibule (Arg-30 and Asp-404). These features account for observed differences between simulations of LeuT with and without bound substrate and for a possible pathway for leucine binding and thereby formation of the occluded LeuT binding site.

  18. Independent valine and leucine isotope labeling in Escherichia coli protein overexpression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Reuther, Lukas; Schörghuber, Julia; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-11-01

    The addition of labeled α-ketoisovalerate to the growth medium of a protein-expressing host organism has evolved into a versatile tool to achieve concomitant incorporation of specific isotopes into valine- and leucine- residues. The resulting target proteins represent excellent probes for protein NMR analysis. However, as the sidechain resonances of these residues emerge in a narrow spectral range, signal overlap represents a severe limitation in the case of high-molecular-weight NMR probes. We present a protocol to eliminate leucine labeling by supplying the medium with unlabeled α-ketoisocaproate. The resulting spectra of a model protein exclusively feature valine signals of increased intensity, confirming the method to be a first example of independent valine and leucine labeling employing α-ketoacid precursor compounds.

  19. Independent valine and leucine isotope labeling in Escherichia coli protein overexpression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenecker, Roman J., E-mail: roman.lichtenecker@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Austria); Weinhäupl, Katharina; Reuther, Lukas [University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria); Schörghuber, Julia; Schmid, Walther [University of Vienna, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Austria); Konrat, Robert [University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria)

    2013-09-28

    The addition of labeled α-ketoisovalerate to the growth medium of a protein-expressing host organism has evolved into a versatile tool to achieve concomitant incorporation of specific isotopes into valine- and leucine-residues. The resulting target proteins represent excellent probes for protein NMR analysis. However, as the side-chain resonances of these residues emerge in a narrow spectral range, signal overlap represents a severe limitation in the case of high-molecular-weight NMR probes. We present a protocol to eliminate leucine labeling by supplying the medium with unlabeled α-ketoisocaproate. The resulting spectra of a model protein exclusively feature valine signals of increased intensity, confirming the method to be a first example of independent valine and leucine labeling employing α-ketoacid precursor compounds.

  20. Dietary leucine--an environmental modifier of insulin resistance acting on multiple levels of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macotela, Yazmin; Emanuelli, Brice; Bång, Anneli M

    2011-01-01

    and cholesterol metabolites, and fatty acids in liver, muscle, fat and serum. Doubling dietary leucine reversed many of the metabolite abnormalities and caused a marked improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin signaling without altering food intake or weight gain. Increased dietary leucine was also associated...... with a decrease in hepatic steatosis and a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue. These changes occurred despite an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase indicating enhanced activation of mTOR, a phenomenon normally associated with insulin resistance. These data indicate that modest...

  1. Increased synthesis of eicosanoids by human monocytes following leucine and methionine enkephalin administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiederhold, M.D.; Ou, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Regulation of eicosanoid biosynthesis by neuropeptides was investigated in human peripheral blood monocytes from normal donors. Metabolites of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) were analyzed by thin layer and high pressure liquid chromatography following exposure to 0.2 ..mu..gm/ml and 2.0 ..mu..gm/ml of leucine (L-ENK) and methionine (M-ENK) enkephalin. Supernatants of cultured cells were analyzed. The data indicate that both leucine and methionine enkephalin can stimulate eicosanoid biosynthesis in human monocytes, and may indicate a possible regulatory mechanism between the central nervous system and the reticuloendothelial system.

  2. Measurement of L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine kinetics in splanchnic and leg tissues in humans. Effect of amino acid infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfand, R.A.; Glickman, M.G.; Castellino, P.; Louard, R.J.; DeFronzo, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    Although whole-body leucine flux is widely measured to study body protein turnover in humans, the contribution of specific tissues to the total-body measurement remains unknown. By combining the organ-balance technique with the systemic infusion of L-(1-14C)leucine, we quantitated leucine production and disposal by splanchnic and leg tissues and by the whole body, simultaneously, in six normal men before and during amino acid infusion. At steady state, disposal of arterial leucine by splanchnic and leg tissues was calculated from the percent extraction (E) of L-(1-14C)leucine counts: uptake = E x (Leu)a x flow. Tissue release of cold leucine (from protein turnover) into vein was calculated as the difference between leucine uptake and the net tissue leucine balance. In the postabsorptive state, despite substantial (P less than .01) extraction of L-(1-14C)leucine by splanchnic (23 +/- 1%) and leg (18 +/- 2%) tissues, net leucine balance across both tissue beds was small, indicating active simultaneous disposal and production of leucine at nearly equivalent rates. Splanchnic tissues accounted for approximately 50% of the measured total-body leucine flux. During amino acid infusion, the net leucine balance across splanchnic and leg tissues became positive, reflecting not only an increase in leucine uptake but also a marked suppression (by approximately 50%, P less than .02) of cold leucine release. This reduction in splanchnic and leg leucine release was indicated by a sharp decline in whole-body endogenous leucine flux.

  3. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older...

  4. The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron-Smith David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched-chain amino acid (BCAA leucine has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal muscle anabolism. Activation of anabolic signalling occurs via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR through an undefined mechanism. System A and L solute carriers transport essential amino acids across plasma membranes; however it remains unknown whether an exogenous supply of leucine regulates their gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic leucine stimulation of anabolic signalling and specific amino acid transporters, using cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells. Results Human myotubes were treated with leucine, insulin or co-treated with leucine and insulin for 30 min, 3 h or 24 h. Activation of mTOR signalling kinases were examined, together with putative nutrient sensor human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34 and gene expression of selected amino acid transporters. Phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K was transiently increased following leucine exposure, independently to insulin. hVps34 protein expression was also significantly increased. However, genes encoding amino acid transporters were differentially regulated by insulin and not leucine. Conclusions mTOR signalling is transiently activated by leucine within human myotubes independently of insulin stimulation. While this occurred in the absence of changes in gene expression of amino acid transporters, protein expression of hVps34 increased.

  5. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  6. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. ...

  7. Mood and cognition in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 G2019S Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Vicki; Groves, Mark; Heiman, Gary; Palmese, Christina; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Ozelius, Laurie; Raymond, Deborah; Bressman, Susan

    2011-08-15

    The behavioral and cognitive features of the leucine-rich repeat kinase G2019S mutation in Parkinson's disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population are not well described; therefore, we sought to more systematically characterize these features using a semistructured psychiatric interview and neuropsychological testing. Twenty-one Ashkenazi Jewish patients having the leucine-rich repeat kinase G2019S mutation were compared with age- and sex-matched Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson's disease without mutations. Although overall rates of affective disorders were not greater in mutation carriers, the carriers exhibited a 6-fold increased risk of premorbid affective disorders (odds ratio, 6.0; P = .10), as determined by the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV. Of interest, we identified 2 leucine-rich repeat kinase carriers with bipolar disorder; no mutation-negative subjects had this diagnosis. Performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Judgment of Line Orientation, and Frontal Assessment Battery was consistent with previous reports and did not differ between groups. Study findings suggest a possible association between premorbid mood disorders and leucine-rich repeat kinase Parkinson's disease, warranting further evaluation.

  8. Molecular characterization of the di-leucine-based internalization motif of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Hou, X; Wegener, A M;

    1996-01-01

    Several cell surface receptors including the T cell receptor (TCR) are phosphorylated and down-regulated following activation of protein kinases. We have recently shown that both phosphorylation of Ser-126 and the presence of the di-leucine sequence Leu-131 and Leu-132 in CD3 gamma are required f...

  9. Synergistic effects of leucine and resveratrol on insulin sensitivity and fat metabolism in adipocytes and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckbauer Antje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirtuins are important regulators of glucose and fat metabolism, and sirtuin activation has been proposed as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. We have shown leucine to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation via Sirt1 dependent pathways. Resveratrol is a widely recognized activator of Sirt; however, the biologically-effective high concentrations used in cell and animal studies are generally impractical or difficult to achieve in humans. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether leucine would exhibit synergy with low levels of resveratrol on sirtuin-dependent outcomes in adipocytes and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Methods 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes were treated with Leucine (0.5 mM, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB (5 μM or Resveratrol (200 nM alone or in combination. In addition, diet-induced obese mice were treated for 6-weeks with low (2 g/kg diet or high (10 g/kg diet dose HMB, Leucine (24 g/kg diet; 200% of normal level or low (12.5 mg/kg diet or high (225 mg/kg diet dose resveratrol, alone or as combination with leucine-resveratrol or HMB-resveratrol. Results Fatty acid oxidation, AMPK, Sirt1 and Sirt3 activity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in muscle cells, were significantly increased by the combinations compared to the individual treatments. Similarly, 6-week feeding of low-dose resveratrol combined with either leucine or its metabolite HMB to DIO mice increased adipose Sirt1 activity, muscle glucose and palmitate uptake (measured via PET/CT, insulin sensitivity (HOMAIR, improved inflammatory stress biomarkers (CRP, IL-6, MCP-1, adiponectin and reduced adiposity comparable to the effects of high dose resveratrol, while low-dose resveratrol exerted no independent effect. Conclusion These data demonstrate that either leucine or its metabolite HMB may be combined with a low concentration of resveratrol to exert synergistic effects on Sirt1-dependent outcomes; this may result in more

  10. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  11. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application.

  12. Dietary leucine--an environmental modifier of insulin resistance acting on multiple levels of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmin Macotela

    Full Text Available Environmental factors, such as the macronutrient composition of the diet, can have a profound impact on risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how a single, simple dietary factor--leucine--can modify insulin resistance by acting on multiple tissues and at multiple levels of metabolism. Mice were placed on a normal or high fat diet (HFD. Dietary leucine was doubled by addition to the drinking water. mRNA, protein and complete metabolomic profiles were assessed in the major insulin sensitive tissues and serum, and correlated with changes in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling. After 8 weeks on HFD, mice developed obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory changes in adipose tissue and insulin resistance at the level of IRS-1 phosphorylation, as well as alterations in metabolomic profile of amino acid metabolites, TCA cycle intermediates, glucose and cholesterol metabolites, and fatty acids in liver, muscle, fat and serum. Doubling dietary leucine reversed many of the metabolite abnormalities and caused a marked improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin signaling without altering food intake or weight gain. Increased dietary leucine was also associated with a decrease in hepatic steatosis and a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue. These changes occurred despite an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase indicating enhanced activation of mTOR, a phenomenon normally associated with insulin resistance. These data indicate that modest changes in a single environmental/nutrient factor can modify multiple metabolic and signaling pathways and modify HFD induced metabolic syndrome by acting at a systemic level on multiple tissues. These data also suggest that increasing dietary leucine may provide an adjunct in the management of obesity-related insulin resistance.

  13. Dietary leucine--an environmental modifier of insulin resistance acting on multiple levels of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macotela, Yazmin; Emanuelli, Brice; Bång, Anneli M; Espinoza, Daniel O; Boucher, Jeremie; Beebe, Kirk; Gall, Walter; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors, such as the macronutrient composition of the diet, can have a profound impact on risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how a single, simple dietary factor--leucine--can modify insulin resistance by acting on multiple tissues and at multiple levels of metabolism. Mice were placed on a normal or high fat diet (HFD). Dietary leucine was doubled by addition to the drinking water. mRNA, protein and complete metabolomic profiles were assessed in the major insulin sensitive tissues and serum, and correlated with changes in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling. After 8 weeks on HFD, mice developed obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory changes in adipose tissue and insulin resistance at the level of IRS-1 phosphorylation, as well as alterations in metabolomic profile of amino acid metabolites, TCA cycle intermediates, glucose and cholesterol metabolites, and fatty acids in liver, muscle, fat and serum. Doubling dietary leucine reversed many of the metabolite abnormalities and caused a marked improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin signaling without altering food intake or weight gain. Increased dietary leucine was also associated with a decrease in hepatic steatosis and a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue. These changes occurred despite an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase indicating enhanced activation of mTOR, a phenomenon normally associated with insulin resistance. These data indicate that modest changes in a single environmental/nutrient factor can modify multiple metabolic and signaling pathways and modify HFD induced metabolic syndrome by acting at a systemic level on multiple tissues. These data also suggest that increasing dietary leucine may provide an adjunct in the management of obesity-related insulin resistance.

  14. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library A A A Did you ever wonder what ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  15. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library Print A A A Did you ever wonder ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  16. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  17. l-Leucine Supplementation Worsens the Adiposity of Already Obese Rats by Promoting a Hypothalamic Pattern of Gene Expression that Favors Fat Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais T. Zampieri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several studies showed that l-leucine supplementation reduces adiposity when provided before the onset of obesity. We studied rats that were exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD for 10 weeks before they started to receive l-leucine supplementation. Fat mass was increased in l-leucine-supplemented rats consuming the HFD. Accordingly, l-leucine produced a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation. In conclusion, l-leucine supplementation worsened the adiposity of rats previously exposed to HFD possibly by central mechanisms.

  18. Basics of Bayesian Learning - Basically Bayes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    Tutorial presented at the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing Workshop 2006, Maynooth, Ireland, September 8, 2006. The tutorial focuses on the basic elements of Bayesian learning and its relation to classical learning paradigms. This includes a critical discussion of the pros and cons...

  19. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  20. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  1. Parkinson's disease: leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 and autophagy, intimate enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology.

  2. Systemic D-Phenylalanine and D-Leucine for Effective Treatment of Pain in the Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, L. S.; Cheng, R. S. S.

    1982-01-01

    This study showed that subcutaneous injection of a solution of D-amino acids produced effective analgesia in horses. It is postulated that systemic D-phenylalanine and D-leucine may become one of the safe, effective and nonaddictive drugs for acute and chronic pain treatment. These D-amino acids cause analgesia by presumably preserving brain endorphins. They may bind reversibly to enkephalinases and prevent enzymatic degradation of enkephalins. PMID:17422107

  3. The SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex regulates leucine uptake through the Agp3 permease in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sun, Xiaoying; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic responses of unicellular organisms are mostly acute, transient, and cell-autonomous. Regulation of nutrient uptake in yeast is one such rapid response. High quality nitrogen sources such as NH(4)(+) inhibit uptake of poor nitrogen sources, such as amino acids. Both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms operate in nutrient uptake regulation; however, many components of this system remain uncharacterized in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we demonstrate that the Spt-Ada-Gcn acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex modulates leucine uptake. Initially, we noticed that a branched-chain amino acid auxotroph exhibits a peculiar adaptive growth phenotype on solid minimal media containing certain nitrogen sources. In fact, the growth of many auxotrophic strains is inhibited by excess NH(4)Cl, possibly through nitrogen-mediated uptake inhibition of the corresponding nutrients. Surprisingly, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional reprogramming during the adaptation of the branched-chain amino acid auxotroph was highly correlated with reprogramming observed in deletions of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase module genes. Deletion of gcn5(+) increased leucine uptake in the prototrophic background and rendered the leucine auxotroph resistant to NH(4)Cl. Deletion of tra1(+) caused the opposite phenotypes. The increase in leucine uptake in the gcn5Δ mutant was dependent on an amino acid permease gene, SPCC965.11c(+). The closest budding yeast homolog of this permease is a relatively nonspecific amino acid permease AGP3, which functions in poor nutrient conditions. Our analysis identified the regulation of nutrient uptake as a physiological function for the SAGA complex, providing a potential link between cellular metabolism and chromatin regulation.

  4. Les besoins en isoleucine, valine et leucine chez le porcelet entre 7 et 15 kg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assadi Soumeh, Elham; van Milgen, Jaap; Sloth, Niels Morten

    2015-01-01

    La réduction des teneurs en protéines des aliments pour porcelets peut se faire uniquement sous contrôle des apports en acides aminés (AA) indispensables tels que les AA ramifies (AAR) valine (Val), isoleucine (Ile) et leucine (Leu) susceptibles d’être déficitaires et d’altérer les performances de...

  5. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  6. Effects of tannic acid on trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase activities in gypsy moth larval midgut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrdaković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of allelochemical stress on genetic variations in the specific activities of gypsy moth digestive enzymes (trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase and relative midgut mass (indirect measure of food consumption, as well as variability in their plasticity, were investigated in fifth instar gypsy moths originating from two populations with different trophic adaptations (oak and locust-tree forests. Thirty-two full-sib families from the Quercus population and twenty-six full-sib families from the Robinia population were reared on an artificial diet with or without supplementation with tannic acid. Between population differences were observed as higher average specific activity of trypsin and relative midgut mass in larvae from the Robinia population. Significant broad-sense heritabilities were observed for the specific activity of trypsin in the control state, and for specific activity of leucine aminopeptidase in a stressful environment. Significantly lower heritability for relative midgut mass was recorded in larvae from the Robinia population reared under stressful conditions. Significant variability of trypsin plasticity in larvae from both populations and significant variability of leucine aminopeptidase plasticity in larvae from the Robinia population point to the potential for the evolution of enzyme adaptive plastic responses to the presence of stressor. Non-significant across-environment genetic correlations do not represent a constraint for the evolution of enzyme plasticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  7. Leucine Modulation of the mTOR Pathway for Cognition Modulation: Kinetic and In Vitro Studies and Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with...studies of leucine kinetics in male Long- Evans rats, together with in vitro studies of the effects of leucine on the mTOR pathway and a mathematical...the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC), International , in accordance with the Guide for the Care and

  8. Leucine-rich diet alters the eukaryotic translation initiation factors expression in skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-cachexia induces a variety of metabolic disorders on protein turnorver, decreasing protein synthesis and increasing protein degradation. Controversly, insulin, other hormones, and branched-chain amino acids, especially leucine, stimulate protein synthesis and modulate the activity of translation initiation factors involved in protein synthesis. Since the tumour effects are more pronounced when associated with pregnancy, ehancing muscle-wasting proteolysis, in this study, the influence of a leucine-rich diet on the protein synthesis caused by cancer were investigated. Methods Pregnant rats with or without Walker 256 tumour were distributed into six groups. During 20 days of experiment, three groups were fed with a control diet: C – pregnant control, W – tumour-bearing, and P – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the W group; three other groups of pregnant rats were fed a leucine-rich diet: L – pregnant leucine, WL – tumour-bearing, and PL – pair-fed, which received the same amount of food as ingested by the WL group. Results The gastrocnemius muscle of WL rats showed increased incorporation of leucine in protein compared to W rats; the leucine-rich diet also prevented the decrease in plasma insulin normally seen in W. The expression of translation initiation factors increased when tumour-bearing rats fed leucine-rich diet, with increase of ~35% for eIF2α and eIF5, ~17% for eIF4E and 20% for eIF4G; the expression of protein kinase S6K1 and protein kinase C was also highly enhanced. Conclusion The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet increased the protein synthesis in skeletal muscle in tumour-bearing rats possibly through the activation of eIF factors and/or the S6kinase pathway.

  9. Impact of leucine supplementation on exercise training induced anti-cardiac remodeling effect in heart failure mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Melara, Thaís Plasti; de Souza, Pamella Ramona Moraes; Guimarães, Fabiana de Salvi; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-05-15

    Leucine supplementation potentiates the effects of aerobic exercise training (AET) on skeletal muscle; however, its potential effects associated with AET on cardiac muscle have not been clarified yet. We tested whether leucine supplementation would potentiate the anti-cardiac remodeling effect of AET in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced heart failure in mice (α2A/α2CARKO). Mice were assigned to five groups: wild type mice treated with placebo and sedentary (WT, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and sedentary (KO, n = 9), α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and sedentary (KOL, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and AET (KOT, n = 12) or α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and AET (KOLT, n = 12). AET consisted of four weeks on a treadmill with 60 min sessions (six days/week, 60% of maximal speed) and administration by gavage of leucine (1.35 g/kg/day) or placebo (distilled water). The AET significantly improved exercise capacity, fractional shortening and re-established cardiomyocytes' diameter and collagen fraction in KOT. Additionally, AET significantly prevented the proteasome hyperactivity, increased misfolded proteins and HSP27 expression. Isolated leucine supplementation displayed no effect on cardiac function and structure (KOL), however, when associated with AET (KOLT), it increased exercise tolerance to a higher degree than isolated AET (KOT) despite no additional effects on AET induced anti-cardiac remodeling. Our results provide evidence for the modest impact of leucine supplementation on cardiac structure and function in exercised heart failure mice. Leucine supplementation potentiated AET effects on exercise tolerance, which might be related to its recognized impact on skeletal muscle.

  10. Basic Research Objectives Reaffirmed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ As a national institution for scientific research and a component of the national innovation system, CAS should and must make key contributions to the great national rejuvenation of the country. Keeping this in mind, CAS has developed four developmental targets for its basic research. This was revealed at a CAS conference on basic research held June 11-12 in Beijing.

  11. Cycles in basic innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de E.A. (Bert); Franses, P.H.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Basic innovations are often believed to be the drivers of economic growth. It has been widely documented that economic growth follows cyclical patterns of varying length. In this paper we examine if such patterns are also present in basic innovations. For an annual time series of count data covering

  12. Basic Science Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  13. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  14. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown.

  15. Interaction between leucine and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition in modulating insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lizhi Fu,1 Fenfen Li,1 Antje Bruckbauer,2 Qiang Cao,1 Xin Cui,1 Rui Wu,1 Hang Shi,1 Bingzhong Xue,1 Michael B Zemel21Department of Biology, Center for Obesity Reversal, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 2NuSirt Biopharma Inc., Nashville, TN, USA Purpose: Leucine activates SIRT1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling and markedly potentiates the effects of other sirtuin and AMPK activators on insulin signaling and lipid metabolism. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition increases nitric oxide–cGMP signaling, which in turn exhibits a positive feedback loop with both SIRT1 and AMPK, thus amplifying peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator α (PGC1α-mediated effects. Methods: We evaluated potential synergy between leucine and PDE5i on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in vitro and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Results: Leucine (0.5 mM exhibited significant synergy with subtherapeutic doses (0.1–10 nM of PDE5-inhibitors (sildenafil and icariin on fat oxidation, nitric oxide production, and mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocytes, adipocytes, and myotubes. Effects on insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism were then assessed in DIO-mice. DIO-mice exhibited fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis, which were not affected by the addition of leucine (24 g/kg diet. However, the combination of leucine and a subtherapeutic dose of icariin (25 mg/kg diet for 6 weeks reduced fasting glucose (38%, P<0.002, insulin (37%, P<0.05, area under the glucose tolerance curve (20%, P<0.01, and fully restored glucose response to exogenous insulin challenge. The combination also inhibited hepatic lipogenesis, stimulated hepatic and muscle fatty acid oxidation, suppressed hepatic inflammation, and reversed high-fat diet-induced steatosis. Conclusion: These robust improvements in insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism indicate therapeutic potential for

  16. Leucine supplementation is anti-atrophic during paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Souza, Helton; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Dáttilo, Murilo; Lee, Kil Sun; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; de Campos Giampa, Sara Quaglia; Phillips, Stuart M; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify sleep deprivation-induced atrophy and the muscle-specific fiber types affected and to determine the effects of leucine supplementation on atrophy and pertinent portions of the pathways of muscle protein synthesis and degradation in rats. A total of 46 Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: control (CTL), leucine supplementation (LEU), sleep deprivation (SD), and leucine supplementation + sleep deprivation (LEU + SD). Leucine supplementation was by gavage (1.35 g/kg/daily), and the animals were subjected to SD for 96 h. Testosterone and corticosterone concentrations, along with proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation and proteasome activity levels, were measured in the gastrocnemius (GA) muscle. Myosin ATPase staining was used to evaluate the different muscle fibers. After sleep deprivation, GA muscle and body masses decreased in the SD group compared to the CTL, LEU, and LEU + SD groups. There was no difference between groups in type I fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). The CSAs for type IIa fibers were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups, while the IIb fiber CSA was lower in the SD group vs. the CSAs in all other groups. The phospho (p)-Akt levels were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups. The p-mTORC1 levels were higher in the LEU, SD, and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL group. The p-p70S6k levels were higher in the LEU and LEU + SD groups; the 4E-BP1 levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups compared to those in the CTL and LEU groups, and the p-4E-BP1 levels were higher in the LEU and SD groups compared to those in the CTL group and even higher in the LEU + SD group compared to those in the LEU and SD groups. Ubiquitinated proteins, LC3, and p62/SQSTM, and proteasome activity levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the LEU and CTL groups. Sleep deprivation led to the atrophy of IIa and IIb muscle fibers; however, leucine

  17. Oral leucine supplementation is sensed by the brain but neither reduces food intake nor induces an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais T Zampieri

    Full Text Available Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity.

