WorldWideScience

Sample records for basic health principles

  1. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Some basic explanations are given of the principles underlying the nuclear fuel cycle, starting with the physics of atomic and nuclear structure and continuing with nuclear energy and reactors, fuel and waste management and finally a discussion of economics and the future. An important aspect of the fuel cycle concerns the possibility of ''closing the back end'' i.e. reprocessing the waste or unused fuel in order to re-use it in reactors of various kinds. The alternative, the ''oncethrough'' cycle, discards the discharged fuel completely. An interim measure involves the prolonged storage of highly radioactive waste fuel. (UK)

  2. [Basic principles and methodological considerations of health economic evaluations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Cesar; Castillo-Portilla, Manuel; Rojas, José Luis; Huayanay, Leandro

    2011-01-01

    Health Economics is an essential instrument for health management, and economic evaluations can be considered as tools assisting the decision-making process for the allocation of resources in health. Currently, economic evaluations are increasingly being used worldwide, thus encouraging evidence-based decision-making and seeking efficient and rational alternatives within the framework of health services activities. In this review, we present an overview and define the basic types of economic evaluations, with emphasis on complete Economic Evaluations (EE). In addition, we review key concepts regarding the perspectives from which EE can be conducted, the types of costs that can be considered, the time horizon, discounting, assessment of uncertainty and decision rules. Finally, we describe concepts about the extrapolation and spread of economic evaluations in health.

  3. Distortion of some of the basic principles of public health practice in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Debabar

    2006-01-01

    India's political leadership has chosen personnel from the Indian Administrative Service cadre of generalist administrators and from the clinician-dominated cadre of the Central Health Services to run the country's health service system. The personnel's inadequate or distorted understanding of some of the basic principles of public health practice--such as developing an epidemiological approach to solving community health problems, choice of appropriate technology, and optimization of health service systems--has had a very deleterious effect on the health service system. These administrators have become vulnerable to manipulation by personnel from international agencies, who also have questionable public health credentials, to create space for imposition of their technocentric, ill-conceived, and ill-designed agenda. To rationalize adoption of such an obviously faulty agenda, they have to be ahistorical, apolitical, and atheoretical and indulge in misinformation, disinformation, and suppression and manipulation of information. This amounts to what Navarro has termed "intellectual fascism."

  4. Emulsion Science Basic Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    Emulsions are generally made out of two immiscible fluids like oil and water, one being dispersed in the second in the presence of surface-active compounds.They are used as intermediate or end products in a huge range of areas including the food, chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, paint, and coating industries. Besides the broad domain of technological interest, emulsions are raising a variety of fundamental questions at the frontier between physics and