  18. Oral Leucine Supplementation Is Sensed by the Brain but neither Reduces Food Intake nor Induces an Anorectic Pattern of Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Thais T.; Pedroso, João A. B.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Tirapegui, Julio; Donato, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK) that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity. PMID:24349566

  19. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  20. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  1. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  2. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  3. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys ...

  4. Health Literacy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. 1 Health literacy is dependent on individual and systemic factors: Communication skills of lay persons and professionals Lay and professional ...

  5. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects...

  6. Basic Concurrency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvengreen, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming.......In this set of notes, we present some of the basic theory underlying the discipline of programming with concurrent processes/threads. The notes are intended to supplement a standard textbook on concurrent programming....

  7. Comparison of high-protein diets and leucine supplementation in the prevention of metabolic syndrome and related disorders in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Anne; Petzke, Klaus J; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-11-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to promote weight loss, to improve glucose homeostasis and to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation. We aimed to study whether leucine supplementation is able to mimic the alleviating effects of high-protein diets on metabolic syndrome parameters in mice fed high-fat diet. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed for 20 weeks with semisynthetic high-fat diets (20% w/w of fat) containing either an adequate (10% protein, AP) or high (50% protein, HP) amount of whey protein, or an AP diet supplemented with L-leucine corresponding to the leucine content of the HP diet (6% leucine, AP+L). Body weight and composition, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, hepatic triacylglycerols (TG), plasma parameters as well as expression levels of mRNA and proteins in different tissues were measured. HP feeding resulted in decreased body weight, body fat and hepatic TG accumulation, as well as increased insulin sensitivity compared to AP. This was linked to an increased total and resting energy expenditure (REE), decreased feed energy efficiency, increased skeletal muscle (SM) protein synthesis, reduced hepatic lipogenesis and increased white fat lipolysis. Leucine supplementation had effects that were intermediate between HP and AP with regard to body composition, liver TG content, insulin sensitivity, REE and feed energy efficiency, and similar effects as HP on SM protein synthesis. However, neither HP nor AP+L showed an activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in SM. Leucine supplementation had no effect on liver lipogenesis and white fat lipolysis compared to AP. It is concluded that the essential amino acid leucine is able to mimic part but not all beneficial metabolic effects of HP diets.

  8. Phase Chemistry and Thermochemstry on Coordination Behavior of Zinc Chloride with Leucine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高胜利; 陈三平; 等

    2003-01-01

    The solubility property of the ZnCl2-Leu-H2O(Leu=L-a-leucine) system at 298.15K in the whole concentration range was investigatey by the semimicro-phase equilibrium method.The corresponding solubility diagram and refractive index diagram were constructed.The results indicated that there was one complex formed in this system.namely,Zn(Leu)Cl2.The complex is congruently soluble in water.Based on Phase equilibrium data,the complex was prepared.Its composition and properties were characterized by chemical analysis,elemental analysis,IR spectra,and TG-DTG.The thermochemical properties of coordination reaction of zinc chloride with L-a-leucine were investigated by a microcalorimeter.The enthalpies of solution of L-a-leucine in water and its zinc complex at infinite dilution and the enthalpy change of solid-liquid reaction wrer determined at 298.15K.The enthalpy change of soild phase reaction and the standard enthalpy of formation of zinc complex were claculated.On the basis of experimental and calculated results,three thermodynamic parameters(the activation enthalpy,the activation entropy and the activation free energy),the rate constant and three kinetic parameters(the activation energy,the preexponential constant and the reaction order) of the reaction,and the standard enthalpy of formation of Zn(Leu)2+(aq) were obtained.The results showed that the title reaction took place easily at studied temperature.

  9. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  10. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations and Parkinson’s disease: three questions

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Greggio; Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) were first identified in 2004 and have since been shown to be the single most common cause of inherited Parkinson's disease. The protein is a large GTP-regulated serine/threonine kinase that additionally contains several protein–protein interaction domains. In the present review, we discuss three important, but unresolved, questions concerning LRRK2. We first ask: what is the normal function of LRRK2? Related to this, we disc...

  11. Role and mechanism of action of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Weirong R; Goodluck, Helen; Zeng, Canjun; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) plays a critical role in regulating cytoskeletal organization, osteoclast activity, and bone resorption with little effect on bone formation parameters. Deficiency of Lrrk1 in mice causes a severe osteopetrosis in the metaphysis of the long bones and vertebrae bones, which makes LRRK1 an attractive alternative drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis and other high-turnover bone diseases. This review summarizes recent advances on the functions of the Lrrk1-related family members, Lrrk1 deficiency-induced skeletal phenotypes, LRRK1 structure–function, potential biological substrates and interacting proteins, and the mechanisms of LRRK1 action in osteoclasts. PMID:28326224

  12. Growth and characterization of NLO crystal: L-leucine phthalic acid potassium iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesh M.R.; Kumar H .M. Suresh; Kumari R. Ananda

    2015-01-01

    A new semi-organic non linear optical crystal, L-leucine phthalic acid potassium iodide (LLPPI) has been grown from an aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to different characterizations, such as single crystal XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis, TGA, SEM, EDAX, micro hardness, dielectric and powder SHG. Single crystal structure was determined from X-ray diffraction data and it revealed that the crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P1. The vibrati...

  13. Additive insulinogenic action of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin extract and leucine after exercise in healthy males

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral intake of a specific extract of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin (OpunDia™) (OFI) has been shown to increase serum insulin concentration while reducing blood glucose level for a given amount of glucose ingestion after an endurance exercise bout in healthy young volunteers. However, it is unknown whether OFI-induced insulin stimulation after exercise is of the same magnitude than the stimulation by other insulinogenic agents like leucine as well as whether OFI can interact with those agents. Therefore, the aims of the present study were: 1) to compare the degree of insulin stimulation by OFI with the effect of leucine administration; 2) to determine whether OFI and leucine have an additive action on insulin stimulation post-exercise. Methods Eleven subjects participated in a randomized double-blind cross-over study involving four experimental sessions. In each session the subjects successively underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a 30-min cycling bout at ~70% VO2max. At t0 and t60 during the OGTT, subjects ingested 75 g glucose and capsules containing either 1) a placebo; 2) 1000 mg OFI; 3) 3 g leucine; 4) 1000 mg OFI + 3 g leucine. Blood samples were collected before and at 30-min intervals during the OGTT for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. Results Whereas no effect of leucine was measured, OFI reduced blood glucose at t90 by ~7% and the area under the glucose curve by ~15% and increased serum insulin concentration at t90 by ~35% compared to placebo (P<0.05). From t60 to the end of the OGTT, serum insulin concentration was higher in OFI+leucine than in placebo which resulted in a higher area under the insulin curve (+40%, P<0.05). Conclusion Carbohydrate-induced insulin stimulation post-exercise can be further increased by the combination of OFI with leucine. OFI and leucine could be interesting ingredients to include together in recovery drinks to resynthesize muscle glycogen faster post

  14. Host-Pathogen Interactions : XXIV. Fragments Isolated from Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cell Walls Inhibit the Ability of the Cells to Incorporate [C]Leucine into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, N; Fry, S C; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1983-07-01

    A bioassay to measure the incorporation of [(14)C]leucine into acid-precipitable polymers of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells is described. Using this assay, cell wall fragments solubilized from sycamore cell walls by partial acid hydrolysis are shown to contain components that inhibit the incorporation of [(14)C]leucine into the acid-precipitable polymers. This inhibition was not attributable to a suppression of [(14)C]leucine uptake. The effectiveness of the wall fragments in inhibiting [(14)C]leucine incorporation was substantially relieved by plasmolysis of the cells. Fragments released from starch and citrus pectin are shown not to possess such inhibitory activities.

  15. Leucine and its transporter provide protection against cigarette smoke-induced cell death: A potential therapy for emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannhi Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is a major risk factor for emphysematous changes in the lungs and the underlying mechanism involves CS-induced cell death. In the present study we investigated the ability of nutrients to rescue CS-induced cell death. We observed that pre-treatment with excess leucine can partially rescue CS extract-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Excess dietary leucine was also effective in alleviating effects of CS in guinea pig lungs. Further investigation to understand the underlying mechanism showed that CS exposure causes downregulation of leucine transporter that results in inactivation of mTOR, which is a positive regulator of protein synthesis and cell proliferation. Notably, leucine supplemented diet ameliorated even existing CS-induced emphysematous changes in guinea pig lung, a condition hitherto thought to be irreversible. Thus the current study documents a new mechanism by which CS affects cellular physiology wherein leucine transporter is a key target.

  16. Essential amino acid leucine and proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuate cigarette smoke induced catabolism in C2 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, A Z

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) and cigarette smoking have been shown to promote catabolism of skeletal muscle. Previous studies and recent findings from our laboratory have demonstrated the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome system and the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in CS induced skeletal muscle catabolism. The essential amino acid leucine is a known anticatabolic agent that improves skeletal muscle metabolism in various atrophic conditions. To examine the protective effect of leucine and proteasome inhibition in CS induced muscle catabolism, C2 myotubes, from an in vitro skeletal muscle cell line, were exposed to CS in the presence or absence of leucine and a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. Diameter of myotubes, levels of the main contractile proteins - myosin heavy chain and actin, expression of MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1 were studied by microscopy, Western blotting, and qPCR. Leucine pretreatment prevented the CS-induced reduction in diameter of myotubes and degradation of myosin heavy chain by suppressing the upregulation of MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1. MG132 also attenuated the CS-induced decrease in diameter of myotubes and degradation of myosin heavy chain. Our findings demonstrate that supplementation with the essential amino acid leucine and inhibition of the proteasome may protect skeletal muscle from CS induced catabolism.

  17. Toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities in wetland water and sediment measured using leucine incorporation and potential denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovski, Susann; Bååth, Erland; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Berglund, Olof

    2010-02-01

    We assessed potential toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities from a constructed wetland, located in southern Sweden, and compared the sensitivity of two endpoints indicating bacterial activity, leucine incorporation, and potential denitrification, in detecting toxicity. The effects of eight fungicides (benomyl, carbendazim, carboxin, captan, cycloheximide, fenpropimorph, propiconazole, and thiram), two bactericides (bronopol and chlortetracycline) as controls, and one reference compound (3,5-dichlorophenol), were tested in a water-sediment microcosm set-up. Leucine incorporation was measured in both the water and sediment column, while potential denitrification was measured for the entire microcosm. The bactericides and the reference compound gave sigmoid concentration-response curves for both endpoints in all but one case. The fungicides thiram, captan, and benomyl, and to a lesser extent fenpropimorph and propiconazole had quantifiable toxic effects on leucine incorporation, with EC(50) values ranging from 3 to 70 mg l(-1), while carbendazim, carboxin, and cycloheximide had little effect at the investigated concentrations. Only thiram and captan inhibited potential denitrification; the other fungicides showed no quantifiable effect. A greater toxic effect on leucine incorporation was recorded for bacterial communities associated with the water column, compared to the sediment column, for all tested compounds. Leucine incorporation was the more sensitive method for toxicity assessment of bacterial communities, and also allowed for a rapid and simple way of comparing exposure in the sediment and water column, making it an attractive standard method for community based toxicological assays in aquatic environments.

  18. Basic Electromagnetism and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2007-01-01

    Basic Electromagnetism and Materials is the product of many years of teaching basic and applied electromagnetism. This textbook can be used to teach electromagnetism to a wide range of undergraduate science majors in physics, electrical engineering or materials science. However, by making lesser demands on mathematical knowledge than competing texts, and by emphasizing electromagnetic properties of materials and their applications, this textbook is uniquely suited to students of materials science. Many competing texts focus on the study of propagation waves either in the microwave or optical domain, whereas Basic Electromagnetism and Materials covers the entire electromagnetic domain and the physical response of materials to these waves. Professor André Moliton is Director of the Unité de Microélectronique, Optoélectronique et Polymères (Université de Limoges, France), which brings together three groups studying the optoelectronics of molecular and polymer layers, micro-optoelectronic systems for teleco...

  19. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Chaudhuri; S Mallik; S Das Gupta

    2014-05-01

    We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment multiplicity, isotopic distribution and isoscaling. Extension of canonical thermodynamical model to a projectile fragmentation model is outlined. Application of the projectile fragmentation model for calculating average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of the largest cluster at different bound, differential charge distribution and cross-section of neutron-rich nuclei of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies are described. Application of nuclear multifragmentation reaction in basic research as well as in other domains is outlined.

  20. Decontamination: back to basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Susan J; Sjorgen, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    My invitation from this Journal's Editor, Felicia Cox, to provide a paper for this themed issue, included the sentence 'I was wondering if you or a colleague would like to contribute a back to basics article on the relevant standards and guidelines for decontamination, including what is compliance?'. The reason it is so interesting to me is that the term 'back to basics' implies reverting to a simpler time in life - when by just sticking to the rules, life became easier. However, with decontamination this is not actually true.

  1. Comprehensive basic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Veena, GR

    2005-01-01

    Salient Features As per II PUC Basic Mathematics syllabus of Karnataka. Provides an introduction to various basic mathematical techniques and the situations where these could be usefully employed. The language is simple and the material is self-explanatory with a large number of illustrations. Assists the reader in gaining proficiency to solve diverse variety of problems. A special capsule containing a gist and list of formulae titled ''REMEMBER! Additional chapterwise arranged question bank and 3 model papers in a separate section---''EXAMINATION CORNER''.

  2. Basic set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Azriel

    2002-01-01

    An advanced-level treatment of the basics of set theory, this text offers students a firm foundation, stopping just short of the areas employing model-theoretic methods. Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, it consists of two parts: the first covers pure set theory, including the basic motions, order and well-foundedness, cardinal numbers, the ordinals, and the axiom of choice and some of it consequences; the second deals with applications and advanced topics such as point set topology, real spaces, Boolean algebras, and infinite combinatorics and large cardinals. An

  3. Basic research championed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebele, Elaine

    In April, the Office of National Science and Technology Policy released its biennial report to Congress. Science and Technology: Shaping the Twenty-First Century addresses the President's policy for maintaining U.S. leadership in science and technology, significant developments, and important national issues in science, and opportunities to use science and technology in federal programs and national goals. The administration strongly supports basic research as a sound investment and an inspiration to society. As corporate laboratories increasingly favor applied R&D projects, the federal government is becoming the dominant sponsor of long-term, basic research.

  4. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  5. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects: busin......: business entities, the transformation process, types of businesses, stakeholders, legislation, the annual report, the VAT system, double-entry bookkeeping, inventories, and year-end cast flow analysis.......This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects...

  6. Stable polyglutamine dimers can contain β-hairpins with interdigitated side chains-but not α-helices, β-nanotubes, β-pseudohelices, or steric zippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Knecht, Volker; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-04-15

    A common thread connecting nine fatal neurodegenerative protein aggregation diseases is an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract found in the respective proteins. Although the structure of this tract in the large mature aggregates is increasingly well described, its structure in the small early aggregates remains largely unknown. As experimental evidence suggests that the most toxic species along the aggregation pathway are the small early ones, developing strategies to alleviate disease pathology calls for understanding the structure of polyglutamine peptides in the early stages of aggregation. Here, we present a criterion, grounded in available experimental data, that allows for using kinetic stability of dimers to assess whether a given polyglutamine conformer can be on the aggregation path. We then demonstrate that this criterion can be assessed using present-day molecular dynamics simulations. We find that although the α-helical conformer of polyglutamine is very stable, dimers of α-helices lack the kinetic stability necessary to support further oligomerization. Dimers of steric zipper, β-nanotube, and β-pseudohelix conformers are also too short-lived to initiate aggregation. The β-hairpin-containing conformers, instead, invariably form very stable dimers when their side chains are interdigitated. Combining these findings with the implications of recent solid-state NMR data on mature fibrils, we propose a possible pathway for the initial stages of polyglutamine aggregation, in which β-hairpin-containing conformers act as templates for fibril formation.

  7. Stable Polyglutamine Dimers Can Contain β-Hairpins with Interdigitated Side Chains—But Not α-Helices, β-Nanotubes, β-Pseudohelices, or Steric Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Markus S.; Monticelli, Luca; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Knecht, Volker; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-01-01

    A common thread connecting nine fatal neurodegenerative protein aggregation diseases is an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract found in the respective proteins. Although the structure of this tract in the large mature aggregates is increasingly well described, its structure in the small early aggregates remains largely unknown. As experimental evidence suggests that the most toxic species along the aggregation pathway are the small early ones, developing strategies to alleviate disease pathology calls for understanding the structure of polyglutamine peptides in the early stages of aggregation. Here, we present a criterion, grounded in available experimental data, that allows for using kinetic stability of dimers to assess whether a given polyglutamine conformer can be on the aggregation path. We then demonstrate that this criterion can be assessed using present-day molecular dynamics simulations. We find that although the α-helical conformer of polyglutamine is very stable, dimers of α-helices lack the kinetic stability necessary to support further oligomerization. Dimers of steric zipper, β-nanotube, and β-pseudohelix conformers are also too short-lived to initiate aggregation. The β-hairpin-containing conformers, instead, invariably form very stable dimers when their side chains are interdigitated. Combining these findings with the implications of recent solid-state NMR data on mature fibrils, we propose a possible pathway for the initial stages of polyglutamine aggregation, in which β-hairpin-containing conformers act as templates for fibril formation. PMID:24739171

  8. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipu Wang; Pierre R Fobert

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae . Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), f...

  9. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Korean Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    These 11 volumes of the Korean Basic Course comprise 112 lesson units designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension and speaking and Level 2 proficiency in reading and writing Korean. (Level 5 on this scale is native-speaker level.) Intended for classroom use in the Defense Language Institute intensive…

  11. Basic physics for all

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B N

    2012-01-01

    This is a simple, concise book for both student and non-physics students, presenting basic facts in straightforward form and conveying fundamental principles and theories of physics. This book will be helpful as a supplement to class teaching and to aid those who have difficulty in mastering concepts and principles.

  12. Vaccine Basics (Smallpox)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Smallpox About Smallpox History of Smallpox Spread and Eradication of Smallpox Transmission Signs and Symptoms Prevention and Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Basics Vaccine Safety Side Effects of Vaccination Who Should Get a Smallpox Vaccination? Bioterrorism The ...

  13. FULA BASIC COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWIFT, LLOYD B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BEGINNING COURSE IS AN INTRODUCTION TO FULA (KNOWN VARIOUSLY AS FULANI, FUL, PEUL, OR PHEUL), A NIGER-CONGO LANGUAGE SPOKEN THROUGHOUT THE GRASSLAND AREAS OF WEST AFRICA FROM THE ATLANTIC TO CAMEROUN. THE TEXT IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SHORT BASIC COURSES IN SELECTED AFRICAN LANGUAGES BEING PREPARED BY THE FOREIGN SERVICE INSTITUTE. IT IS…

  14. Basic Library List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, William L., Jr.

    Reported is an initial attempt to define a minimal college mathematics library. Included is a list of some 300 books, from which approximately 170 are to be chosen to form a basic library in undergraduate mathematics. The areas provided for in this list include Algebra, Analysis, Applied Mathematics, Geometry, Topology, Logic, Foundations and Set…

  15. Lippincott Basic Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 459 students in grades 1-3 at 15 elementary schools. The program employs a diagnostic-prescriptive approach to instruction in a nongraded setting through the use of the Lippincott Basic Reading program. When a child enters the program, he is introduced to a decoding…

  16. Basic Drafting: Book Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ronald; And Others

    The second of a two-book course in drafting, this manual consists of 12 topics in the following units: sketching techniques, geometric constructions, orthographic views, dimensioning procedures, basic tolerancing, auxiliary views, sectional views, inking tools and techniques, axonometrics, oblique, perspective, and computer-aided drafting.…

  17. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members at a lower cost. The four basic types of managed care plans are: HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). When you join an HMO, you choose a ... may have to pay more. EPO (Exclusive Provider Organization). An EPO is like a PPO, only ... Health Plan (CDHP) This type of plan is fairly new. It lets you ...

  18. Basic bioreactor design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, van 't K.; Tramper, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a graduate course in biochemical engineering, provides the basic knowledge needed for the efficient design of bioreactors and the relevant principles and data for practical process engineering, with an emphasis on enzyme reactors and aerated reactors for microorganisms. Includes exercises.

  19. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  20. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  1. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  2. Basic Tuberculosis Facts

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses basic TB prevention, testing, and treatment information.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  3. ValidNESs: a database of validated leucine-rich nuclear export signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Szu-Chin; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Horton, Paul; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2013-01-01

    ValidNESs (http://validness.ym.edu.tw/) is a new database for experimentally validated leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-containing proteins. The therapeutic potential of the chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-mediated nuclear export pathway and disease relevance of its cargo proteins has gained recognition in recent years. Unfortunately, only about one-third of known CRM1 cargo proteins are accessible in a single database since the last compilation in 2003. CRM1 cargo proteins are often recognized by a classical NES (leucine-rich NES), but this signal is notoriously difficult to predict from sequence alone. Fortunately, a recently developed prediction method, NESsential, is able to identify good candidates in some cases, enabling valuable hints to be gained by in silico prediction, but until now it has not been available through a web interface. We present ValidNESs, an integrated, up-to-date database holding 221 NES-containing proteins, combined with a web interface to prediction by NESsential.

  4. Positive selection in the leucine-rich repeat domain of Gro1 genes in Solanum species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valentino Ruggieri; Angelina Nunziata; Amalia Barone

    2014-12-01

    In pathogen resistant plants, solvent-exposed residues in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are thought to mediate resistance by recognizing plant pathogen elicitors. In potato, the gene Gro1-4 confers resistance to Globodera rostochiensis. The investigation of variablity in different copies of this gene represents a good model for the verification of positive selection mechanisms. Two datasets of Gro1 LRR sequences were constructed, one derived from the Gro1-4 gene, belonging to different cultivated and wild Solanum species, and the other belonging to paralogues of a resistant genotype. Analysis of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates $(K_{a}/K_{s})$ highlighted 14 and six amino acids with $K_{a}/K_{s} \\gt 1$ in orthologue and paralogue datasets, respectively. Selection analysis revealed that the leucine-rich regions accumulate variability in a very specific way, and we found that some combinations of amino acids in these sites might be involved in pathogen recognition. The results confirm previous studies on positive selection in the LRR domain of R protein in Arabidopsis and other model plants and extend these to wild Solanum species. Moreover, positively selected sites in the Gro1 LRR domain show that coevolution mainly occurred in two regions on the internal surface of the three-dimensional horseshoe structure of the domain, albeit with different evolutionary forces between paralogues and orthologues.

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Leucine and Alanine by Ag(III Complex in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changying Song

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of leucine and alanine by Ag(III complex were studied spectrophotometrically in alkaline medium at constant ion strength. The reaction was in first order with respect to Ag(III complex and amino acids (leucine, alanine. The second-order rate constant, k−, decreased with the increasing in [OH−] and [IO4−]. A plausible mechanism was proposed from the kinetics study, and the rate equations derived from mechanism can explain all experimental phenomena. The activation parameters were calculated at 298.2 K.

  6. Basic electronic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, P M

    1980-01-01

    In the past, the teaching of electricity and electronics has more often than not been carried out from a theoretical and often highly academic standpoint. Fundamentals and basic concepts have often been presented with no indication of their practical appli­ cations, and all too frequently they have been illustrated by artificially contrived laboratory experiments bearing little relationship to the outside world. The course comes in the form of fourteen fairly open-ended constructional experiments or projects. Each experiment has associated with it a construction exercise and an explanation. The basic idea behind this dual presentation is that the student can embark on each circuit following only the briefest possible instructions and that an open-ended approach is thereby not prejudiced by an initial lengthy encounter with the theory behind the project; this being a sure way to dampen enthusiasm at the outset. As the investigation progresses, questions inevitably arise. Descriptions of the phenomena encounte...

  7. Basics of statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller-Kirsten, Harald J W

    2013-01-01

    Statistics links microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, and requires for this reason a large number of microscopic elements like atoms. The results are values of maximum probability or of averaging. This introduction to statistical physics concentrates on the basic principles, and attempts to explain these in simple terms supplemented by numerous examples. These basic principles include the difference between classical and quantum statistics, a priori probabilities as related to degeneracies, the vital aspect of indistinguishability as compared with distinguishability in classical physics, the differences between conserved and non-conserved elements, the different ways of counting arrangements in the three statistics (Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein), the difference between maximization of the number of arrangements of elements, and averaging in the Darwin-Fowler method. Significant applications to solids, radiation and electrons in metals are treated in separate chapters, as well as Bose-Eins...

  8. Basic linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S

    2002-01-01

    Basic Linear Algebra is a text for first year students leading from concrete examples to abstract theorems, via tutorial-type exercises. More exercises (of the kind a student may expect in examination papers) are grouped at the end of each section. The book covers the most important basics of any first course on linear algebra, explaining the algebra of matrices with applications to analytic geometry, systems of linear equations, difference equations and complex numbers. Linear equations are treated via Hermite normal forms which provides a successful and concrete explanation of the notion of linear independence. Another important highlight is the connection between linear mappings and matrices leading to the change of basis theorem which opens the door to the notion of similarity. This new and revised edition features additional exercises and coverage of Cramer's rule (omitted from the first edition). However, it is the new, extra chapter on computer assistance that will be of particular interest to readers:...

  9. Basic Semiconductor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of the basic semiconductor physics. The reader is assumed to have a basic command of mathematics and some elementary knowledge of solid state physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. The reader can understand three different methods of energy band calculations, empirical pseudo-potential, k.p perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for full band Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Experiments and theoretical analysis of cyclotron resonance are discussed in detail because the results are essential to the understanding of semiconductor physics. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET), and quantum transport are reviewed, explaining optical transition, electron phonon interactions, electron mob...

  10. Basics of RF electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, A

    2011-01-01

    RF electronics deals with the generation, acquisition and manipulation of high-frequency signals. In particle accelerators signals of this kind are abundant, especially in the RF and beam diagnostics systems. In modern machines the complexity of the electronics assemblies dedicated to RF manipulation, beam diagnostics, and feedbacks is continuously increasing, following the demands for improvement of accelerator performance. However, these systems, and in particular their front-ends and back-ends, still rely on well-established basic hardware components and techniques, while down-converted and acquired signals are digitally processed exploiting the rapidly growing computational capability offered by the available technology. This lecture reviews the operational principles of the basic building blocks used for the treatment of high-frequency signals. Devices such as mixers, phase and amplitude detectors, modulators, filters, switches, directional couplers, oscillators, amplifiers, attenuators, and others are d...

  11. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  12. Emulsion Science Basic Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    Emulsions are generally made out of two immiscible fluids like oil and water, one being dispersed in the second in the presence of surface-active compounds.They are used as intermediate or end products in a huge range of areas including the food, chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, paint, and coating industries. Besides the broad domain of technological interest, emulsions are raising a variety of fundamental questions at the frontier between physics and chemistry. This book aims to give an overview of the most recent advances in emulsion science. The basic principles, covering aspects of emulsions from their preparation to their destruction, are presented in close relation to both the fundamental physics and the applications of these materials. The book is intended to help scientists and engineers in formulating new materials by giving them the basics of emulsion science.

  13. Menstrual Cycle: Basic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The basic biology of the menstrual cycle is a complex, coordinated sequence of events involving the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, and endometrium. The menstrual cycle with all its complexities can be easily perturbed by environmental factors such as stress, extreme exercise, eating disorders, and obesity. Furthermore, genetic influences such as fragile X premutations (Chapter X), X chromosome abnormalities (Chapter X), and galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) point mutati...

  14. Risk communication basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, P.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information.

  15. Visual Basic educational programme

    OpenAIRE

    Pranaitis, Arūnas

    2005-01-01

    Visual basic educational programme Informational Technologies has become such a popular subject that they are applied in all works of life. However, Informational Technologies are still rarely used in the lessons at school. There are such reasons of the mentioned issue: · Insufficient base of computers, · The old software and its disadvantages, · The lack of computerized educational programmes. The aim of the work was to prove that it is actual to create computerized educat...

  16. Basics of Computer Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Robertazzi, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Springer Brief Basics of Computer Networking provides a non-mathematical introduction to the world of networks. This book covers both technology for wired and wireless networks. Coverage includes transmission media, local area networks, wide area networks, and network security. Written in a very accessible style for the interested layman by the author of a widely used textbook with many years of experience explaining concepts to the beginner.

  17. Thermodynamics - basic conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Eul Bok

    1979-08-15

    This book tells of basic conception of thermodynamics, condition and property of matter, work and power, thermal efficiency, the principle of the conservation of energy, relationship between work and heat, enthalpy, Jouel's law, complete gasification, the second low of thermodynamics such as thermal efficiency and quality factor, carnot cycle, and entropy, condensation of gas like press of internal combustion engine, vapor, steam power plant and structure, internal combustion cycle, freeze cycle, flow of fluid, combustion and heat transfer.

  18. Decision support basics

    CERN Document Server

    Power, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    This book is targeted to busy managers and MBA students who need to grasp the basics of computerized decision support. Some of the topics covered include: What is a DSS? What do managers need to know about computerized decision support? And how can managers identify opportunities to create innovative DSS? Overall the book addresses 35 fundamental questions that are relevant to understanding computerized decision support.

  19. A route to anionic hydrophilic films of copolymers of l-leucine, l-aspartic acid and l-aspartic acid esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sederel, W.L.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.

    1975-01-01

    A series of copolymers of l-leucine and β-benzyl-l-aspartate [Leu/Asp(OBz)] covering the range 30–70 mol % of l-leucine, was synthesized by the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) method. The copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and viscometry. For all compositions high m

  20. The basic anaesthesia machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudatt, Cl

    2013-09-01

    After WTG Morton's first public demonstration in 1846 of use of ether as an anaesthetic agent, for many years anaesthesiologists did not require a machine to deliver anaesthesia to the patients. After the introduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide in the form of compressed gases in cylinders, there was a necessity for mounting these cylinders on a metal frame. This stimulated many people to attempt to construct the anaesthesia machine. HEG Boyle in the year 1917 modified the Gwathmey's machine and this became popular as Boyle anaesthesia machine. Though a lot of changes have been made for the original Boyle machine still the basic structure remains the same. All the subsequent changes which have been brought are mainly to improve the safety of the patients. Knowing the details of the basic machine will make the trainee to understand the additional improvements. It is also important for every practicing anaesthesiologist to have a thorough knowledge of the basic anaesthesia machine for safe conduct of anaesthesia.

  1. Chronic leucine supplementation improves lipid metabolism in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leucine supplementation has been reported to improve lipid metabolism. However, lipid metabolism in adipose tissues and liver has not been extensively studied for leucine supplementation in mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD. Design: C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow diet, HFCD, HFCD supplemented with 1.5% leucine (HFCD+1.5% Leu group or 3% leucine (HFCD+3% Leu group for 24 weeks. The body weight, peritoneal adipose weight, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride in serum and liver, and serum adipokines were analyzed. In addition, expression levels of proteins associated with hepatic lipogenesis, adipocyte lipolysis, and white adipose tissue (WAT browning were determined. Results: Mice in the HFCD group developed obesity and deteriorated lipid metabolism. Compared with HFCD, leucine supplementation lowered weight gain and TC levels in circulation and the liver without changing energy intake. The decrease in body fat was supported by histological examination in the WAT and liver. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were significantly decreased by supplemented leucine. At the protein level, leucine potently decreased the hepatic lipogenic enzymes (fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and corresponding upstream proteins. In epididymal WAT, the reduced expression levels of two major lipases by HFCD, namely phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, were reversed when leucine was supplemented. Uncoupling protein 1, β3 adrenergic receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1α, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were involved in the thermogenic program and WAT browning. Leucine additionally upregulated their protein expression in both WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that chronic leucine supplementation reduced the body weight and improved the

  2. Chronic leucine supplementation improves lipid metabolism in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jun; Han, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Tong, Xing; Yin, Xue-Bin; Yuan, Lin-Xi; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation has been reported to improve lipid metabolism. However, lipid metabolism in adipose tissues and liver has not been extensively studied for leucine supplementation in mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Design C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow diet, HFCD, HFCD supplemented with 1.5% leucine (HFCD+1.5% Leu group) or 3% leucine (HFCD+3% Leu group) for 24 weeks. The body weight, peritoneal adipose weight, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride in serum and liver, and serum adipokines were analyzed. In addition, expression levels of proteins associated with hepatic lipogenesis, adipocyte lipolysis, and white adipose tissue (WAT) browning were determined. Results Mice in the HFCD group developed obesity and deteriorated lipid metabolism. Compared with HFCD, leucine supplementation lowered weight gain and TC levels in circulation and the liver without changing energy intake. The decrease in body fat was supported by histological examination in the WAT and liver. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were significantly decreased by supplemented leucine. At the protein level, leucine potently decreased the hepatic lipogenic enzymes (fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase) and corresponding upstream proteins. In epididymal WAT, the reduced expression levels of two major lipases by HFCD, namely phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, were reversed when leucine was supplemented. Uncoupling protein 1, β3 adrenergic receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1α, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were involved in the thermogenic program and WAT browning. Leucine additionally upregulated their protein expression in both WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue. Conclusion This study demonstrated that chronic leucine supplementation reduced the body weight and improved the lipid profile of

  3. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  4. Assembly of neuronal connectivity by neurotrophic factors and leucine-rich repeat proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ledda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders.

  5. Studies on an L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal for frequency conversion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, P.; Vimalan, M.; Anandan, P.; Bakiyaraj, G.; Kirubavathi, K.; Praveen, S. G.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-03-01

    An L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal has been synthesized and grown by a slow evaporation technique. The lattice parameters of the grown crystal have been confirmed using single-crystal x-ray diffractometry. Various functional groups present in the crystal were identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral) assessment. The optical transmission percentage of the crystal was ascertained by UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) studies. The thermal stability of the crystal was determined by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis curves. The mechanical behavior of the crystal was studied using the Vicker’s microhardness analysis. The dielectric properties of the crystal have been investigated for varying temperatures. The second-harmonic generation efficiency was measured by the Kurtz and Perry powder technique and the efficiency is comparable to that of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.

  6. Leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins instruct discrete dendrite targeting in an olfactory map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weizhe; Zhu, Haitao; Potter, Christopher J; Barsh, Gabrielle; Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Zinn, Kai; Luo, Liqun

    2009-12-01

    Olfactory systems utilize discrete neural pathways to process and integrate odorant information. In Drosophila, axons of first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and dendrites of second-order projection neurons (PNs) form class-specific synaptic connections at approximately 50 glomeruli. The mechanisms underlying PN dendrite targeting to distinct glomeruli in a three-dimensional discrete neural map are unclear. We found that the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane protein Capricious (Caps) was differentially expressed in different classes of PNs. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies indicated that Caps instructs the segregation of Caps-positive and Caps-negative PN dendrites to discrete glomerular targets. Moreover, Caps-mediated PN dendrite targeting was independent of presynaptic ORNs and did not involve homophilic interactions. The closely related protein Tartan was partially redundant with Caps. These LRR proteins are probably part of a combinatorial cell-surface code that instructs discrete olfactory map formation.

  7. The biology of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in bone pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic, Dragana; Aggelidakis, John; Young, Marian F; Iozzo, Renato V; Karamanos, Nikos K; Tzanakakis, George N

    2012-10-05

    The class of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) is a family of homologous proteoglycans harboring relatively small (36-42 kDa) protein cores compared with the larger cartilage and mesenchymal proteoglycans. SLRPs have been localized to most skeletal regions, with specific roles designated during all phases of bone formation, including periods relating to cell proliferation, organic matrix deposition, remodeling, and mineral deposition. This is mediated by key signaling pathways regulating the osteogenic program, including the activities of TGF-β, bone morphogenetic protein, Wnt, and NF-κB, which influence both the number of available osteogenic precursors and their subsequent development, differentiation, and function. On the other hand, SLRP depletion is correlated with degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and ectopic bone formation. This minireview will focus on the SLRP roles in bone physiology and pathology.

  8. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  9. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors as markers of adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers are used to characterize and track adult stem cells. Colon cancer research has led to the identification of 2 related receptors, leucine-rich repeat-containing, G-protein-coupled receptors (Lgr)5 and Lgr6, that are expressed by small populations of cells in a variety of adult organ

  10. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  11. Structure-property relations in crystalline L-leucine obtained from calorimetry, X-rays, neutron and Raman scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Facanha Filho, Pedro F.; Jiao, Xueshe; Freire, Paulo T. C.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the amino acid L-leucine (LEU) using inelastic neutron scattering, X-rays and neutron diffraction, calorimetry and Raman scattering as a function of temperature, focusing on the relationship between the local dynamics of the NH(3), CH(3), CH(2) and CO(2) moieties and the molecular...

  12. Leucine-rich repeat, immunoglobulin-like and transmembrane domain 3 (LRIT3) is a modulator of FGFR1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, S.D.; Liu, J.L.; Roscioli, T.; Buckley, M.F.; Yagnik, G.; Boyadjiev, S.A.; Kim, J.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in craniofacial and skeletal development via multiple signaling pathways including MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and PLC-?. FGFR-mediated signaling is modulated by several regulators. Proteins with leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and/or immunoglobulin (IG)

  13. Rapamycin blocks leucine-induced protein synthesis by suppressing mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine (Leu). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Leu stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight fasted 7-day-old piglets were...

  14. Effect of minimal enteral feeding on splanchnic uptake of leucine in the postabsorptive state in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pipaon, MS; Vanbeek, RHT; Quero, J; Perez, J; Wattimena, DJL; Sauer, PJJ

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a controlled, randomized trial to study the effect of minimal enteral feeding on leucine uptake by splanchnic tissues, as an indicator of maturation of these tissues, in preterm infants in the first week of life. Within a few hours after birth, while receiving only glucose, a primed con

  15. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  16. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  17. Electrical installation calculations basic

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for basic electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practice. A step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3Fo

  18. Back to basics audio

    CERN Document Server

    Nathan, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Back to Basics Audio is a thorough, yet approachable handbook on audio electronics theory and equipment. The first part of the book discusses electrical and audio principles. Those principles form a basis for understanding the operation of equipment and systems, covered in the second section. Finally, the author addresses planning and installation of a home audio system.Julian Nathan joined the audio service and manufacturing industry in 1954 and moved into motion picture engineering and production in 1960. He installed and operated recording theaters in Sydney, Austra

  19. Basic genetics for dermatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Sendhil Kumaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, advances in the field of molecular genetics have enriched us in understanding the pathogenesis of diseases, their identification, and appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the last 20 years, genetic basis of more than 350 monogenic skin diseases have been elucidated and is counting. The widespread use of molecular genetics as a tool in diagnosis is not practiced routinely due to genetic heterogenicity, limited access and low sensitivity. In this review, we have presented the very basics of genetics so as to enable dermatologists to have working understanding of medical genetics.

  20. Machine shop basics

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rex

    2004-01-01

    Use the right tool the right wayHere, fully updated to include new machines and electronic/digital controls, is the ultimate guide to basic machine shop equipment and how to use it. Whether you're a professional machinist, an apprentice, a trade student, or a handy homeowner, this fully illustrated volume helps you define tools and use them properly and safely. It's packed with review questions for students, and loaded with answers you need on the job.Mark Richard Miller is a Professor and Chairman of the Industrial Technology Department at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, T

  1. C# Database Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Working with data and databases in C# certainly can be daunting if you're coming from VB6, VBA, or Access. With this hands-on guide, you'll shorten the learning curve considerably as you master accessing, adding, updating, and deleting data with C#-basic skills you need if you intend to program with this language. No previous knowledge of C# is necessary. By following the examples in this book, you'll learn how to tackle several database tasks in C#, such as working with SQL Server, building data entry forms, and using data in a web service. The book's code samples will help you get started

  2. Menstrual Cycle: Basic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    The basic biology of the menstrual cycle is a complex, coordinated sequence of events involving the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, and endometrium. The menstrual cycle with all its complexities can be easily perturbed by environmental factors such as stress, extreme exercise, eating disorders, and obesity. Furthermore, genetic influences such as fragile X premutations (Chapter X), X chromosome abnormalities (Chapter X), and galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) point mutations (galactosemia) also contribute to perturbations of the menstrual cycle. Although not perfect, mouse model have helped to identify and confirm additional components and pathways in menstrual cycle function and dysfunction in humans. PMID:18574203

  3. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  4. Metabolic labeling of leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 with radioactive phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Gao, Fangye; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-09-18

    Leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 (LRRK1 and LRRK2) are paralogs which share a similar domain organization, including a serine-threonine kinase domain, a Ras of complex proteins domain (ROC), a C-terminal of ROC domain (COR), and leucine-rich and ankyrin-like repeats at the N-terminus. The precise cellular roles of LRRK1 and LRRK2 have yet to be elucidated, however LRRK1 has been implicated in tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, while LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this report, we present a protocol to label the LRRK1 and LRRK2 proteins in cells with (32)P orthophosphate, thereby providing a means to measure the overall phosphorylation levels of these 2 proteins in cells. In brief, affinity tagged LRRK proteins are expressed in HEK293T cells which are exposed to medium containing (32)P-orthophosphate. The (32)P-orthophosphate is assimilated by the cells after only a few hours of incubation and all molecules in the cell containing phosphates are thereby radioactively labeled. Via the affinity tag (3xflag) the LRRK proteins are isolated from other cellular components by immunoprecipitation. Immunoprecipitates are then separated via SDS-PAGE, blotted to PVDF membranes and analysis of the incorporated phosphates is performed by autoradiography ((32)P signal) and western detection (protein signal) of the proteins on the blots. The protocol can readily be adapted to monitor phosphorylation of any other protein that can be expressed in cells and isolated by immunoprecipitation.

  5. Molecular dynamics of leucine and dopamine transporter proteins in a model cell membrane lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Indarte, Martín; Surratt, Christopher K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2010-03-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) operates via facilitated diffusion, harnessing an inward Na(+) gradient to drive dopamine from the extracellular synaptic cleft to the neuron interior. The DAT is relevant to central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and is the primary site of action for the abused psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Crystallization of a DAT homolog, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, provided the first reliable 3-D DAT template. Here, the LeuT crystal structure and the DAT molecular model have been combined with their respective substrates, leucine and dopamine, in lipid bilayer molecular dynamics simulations toward tracking substrate movement along the protein's substrate/ion permeation pathway. Specifically, movement of residue pairs that comprise the "external gate" was followed as a function of substrate presence. The transmembrane (TM) 1 arginine-TM 10 aspartate strut formed less readily in DAT compared with LeuT, with or without substrate present. For LeuT but not DAT, the addition of substrate enhanced the chances of forming the TM 1-10 bridge. Also, movement of the fourth extracellular loop EL-4 in the presence of substrate was more pronounced for DAT, the EL-4 unwinding to a degree. The overall similarity between the LeuT and DAT molecular dynamics simulations indicated that LeuT was a legitimate model to guide DAT structure-function predictions. There were, nevertheless, differences significant enough to allow for DAT-unique insights, which may include how cocaine, methylphenidate (Ritalin, NIDA Drug Supply, Rockville, MD), and other DAT blockers are not recognized as substrates even though they can access the primary substrate binding pocket. Proteins 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Copolymers based on N-acryloyl-L-leucine and urea methacrylate with pyridine moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buruiana Emil C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using free radical polymerization of (N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea (MAcPU and N-acryloyl-L-leucine (AcLeu, an optically active copolymer, poly[(N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea-co-N-acryloyl-L-leucine], MAcPU-co-AcLeu (1.86:1 molar ratio was prepared and subsequently functionalized at the pyridine-N with (1R/S-(−/+-10-camphorsulfonic acid (R/S-CSA and at carboxyl group with (R-(+-α-ethylbenzylamine (R-EBA or trans-4-stilbene methanol (t-StM. The structures, chemical composition and chiroptical activity of the monomers and the copolymers were characterized by spectral analysis (FTIR, 1H (13C-NMR, 1H,1H-COSY, UV/vis, thermal methods (TGA, DSC, fluorescence spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography and specific rotation measurements. Influence of the optical activity of monomer and modifier on modified copolymers suggested a good correlation between the experimental data obtained (23[α]589=+12.5° for AcLeu and MAcPU-co-AcLeu, 23[α]589=0°+27.5° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R/S-CSA, 23[α]589=+25° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R-EBA, and 23[α]589 = 0° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St. In addition, the photobehavior of the stilbene copolymer (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St in film was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching of the stilbene species in the presence of aliphatic/aromatic amine in DMF solution was evaluated, more efficiently being 4,4′−dipyridyl (detection limit: 7.2 x 10-6 mol/L.

  7. Expression of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix and comprise a specific core protein substituted with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan chains. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are a major family of proteoglycans and have key roles as potent effectors in cellular signaling pathways. Research during the last two decades has shown that SLRPs regulate biological functions in many tissues such as skin, tendon, kidney, liver, and heart. However, little is known of the expression of SLRPs, or the characteristics of the cells that produce them, in the anterior pituitary gland. Therefore, we have determined whether SLRPs are present in rat anterior pituitary gland. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of SLRP genes and have identified the cells that produce SLRPs by using in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probe. We have clearly detected the mRNA expression of SLRP genes, and cells expressing decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), and osteoglycin are located in the anterior pituitary gland. We have also investigated the possible double-staining of SLRP mRNA and pituitary hormones, S100 protein (a marker of folliculostellate cells), desmin (a marker of capillary pericytes), and isolectin B4 (a marker of endothelial cells). Decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, PRELP, and osteoglycin mRNA have been identified in S100-protein-positive and desmin-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that folliculostellate cells and pericytes produce SLRPs in rat anterior pituitary gland.

  8. LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation does not require the leucine-rich repeats and is reversed by p75(NTR) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourikas, Dimitris; Mir, Anis; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2010-12-01

    LINGO-1 is a potent negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and hence may play a pivotal restrictive role during remyelination in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, little is known as to which stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation are inhibited by LINGO-1, which domains of the protein are involved and whether accessory proteins are required. Here, we show that LINGO-1 expression in the human oligodendroglial cell line MO3.13 inhibited process extension and this was reversed by an anti-LINGO-1 antibody or the antagonist LINGO-1-Fc. LINGO-1 expression was also found to inhibit myelin basic protein transcription in the rat oligodendroglial cell line CG4. Both of these inhibitory actions of LINGO-1 were abrogated by deletion of the entire ectodomain or cytoplasmic domains but, surprisingly, were unaffected by deletion of the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). As in neurons, LINGO-1 physically associated with endogenous p75(NTR) in MO3.13 cells and, correspondingly, its inhibition of process extension was reversed by antagonists of p75(NTR). Thus, LINGO-1 inhibits multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation independently of the LRRs via a process that requires p75(NTR) signalling.

  9. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  10. Basic research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The research programs under the cognizance of the Office of Energy Research (OER) are directed toward discovery of natural laws and new knowledge, and to improved understanding of the physical and biological sciences as related to the development, use, and control of energy. The ultimate goal is to develop a scientific underlay for the overall DOE effort and the fundamental principles of natural phenomena so that these phenomena may be understood, and new principles, formulated. The DOE-OER outlay activities include three major programs: High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, and Basic Energy Sciences. Taken together, these programs represent some 30 percent of the Nation's Federal support of basic research in the energy sciences. The research activities of OER involve more than 6,000 scientists and engineers working in some 17 major Federal Research Centers and at more than 135 different universities and industrial firms throughout the United States. Contract holders in the areas of high-energy physics, nuclear physics, materials sciences, nuclear science, chemical sciences, engineering, mathematics geosciences, advanced energy projects, and biological energy research are listed. Funding trends for recent years are outlined. (RWR)

  11. Synergistic effects of polyphenols and methylxanthines with Leucine on AMPK/Sirtuin-mediated metabolism in muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Bruckbauer

    Full Text Available The AMPK-Sirt1 pathway is an important regulator of energy metabolism and therefore a potential target for prevention and therapy of metabolic diseases. We recently demonstrated leucine and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB to synergize with low-dose resveratrol (200 nM to activate sirtuin signaling and stimulate energy metabolism. Here we show that leucine exerts a direct effect on Sirt1 kinetics, reducing its Km for NAD(+ by >50% and enabling low doses of resveratrol to further activate the enzyme (p = 0.012. To test which structure elements of resveratrol are necessary for synergy, we assessed potential synergy of structurally similar and dissimilar polyphenols as well as other compounds converging on the same pathways with leucine using fatty acid oxidation (FAO as screening tool. Dose-response curves for FAO were constructed and the highest non-effective dose (typically 1-10 nM was used with either leucine (0.5 mM or HMB (5 µM to treat adipocytes and myotubes for 24 h. Significant synergy was detected for stilbenes with FAO increase in adipocytes by 60-70% (p2000% (p1 µM and exhibited little or no synergy. Thus, the six-carbon ring structure bound to a carboxylic group seems to be a necessary element for leucine/HMB synergy with other stilbenes and hydroxycinnamic acids to stimulate AMPK/Sirt1 dependent FAO; these effects occur at concentrations that produce no independent effects and are readily achievable via oral administration.

  12. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; Helmich, Rick C; Ferraye, Murielle; Thaler, Avner; Hendler, Talma; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Mirelman, Anat; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen S; Giladi, Nir; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, namely carriers of a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation associated with dominantly inherited parkinsonism. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine cerebral activity evoked during internal selection of motor representations, a core motor deficit in clinically overt Parkinson's disease. Thirty-nine healthy first-degree relatives of Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson's disease, who carry the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation, participated in this study. Twenty-one carriers of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation and 18 non-carriers of this mutation were engaged in a motor imagery task (laterality judgements of left or right hands) known to be sensitive to motor control parameters. Behavioural performance of both groups was matched. Mutation carriers and non-carriers were equally sensitive to the extent and biomechanical constraints of the imagined movements in relation to the current posture of the participants' hands. Cerebral activity differed between groups, such that leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers had reduced imagery-related activity in the right caudate nucleus and increased activity in the right dorsal premotor cortex. More severe striatal impairment was associated with stronger effective connectivity between the right dorsal premotor cortex and the right extrastriate body area. These findings suggest that altered movement-related activity in the caudate nuclei of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers might remain behaviourally latent by virtue of cortical compensatory mechanisms involving long-range connectivity between the dorsal premotor cortex and posterior sensory regions. These

  13. Leucine transport in membrane vesicles from Chironomus riparius larvae displays a mélange of crown-group features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, P; Forcella, M; Pugliese, A; Giacchini, R; Rossaro, B; Hanozet, G M

    2001-10-01

    Leucine uptake into membrane vesicles from larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius was studied. The membrane preparation was highly enriched in typical brush border membrane enzymes and depleted of other membrane contaminants. In the absence of cations, there was a stereospecific uptake of l-leucine, which exhibited saturation kinetics. Parameters were determined both at neutral (Km 33 +/- 5 microM and Vmax 22.6 +/- 6.8 pmol/7s/mg protein) and alkaline (Km 46 +/- 5 microM and Vmax 15.5 +/- 2.5 pmol/7s/mg protein) pH values. At alkaline pH, external sodium increased the affinity for leucine (Km 17 +/- 1 microM) and the maximal uptake rate (Vmax 74.0 +/- 12.5 pmol/7s/mg protein). Stimulation of leucine uptake by external alkaline pH agreed with lumen pH measurements in vivo. Competition experiments indicated that at alkaline pH, the transport system readily accepts most L-amino acids, including branched, unbranched, and alpha-methylated amino acids, histidine and lysine, but has a low affinity for phenylalanine, beta-amino acids, and N-methylated amino acids. At neutral pH, the transport has a decreased affinity for lysine, glycine, and alpha-methylleucine. Taken together, these data are consistent with the presence in midges of two distinct leucine transport systems, which combine characters of the lepidopteran amino acid transport system and of the sodium-dependent system from lower neopterans.

  14. Process for passivation of brass zipper from a bath containing benzotriazole, lanthanum nitrate, and sodium molybdate%黄铜拉链苯并三氮唑-硝酸镧-钼酸钠钝化工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭远凯; 唐春保; 赖俐超

    2012-01-01

    An efficient passivation process was developed for brass zipper. The passivation bath is based on benzotriazole (BTA) with a small amount of lanthanum nitrate and sodium molybdate. The effects of bath composition, temperature, and time on passivation effect of the brass zippers treated by different oxidation coloring processes were studied. The results showed that the optimal passivating temperature and time are 30 °C and 2 min, respectively. The passivation bath comprising BTA 3-4 g/L, La(NO3)3-6H2O 0.3-0.4 g/L, Na2MoO4-2H2O 0.6-0.8 g/L, and PEG-6000 1 g/L is easily prepared, environmentally safe, and suitable for the brass zippers in red bronze, imitation gold, and imitation silver colors. The passivated brass zippers have improved corrosion and heat resistance after painting.%开发了一种黄铜拉链高效钝化工艺,钝化液以苯并三氮唑(BTA)为主,添加了少量硝酸镧和钼酸钠.探讨了钝化液配方、钝化温度和时间对经不同氧化着色工艺处理的黄铜拉链钝化效果的影响.结果表明,最佳钝化温度为30℃,钝化时间为2 min.适用于红古铜色、仿金色及仿银色拉链的钝化液配方为:BTA3 ~4g/L,La(NO3)3·6H2O 0.3 ~ 0.4g/L,Na2MoO4·2H2O 0.6~0.8g/L,聚乙二醇6000 1g/L.上述配方简单且安全无毒.经钝化及涂油处理后,黄铜拉链的耐蚀性和耐热性明显提高.

  15. Basic real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrab, Houshang H

    2014-01-01

    This expanded second edition presents the fundamentals and touchstone results of real analysis in full rigor, but in a style that requires little prior familiarity with proofs or mathematical language. The text is a comprehensive and largely self-contained introduction to the theory of real-valued functions of a real variable. The chapters on Lebesgue measure and integral have been rewritten entirely and greatly improved. They now contain Lebesgue’s differentiation theorem as well as his versions of the Fundamental Theorem(s) of Calculus. With expanded chapters, additional problems, and an expansive solutions manual, Basic Real Analysis, Second Edition, is ideal for senior undergraduates and first-year graduate students, both as a classroom text and a self-study guide. Reviews of first edition: The book is a clear and well-structured introduction to real analysis aimed at senior undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The prerequisites are few, but a certain mathematical sophistication is required. ....

  16. Basics of plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuderi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This book is an introduction to contemporary plasma physics that discusses the most relevant recent advances in the field and covers a careful choice of applications to various branches of astrophysics and space science. The purpose of the book is to allow the student to master the basic concepts of plasma physics and to bring him or her up to date in a number of relevant areas of current research. Topics covered include orbit theory, kinetic theory, fluid models, magnetohydrodynamics, MHD turbulence, instabilities, discontinuities, and magnetic reconnection. Some prior knowledge of classical physics is required, in particular fluid mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. The mathematical developments are self-contained and explicitly detailed in the text. A number of exercises are provided at the end of each chapter, together with suggestions and solutions.

  17. Anisotropic hydrodynamics -- basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rapid longitudinal expansion of the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies are generated. The magnitude of these momentum-space anisotropies can be so large as to violate the central assumption of canonical viscous hydrodynamical treatments which linearize around an isotropic background. In order to better describe the early-time dynamics of the quark gluon plasma, one can consider instead expanding around a locally anisotropic background which results in a dynamical framework called anisotropic hydrodynamics. In this proceedings contribution we review the basic concepts of the anisotropic hydrodynamics framework presenting viewpoints from both the phenomenological and microscopic points of view.

  18. Cloud computing basics

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing Basics covers the main aspects of this fast moving technology so that both practitioners and students will be able to understand cloud computing. The author highlights the key aspects of this technology that a potential user might want to investigate before deciding to adopt this service. This book explains how cloud services can be used to augment existing services such as storage, backup and recovery. Addressing the details on how cloud security works and what the users must be prepared for when they move their data to the cloud. Also this book discusses how businesses could prepare for compliance with the laws as well as industry standards such as the Payment Card Industry.

  19. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  20. Corroboration of the predominant localization of radioactivity on the dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of linalool biosynthesized from radioisotopically labeled leucine by higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tange, K.; Okita, H.; Nakao, Y.; Hirata, T.; Suga, T. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    The co-feeding experiment of leucine-4,5-/sup 3/H and mevalonic-2-/sup 14/C acid corroborated the preferential localization of radioactivity on the 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of linalool in its biosynthesis from radioisotopically labeled leucine by Cinnamomum Camphora Sieb. var. linalooliferum Fujita, in contrast to the predominant location of the activity on its isopentenyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety in the biosynthesis from mevalonic acid. Also, it was established that the imbalance in the localization of radioactivity is not influenced by exogenous administration of leucine or inhibition of isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase.

  1. Sequence-structure-function relations of the mosquito leucine-rich repeat immune proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povelones Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and characterisation of factors governing innate immune responses in insects has driven the elucidation of many immune system components in mammals and other organisms. Focusing on the immune system responses of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, has uncovered an array of components and mechanisms involved in defence against pathogen infections. Two of these immune factors are LRIM1 and APL1C, which are leucine-rich repeat (LRR containing proteins that activate complement-like defence responses against malaria parasites. In addition to their LRR domains, these leucine-rich repeat immune (LRIM proteins share several structural features including signal peptides, patterns of cysteine residues, and coiled-coil domains. Results The identification and characterisation of genes related to LRIM1 and APL1C revealed putatively novel innate immune factors and furthered the understanding of their likely molecular functions. Genomic scans using the shared features of LRIM1 and APL1C identified more than 20 LRIM-like genes exhibiting all or most of their sequence features in each of three disease-vector mosquitoes with sequenced genomes: An. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparative sequence analyses revealed that this family of mosquito LRIM-like genes is characterised by a variable number of 6 to 14 LRRs of different lengths. The "Long" LRIM subfamily, with 10 or more LRRs, and the "Short" LRIMs, with 6 or 7 LRRs, also share the signal peptide, cysteine residue patterning, and coiled-coil sequence features of LRIM1 and APL1C. The "TM" LRIMs have a predicted C-terminal transmembrane region, and the "Coil-less" LRIMs exhibit the characteristic LRIM sequence signatures but lack the C-terminal coiled-coil domains. Conclusions The evolutionary plasticity of the LRIM LRR domains may provide templates for diverse recognition properties, while their coiled-coil domains could be involved in the formation

  2. Cold, Gas-Phase UV and IR Spectroscopy of Protonated Leucine Enkephalin and its Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nicole L.; Redwine, James; Dean, Jacob C.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The conformational preferences of peptide backbones and the resulting hydrogen bonding patterns provide critical biochemical information regarding the structure-function relationship of peptides and proteins. The spectroscopic study of cryogenically-cooled peptide ions in a mass spectrometer probes these H-bonding arrangements and provides information regarding the influence of a charge site. Leucine enkephalin, a biologically active endogenous opiod peptide, has been extensively studied as a model peptide in mass spectrometry. This talk will present a study of the UV and IR spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin [YGGFL+H]+ and two of its analogues: the sodiated [YGGFL+Na]+ and C-terminally methyl esterified [YGGFL-OMe+H]+ forms. All experiments were performed in a recently completed multi-stage mass spectrometer outfitted with a cryocooled ion trap. Ions are generated via nano-electrospray ionization and the analyte of interest is isolated in a linear ion trap. The analyte ions are trapped in a 22-pole ion trap held at 5 K by a closed cycle helium cryostat and interrogated via UV and IR lasers. Photofragments are trapped and isolated in a second LIT and mass analyzed. Double-resonance UV and IR methods were used to assign the conformation of [YGGFL+H]+, using the NH/OH stretch, Amide I, and Amide II regions of the infrared spectrum. The assigned structure contains a single backbone conformation at vibrational/rotational temperatures of 10 K held together with multiple H-bonds that self-solvate the NH3+ site. A "proton wire" between the N and C termini reinforces the H-bonding activity of the COO-H group to the F-L peptide bond, whose cleavage results in formation of the b4 ion, which is a prevalent, low-energy fragmentation pathway for [YGGFL+H]+. The reinforced H-bonding network in conjunction with the mobile proton theory may help explain the prevalence of the b4 pathway. In order to elucidate structural changes caused by modifying this H-bonding activity

  3. Basics of aerothermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschel, Ernst Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    This successful book gives an introduction to the basics of aerothermodynamics, as applied in particular to winged re-entry vehicles and airbreathing hypersonic cruise and acceleration vehicles. The book gives a review of the issues of transport of momentum, energy and mass, real-gas effects as well as inviscid and viscous flow phenomena. In this second, revised edition the chapters with the classical topics of aerothermodynamics more or less were left untouched. The access to some single topics of practical interest was improved. Auxiliary chapters were put into an appendix. The recent successful flights of the X-43A and the X-51A indicate that the dawn of sustained airbreathing hypersonic flight now has arrived. This proves that the original approach of the book to put emphasis on viscous effects and the aerothermodynamics of radiation-cooled vehicle surfaces was timely. This second, revised edition even more accentuates these topics. A new, additional chapter treats examples of viscous thermal surface eff...

  4. [Basic research in pulmonology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim

    2008-11-01

    This is a review of the articles dealing with basic science published in recent issues of Archivos de Bronconeumología. Of particular interest with regard to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were an article on extrapulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress and another on bronchial remodeling. The articles relating to asthma included a review on the use of drugs that block free immunoglobulin-E and an article about the contribution of experimental models to our knowledge of this disease. Two of the most interesting articles on the topic of lung cancer dealt with gene therapy and resistance to chemotherapy. Also notable were 2 studies that investigated ischemia-reperfusion injury. One evaluated tissue resistance to injury while the other analyzed the role played by interleukin-8 in this process. On the topic of pulmonary fibrosis, an article focused on potential biomarkers of progression and prognosis; others dealt with the contribution of experimental models to our understanding of this disorder and the fibrogenic role of transforming growth factor b. In the context of both sleep apnea syndrome and pulmonary infection, studies investigating the role of oxidative stress were published. Finally, 2 studies analyzed the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and other pulmonary infections.

  5. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  6. Nanodesign: some basic questions

    CERN Document Server

    Schommers, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that nanoscience will be the dominant direction for technology in this century, and that this science will influence our lives to a large extent as well as open completely new perspectives on all scientific and technological disciplines. To be able to produce optimal nanosystems with tailor-made properties, it is necessary to analyze and construct such systems in advance by adequate theoretical and computational methods. Since we work in nanoscience and nanotechnology at the ultimate level, we have to apply the basic laws of physics. What methods and tools are relevant here? The book gives an answer to this question. The background of the theoretical methods and tools is critically discussed, and also the world view on which these physical laws are based. Such a debate is not only of academic interest but is of highly general concern, and this is because we constantly move in nanoscience and nanotechnology between two extreme poles, between infinite life and total destruction . On the one ...

  7. Basic operator theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gohberg, Israel

    2001-01-01

    rii application of linear operators on a Hilbert space. We begin with a chapter on the geometry of Hilbert space and then proceed to the spectral theory of compact self adjoint operators; operational calculus is next presented as a nat­ ural outgrowth of the spectral theory. The second part of the text concentrates on Banach spaces and linear operators acting on these spaces. It includes, for example, the three 'basic principles of linear analysis and the Riesz­ Fredholm theory of compact operators. Both parts contain plenty of applications. All chapters deal exclusively with linear problems, except for the last chapter which is an introduction to the theory of nonlinear operators. In addition to the standard topics in functional anal­ ysis, we have presented relatively recent results which appear, for example, in Chapter VII. In general, in writ­ ing this book, the authors were strongly influenced by re­ cent developments in operator theory which affected the choice of topics, proofs and exercises. One ...

  8. Basic Social Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of grounded theory is to generate a theory that accounts for a pattern of behavior that is relevant and problematic for those involved. The goal is not voluminous description, nor clever verification. As with all grounded theory, the generation of a basic social process (BSP theory occurs around a core category. While a core category is always present in a grounded research study, a BSP may not be.BSPs are ideally suited to generation by grounded theory from qualitative research because qualitative research can pick up process through fieldwork that continues over a period of time. BSPs are a delight to discover and formulate since they give so much movement and scope to the analyst’s perception of the data. BSPs such as cultivating, defaulting, centering, highlighting or becoming, give the feeling of process, change and movement over time. They also have clear, amazing general implications; so much so, that it is hard to contain them within the confines of a single substantive study. The tendency is to refer to them as a formal theory without the necessary comparative development of formal theory. They are labeled by a “gerund”(“ing” which both stimulates their generation and the tendency to over-generalize them.

  9. Basic science of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, Magali; de Girolamo, Laura; Filardo, Giuseppe; Oliveira, J Miguel; Orth, Patrick; Pape, Dietrich; Reboul, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent, disabling disorder of the joints that affects a large population worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure. This review provides critical insights into the basic knowledge on OA that may lead to innovative end efficient new therapeutic regimens. While degradation of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of OA, with altered interactions between chondrocytes and compounds of the extracellular matrix, the subchondral bone has been also described as a key component of the disease, involving specific pathomechanisms controlling its initiation and progression. The identification of such events (and thus of possible targets for therapy) has been made possible by the availability of a number of animal models that aim at reproducing the human pathology, in particular large models of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). From a therapeutic point of view, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising option for the treatment of OA and may be used concomitantly with functional substitutes integrating scaffolds and drugs/growth factors in tissue engineering setups. Altogether, these advances in the fundamental and experimental knowledge on OA may allow for the generation of improved, adapted therapeutic regimens to treat human OA.

  10. Basic Data on Biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Renewable gases such as biogas and biomethane are considered as key energy carrier when the society is replacing fossil fuels with renewable alternatives. In Sweden, almost 80 % of the fossil fuels are used in the transport sector. Therefore, the focus in Sweden has been to use the produced biogas in this sector as vehicle gas. Basic Data on Biogas contains an overview of production, utilisation, climate effects etc. of biogas from a Swedish perspective. The purpose is to give an easy overview of the current situation in Sweden for politicians, decision makers and interested public. 1.4 TWh of biogas is produced annually in Sweden at approximately 230 facilities. The 135 wastewater treatment plants that produce biogas contribute with around half of the production. In order to reduce the sludge volume, biogas has been produced at wastewater treatment plants for decades. New biogas plants are mainly co-digestion plants and farm plants. The land filling of organic waste has been banned since 2005, thus the biogas produced in landfills is decreasing.

  11. A NMR experiment for simultaneous correlations of valine and leucine/isoleucine methyls with carbonyl chemical shifts in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Venditti, Vincenzo; Marius Clore, G

    2014-01-01

    A methyl-detected 'out-and-back' NMR experiment for obtaining simultaneous correlations of methyl resonances of valine and isoleucine/leucine residues with backbone carbonyl chemical shifts, SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO, is described. The developed pulse-scheme serves the purpose of convenience in recording a single data set for all Ile(δ1), Leu(δ) and Val(γ) (ILV) methyl positions instead of acquiring two separate spectra selective for valine or leucine/isoleucine residues. The SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO experiment can be used for ILV methyl assignments in moderately sized protein systems (up to ~100 kDa) where the backbone chemical shifts of (13)C(α), (13)Cβ and (13)CO are known from prior NMR studies and where some losses in sensitivity can be tolerated for the sake of an overall reduction in NMR acquisition time.

  12. Experiment list: SRX190296 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s encode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby forming the tran...L2. These genes encode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby fo

  13. Experiment list: SRX190224 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and FOSL2. These genes encode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby... FOSB, FOSL1, and FOSL2. These genes encode leucine zipper proteins that can dimerize with proteins of the JUN family, thereby

  14. Main: ATHB6COREAT [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis (A.T.) homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, ATHB6; ATHB6 is a target of the protein phosphatase ...ABI1 and regulates hormone responses; See S000371; ATHB6; ABA; ABI1; homeodomain-leucine zipper; Arabidopsis thaliana CAATTATTA ... ...ATHB6COREAT S000399 27-Aug-2002 (last modified) uchi Consensus binding sequence for

  15. InterProScan Result: FS772208 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS772208 FS772208_2_ORF2 573AC175A172A542 PANTHER PTHR13618 LEUCINE ZIPPER CONTAINI...NG TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (LZF1) 6.9e-64 T IPR019386 Rogdi, leucine zipper-containing protein ...

  16. Synthesis and spectroscopic DNA binding investigations of dibutyltin N-(5-chlorosalicylidene)-leucinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Yuan, Hongyu; Tian, Laijin

    2017-02-01

    A new dibutyltin N-(5-Chlorosalicylidene)-leucinate (DNCL) was synthesized by the reaction of dibutyltin dichloride with in situ formed potassium N-(5-chlorosalicylidene)-L-isoleucinate 3 characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectra. The interaction between DNCL and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in a pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. It was found that DNCL molecules could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA, forming a DNCL-DNA complex with a binding constant of Kf = 5.75 × 105 L mol-1 (310 K). The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were calculated to be 1.16 × 105 J mol-1, 486.5 J K-1 mol -1 and -3.48 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the DNCL-DNA complex.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+) and leucine transport by LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na(+) and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na(+) binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na(+) binding and release. In Cl(-)-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl(-) ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na(+) and substrate transport as well as Cl(-)-independence of LeuT.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na{sup +} and leucine transport by LeuT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Rong, E-mail: rong.chen@anu.edu.au; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na{sup +} and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na{sup +} binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na{sup +} binding and release. In Cl{sup −}-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl{sup −} ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na{sup +} and substrate transport as well as Cl{sup −}-independence of LeuT. - Highlights: • Ion binding site involving Glu290 is identified in the outward- and inward-open LeuT. • Sodium is released from inward-open LeuT once the side chain of Glu290 is protonated. • Protonation state of Glu290 regulates sodium binding and transport in LeuT.

  19. In ovo Administration of Ghrelin and Subsequent Intestinal Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP Activity in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ghiasi Ghaleh-kandi,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to investigation on effect of in ovo administration of ghrelin on subsequent Leucine Aminopeptidase (LAP activity in broiler chickens. In this experiment 250 fertilized eggs were collected from commercial breeder flock. The eggs were divided into five experimental groups; control T1 (without injection, group T2 (in ovo injected with solution, group T3 (in ovo injected with 50 μg/egg ghrelin, group T4 (in ovo injected with 100 μg/egg ghrelin and group T5 (in ovo injected with 150 μg/egg ghrelin. All of groups were incubated. In ovo injection was done at day 7 of incub ation. in ovo administration of 150 μg/egg ghrelin in embryonic period, could stimulate LAP activity at 21-day- old chicks in 10, 30 and 50% of intestine with 3520.4, 266.9, 4595.6 IU/g protein, also in ovo injected 50 and 150 μg/egg ghrelin could stimulate LAP activity in 1, 50 and 70% of intestine with 3071.4, 4779.3 and 5013.4 IU/g. In 42-day-old chicks, in ovo injected 50 μg/egg ghrelin could stimulate LAP activity in 1, 10, 30, 40, 70, and 90% percent of intestine. These findings demonstrated stimulatory effects of ghrelin in low doses (50 μg in chicken intestine LAP activity.

  20. LRRML: a conformational database and an XML description of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine-rich repeats (LRRs are present in more than 6000 proteins. They are found in organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes and play an important role in protein-ligand interactions. To date, more than one hundred crystal structures of LRR containing proteins have been determined. This knowledge has increased our ability to use the crystal structures as templates to model LRR proteins with unknown structures. Since the individual three-dimensional LRR structures are not directly available from the established databases and since there are only a few detailed annotations for them, a conformational LRR database useful for homology modeling of LRR proteins is desirable. Description We developed LRRML, a conformational database and an extensible markup language (XML description of LRRs. The release 0.2 contains 1261 individual LRR structures, which were identified from 112 PDB structures and annotated manually. An XML structure was defined to exchange and store the LRRs. LRRML provides a source for homology modeling and structural analysis of LRR proteins. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the database we modeled the mouse Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 by multiple templates homology modeling and compared the result with the crystal structure. Conclusion LRRML is an information source for investigators involved in both theoretical and applied research on LRR proteins. It is available at http://zeus.krist.geo.uni-muenchen.de/~lrrml.

  1. Contrasting Response of Two Dipolar Fluorescence Probes in a Leucine-Based Organogel and Its Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, Sivalingam; Seth, Sudipta; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2015-08-03

    The microenvironments of a leucine-based organogel are probed by monitoring the fluorescence behavior of coumarin 153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP). The steady-state data reveals distinctly different locations of the two molecules in the gel. Whereas AP resides close to the hydroxyl moieties of the gelator and engages in hydrogen-bonding interactions, C153 is found in bulk-toluene-like regions. In contrast to C153, AP exhibits excitation-wavelength-dependent emission, indicating that the environments of the hydrogen-bonded AP molecules are not all identical. A two-component fluorescence decay of AP in gel, unlike C153, supports this model. A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study of the rotational motion of the molecules also reveals the strong association of only AP with the gelator. That AP influences the critical gelation concentration implies its direct involvement in the gel-formation process. The results highlight the importance of guest-gelator interactions in gels containing guest molecules.

  2. Biochemical Properties and Potential Applications of Recombinant Leucine Aminopeptidase from Bacillus kaustophilus CCRC 11223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of various factors on the activity and conformation of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase of Bacillus kaustophilus CCRC 11223 (BkLAP and potential utilization of BkLAP in the hydrolysis of anchovy protein. Optimal temperature and pH of BkLAP were 70 °C and 8.0 in potassium-phosphate buffer, respectively, and the activity was strongly stimulated by Ni2+, followed by Mn2+ and Co2+. Conformational studies via circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that various factors could influence the secondary structure of BkLAP to different extents and further induce the changes in enzymatic activity. The secondary structure of BkLAP was slightly modified by Ni2+ at the concentration of 1×10−4 M, however, significant changes on the secondary structures of the enzyme were observed when Hg2+ was added to the concentration of 1×10−4 M. The potential application of BkLAP was evaluated through combination with the commercial or endogenous enzyme to hydrolysis the anchovy protein. Results showed that combining the BkLAP with other enzymes could significantly increase the degree of hydrolysis and amino acid component of hydrolysate. In this regard, BkLAP is a potential enzyme that can be used in the protein hydrolysate industry.

  3. Cellular pattern formation by SCRAMBLED, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Schiefelbein, John

    2008-02-01

    The appropriate specification of distinct cell types is important for generating the proper tissues and bodies of multicellular organisms. In the root epidermis of Arabidopsis, cell fate determination is accomplished by a transcriptional regulatory circuit that is influenced by positional signaling. A leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SCRAMBLED (SCM), has been shown to be responsible for the position-dependent aspect of this epidermal pattern. In a recent report, we find that SCM affects the transcriptional regulatory network by down-regulating the WEREWOLF (WER) MYB gene expression in a set of epidermal cells located in a specific position. We also find that SCM and the SCM-related SRF1 and SRF3 are not required for embryonic epidermal patterning and that SRF1 and SRF3 do not act redundantly with SCM. This suggests that distinct positional signaling mechanisms exist for embryonic and post-embryonic epidermal patterning. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our recent findings and extend our working model for epidermal cell pattering.

  4. Gas-phase synthesis of solid state DNA nanoparticles stabilized by l-leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raula, Janne; Hanzlíková, Martina; Rahikkala, Antti; Hautala, Juho; Kauppinen, Esko I; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2013-02-28

    Aerosol flow reactor is used to generate solid-state nanoparticles in a one-step process that is based on drying of aerosol droplets in continuous flow. We investigated the applicability of aerosol flow reactor method to prepare solid state DNA nanoparticles. Precursor solutions of plasmid DNA with or without complexing agent (polyethylenimine), coating material (l-leucine) and mannitol (bulking material) were dispersed to nanosized droplets and instantly dried in laminar heat flow. Particle morphology, integrity and stability were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The stability of DNA was studied by gel electrophoresis. Plasmid DNA as such degraded in the aerosol flow process. Complexing agent protected DNA from degradation and coating material enabled production of dispersed, non-aggregated, nanoparticles. The resulting nanoparticles were spherical and their mean diameter ranged from 65 to 125nm. The nanoparticles were structurally stable at room temperature and their DNA content was about 10%. We present herein the proof of principle for the production of dispersed solid state nanoparticles with relevant size and intact plasmid DNA.

  5. Essential Role for an M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase in Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Ran; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Song, Su-Min; Joo, So-Young; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2015-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions such as starvation, low temperatures, and exposure to biocides. During encystation, a massive turnover of intracellular components occurs, and a large number of organelles and proteins are degraded by proteases. Previous studies with specific protease inhibitors have shown that cysteine and serine proteases are involved in encystation of Acanthamoeba, but little is known about the role of metalloproteases in this process. Here, we have biochemically characterized an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AcLAP) and analyzed its functional involvement in encystation of the parasite. Recombinant AcLAP shared biochemical properties such as optimal pH, requirement of divalent metal ions for activity, substrate specificity for Leu, and inhibition profile by aminopeptidase inhibitors and metal chelators with other characterized M17 family LAPs. AcLAP was highly expressed at a late stage of encystation and mainly localized in the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Knockdown of AcLAP using small interfering RNA induced a decrease of LAP activity during encystation, a reduction of mature cyst formation, and the formation of abnormal cyst walls. In summary, these results indicate that AcLAP is a typical M17 family enzyme that plays an essential role during encystation of Acanthamoeba.

  6. Essential Role for an M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase in Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ran Lee

    Full Text Available Encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions such as starvation, low temperatures, and exposure to biocides. During encystation, a massive turnover of intracellular components occurs, and a large number of organelles and proteins are degraded by proteases. Previous studies with specific protease inhibitors have shown that cysteine and serine proteases are involved in encystation of Acanthamoeba, but little is known about the role of metalloproteases in this process. Here, we have biochemically characterized an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AcLAP and analyzed its functional involvement in encystation of the parasite. Recombinant AcLAP shared biochemical properties such as optimal pH, requirement of divalent metal ions for activity, substrate specificity for Leu, and inhibition profile by aminopeptidase inhibitors and metal chelators with other characterized M17 family LAPs. AcLAP was highly expressed at a late stage of encystation and mainly localized in the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Knockdown of AcLAP using small interfering RNA induced a decrease of LAP activity during encystation, a reduction of mature cyst formation, and the formation of abnormal cyst walls. In summary, these results indicate that AcLAP is a typical M17 family enzyme that plays an essential role during encystation of Acanthamoeba.

  7. Increased leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin- like domains 1 expression enhances chemosensitivity in glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baohui Liu; Shenqi Zhang; Dong Ruan; Xiaonan Zhu; Zhentao Guo; Huimin Dong; Mingmin Yan; Qianxue Chen; Daofeng Tian; Liquan Wu; Junmin Wang; Qiang Cai; Heng Shen; Baowei Ji; Long Wang

    2011-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is an anti-oncogene.LRIG1 is correlated with Bcl-2 in ependymomas.Decreased Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression can improve the chemosensitivity of glioma.In the present study, a tissue microarray of human brain astrocytomas was constructed.To investigate the relationship of LRIG1 with Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase, LRIG1, Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression in our tissue microarray was determined using immunohistochemistry.In addition, we constructed the LRIG1-U251 cell line, and its responses to doxorubicin and temozolomide were detected using the MTT assay.Results showed that LRIG1 expression was significantly negatively correlated with Bcl-2 and manganese superoxide dismutase expression in glioma.Also, proliferation of LRIG1-U251 cells exposed to doxorubicin or temozolomide was significantly inhibited, i.e.in the LRIG1-U251 cell line, the chemosensitivity to doxorubicin and temozolomide was increased.This indicates that increased LRIG1 expression produces a chemosensitivity in glioma.

  8. [B17-D-leucine]insulin and [B17-norleucine]insulin: synthesis and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, R; Danho, W; Büllesbach, E E; Gattner, H G; Zahn, H; King, G L; Kahn, C R

    1983-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of two porcine insulin analogues is described. Leucine in position B17 of the native molecule was substituted by its D-enantiomer and by L-norleucine, respectively. Both B-chain derivatives were synthesized by fragment condensation and purified as di-S-sulphonates by gel filtration followed by ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sephadex at pH3. Combination with native sulphhydryl A-chain yielded [DLeuB17]insulin and [NleB17]insulin. Both insulin analogues were isolated by gel filtration followed by ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose at pH 4.0. Biological activities of the analogues were determined relative to native pork insulin: 1) glucose oxidation in rat epididymal adipocytes was 6% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 16% for [NleB17]insulin, 2) receptor-binding affinity tested with cultured human fibroblasts and with rat adipocytes was 3% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 26% for [NleB17]insulin, and 3) thymidine incorporation into DNA of human fibroblasts was 35% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 100% for [NleB17]insulin.

  9. mTOR independent regulation of macroautophagy by Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 via Beclin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Roosen, Dorien A.; Dihanich, Sybille; Soutar, Marc P. M.; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Hardy, John; Tooze, Sharon A.; Cookson, Mark R.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 is a complex enzyme with both kinase and GTPase activities, closely linked to the pathogenesis of several human disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Crohn’s disease, leprosy and cancer. LRRK2 has been implicated in numerous cellular processes; however its physiological function remains unclear. Recent reports suggest that LRRK2 can act to regulate the cellular catabolic process of macroautophagy, although the precise mechanism whereby this occurs has not been identified. To investigate the signalling events through which LRRK2 acts to influence macroautophagy, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and Beclin-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways were evaluated in astrocytic cell models in the presence and absence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity resulted in the stimulation of macroautophagy in a non-canonical fashion, independent of mTOR and ULK1, but dependent upon the activation of Beclin 1-containing class III PI3-kinase. PMID:27731364

  10. Escherichia coli D-malate dehydrogenase, a generalist enzyme active in the leucine biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-10-17

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of D-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on D-malate as a carbon source, the D-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB(-) strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (L(+)-tartrate, D-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution.

  11. Overexpression, purification and biochemical characterization of the wound-induced leucine aminopeptidase of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y Q; Holzer, F M; Walling, L L

    1999-08-01

    Wounding of tomato leaves results in the accumulation of an exoprotease called leucine aminopeptidase (LAP-A). While the expression of LapA genes are well characterized, the specificity of the LAP-A enzyme has not been studied. The LAP-A preprotein and mature polypeptide were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. PreLAP-A was not processed and was inactive accumulating in inclusion bodies. In contrast, 55-kDa mature LAP-A subunits assembled into an active, 357-kDa enzyme in E. coli. LAP-A from E. coli cultures was purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized relative to its animal (porcine LAP) and prokaryotic (E. coli PepA) homologues. Similar to the porcine and E. coli enzymes, the tomato LAP-A had high temperature and pH optima. Mn2+ was a strong activator for all three enzymes, while chelators, zinc ion, and the slow-binding aminopeptidase inhibitors (amastatin and bestatin) strongly inhibited activities of all three LAPs. The substrate specificities of porcine, E. coli and tomato LAPs were determined using amino-acid-p-nitroanilide and -beta-naphthylamide substrates. The tomato LAP-A preferentially hydrolyzed substrates with N-terminal Leu, Met and Arg residues. LAP-A had substantially lower levels of activity on other chromogenic substrates. Several differences in substrate specificities for the animal, plant and prokaryotic enzymes were noted.

  12. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  13. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam R Lomate

    Full Text Available Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  14. Growth and characterization of NLO crystal: L-leucine phthalic acid potassium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh M.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new semi-organic non linear optical crystal, L-leucine phthalic acid potassium iodide (LLPPI has been grown from an aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to different characterizations, such as single crystal XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis, TGA, SEM, EDAX, micro hardness, dielectric and powder SHG. Single crystal structure was determined from X-ray diffraction data and it revealed that the crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P1. The vibrational frequencies of various functional groups were derived from FT-IR spectrum. Thermal stability of the grown crystal was investigated by TG-DTA studies and it was observed that the crystal was thermally stable up to 192 °C. Optical absorption study was carried out and a good transparency in the entire visible region was observed at the lower cutoff wavelength of 227 nm. Dielectric study was performed as a function of frequency and normal dielectric behavior was observed. The micro hardness test was carried out and the load dependent hardness was measured. Kurtz powder method was employed to explore the NLO characteristics of the grown crystal.

  15. Branched-chain Amino Acid Biosensing Using Fluorescent Modified Engineered Leucine/Isoleucine/Valine Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescence sensing system for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAswas developed based on engineered leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding proteins (LIVBPsconjugated with environmentally sensitive fluorescence probes. LIVBP was cloned fromEscherichia coli and Gln149Cys, Gly227Cys, and Gln254Cys mutants were generated bygenetic engineering. The mutant LIVBPs were then modified with environmentallysensitive fluorophores. Based on the fluorescence intensity change observed upon thebinding of the ligands, the MIANS-conjugated Gln149Cys mutant (Gln149Cys-M showedthe highest and most sensitive response. The BCAAs Leu, Ile, and Val can each bemonitored at the sub-micromolar level using Gln149Cys-M. Measurements were alsocarried out on a mixture of BCAFAs and revealed that Gln149Cys-M-based measurementis not significantly affected by the change in the molar ratio of Leu, Ile and Val in thesample. Its high sensitivity and group-specific molecular recognition ability make the newsensing system ideally suited for the measurement of BCAAs and the determination of theFischer ratio, an indicator of hepatic disease involving metabolic dysfunction.

  16. Identification of the FTBL protein of Sumner and Dounce as a leucine aminopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounce, A L; Allen, P Z

    1987-08-15

    The crystalline beef liver protein of Sumner and Dounce (A. L. Dounce, P. Z. Allen, and G. A. Mourtzikos (1978) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 188, 251-265) termed FTBL (football) protein because of the shape of its crystals, has been identified as a crystalline leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), on the basis of its high specific LAP activity and coincidence of its N terminal amino acid sequence (30 amino acids) with that of beef eye lens LAP. Amino acid analyses of the two proteins are also in reasonable agreement when based on the exact monomer molecular weight of beef eye lens protein obtained by the van Loon group ((1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 7077-7081). Our previously published monomer molecular weight of the FTBL protein was 25% too high, leading to the erroneous conclusion that the beef liver FTBL-LAP protein was a tetramer rather than a hexamer, as found by the van Loon group for beef lens LAP. The present report, taken together with our first paper on the FTBL protein establishes that the FTBL-LAP protein has been isolated from beef kidney and beef spleen as well as from beef liver. We now find that the properties of FTBL-LAP protein indicate that it is the same protein as beef eye lens LAP. The cellular and intracellular distributions of the FTBL-LAP protein have been considered in our first publication on the FTBL protein.

  17. The regulatory roles of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shoujun; Birk, David E

    2013-05-01

    Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are involved in a variety of biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on their regulatory roles in matrix assembly. SLRPs have protein cores and hypervariable glycosylation with multivalent binding abilities. During development, differential interactions of SLRPs with other molecules result in tissue-specific spatial and temporal distributions. The changing expression patterns play a critical role in the regulation of tissue-specific matrix assembly and therefore tissue function. SLRPs play significant structural roles within extracellular matrices. In addition, they play regulatory roles in collagen fibril growth, fibril organization and extracellular matrix assembly. Moreover, they are involved in mediating cell-matrix interactions. Abnormal SLRP expression and/or structures result in dysfunctional extracellular matrices and pathophysiology. Altered expression of SLRPs has been found in many disease models, and structural deficiency also causes altered matrix assembly. SLRPs regulate assembly of the extracellular matrix, which defines the microenvironment, modulating both the extracellular matrix and cellular functions, with an impact on tissue function.

  18. Production of leucine amino peptidase in lab scale bioreactors using Streptomyces gedanensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahulan, Raji; Dhar, Kiran S; Madhavan Nampoothiri, K; Pandey, Ashok

    2011-09-01

    Studies were conducted on the production of leucine amino peptidase (LAP) by Streptomyces gedanensis to ascertain the performance of the process in shake flask, parallel fermenter and 5-L fermenter utilizing soy bean meal as the carbon source. Experiments were conducted to analyze the effects of aeration and agitation rate on cell growth and LAP production. The results unveiled that an agitation rate of 300 rpm, 50% dissolved oxygen (DO) upholding and 0.15 vvm strategies were the optimal for the enzyme production, yielding 22.72 ± 0.11 IU/mL LAP in parallel fermenter which was comparable to flask level (24.65 ± 0.12 IU/mL LAP) fermentation. Further scale-up, in 5-L fermenter showed 50% DO and 1 vvm aeration rate was the best, producing optimum and the production was 20.09 ± 0.06 IU/mL LAP. The information obtained could be useful to design a strategy to improve a large-scale bioreactor cultivation of cells and production of LAP.

  19. Effects of Leucin-Enkephalins on Surface Characteristics and Morphology of Model Membranes Composed of Raft-Forming Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanova, Asya; Jordanova, A; Lalchev, Z

    2016-06-01

    During the last decades opioid peptides, like enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) are subject to extensive studies due to their antinociceptive action in organism. According to the membrane catalysis theory, in order to adopt a proper conformation for binding to their receptors, opioid peptides interact with the lipid phase of the membrane receptor surrounding. With this regard, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of synthetic leucine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalinamide on surface characteristics and morphology of lipid monolayers, composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol alone and with their mixtures. The lipids were chosen to represent a model of a membrane raft, since it is known that G-protein-coupled receptors, including opioid receptors, are located preferably in membrane rafts. By using Langmuir's monolayer method, the change in surface pressure of the model membranes before and after the addition of the synthetic enkephalins was studied, and the compressional moduli of the lipids and lipid-peptides monolayers were determined. In addition, by Brewster angle microscopy, the surface morphology of the lipid monolayers alone and after the injection of both enkephalins was monitored. Our results showed that both leucine-enkephalins affected the lipid monolayers surface characteristics, and led to an increase in surface density of the mixed surface lipids/enkephalins films at loose lipid packing. This effect was more pronounced for the enkephalinamide, suggesting a different mechanism of interaction for the amidated enkephalin with the lipid phase, as compared to leucine-enkephalin.

  20. Obese women on a low energy rice and bean diet: effects of leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation on protein turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Marchini

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation in adult obese patients (body mass index of 33 ± 4 kg/m² consuming a Brazilian low energy and protein diet (4.2 MJ/day and 0.6 g protein/kg affects protein and amino acid metabolism. After four weeks adaptation to this diet, each subject received supplements of these amino acids (equivalent to 0.2 g protein kg-1 day-1 in random order. On the seventh day of each amino acid supplementation, a single-dose 15N-glycine study was carried out. There were no significant differences in protein flux, synthesis or breakdown. The protein flux (grams of nitrogen, gN/9 h was 55 ± 24 during the nonsupplemented diet intake and 39 ± 10, 44 ± 22 and 58 ± 35 during the leucine-, glycine- and arginine-supplemented diet intake, respectively; protein synthesis (gN/9 h was 57 ± 24, 36 ± 10, 41 ± 22 and 56 ± 36, respectively; protein breakdown (gN/9 h was 51 ± 24, 34 ± 10, 32 ± 28 and 53 ± 35, respectively; kinetic balance (gN/9 h was 3.2 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 1.7, 3.4 ± 2.9 and 3.9 ± 1.6. There was no difference in amino acid profiles due to leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation. The present results suggest that 0.6 g/kg of dietary protein is enough to maintain protein turnover in obese women consuming a reduced energy diet and that leucine, arginine or glycine supplementation does not change kinetic balance or protein synthesis.

  1. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation.

  2. Postprandial leucine and insulin responses and toxicological effects of a novel whey protein hydrolysate-based supplement in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toedebusch Ryan G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was: aim 1 compare insulin and leucine serum responses after feeding a novel hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH-based supplement versus a whey protein isolate (WPI in rats during the post-absorptive state, and aim 2 to perform a thorough toxicological analysis on rats that consume different doses of the novel WPH-based supplement over a 30-day period. In male Wistar rats (~250 g, n = 40, serum insulin and leucine concentrations were quantified up to 120 min after one human equivalent dose of a WPI or the WPH-based supplement. In a second cohort of rats (~250 g, n = 20, we examined serum/blood and liver/kidney histopathological markers after 30 days of feeding low (1human equivalent dose, medium (3 doses and high (6 doses amounts of the WPH-based supplement. In aim 1, higher leucine levels existed at 15 min after WPH vs. WPI ingestion (p = 0.04 followed by higher insulin concentrations at 60 min (p = 0.002. In aim 2, liver and kidney histopathology/toxicology markers were not different 30 days after feeding with low, medium, high dose WPH-based supplementation or water only. There were no between-condition differences in body fat or lean mass or circulating clinical chemistry markers following the 30-day feeding intervention in aim 2. In comparison to WPI, acute ingestion of a novel WPH-based supplement resulted in a higher transient leucine response with a sequential increase in insulin. Furthermore, chronic ingestion of the tested whey protein hydrolysate supplement appears safe.

  3. Recombinant expression of TLR5 proteins by ligand supplementation and a leucine-rich repeat hybrid technique

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Minsun; Yoon, Sung-il; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate TLR5 directly binds bacterial flagellin proteins and activates innate immune responses against pathogenic flagellated bacteria. Structural and biochemical studies on the TLR5/flagellin interaction have been challenging due to the technical difficulty in obtaining active recombinant proteins of TLR5 ectodomain (TLR5-ECD). We recently succeeded in production of the N-terminal leucine rich repeats (LRRs) of Danio rerio (dr) TLR5-ECD in a hybrid with another LRR protein, hagfish variab...

  4. L-Leucine improves the anaemia in models of Diamond Blackfan anaemia and the 5q- syndrome in a TP53-independent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Anupama; Payne, Elspeth M; Abayasekara, Nirmalee; Hurst, Slater N; Raiser, David M; Look, A Thomas; Berliner, Nancy; Ebert, Benjamin L; Khanna-Gupta, Arati

    2014-11-01

    Haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins (RPs) and upregulation of the tumour suppressor TP53 have been shown to be the common basis for the anaemia observed in Diamond Blackfan anaemia and 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome. We previously demonstrated that treatment with L-Leucine resulted in a marked improvement in anaemia in disease models. To determine if the L-Leucine effect was Tp53-dependent, we used antisense MOs to rps19 and rps14 in zebrafish; expression of tp53 and its downstream target cdkn1a remained elevated following L-leucine treatment. We confirmed this observation in human CD34+ cells. L-Leucine thus alleviates anaemia in RP-deficient cells in a TP53-independent manner.

  5. Elaboration of biscuits with oatmeal and fat palm with added L-leucine and calcium for sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Elita Bertolin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of oatmeal and palm fat in the elaboration of biscuits with added L-leucine and calcium in order to develop a product for sarcopenia in the elderly. The biscuits, or cookies, were elaborated applying a central composite rotational design with surface response methodology, and the significant linear, quadratic and interaction terms were used in the second order mathematical model. Physical, physicochemical and sensory analyses were performed by a trained panel. Based on the best results obtained, three cookie formulations were selected for sensory evaluation by the target group and physicochemical determinations. The formulations with the highest sensory scores for appearance and texture and medium scores for color and expansion index were selected. The addition of calcium and leucine increased significantly the concentration of these components in the biscuits elaborated resulting in a cookie with more than 30% of DRI (Dietary Reference Intake for calcium and leucine. The formulations selected showed high acceptance by the target group; therefore, they can be included in the diet of elderly with sarcopenia as a functional food.

  6. Beneficial effects of l-leucine and l-valine on arrhythmias, hemodynamics and myocardial morphology in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitręga, Katarzyna; Zorniak, Michał; Varghese, Benoy; Lange, Dariusz; Nożynski, Jerzy; Porc, Maurycy; Białka, Szymon; Krzemiński, Tadeusz F

    2011-09-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) have been shown to have a general protective effect on the heart in different animal models as well as in humans. However, so far no attempt has been made to specifically elucidate their influence on arrhythmias. Our study was performed to evaluate whether an infusion of either l-leucine or l-valine in a dose of 1mgkg(-1)h(-1) 10min before a 7-min period of left anterior descending artery occlusion followed by 15min of reperfusion, had an effect on arrhythmias measured during the reperfusion phase in the ischemia- and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias model in rats in vivo. The effect of the infusion of these substances on mean arterial blood pressure was monitored throughout the experiment. Both of the tested amino acids exhibited significant antiarrhythmic properties. l-Leucine reduced the duration of ventricular fibrillation (Pvaline decreased the duration of ventricular fibrillation (PValine lowered blood pressure in all phases of the experiment (Pvaline in the dose that was used attenuates arrhythmias and are hypotensive in their influence. Our findings lend support to the many ongoing investigations into the benefit of the application of l-leucine and l-valine in cardiology like their addition to cardioplegic solutions.

  7. Failure to Target RANKL Signaling Through p38-MAPK Results in Defective Osteoclastogenesis in the Microphthalmia Cloudy-Eyed Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Heather A; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Cabrera, Jennifer; Hildreth, Blake E; Cuitiño, Maria; Fu, Qi; Ahmad, Asrar; Toribio, Ramiro E; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sharma, Sudarshana M

    2016-03-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper family factor that is essential for terminal osteoclast differentiation. Previous work demonstrates that phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK downstream of Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL) signaling is necessary for MITF activation in osteoclasts. The spontaneous Mitf cloudy eyed (ce) allele results in production of a truncated MITF protein that lacks the leucine zipper and C-terminal end. Here we show that the Mitf(ce) allele leads to a dense bone phenotype in neonatal mice due to defective osteoclast differentiation. In response to RANKL stimulation, in vitro osteoclast differentiation was impaired in myeloid precursors derived from neonatal or adult Mitf(ce/ce) mice. The loss of the leucine zipper domain in Mitf(ce/ce) mice does not interfere with the recruitment of MITF/PU.1 complexes to target promoters. Further, we have mapped the p38 MAPK docking site within the region deleted in Mitf(ce). This interaction is necessary for the phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK. Site-directed mutations in the docking site interfered with the interaction between MITF and its co-factors FUS and BRG1. MITF-ce fails to recruit FUS and BRG1 to target genes, resulting in decreased expression of target genes and impaired osteoclast function. These results highlight the crucial role of signaling dependent MITF/p38 MAPK interactions in osteoclast differentiation.

  8. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Mojibola, Adeolu; Dongmo-Momo, Gilles; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanopart...

  9. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 restores insulin action in leucine-treated skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A; Salehzadeh, F; Metayer-Coustard, S

    2009-01-01

    Excessive nutrients, especially amino acids, impair insulin action on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that the branched-chain amino acid leucine reduces acute insulin action in primary myotubes via a negative feedback mechanism involving ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1...... to excessive leucine. In conclusion, S6K1 plays an important role in the regulation of insulin action on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle....

  10. Leucine transport is affected by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in brush border membrane vesicles from Ostrinia nubilalis Hb (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, M Giovanna; Caccia, Silvia; González-Cabrera, Joel; Ferré, Juan; Giordana, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming activity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Fa and Cry1Ca toxins and their interaction with leucine transport mediated by the K(+)/leucine cotransporter were studied in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) isolated from the midgut of Ostrinia nubilalis and Sesamia nonagrioides. In both species, as in other Lepidoptera, leucine uptake by BBMVs can take place in the absence of cations, but it can also be driven by a K(+) gradient. Experiments with the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide proved that Cry1Ab, a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin active in vivo, enhanced the membrane permeability to potassium in O. nubilalis BBMVs. This result is in agreement with similar effects observed in S. nonagrioides BBMV incubated with various Cry1 toxins active in vivo. The effect of the above toxins was tested on the initial rate of 0.1 mM: leucine influx. Instead of an increase in leucine influx, a reduction was observed with the Cry1 toxins active in vivo. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa, but not the inactive toxin Cry1Da, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner leucine uptake both in the absence and in the presence of a K(+) gradient, a clear indication that their effect is independent of the channel formed by the toxins and that this effect is exerted directly on the amino acid transport system.

  11. Investigations of a compartmental model for leucine kinetics using non-linear mixed effects models with ordinary and stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Martin; Sunnåker, Mikael; Adiels, Martin; Jirstrand, Mats; Wennberg, Bernt

    2012-12-01

    Non-linear mixed effects (NLME) models represent a powerful tool to simultaneously analyse data from several individuals. In this study, a compartmental model of leucine kinetics is examined and extended with a stochastic differential equation to model non-steady-state concentrations of free leucine in the plasma. Data obtained from tracer/tracee experiments for a group of healthy control individuals and a group of individuals suffering from diabetes mellitus type 2 are analysed. We find that the interindividual variation of the model parameters is much smaller for the NLME models, compared to traditional estimates obtained from each individual separately. Using the mixed effects approach, the population parameters are estimated well also when only half of the data are used for each individual. For a typical individual, the amount of free leucine is predicted to vary with a standard deviation of 8.9% around a mean value during the experiment. Moreover, leucine degradation and protein uptake of leucine is smaller, proteolysis larger and the amount of free leucine in the body is much larger for the diabetic individuals than the control individuals. In conclusion, NLME models offers improved estimates for model parameters in complex models based on tracer/tracee data and may be a suitable tool to reduce data sampling in clinical studies.

  12. Visual Basic 2012 programmer's reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive guide to Visual Basic 2012 Microsoft Visual Basic (VB) is the most popular programming language in the world, with millions of lines of code used in businesses and applications of all types and sizes. In this edition of the bestselling Wrox guide, Visual Basic expert Rod Stephens offers novice and experienced developers a comprehensive tutorial and reference to Visual Basic 2012. This latest edition introduces major changes to the Visual Studio development platform, including support for developing mobile applications that can take advantage of the Windows 8 operating system

  13. Timing of gene expression from different genetic systems in shaping leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) meal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guo Lin Chen; Jian Guo Wu; Murali-Tottekkaad Variath; Chun Hai Shi

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) using a diallel design with nine parents: Youcai 601, Double 20-4, Huashuang 3, Gaoyou 605, Zhongyou 821, Eyouchangjia, Zhong R-888, Tower and Zheshuang 72. The seed developmental process was divided into five stages, namely initial (days 1–15 after flowering), early (days 16–22 after flowering), middle (days 23–29), late (days 30–36), and maturing (days 37–43) developmental stages. The variation of dynamic genetic effects for leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed meal was analysed at five developmental stages, across different environments using the genetic models with time-dependent measures. The results from unconditional and conditional analyses indicated that the expression of diploid embryo, cytoplasmic and diploid maternal plant genes were important for leucine and isoleucine contents at different developmental stages of rapeseed, particularly at the initial and early developmental stages. Among different genetic systems, nutrition quality traits were mainly controlled by the accumulative or net maternal main effects and their GE interaction effects, except at maturity when the net diploid embryo effects were larger. The expression of genes was affected by the environmental conditions on 15, 22, 29 or 36 days after flowering, but was more stable at mature stage. For the isoleucine content the narrow-sense heritabilities on 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 days after flowering were 43.0, 65.7, 60.1, 65.5 and 78.2%, respectively, while for the leucine content the corresponding narrow-sense heritabilities were relatively smaller. The interaction heritabilities were more important than the general heritabilities at the first three developmental times. The improvement for isoleucine content could be achieved by selection based on the higher narrow-sense heritabilities. Various genetic systems exhibited genetic correlations among the developmental times or leucine and isoleucine contents. A

  14. Specific rates of leucine incorporation by marine bacterioplantkon in the open Mediterranean Sea in summer using cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarmin, A.; van Wambeke, F.; Catala, P.; Courties, C.; Lebaron, P.

    2010-08-01

    Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates were determined in early summer across the open stratified Mediterranean Sea along vertical profiles from 0 to 200 m. During the period of our study, the bulk leucine incorporation rate was on average 5.0 ± 4.0 (n=31) pmol leu l-1 h-1. After 3H-radiolabeled leucine incorporation and SyBR Green I staining, populations were sorted using flow cytometry. Heterotrophic prokaryotes (Hprok) were divided in several clusters according to the cytometric properties of side scatter and green fluorescence of the cells: the low nucleic acid content cells (LNA) and the high nucleic acid content cells (HNA), with high size and low size (HNA-hs and HNA-ls, respectively). LNA cells represented 45 to 63% of the Hprok abundance between surface and 200 m, and significantly contributed to the bulk activity, from 17 to 55% all along the transect. The HNA/LNA ratio of cell-specific activities was on average 2.1 ± 0.7 (n=31). Among Hprok populations from surface samples (0 down to the deep chlorophyll depth, DCM), HNA-hs was mostly responsible for the leucine incorporation activity. Its cell-specific activity was up to 13.3 and 6.9-fold higher than that of HNA-ls and LNA, respectively, and it varied within a wide range of values (0.9-54.3×10-21 mol leu cell-1 h-1). At the opposite, ratios between the specific activities of the 3 populations tended to get closer to each other, below the DCM, implying a potentially higher homogeneity in activity of Hprok in the vicinity of nutriclines. Prochlorococcus cells were easily sorted near the DCM and displayed cell-specific activities equally high, sometimes higher than the HNA-hs group (2.5-55×10-21 mol leu cell-1 h-1). We then showed that all the sorted populations were key-players in leucine incorporation into proteins. The mixotrophic feature of certain photosynthetic prokaryotes and the non-negligible activity of LNA cells all over Mediterranean were reinforced.

  15. Specific rates of leucine incorporation by marine bacterioplantkon in the open Mediterranean Sea in summer using cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Talarmin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell-specific leucine incorporation rates were determined in early summer across the open stratified Mediterranean Sea along vertical profiles from 0 to 200 m. During the period of our study, the bulk leucine incorporation rate was on average 5.0 ± 4.0 (n=31 pmol leu l−1 h−1. After 3H-radiolabeled leucine incorporation and SyBR Green I staining, populations were sorted using flow cytometry. Heterotrophic prokaryotes (Hprok were divided in several clusters according to the cytometric properties of side scatter and green fluorescence of the cells: the low nucleic acid content cells (LNA and the high nucleic acid content cells (HNA, with high size and low size (HNA-hs and HNA-ls, respectively. LNA cells represented 45 to 63% of the Hprok abundance between surface and 200 m, and significantly contributed to the bulk activity, from 17 to 55% all along the transect. The HNA/LNA ratio of cell-specific activities was on average 2.1 ± 0.7 (n=31. Among Hprok populations from surface samples (0 down to the deep chlorophyll depth, DCM, HNA-hs was mostly responsible for the leucine incorporation activity. Its cell-specific activity was up to 13.3 and 6.9-fold higher than that of HNA-ls and LNA, respectively, and it varied within a wide range of values (0.9–54.3×10−21 mol leu cell−1 h−1. At the opposite, ratios between the specific activities of the 3 populations tended to get closer to each other, below the DCM, implying a potentially higher homogeneity in activity of Hprok in the vicinity of nutriclines. Prochlorococcus cells were easily sorted near the DCM and displayed cell-specific activities equally high, sometimes higher than the HNA-hs group (2.5–55×10−21 mol leu cell−1 h−1. We then showed that all the sorted populations were key-players in leucine incorporation into proteins. The mixotrophic feature of

  16. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

  17. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Aggarwal

    Full Text Available Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

  18. Bacterial production in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil evaluated by ³H-leucine incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Gonzalez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the necessary ³H-leucine concentration to estimate bacterial production in Guanabara Bay through saturation curves. A second aim was to collect preliminary data of bacterial production in two distinct sites corresponding to different water qualities: Urca inlet and Governador Island. Saturation curves were made with water samples taken at the main circulation channel of the bay, Paquetá Island, and the two sites mentioned before. The ³H-leucine curves showed similar pattern for all studied areas, indicating the ideal isotope concentration to be 10 nM. Bacterial biomass production ranged from 0.40 to 4.53 µgC L-1 h-1 in Urca and from 3.86 to 73.72 µgC L-1 h-1 in Governador Island indicating the relationship between nutrients and organic matter supply and bacterial productivity. This work is an important reference for studies on trophodynamics, biogeochemical cycles and modelling in Guanabara Bay.O objetivo desse trabalho foi realizar curvas de saturação a fim de otimizar a concentração de ³H-leucina necessária para avaliar produção bacteriana na Baía de Guanabara. Objetivou-se ainda a aquisição de dados preliminares de produção bacteriana em dois locais distintos em termos de qualidade de água : enseada da Urca e Ilha do Governador. As amostras para as curvas foram obtidas na região do Canal Central e na Ilha de Paquetá, além dos dois locais de coleta citados acima. Seguiu-se a metodologia descrita por Kirchman et al. (1985 e modificada por Smith & Azam (1992. As curvas de ³H-leucina mostraram um padrão semelhante para todas as áreas estudadas, indicando a concentração ótima de isótopo de 10 nM. A produção de biomassa bacteriana variou de 0,40 a 4,53 µgC L-1 h-1 na Urca e de 3,86 a 73,72 µgC L-1 h-1 na Ilha do Governador confirmando a relação entre a disponibilidade de nutrientes e matéria orgânica e o aumento da produtividade bacteriana. Essas análises poderão ser

  19. Basic Learning Processes in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Hayne W.

    This book is an introduction to the psychological study of basic learning processes in children. Written for students who are not majors in psychology and who do not have much familiarity with the technical vocabulary of psychology, it has two themes: even the most basic kinds of learning are included by cognitive processes or mental activities;…

  20. Basics for Handling Food Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) Basics for Safe Food Handling dishes in bowls of ice or use ... 9 months Do not freeze 2 Basics for Safe Food Handling Product Refrigerator Freezer (40 °F) (0 °F) ...

  1. Japanese Basic Course: Exercise Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This exercise book, prepared for use after Lesson 121 of the Defense Language Institute Basic Course in Japanese, provides for instruction in the use of Kanji dictionaries, familiarizes students with useful phrases and expressions that are not included in the Basic Course, and allows for greater variety in the classroom. The ten lessons, in the…

  2. The bHLH transcription factor bHLH104 interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and modulates iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression.

  3. Engineering the leucine biosynthetic pathway for isoamyl alcohol overproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jifeng; Mishra, Pranjul; Ching, Chi Bun

    2017-01-01

    Isoamyl alcohol can be used not only as a biofuel, but also as a precursor for various chemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae inherently produces a small amount of isoamyl alcohol via the leucine degradation pathway, but the yield is very low. In the current study, several strategies were devised to overproduce isoamyl alcohol in budding yeast. The engineered yeast cells with the cytosolic isoamyl alcohol biosynthetic pathway produced significantly higher amounts of isobutanol over isoamyl alcohol, suggesting that the majority of the metabolic flux was diverted to the isobutanol biosynthesis due to the broad substrate specificity of Ehrlich pathway enzymes. To channel the key intermediate 2-ketosiovalerate (KIV) towards α-IPM biosynthesis, we introduced an artificial protein scaffold to pull dihydroxyacid dehydratase and α-IPM synthase into the close proximity, and the resulting strain yielded more than twofold improvement of isoamyl alcohol. The best isoamyl alcohol producer yielded 522.76 ± 38.88 mg/L isoamyl alcohol, together with 540.30 ± 48.26 mg/L isobutanol and 82.56 ± 8.22 mg/L 2-methyl-1-butanol. To our best knowledge, our work represents the first study to bypass the native compartmentalized α-IPM biosynthesis pathway for the isoamyl alcohol overproduction in budding yeast. More importantly, artificial protein scaffold based on the feature of quaternary structure of enzymes would be useful in improving the catalytic efficiency and the product specificity of other enzymatic reactions.

  4. Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II interacts with the leucin rich repeat of NLR family member Ipaf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Cividini

    Full Text Available IMP/GMP preferring cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II is a bifunctional enzyme whose activities and expression play crucial roles in nucleotide pool maintenance, nucleotide-dependent pathways and programmed cell death. Alignment of primary amino acid sequences of cN-II from human and other organisms show a strong conservation throughout the entire vertebrata taxon suggesting a fundamental role in eukaryotic cells. With the aim to investigate the potential role of this homology in protein-protein interactions, a two hybrid system screening of cN-II interactors was performed in S. cerevisiae. Among the X positive hits, the Leucin Rich Repeat (LRR domain of Ipaf was found to interact with cN-II. Recombinant Ipaf isoform B (lacking the Nucleotide Binding Domain was used in an in vitro affinity chromatography assay confirming the interaction obtained in the screening. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation with proteins from wild type Human Embryonic Kidney 293 T cells demonstrated that endogenous cN-II co-immunoprecipitated both with wild type Ipaf and its LRR domain after transfection with corresponding expression vectors, but not with Ipaf lacking the LRR domain. These results suggest that the interaction takes place through the LRR domain of Ipaf. In addition, a proximity ligation assay was performed in A549 lung carcinoma cells and in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and showed a positive cytosolic signal, confirming that this interaction occurs in human cells. This is the first report of a protein-protein interaction involving cN-II, suggesting either novel functions or an additional level of regulation of this complex enzyme.

  5. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the vertebrae of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mona E; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Kohler, Achim; Baeverfjord, Grete; Enersen, Grethe; Ruyter, Bente; Takle, Harald; Hannesson, Kirsten O

    2013-09-24

    We analysed the distribution and expression of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) decorin, biglycan and lumican in vertebral columns of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. with and without radiographically detectable deformities. Vertebral deformities are a reoccurring problem in salmon and other intensively farmed species, and an understanding of the components involved in the pathologic development of the vertebrae is important in order to find adequate solutions to this problem. Using immunohistology and light microscopy, we found that in non-deformed vertebrae biglycan, lumican and decorin were all expressed in osteoblasts at the vertebral growth zones and at the ossification front of the chondrocytic arches. Hence, the SLRPs are expressed in regions where intramembranous and endochondral ossification take place. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican was demonstrated in a primary osteoblast culture established from Atlantic salmon, supporting the in vivo findings. Transcription of the SLRPs increased during differentiation of the osteoblasts in vitro and where lumican mRNA expression increased later in the differentiation compared with decorin and biglycan. Intriguingly, in vertebral fusions, biglycan, decorin and lumican protein expression was extended to trans-differentiating cells at the border between arch centra and osteoblast growth zones. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican differed between non-deformed and fused vertebrae, as shown by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Western blotting revealed an additional band of biglycan in fused vertebrae which had a higher molecular weight than in non-deformed vertebrae. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed more spectral focality in the endplates of vertebral fusions and significantly more non-reducible collagen crosslinks compared with non-deformed vertebrae, thus identifying differences in bone structure.

  6. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta;

    2015-01-01

    19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein...... was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 k...... to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs...

  7. L-leucine, L-methionine, and L-phenylalanine share a Na(+)/K (+)-dependent amino acid transporter in shrimp hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, Ada; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV), made from Atlantic White shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus), were used to characterize the transport properties of (3)H-L-leucine influx by these membrane systems and how other essential amino acids and the cations, sodium and potassium, interact with this transport system. (3)H-L-leucine uptake by BBMV was pH-sensitive and occurred against transient transmembrane concentration gradients in both Na(+)- and K(+)-containing incubation media, suggesting that either cation was capable of providing a driving force for amino acid accumulation. (3)H-L-leucine uptake in NaCl or KCl media were each three times greater in acidic pH (pH 5.5) than in alkaline pH (pH 8.5). The essential amino acid, L-methionine, at 20 mM significantly (p  0.05) and may represent an L-methionine- and cation-independent transport system. (3)H-L-leucine influxes in both NaCl and KCl incubation media were hyperbolic functions of [L-leucine], following the carrier-mediated Michaelis-Menten equation. In NaCl, (3)H-L-leucine influx displayed a low apparent K M (high affinity) and low apparent J max, while in KCl the transport exhibited a high apparent K M (low affinity) and high apparent J max. L-methionine or L-phenylalanine (7 and 20 mM) were competitive inhibitors of (3)H-L-leucine influxes in both NaCl and KCl media, producing a significant (p phenylalanine-shared carrier system that is enhanced by acidic pH and can be stimulated by either Na(+) or K(+) acting as co-transport drivers binding to shared activator sites.

  8. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  9. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction. PMID:26136767

  10. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  11. Basic properties of Fedosov supermanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, B

    2004-01-01

    Basic properties of even (odd) supermanifolds endowed with a connection respecting a given symplectic structure are studied. Such supermanifolds can be considered as generalization of Fedosov manifolds to the supersymmetric case.

  12. Complementary Basic Education in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    大津, 和子

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses current development in the Complementary Basic Education program (COBET), which aims to contribute to the provision of alternative learning opportunities for out-of-school children, particularly girls in a non-formal setting. The Ministry of Education and Culture started the program as part of the Basic Education Master Plan (BEMP) in 1999. Unlike traditional primary schools, the COBET centers have no school fees, no uniforms, no corporal punishment and no child labou...

  13. The Effects of Leucine, Zinc, and Chromium Supplements on Inflammatory Events of the Respiratory System in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of serious micro- and macrovascular diseases that affect nearly every system in the body, including the respiratory system. Non-enzymatic protein glycation due to hyperglycaemic stress has fundamental implications due to the large capillary network and amount of connective tissue in the lung. The current study was designed to determine whether leucine, zinc, and chromium supplementations influence the function and histological structure of the respiratory tract in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Seventy-seven rats were divided into eleven groups, consisting of 7 animals each. One group served as negative control and insulin and glibenclamide were used as positive control drugs. Thus, eight groups received the nutritional supplements alone or in combination with each other. Nutritional supplements and glibenclamide were added to the drinking water and neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin was subcutaneously injected during the 4 weeks of treatment period. The induction of type 2 diabetes in the rats caused an infiltration of mononuclear cells and edema in the submucosa of the trachea and lung, severe fibrosis around the vessels and airways, and perivascular and peribronchial infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrin. In the diabetic group, the total inflammation score and Reid index significantly increased. Diabetes induction significantly reduced the total antioxidant status and elevated the lipid peroxidation products in the serum, lung lavage and lung tissue of the diabetic animals. Treatment with nutritional supplements significantly decreased the histopathological changes and inflammatory indices in the diabetic animals. Supplementation of diabetic rats with leucine, zinc, and chromium, alone and in combination, significantly increased the total antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation level in the diabetic animals. The nutritional supplements improved the enzymatic antioxidant activity of catalase

  14. Identification of a novel Leucine-rich repeat protein and candidate PP1 regulatory subunit expressed in developing spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperry Ann O

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is comprised of a series of highly regulated developmental changes that transform the precursor germ cell into a highly specialized spermatozoon. The last phase of spermatogenesis, termed spermiogenesis, involves dramatic morphological change including formation of the acrosome, elongation and condensation of the nucleus, formation of the flagella, and disposal of unnecessary cytoplasm. A prominent cytoskeletal component of the developing spermatid is the manchette, a unique microtubular structure that surrounds the nucleus of the developing spermatid and is thought to assist in both the reshaping of the nucleus and redistribution of spermatid cytoplasm. Although the molecular motor KIFC1 has been shown to associate with the manchette, its precise role in function of the manchette and the identity of its testis specific protein partners are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins in the testis that interact with KIFC1 using a yeast 2 hybrid screen of a testis cDNA library. Results Thirty percent of the interacting clones identified in our screen contain an identical cDNA encoding a 40 kD protein. This interacting protein has 4 leucine-rich repeats in its amino terminal half and is expressed primarily in the testis; therefore we have named this protein testis leucine-rich repeat protein or TLRR. TLRR was also found to associate tightly with the KIFC1 targeting domain using affinity chromatography. In addition to the leucine-rich repeats, TLRR contains a consensus-binding site for protein phosphatase-1 (PP1. Immunocytochemistry using a TLRR specific antibody demonstrates that this protein is found near the manchette of developing spermatids. Conclusion We have identified a previously uncharacterized leucine-rich repeat protein that is expressed abundantly in the testis and associates with the manchette of developing spermatids, possibly through its interaction with the KIFC1 molecular motor

  15. A novel mutation of a leucine residue in coil 1A of keratin 9 in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, H; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H

    1997-07-01

    Keratin 9 mutation was examined in a Japanese kindred of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), which is a dominantly inherited autosomal disorder of keratinization characterized by diffuse thickening of the palms and soles and by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis histologically. We report herein a novel mutation, a C --> G transversion at nucleotide position 541 that converts a leucine residue (CTC) to a valine (GTC) at codon 159. As in all other reported cases of keratin 9 mutation in EPPK, this mutation lies within the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, which is considered to play a role in the correct alignment of the coiled-coil molecules.

  16. A new method for determining the metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil using tritiated leucine and immunomagnetic separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, Gitte; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Frette, Lone

    2000-01-01

    A new assay, using immunomagnetic separation and uptake of tritiated leucine ([3H]-Leu), was developed for measuring the in situ metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil. Such assays are needed to assess the role individual species play in diverse microbial soil communities....... The method was optimized using Pseudomonas putida KT2440¿:¿:Tc+/TOL::gfp inoculated into soil microcosms. Inoculated soil samples were incubated with [3H]-Leu followed by an immunomagnetic separation to recover the target bacteria. Radiolabel incorporated by the target bacteria was then measured. Incubation...

  17. Effects of a leucine and pyridoxine-containing nutraceutical on body weight and composition in obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemel MB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael B Zemel,1,2 Antje Bruckbauer11NuSirt Sciences Inc, 2Nutrition Department, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USABackground: We recently demonstrated leucine to modulate energy partitioning between adipose tissue and muscle. Further, leucine exhibits a synergy with B6, resulting in reduced adipocyte lipid storage coupled with increased muscle fat oxidation. Accordingly, a nutraceutical (NuShape™ containing 2.25 g leucine and 30 mg B6 increased fat oxidation by > 30 g/day in a 28-day randomized controlled trial. The present study evaluated the long-term efficacy of this combination in modulating body weight and composition.Methods: Two 24-week, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, one with weight maintenance (n = 20 and one hypocaloric (-500 kcal/day; n = 24, were conducted using the nutraceutical Nushape in obese subjects.Results: The supplement resulted in fat loss in the maintenance study (-1.12 ± 0.36 and -1.82 ± 0.70 kg at 12 and 24 weeks, P < 0.01 versus placebo while no change was found in the placebo group. In the hypocaloric study, the supplement group lost up to twice as much weight (6.18 ± 1.02 versus 3.40 ± 0.81 kg at 12 weeks and 8.15 ± 1.33 versus 5.25 ± 1.13 kg at 24 weeks, P < 0.01 and fat (4.96 ± 0.61 versus 2.31 ± 0.53 kg at 12 weeks and 7.00 ± 0.95 versus 4.22 ± 0.74 kg at 24 weeks, P < 0.01 than the placebo group.Conclusion: This nutraceutical combination results in significant fat loss in the absence of caloric restriction and markedly enhances weight and fat loss by 50%–80% over a 24-week period.Keywords: leucine, vitamin B6, pyridoxine, fat loss, weight loss, caloric restriction, adiposity, body composition

  18. Repeated post-exercise administration with a mixture of leucine and glucose alters the plasma amino acid profile in Standardbred trotters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nostell Katarina EA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched chain amino acid leucine is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion. Used in combination with glucose it can increase the insulin response and the post exercise re-synthesis of glycogen in man. Decreased plasma amino acid concentrations have been reported after intravenous or per oral administration of leucine in man as well as after a single per oral dose in horses. In man, a negative correlation between the insulin response and the concentrations of isoleucine, valine and methionine have been shown but results from horses are lacking. This study aims to determine the effect of repeated per oral administration with a mixture of glucose and leucine on the free amino acid profile and the insulin response in horses after glycogen-depleting exercise. Methods In a crossover design, after a glycogen depleting exercise, twelve Standardbred trotters received either repeated oral boluses of glucose, 1 g/kg body weight (BW at 0, 2 and 4 h with addition of leucine 0.1 g/kg BW at 0 and 4 h (GLU+LEU, or repeated boluses of water at 0, 2 and 4 h (CON. Blood samples for analysis of glucose, insulin and amino acid concentrations were collected prior to exercise and over a 6 h post-exercise period. A mixed model approach was used for the statistical analyses. Results Plasma leucine, isoleucine, valine, tyrosine and phenylalanine concentrations increased after exercise. Post-exercise serum glucose and plasma insulin response were significantly higher in the GLU+LEU treatment compared to the CON treatment. Plasma leucine concentrations increased after supplementation. During the post-exercise period isoleucine, valine and methionine concentrations decreased in both treatments but were significantly lower in the GLU+LEU treatment. There was no correlation between the insulin response and the response in plasma leucine, isoleucine, valine and methionine. Conclusions Repeated post-exercise administration with a mixture of leucine

  19. The i6A37 tRNA modification is essential for proper decoding of UUX-Leucine codons during rpoS and iraP translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubee, Joseph I; Olu, Morenike; Thompson, Karl M

    2016-05-01

    The translation of rpoS(σ(S)), the general stress/stationary phase sigma factor, is tightly regulated at the post-transcriptional level by several factors via mechanisms that are not clearly defined. One of these factors is MiaA, the enzyme necessary for the first step in theN(6)-isopentyl-2-thiomethyl adenosinemethyl adenosine 37 (ms(2)i(6)A37) tRNA modification. We tested the hypothesis that an elevated UUX-Leucine/total leucine codon ratio can be used to identify transcripts whose translation would be sensitive to loss of the MiaA-dependent modification. We identified iraPas another candidate MiaA-sensitive gene, based on the UUX-Leucine/total leucine codon ratio. AniraP-lacZ fusion was significantly decreased in the abse nce of MiaA, consistent with our predictive model. To determine the role of MiaA in UUX-Leucine decoding in rpoS and iraP, we measured β-galactosidase-specific activity of miaA(-)rpo Sandira P translational fusions upon overexpression of leucine tRNAs. We observed suppression of the MiaA effect on rpoS, and notira P, via overexpression of tRNA(LeuX)but not tRNA(LeuZ) We also tested the hypothesis that the MiaA requirement for rpoS and iraP translation is due to decoding of UUX-Leucine codons within the rpoS and iraP transcripts, respectively. We observed a partial suppression of the MiaA requirement for rpoS and iraP translational fusions containing one or both UUX-Leucine codons removed. Taken together, this suggests that MiaA is necessary for rpoS and iraP translation through proper decoding of UUX-Leucine codons and that rpoS and iraP mRNAs are both modification tunable transcripts (MoTTs) via the presence of the modification.

  20. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn; van Hall, Gerrit; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (PlaceboBCAABCAA. However, after 180 min of recovery this difference between EAA and BCAA had disappeared, although with both these supplements the increases were still higher than with leucine (40%, P BCAA.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-leucine by alkaline diperiodatocuprate(III)—A free radical intervention, deamination and decarboxylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keerti M Naik; Sharanappa T Nandibewoor

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of L-leucine by diperiodatocuprate (III) (DPC) in aqueous alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.10mol dm-3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between L-leucine and DPC in alkaline medium exhibits 1:4 stoichiometry (L-leucine: DPC). The reaction is of first order in [DPC] and has less than unit order in both [L-leucine] and [alkali]. However, the order in [Lleucine] and [alkali] changes from first order to zero order as their concentration increase. Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. Increase in periodate concentration decreased the rate. The oxidation reaction in alkaline medium has been shown to proceed via a monoperiodatocuprate (III) - L-leucine complex, which decomposed slowly in a rate-determining step followed by other fast steps to give the products. The main oxidative products were identified by spot test and GC-MS. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanism were calculated.

  2. Altered Specificity of DNA-Binding Proteins with Transition Metal Dimerization Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenoud, Bernard; Schepartz, Alanna

    1993-01-01

    The bZIP motif is characterized by a leucine zipper domain that mediates dimerization and a basic domain that contacts DNA. A series of transition metal dimerization domains were used to alter systematically the relative orientation of basic domain peptides. Both the affinity and the specificity of the peptide-DNA interaction depend on domain orientation. These results indicate that the precise configuration linking the domains is important; dimerization is not always sufficient for DNA binding. This approach to studying the effect of orientation on protein function complements mutagenesis and could be used in many systems.

  3. Dopamine transporter comparative molecular modeling and binding site prediction using the LeuT(Aa) leucine transporter as a template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarte, Martín; Madura, Jeffry D; Surratt, Christopher K

    2008-02-15

    Pharmacological and behavioral studies indicate that binding of cocaine and the amphetamines by the dopamine transporter (DAT) protein is principally responsible for initiating the euphoria and addiction associated with these drugs. The lack of an X-ray crystal structure for the DAT or any other member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family has hindered understanding of psychostimulant recognition at the atomic level; structural information has been obtained largely from mutagenesis and biophysical studies. The recent publication of a crystal structure for the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT(Aa), a distantly related NSS family homolog, provides for the first time a template for three-dimensional comparative modeling of NSS proteins. A novel computational modeling approach using the capabilities of the Molecular Operating Environment program MOE 2005.06 in conjunction with other comparative modeling servers generated the LeuT(Aa)-directed DAT model. Probable dopamine and amphetamine binding sites were identified within the DAT model using multiple docking approaches. Binding sites for the substrate ligands (dopamine and amphetamine) overlapped substantially with the analogous region of the LeuT(Aa) crystal structure for the substrate leucine. The docking predictions implicated DAT side chains known to be critical for high affinity ligand binding and suggest novel mutagenesis targets in elucidating discrete substrate and inhibitor binding sites. The DAT model may guide DAT ligand QSAR studies, and rational design of novel DAT-binding therapeutics.

  4. Ursolic acid inhibits leucine-stimulated mTORC1 signaling by suppressing mTOR localization to lysosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ou

    Full Text Available Ursolic acid (UA, a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in medicinal herbs and fruits, has been reported to possess a wide range of beneficial properties including anti-hyperglycemia, anti-obesity, and anti-cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of UA remain largely unknown. Here we show that UA inhibits leucine-induced activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway in C2C12 myotubes. The UA-mediated inhibition of mTORC1 is independent of Akt, tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2 (TSC1/2, and Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb, suggesting that UA negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling by targeting at a site downstream of these mTOR regulators. UA treatment had no effect on the interaction between mTOR and its activator Raptor or inhibitor Deptor, but suppressed the binding of RagB to Raptor and inhibited leucine-induced mTOR lysosomal localization. Taken together, our study identifies UA as a direct negative regulator of the mTORC1 signaling pathway and suggests a novel mechanism by which UA exerts its beneficial function.

  5. Crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the archetypal small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul G; McEwan, Paul A; Dodd, Carole M; Bergmann, Ernst M; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2004-11-02

    Decorin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix proteoglycan with a variety of important biological functions that are mediated by its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, cytokines, and cell surface receptors. Decorin is the prototype of the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and proteins (SLRPs), characterized by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), flanked by two cysteine-rich regions. We report here the crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the best characterized member of the SLRP family. Each monomer adopts the curved solenoid fold characteristic of LRR domains, with a parallel beta-sheet on the inside interwoven with loops containing short segments of beta-strands, 3(10) helices, and polyproline II helices on the outside. Two main features are unique to this structure. First, decorin dimerizes through the concave surfaces of the LRR domains, which have been implicated previously in protein-ligand interactions. The amount of surface buried in this dimer rivals the buried surfaces of some of the highest-affinity macromolecular complexes reported to date. Second, the C-terminal region adopts an unusual capping motif that involves a laterally extended LRR and a disulfide bond. This motif seems to be unique to SLRPs and has not been observed in any other LRR protein structure to date. Possible implications of these features for decorin ligand binding and SLRP function are discussed.

  6. Axon reaction in hypoglossal and dorsal motor vagal neurons of adult rat: incorporation of (3H)leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldskogius, H.; Barron, K.D.; Regal, R.

    1984-07-01

    Pairs of adult rats received (/sup 3/H)leucine 0.25, 1, and 16 h before killing and zero to 164 days after unilateral cervical vagotomy and hypoglossal neurotomy. Grain counts and morphometric measurements were made on axotomized and uninjured neurons in histoautoradiographs of the medullary nuclei. Axotomized hypoglossal neurons, which largely survive the injury, both enlarged and incorporated increased amounts of tritiated leucine at each labeling interval, 3 through 28 days postoperatively. In the vagal dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), axotomized cells, which frequently die after neurotomy, enlarged slightly through 28 days postoperatively, then atrophied; DMN neurons increased amino acid uptake for a shorter period (days 7 through 14) than hypoglossal neurons. Axotomized DMN neurons did not sustain increased protein synthesis as long as their hypoglossal counterparts and seemed to fail to increase synthesis of structural proteins with long half-lives (16-h labeling interval). The frequently necrobiotic response of axotomized DMN neurons may relate to these phenomena. From these and earlier results, the authors conclude that axon reaction appears to differ fundamentally in peripheral and central neurons. This difference may have significance for research on regeneration in the central nervous system.

  7. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  8. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn

    2016-01-01

    of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo......, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (PlaceboBCAA...6K1, being 18% higher with EAA than BCAA. However, after 180 min of recovery this difference between EAA and BCAA had disappeared, although with both these supplements the increases were still higher than with leucine (40%, P

  9. Effects of "Bioactive" amino acids leucine, glutamate, arginine and tryptophan on feed intake and mRNA expression of relative neuropeptides in broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Songbo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Feed intake control is vital to ensuring optimal nutrition and achieving full potential for growth and development in poultry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of L-leucine, L-glutamate, L-tryptophan and L-arginine on feed intake and the mRNA expression levels of hypothalamic Neuropeptide involved in feed intake regulation in broiler chicks. Leucine, glutamate, tryptophan or arginine was intra-cerebroventricularly (ICV administrated to 4d-old broiler chicks respectively and the feed intake were recorded at various time points. Quantitative PCR was performed to determine the hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related protein (AgRP, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF. Our results showed that ICV administration of L-leucine (0.15 or 1.5  μmol significantly (P P 

  10. E-Basics: Online Basic Training in Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Ben

    2016-01-01

    E-Basics is an online training in program evaluation concepts and skills designed for youth development professionals, especially those working in nonformal science education. Ten hours of online training in seven modules is designed to prepare participants for mentoring and applied practice, mastery, and/or team leadership in program evaluation.…

  11. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  12. Basic research for environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojibola, Adeolu; Dongmo-Momo, Gilles; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine's morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine's {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions.

  14. A leucine-rich diet and exercise affect the biomechanical characteristics of the digital flexor tendon in rats after nutritional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Wesley Carvalho; Benevides, Gustavo Pereira; Alferes, Leda Maria Totti; Salomão, Emilianne Miguel; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Gomes, Laurecir

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the capacity of athletic performance depends on adequate nutrition, which ensures optimal function of the musculoskeletal system, including tendon stability. However, little is known about the status of tendons and extracellular matrix modifications during malnutrition and nutritional recovery when leucine is used in response to exercise conditioning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collagen content and biomechanical aspects of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) in malnourished rats submitted to nutritional recovery (control diet or leucine-rich diet) and aerobic physical activity. After 60 days of undernourishment (6% protein diet), the malnourished rats were subsequently nutritionally recovered with a control diet or leucine-rich diet and trained or not (swimming, without overload) for 5 weeks. The biomechanical analysis and quantification of hydroxyproline were assessed in the DDFT in all experimental groups. The leucine-rich diet increased hydroxyproline content in the tension region, independently of the training. In the compression region, hydroxyproline content was higher in the malnourished and leucine-trained groups. Biomechanical analysis showed a lower load in the malnourished and all-trained groups. The lowest stress was observed with control-trained animals. The nutritional-recovered groups showed higher strain values corresponding to control group, while the lowest values were observed in malnourished and trained groups. The results suggest that a leucine-rich diet stimulates collagen synthesis of the DDFT, especially when in combination with physical exercise, and seems to determine the increase of resistance and the biomechanical characteristics of tendons.

  15. Estimation of the leucine and histidine requirements for piglets fed a low-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A G; Kluge, H; Mielenz, N; Corrent, E; Bartelt, J; Stangl, G I

    2016-11-01

    Reduction of the CP content in the diets of piglets requires supplementation with crystalline essential amino acids (AA). Data on the leucine (Leu) and histidine (His) requirements of young pigs fed low-CP diets are limited and have primarily been obtained from nonlinear models. However, these models do not consider the possible decline in appetite and growth that can occur when pigs are fed excessive amounts of AA such as Leu. Therefore, two dose-response studies were conducted to estimate the standardised ileal digestible (SID) Leu : lysine (Lys) and His : Lys required to optimise the growth performance of young pigs. In both studies, the average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI) and gain-to-feed ratio (G : F) were determined during a 6-week period. To ensure that the diets had sub-limiting Lys levels, a preliminary Lys dose-response study was conducted. In the Leu study, 60 35-day-old piglets of both sexes were randomly assigned to one of five treatments and fed a low-CP diet (15%) with SID Leu : Lys levels of 83%, 94%, 104%, 115% or 125%. The His study used 120 31-day-old piglets of both sexes, which were allotted to one of five treatments and fed a low-CP diet (14%) with SID His : Lys levels of 22%, 26%, 30%, 34% or 38%. Linear broken-line, curvilinear-plateau and quadratic-function models were used for estimations of SID Leu : Lys and SID His : Lys. The minimum SID Leu : Lys level needed to maximise ADG, ADFI and G : F was, on average, 101% based on the linear broken-line and curvilinear-plateau models. Using the quadratic-function model, the minimum SID Leu : Lys level needed to maximise ADG, ADFI and G : F was 108%. Data obtained from the quadratic-function analysis further showed that a ±10% deviation from the identified Leu requirement was accompanied by a small decline in the ADG (-3%). The minimum SID His : Lys level needed to maximise ADG, ADFI and G : F was 27% and 28% using the linear broken-line and curvilinear-plateau models

  16. Electronic imaging fundamentals: basic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizy, K N

    1983-01-01

    Introduction of the computer into the field of medical imaging, as typified by the extensive use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), created an important need for a basic understanding of the principles of digital imaging. This paper reviews these fundamental principles, starting with the definition of images and the interaction of these images with television display systems, then continuing with a detailed description of the way in which imaging systems are specified. This work defines the basic terms and concepts that will be used throughout the contents of this issue.

  17. Stereochemistry basic concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nógrádi, M

    2013-01-01

    Stereochemistry: Basic Concepts and Applications is a three-chapter text that introduces the basic principles and concepts of stereochemistry, as well as its application to organic chemistry application.Chapter 1 describes first the stereochemistry of the ground state, specifically the configuration and conformation of organic compounds, as well as the most important methods for its investigation. This chapter also deals with the kinetics of conformational changes and provides an overview of the so-called ""applied stereochemistry"". Chapter 2 focuses on the analysis of the internal motions of

  18. Basic linear partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Treves, Francois

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on the archetypes of linear partial differential equations, this text for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students features most of the basic classical results. The methods, however, are decidedly nontraditional: in practically every instance, they tend toward a high level of abstraction. This approach recalls classical material to contemporary analysts in a language they can understand, as well as exploiting the field's wealth of examples as an introduction to modern theories.The four-part treatment covers the basic examples of linear partial differential equations and their

  19. The chemisorptive bond basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Alfred

    1974-01-01

    The Chemisorptive Bond: Basic Concepts describes the basic concepts of the chemisorptive bond on solid surfaces from the simple analogies with ordinary chemical bonds to the quantum-mechanical approaches.This book is composed of 10 chapters and begins with discussions of simple formulas for correlating measurable quantities in chemisorptions and catalysis. The succeeding chapters deal with theories based on quantum-mechanical principles that describe the mutual interactions of atoms of the solid and foreign atoms on the surface. The remaining chapters consider the possible arrangements

  20. Predicting Grades in Basic Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Elise

    1994-01-01

    Data from (n=470) students at Owens Technical College in Fall 1991 showed that high school GPA was the best predictor of grades in Basic Algebra, followed by high school rank, college GPA, ACT natural sciences, ASSET numerical skills, and ASSET elementary algebra scores. (11 references) (SW)

  1. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficult to manage. The basic fact is healthy teeth and gums are essential for: n Preventing infections which may cause MS symptoms to increase n ... person clenches his or her jaws or “grinds” teeth, usually during the night n ... and periodontitis are infections, each of which can be made worse by ...

  2. Basic DTU Wind Energy controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    This report contains a description and documentation, including source code, of the basic DTU Wind Energy controller applicable for pitch-regulated, variable speed wind turbines. The controller features both partial and full load operation capabilities as well as switching mechanisms ensuring...

  3. Unions: Bread, Butter & Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business Community, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Unions are natural providers of basic skills instruction. They are in daily workplace contact with their membership, are trusted to work on members' behalf, and speak the language of the worker. Unions are trying to address the needs of illiterate workers through collective bargaining arrangements in which employers contribute a percentage of…

  4. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Statistics Center . How many people are diagnosed with HIV each year in the United States? In 2015, ...

  5. Guarani Basic Course, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert W.; And Others

    This volume of the basic course in Guarani (the indigenous language of Paraguay) contains the core stage, or class-instructional phase, of the ten units presented in Volume One. These units contain explanations, exercises, dialogues, various types of pattern drills, suggestions for games and communication activities, and various types of…

  6. Guarani Basic Course, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert W.; And Others

    This is the first in a two-volume basic course in Guarani, the indigenous language of Paraguay. The volume consists of an introduction to the Guarani language, some general principles for adult language-learning, and ten instructional units. Because the goal of the course is to encourage and lead the learner to communicate in Guarani in class and…

  7. The Measurement of Basic Stuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disch, James G., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven articles contain information about measurement and evaluation in physical education and sport and complement the "Basic Stuff" series. They focus on (1) student self-assessment for exercise physiology; (2) monitoring motor development; (3) biomechanical analysis; and (4) measurements of aesthetic qualities, psychosocial…

  8. Emergency medicine: beyond the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1997-07-01

    Medical emergencies can arise in the dental office. Preparedness for these emergencies is predicated on an ability to rapidly recognize a problem and to effectively institute prompt and proper management. In all emergency situations, management is based on implementation of basic life support, as needed. The author describes the appropriate management of two common emergency situations: allergy and chest pain.

  9. Basic research in kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, E.; Rathmell, W.K.; Junker, K.; Brannon, A.R.; Pouliot, F.; Finley, D.S.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Kirkali, Z.; Uemura, H.; Belldegrun, A.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Advances in basic research will enhance prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of renal cancer patients. OBJECTIVE: To discuss advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of renal cancer, targeted therapies, renal cancer and immunity, and genetic factors and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

  10. Thermionics basic principles of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J; Ashhurst, W

    2013-01-01

    Basic Principles of Electronics, Volume I : Thermionics serves as a textbook for students in physics. It focuses on thermionic devices. The book covers topics on electron dynamics, electron emission, and the themionic vacuum diode and triode. Power amplifiers, oscillators, and electronic measuring equipment are studied as well. The text will be of great use to physics and electronics students, and inventors.

  11. Women in Adult Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Rosemarie J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of adult basic education (ABE) program directors in five states revealed that most ABE teachers are women and work part-time without benefits while most ABE administrators are men who are employed full-time. Concludes that women employed in ABE are victims of discrimination. (EM)

  12. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  13. Basic Income on the Agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Loek; Veen, van der Robert-Jan

    2000-01-01

    Persisting unemployment, poverty and social exclusion, labour market flexibility, job insecurity and higher wage inequality, changing patterns of work and family life are among the factors that exert pressure on welfare states in Europe. This book explores the potential of an unconditional basic inc

  14. Basic types of plant layout

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Bacalla, Julio; Docente FII-UNMSM

    2014-01-01

    Basic formats plant layout shown, considering the criteria to be taken into account in each of the formats.  Se muestra los formatos básicos de la distribución de planta, considerando los criterios que se deben tomar en cuenta en cada uno de los formatos.

  15. Association of the leucine-7 to proline-7 variation in the signal sequence of neuropeptide Y with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Pernille; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Hansen, Thomas v.O;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There is clear evidence of a genetic component in major depression, and several studies indicate that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. A well-known polymorphism encoding the substitution of leucine to proline in the signal peptide...... sequence of NPY (Leu7Pro variation) was previously found to protect against depression. Our study aimed at replicating this association in a large Danish population with major depression. Method: Leu7Pro was studied in a sample of depressed patients and ethnically matched controls, as well as psychiatric.......46) as compared to ethnically matched controls (3.8%, n = 2912), while schizophrenia patients (4.1%, n = 503) did not differ. In vitro, the Pro7 substitution appeared to be associated with reduced levels of NPY without affecting its mRNA level. Conclusion: The Leu7Pro variation may increase the risk of major...

  16. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranković, M. Lj. [Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Canon, F. [INRA, UMR1324 Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l’Alimentation, F-21000 Dijon (France); Nahon, L. [SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, St Aubin, BP48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Giuliani, A. [SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, St Aubin, BP48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); INRA, UAR1008, CEPIA, Rue de la Géraudière, BP 71627, 44316 Nantes (France); Milosavljević, A. R., E-mail: vraz@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    We have studied the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4, and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insight into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. The photodissociation yields appear to be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending on both the types of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.

  17. POLYMERIZATION OF N,N′-(PYROMELLITOYL)-BIS-L-LEUCINE DIACID CHLORIDE WITH HYDANTOIN DERIVATIVES BY MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalil Faghihi

    2004-01-01

    Facile and rapid polycondensation reactions of N,N′-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-leucine diacid chloride 1 with eight different derivatives of hydantoin compounds 2a-h were developed by using a domestic microwave oven in the presence ora small amount of polar organic medium such as o-cresol. The polycondensation reactions proceeded rapidly, compared with the conventional solution polycondensation, and was completed within 7-10 min, producing a series of novel optically active poly(amide-imide)s 3a-h with high yield and inherent viscosity of 0.35-0.65 dL/g. All of the above polymers were fully characterized by FT-IR, elemental analyses, inherent viscosity (ηiaa), solubility test and specific rotation. Some structural characterization and physical properties of these optically active poly(amide-imide)s are reported.

  18. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  19. Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) as a potential therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is caused by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although the etiology for most PD remains elusive, the identification of specific genetic defects in familial cases of PD and the signaling pathways governed by these genes has provided tremendous insight into PD pathogenesis. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are frequently found in familial and sporadic PD. Although current knowledge regarding the regulatory mechanisms of LRRK2 activation is limited, it is becoming increasingly evident that aberrant kinase activity of the pathologic mutants of LRRK2 is associated with neurodegeneration, suggesting that the kinase activity of LRRK2 is a potential therapeutic target. In addition, LRRK2 inhibitors might provide valuable tools to understand the pathophysiological and physiological roles of LRRK2 as well as the etiology of PD. We discuss here the potential and feasibility of targeting LRRK2 as a therapeutic strategy for PD. PMID:22578536

  20. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens.

  1. Kinetics of Oxidation of L-Leucine by Mono-and Bimetallic Gold and Silver Nanoparticles in Hydrogen Peroxide Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.VENKATESAN; J.SANTHANALAKSHMI

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of surfactant stabilized mono- and bimetallic Au and Ag nanoparticles for the oxidation of an amino acid,L-leucine,was studied using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant.The Au and Ag nanoparticle catalysts exhibited very good catalytic activity and the kinetics of the reaction were found to be pseudo-first order with respect to the amino acid.The effects of several factors,such as oxidant concentration,ionic strength,pH,and catalyst concentration on the reaction,were also investigated.In particular,optimal oxidant and catalyst concentrations were determined.Very high concentrations of the metal nano-catalysts or the oxidant led to a dramatic increase in reaction rate.Moreover,bimetallic Au-Ag catalysts provided higher selectivity than pure Au or Ag.

  2. Body composition of piglets from sows fed the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate in late gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flummer, Christine; Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate (HMB) to sows during late gestation or lactation has been shown to improve piglet health, survival, and growth. This study aimed to investigate long-term effects of HMB supplementation to late-gestating sows on body...... characteristics of piglets at weaning. Sows were fed a standard lactation diet from day –15 relative to parturition and throughout the experiment and a diet supplemented with (HMB; n = 2) or without [control (CON); n = 3] 15 mg Ca(HMB)2/kg BW in morning meals from day –10 until parturition. Fifty-six suckling...... piglets were weighed at day 28 and water content was assessed by deuterium oxide dilution. Piglets were euthanized, organ weights and lengths were recorded, the empty carcass was analyzed for dry matter, ash, and crude protein content, and body fat content was calculated. Two litters were treated...

  3. Association of the leucine-7 to proline-7 variation in the signal sequence of neuropeptide Y with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Pernille; Woldbye, David P. D.; Hansen, Thomas v. O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There is clear evidence of a genetic component in major depression, and several studies indicate that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. A well-known polymorphism encoding the substitution of leucine to proline in the signal peptide...... sequence of NPY (Leu7Pro variation) was previously found to protect against depression. Our study aimed at replicating this association in a large Danish population with major depression. Method: Leu7Pro was studied in a sample of depressed patients and ethnically matched controls, as well as psychiatric...... disease controls with schizophrenia. Possible functional consequences of Leu7Pro were explored in vitro. Results: In contrast to previous studies, Pro7 appeared to be a risk allele for depression, being significantly more frequent in the depression sample (5.5 n = 593; p = 0.009; odds ratio, OR: 1...

  4. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  5. Breath test measurements in combination with indirect calorimetry for estimation of 13C-leucine oxidation in mink (Mustela vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauson, Anne-Helene; Ali, Abdalla; Kanska, Katarzyna

    2000-01-01

    Gas exchange measurements by means of indirect calorimetry can be used to calculate quantitative substrate oxidation. The results represents average net oxidation values (substrate disappearance rate), but they cannot describe the dynamics of the oxidation processes. Breath test measurements...... to feeding and fasting. Twelve 1-year-old male mink (Mustela vison) were measured in each five consecutive periods by means of indirect calorimetry and simultaneous breath test. In Periods 1, 3 and 5, each lasting 3 days, the animals were fed ad libitum and Periods 2 and 4 were fasting periods, each of 48 h....... In Periods 1 and 5 all animals were fed a diet with a high quality fish meal (FISH; n=12), while in Period 3 half of the animals received the FISH diet (n=6) and the other half a diet with soy protein concentrate (SOY; n=6) as main protein source. An intraperitoneal injection of 1-13C-leucine was given...

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β regulates leucine-309 demethylation of protein phosphatase-2A via PPMT1 and PME-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiu-Qing; Li, Xia-Chun; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Yin, Yang-Yang; Liu, Bin; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2012-07-30

    Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity is significantly suppressed in Alzheimer's disease. We have reported that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibits PP2A via upregulating the phosphorylation of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A(C)). Here we studied the effects of GSK-3β on the inhibitory demethylation of PP2A at leucine-309 (dmL309-PP2A(C)). We found that GSK-3β regulates dmL309-PP2A(C) level by regulating PME-1 and PPMT1. Knockdown of PME-1 or PPMT1 eliminated the effects of GSK-3β on PP2A(C). GSK-3 could negatively regulate PP2A regulatory subunit protein level. We conclude that GSK-3β can inhibit PP2A by increasing the inhibitory L309-demethylation involving upregulation of PME-1 and inhibition of PPMT1.

  7. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Johansen, Maja L.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of neuronal glutamate from a-ketoglutarate for neurotransmission necessitates an amino group nitrogen donor; however, it is not clear which amino acid(s) serves this role. Thus, the ability of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to act as amino...... group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 µ......]valine was able to maintain the amount of vesicular glutamate during synaptic activity. This indicates that, among the BCAAs, only valine supports the increased need for synthesis of vesicular glutamate. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  8. Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy is associated with a deletion of small leucine-rich proteoglycans on chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle J; Frausto, Ricardo F; Rosenwasser, George O D; Bui, Tina; Le, Derek J; Stone, Edwin M; Aldave, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy (PACD) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder affecting the cornea and iris. Next-generation sequencing of the previously identified PACD linkage interval on chromosome 12q21.33 failed to yield a pathogenic mutation. However, array-based copy number analysis and qPCR were used to detect a hemizygous deletion in the PACD linkage interval containing 4 genes encoding small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs): KERA, LUM, DCN, and EPYC. Two other unrelated families with PACD also demonstrated deletion of these SLRPs, which play important roles in collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Given that these genes are essential to the maintenance of corneal clarity and the observation that knockout murine models display corneal phenotypic similarities to PACD, we provide convincing evidence that PACD is associated with haploinsufficiency of these SLRPs.

  9. Basic concepts in computational physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stickler, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    This new edition is a concise introduction to the basic methods of computational physics. Readers will discover the benefits of numerical methods for solving complex mathematical problems and for the direct simulation of physical processes. The book is divided into two main parts: Deterministic methods and stochastic methods in computational physics. Based on concrete problems, the first part discusses numerical differentiation and integration, as well as the treatment of ordinary differential equations. This is extended by a brief introduction to the numerics of partial differential equations. The second part deals with the generation of random numbers, summarizes the basics of stochastics, and subsequently introduces Monte-Carlo (MC) methods. Specific emphasis is on MARKOV chain MC algorithms. The final two chapters discuss data analysis and stochastic optimization. All this is again motivated and augmented by applications from physics. In addition, the book offers a number of appendices to provide the read...

  10. Health insurance basic actuarial models

    CERN Document Server

    Pitacco, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Health Insurance aims at filling a gap in actuarial literature, attempting to solve the frequent misunderstanding in regards to both the purpose and the contents of health insurance products (and ‘protection products’, more generally) on the one hand, and the relevant actuarial structures on the other. In order to cover the basic principles regarding health insurance techniques, the first few chapters in this book are mainly devoted to the need for health insurance and a description of insurance products in this area (sickness insurance, accident insurance, critical illness covers, income protection, long-term care insurance, health-related benefits as riders to life insurance policies). An introduction to general actuarial and risk-management issues follows. Basic actuarial models are presented for sickness insurance and income protection (i.e. disability annuities). Several numerical examples help the reader understand the main features of pricing and reserving in the health insurance area. A short int...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  12. Nuclear medicine physics the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    For decades this classic reference has been the book to review to master the complexities of nuclear-medicine physics. Part of the renowned The Basics series of medical physics books, Nuclear Medicine Physics has become an essential resource for radiology residents and practitioners, nuclear cardiologists, medical physicists, and radiologic technologists. This thoroughly revised Seventh Edition retains all the features that have made The Basics series a reliable and trusted partner for board review and reference. This handy manual contains key points at the end of each chapter that help to underscore principal concepts. You'll also find review questions at the end of each chapter—with detailed answers at the end of the book—to help you master the material. This edition includes useful appendices that elaborate on specific topics, such as physical characteristics of radionuclides and CGS and SI Units.

  13. Basics of modern mathematical statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Spokoiny, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides a unified and self-contained presentation of the main approaches to and ideas of mathematical statistics. It collects the basic mathematical ideas and tools needed as a basis for more serious studies or even independent research in statistics. The majority of existing textbooks in mathematical statistics follow the classical asymptotic framework. Yet, as modern statistics has changed rapidly in recent years, new methods and approaches have appeared. The emphasis is on finite sample behavior, large parameter dimensions, and model misspecifications. The present book provides a fully self-contained introduction to the world of modern mathematical statistics, collecting the basic knowledge, concepts and findings needed for doing further research in the modern theoretical and applied statistics. This textbook is primarily intended for graduate and postdoc students and young researchers who are interested in modern statistical methods.

  14. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  15. Basic statistics in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaux, David L

    2014-01-01

    The physicist Ernest Rutherford said, "If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment." Although this aphorism remains true for much of today's research in cell biology, a basic understanding of statistics can be useful to cell biologists to help in monitoring the conduct of their experiments, in interpreting the results, in presenting them in publications, and when critically evaluating research by others. However, training in statistics is often focused on the sophisticated needs of clinical researchers, psychologists, and epidemiologists, whose conclusions depend wholly on statistics, rather than the practical needs of cell biologists, whose experiments often provide evidence that is not statistical in nature. This review describes some of the basic statistical principles that may be of use to experimental biologists, but it does not cover the sophisticated statistics needed for papers that contain evidence of no other kind.

  16. Evaluation of the leucine incorporation technique for detection of pollution-induced community tolerance to copper in a long-term agricultural field trial with urban waste fertilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Magid, Jakob; Holm, Peter Engelund;

    2014-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is known to accumulate in agricultural soils receiving urban waste products as fertilizers. We here report the use of the leucine incorporation technique to determine pollution-induced community tolerance (Leu-PICT) to Cu in a long-term agricultural field trial. A significantly...

  17. Enteral leucine supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTORC1-dependent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucine activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to upregulate protein synthesis (PS). To examine enteral Leu effects on PS and signaling activation, 5-d-old piglets were fed for 24 h diets containing: (i) LP, (ii) LP+L, or (iii) HP. PS in skeletal muscles, heart, liver, pancreas, and jejunum...

  18. Differential effects of L-tryptophan and L-leucine administration on brain resting state functional networks and plasma hormone levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Davide; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Suenderhauf, Claudia; Janach, Katharina; le Roux, Carel W.; Haller, Sven; Drewe, Jürgen; Beglinger, Christoph; Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K.; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Depending on their protein content, single meals can rapidly influence the uptake of amino acids into the brain and thereby modify brain functions. The current study investigates the effects of two different amino acids on the human gut-brain system, using a multimodal approach, integrating physiological and neuroimaging data. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, L-tryptophan, L-leucine, glucose and water were administered directly into the gut of 20 healthy subjects. Functional MRI (fMRI) in a resting state paradigm (RS), combined with the assessment of insulin and glucose blood concentration, was performed before and after treatment. Independent component analysis with dual regression technique was applied to RS-fMRI data. Results were corrected for multiple comparisons. In comparison to glucose and water, L-tryptophan consistently modifies the connectivity of the cingulate cortex in the default mode network, of the insula in the saliency network and of the sensory cortex in the somatosensory network. L-leucine has lesser effects on these functional networks. L-tryptophan and L-leucine also modified plasma insulin concentration. Finally, significant correlations were found between brain modifications after L-tryptophan administration and insulin plasma levels. This study shows that acute L-tryptophan and L-leucine intake directly influence the brain networks underpinning the food-reward system and appetite regulation. PMID:27760995

  19. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upreg...

  20. Whole-body protein turnover in peritoneal dialysis patients: A comparison of the [15N]glycine end product and the [13C]leucine precursor methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Tjiong (Hoey Lan); R. Swart (Roel); T. Rietveld (Trinet); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); M.W.J.A. Fieren (Marien); J.W. van den Berg (Jacobus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Two well-described methods for measuring whole-body protein turnover (WBPT) are the precursor method using a primed continuous infusion of [1-13C]leucine and the end-product method with a single oral dose of [15N]glycine. We previously measured the effects of amino acid (AA)-

  1. Biodegradability and tissue reaction of random copolymers of L-leucine, L-aspartic acid, and L-aspartic acid esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, K.W.; Wildevuur, Ch.R.H.; Sederel, W.L.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.

    1977-01-01

    A series of copoly(α-amino acids) with varying percentages of hydrophilic (l-aspartic acid) and hydrophobic monomers (l-leucine, ß-methyl-l-aspartate, and ß-benzyl-l-aspartate) were implanted subcutaneously in rats and the macroscopic degradation behavior was studied. Three groups of materials (A, B

  2. Co-ingestion of a protein hydrolysate with or without additional leucine effectively reduces postprandial blood glucose excursions in type 2 diabetic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, R.J.; Koopman, R.; Sluijsmans, W.E.; Berg, R. van den; Verbeek, K.; Saris, W.H.; Wagenmakers, A.J.; Loon, L.J. van

    2006-01-01

    This study examined postprandial plasma insulin and glucose responses after co-ingestion of an insulinotropic protein (Pro) hydrolysate with and without additional free leucine with a single bolus of carbohydrate (Cho). Male patients with long-standing Type 2 diabetes (n = 10) and healthy controls (

  3. Differential regulation of leucine-rich primary response gene 1 (LRPR1) mRNA expression in rat testis and ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Slegtenhorst-Eegdeman; M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); M. Parvinen; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn immature rat Sertoli cells, leucine-rich primary response gene 1 (LRPR1) represents a follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-responsive gene; the function of the encoded protein is not yet known. LRPR1 mRNA expression is up-regulated very rapidly and specific

  4. Action of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate on L-14C-leucine incorporation in a system of rough microsomes from bovine thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägar, G

    1976-01-01

    The effect of cAMP and varying concentrations of potassium (18-72 mM) on the incorporation of L-14C-leucine into TCA-precipitable protein was studied in a cell-free system comprising rough thyroid microsomes. cAMP (2mM) alone or in combination with theopylline increased the incorporation of leucine into ribosome-bound (after DOC treatment) and extra-vesicular material, but had no significant effect on the DOC-released intravesicular material. Increase of the K+ concentration from 18 mM to 72 mM affected the incorporation of leucine into the microsomal compartments in much the same way as cAMP did. The effect of cAMP and potassium seems to be due in partly to enhanced activation of amino acids, since in a system of pH5 fraction and cell sap, both cAMP and K+ increased the incorporation of 14C-leucine into cold TCA-precipitable material. Experiments with 14C-leucyl-tRNA as a marker suggest that the effect of cAMP and K+ is a consequence not only of increased activation of amino acids, but also of increased binding of activated amino acyl-tRNA to ribosomes.

  5. Effect of glucagon on cyclic AMP, albumin metabolism and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal rat liver cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1976-01-01

    wet wt. This is about the rate found in the perfused liver, Glucagon (10(-8-10(-6) M) inhibited albumin secretion and the incorporation of 14C-leucine into albumin, into total proteins in the medium and into total proteins in the cell suspension. The effect of glucagon on albumin secretion...

  6. Multimodal dynamic response of the Buchnera aphidicola pLeu plasmid to variations in leucine demand of its host, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñuelas, José; Febvay, Gérard; Duport, Gabrielle; Colella, Stefano; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Charles, Hubert; Rahbé, Yvan; Calevro, Federica

    2011-09-01

    Aphids, important agricultural pests, can grow and reproduce thanks to their intimate symbiosis with the γ-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola that furnishes them with essential amino acids lacking in their phloem sap diet. To study how B. aphidicola, with its reduced genome containing very few transcriptional regulators, responds to variations in the metabolic requirements of its host, we concentrated on the leucine metabolic pathway. We show that leucine is a limiting factor for aphid growth and it displays a stimulatory feeding effect. Our metabolic analyses demonstrate that symbiotic aphids are able to respond to leucine starvation or excess by modulating the neosynthesis of this amino acid. At a molecular level, this response involves an early important transcriptional regulation (after 12 h of treatment) followed by a moderate change in the pLeu plasmid copy number. Both responses are no longer apparent after 7 days of treatment. These experimental data are discussed in the light of a re-annotation of the pLeu plasmid regulatory elements. Taken together, our data show that the response of B. aphidicola to the leucine demand of its host is multimodal and dynamically regulated, providing new insights concerning the genetic regulation capabilities of this bacterium in relation to its symbiotic functions.

  7. Impaired Uptake and/or Utilization of Leucine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Suppressed by the SPT15-300 Allele of the TATA-Binding Protein Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baerends, RJ; Qiu, Jin-Long; Rasmussen, Simon;

    2009-01-01

    us to examine the effect of expression of the SPT15-300 allele in various yeast species of industrial importance. Expression of SPT15-300 in leucine-prototrophic strains of S. cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, or Saccharomyces pastorianus (lager brewing yeast), however, did not improve tolerance...

  8. Generalized Stieltjes transforms: basic aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Karp, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    The paper surveys the basic properties of generalized Stieltjes functions including some new ones. We introduce the notion of exact Stieltjes order and give a criterion of exactness, simple sufficient conditions and some prototypical examples. The paper includes an appendix, where we define the left sided Riemann-Liouville and the right sided Kober-Erdelyi fractional integrals of measures supported on half axis and give inversion formulas for them.

  9. Basic emotions - self-awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Ana Almeida; Veiga-Branco, Augusta

    2011-01-01

    We start from basic emotions using Paul Ekman’s model (1999): joy, sadness, anger, surprise, disgust, fear and contempt, to study the concepts of Self- Awareness - Knowing our own emotions - (Goleman, 1995), and Emotional Awareness - Ability to become aware of one's own emotions - (Bisquerra, 2001). Objectives: To understand the levels of Emotional Self-awareness/ Emotional awareness of a group of preschool, primary and lower secondary school teachers through the identifi...

  10. Basic statistics for social research

    CERN Document Server

    Hanneman, Robert A; Riddle, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    A core statistics text that emphasizes logical inquiry, notmath Basic Statistics for Social Research teaches core generalstatistical concepts and methods that all social science majorsmust master to understand (and do) social research. Its use ofmathematics and theory are deliberately limited, as the authorsfocus on the use of concepts and tools of statistics in theanalysis of social science data, rather than on the mathematicaland computational aspects. Research questions and applications aretaken from a wide variety of subfields in sociology, and eachchapter is organized arou

  11. HMPT: Basic Radioactive Material Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Hazardous Materials and Packaging and Transportation (HMPT): Basic Radioactive Material Transportation Live (#30462, suggested one time) and Test (#30463, required initially and every 36 months) address the Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) function-specific [required for hazardous material (HAZMAT) handlers, packagers, and shippers] training requirements of the HMPT Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Labwide training. This course meets the requirements of 49 CFR 172, Subpart H, Section 172.704(a)(ii), Function-Specific Training.

  12. Basic principles of electronics thermionics

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J

    2013-01-01

    Basic Principles of Electronics, Volume I: Thermionics covers topics related to thermionic devices. The book starts by providing a physical background about electronics, including structure of matter, ionic, chemical and covalent combination, crystalline structure, conductors and insulators, and thermionic emission. The text then discusses electron dynamics; the characteristics and properties of electrons in solids; electron emission; and thermionic emission in a vacuum diode or triode. The development of the vacuum triode; gas-filled valves; and power amplifiers are also considered. The book

  13. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  14. RF Basics I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Maxwell's equations are introduced in their general form, together with a basic set of mathematical operations needed to work with them. After simplifying and adapting the equations for application to radio frequency problems, we derive the most important formulae and characteristic quantities for cavities and waveguides. Several practical examples are given to demonstrate the use of the derived equations and to explain the importance of the most common figures of merit.

  15. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  16. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p < 0.05). AminoL40 administration significantly mitigated the EC-induced impairment of the FSR (0.172 ± 0.018 %/h). EC decreased the paw withdrawal threshold at 1 and 2 days after EC, which indicated that EC induced muscle soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

  17. New poly(ester urea) derived from L-leucine: Electrospun scaffolds loaded with antibacterial drugs and enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Angélica; Valle, Luis J. del [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Tugushi, David; Katsarava, Ramaz [Institute of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Agricultural University of Georgia, 13 km. David Aghmashenebeli Alley, Tblisi 0131, Georgia (United States); Puiggalí, Jordi, E-mail: Jordi.Puiggali@upc.edu [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds from an amino acid containing poly(ester urea) (PEU) were developed as promising materials in the biomedical field and specifically in tissue engineering applications. The selected poly(ester urea) was obtained with a high yield and molecular weight by reaction of phosgene with a bis(α-aminoacyl)-α,ω-diol-diester monomer. The polymer having L-leucine, 1,6-hexanediol and carbonic acid units had a semicrystalline character and relatively high glass transition and melting temperatures. Furthermore it was highly soluble in most organic solvents, an interesting feature that facilitated the electrospinning process and the effective incorporation of drugs with bactericidal activity (e.g. biguanide derivatives such as clorhexidine and polyhexamethylenebiguanide) and enzymes (e.g. α-chymotrypsin) that accelerated the degradation process. Continuous micro/nanofibers were obtained under a wide range of processing conditions, being diameters of electrospun fibers dependent on the drug and solvent used. Poly(ester urea) samples were degradable in media containing lipases and proteinases but the degradation rate was highly dependent on the surface area, being specifically greater for scaffolds with respect to films. The high hydrophobicity of new scaffolds had repercussions on enzymatic degradability since different weight loss rates were found depending on how samples were exposed to the medium (e.g. forced or non-forced immersion). New scaffolds were biocompatible, as demonstrated by adhesion and proliferation assays performed with fibroblast and epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Electrospun scaffolds from a biodegradable poly(ester urea) have been prepared. • Scaffolds were effectively loaded with bactericide agents. • Enzymatic degradability of the L-leucine derived poly(ester urea) was demonstrated. • Enzymes that accelerate degradation were incorporated in the electrospun fibers. • Cell adhesion/proliferation assays demonstrated

  18. Basic sciences agonize in Turkey!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Fatma; Araz, Asli; Akman, Ferdi; Durak, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, changes from past to present in the departments of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics, which are considered as the basic sciences in Turkey, are shown. The importance of basic science for the country emphasized and the status of our country was discussed with a critical perspective. The number of academic staff, the number of students, opened quotas according to years for these four departments at universities were calculated and analysis of the resulting changes were made. In examined graphics changes to these four departments were similar. Especially a significant change was observed in the physics department. Lack of jobs employing young people who have graduated from basic science is also an issue that must be discussed. There are also qualitative results of this study that we have discussed as quantitative. Psychological problems caused by unemployment have become a disease among young people. This study was focused on more quantitative results. We have tried to explain the causes of obtained results and propose solutions.

  19. BLAS- BASIC LINEAR ALGEBRA SUBPROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is a collection of FORTRAN callable routines for employing standard techniques in performing the basic operations of numerical linear algebra. The BLAS library was developed to provide a portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebraic computations. The subprograms available in the library cover the operations of dot product, multiplication of a scalar and a vector, vector plus a scalar times a vector, Givens transformation, modified Givens transformation, copy, swap, Euclidean norm, sum of magnitudes, and location of the largest magnitude element. Since these subprograms are to be used in an ANSI FORTRAN context, the cases of single precision, double precision, and complex data are provided for. All of the subprograms have been thoroughly tested and produce consistent results even when transported from machine to machine. BLAS contains Assembler versions and FORTRAN test code for any of the following compilers: Lahey F77L, Microsoft FORTRAN, or IBM Professional FORTRAN. It requires the Microsoft Macro Assembler and a math co-processor. The PC implementation allows individual arrays of over 64K. The BLAS library was developed in 1979. The PC version was made available in 1986 and updated in 1988.

  20. Basic Color Terms in Estonian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, Liivi; Sutrop, Urmas

    2011-01-01

    The article is written in the tradition of Brent Berlin and Paul Kay's theory of basic color terms. According to this theory there is a universal inventory of eleven basic color categories from which the basic color terms of any given language are always drawn. The number of basic color terms varies from 2 to 11 and in a language having a fully…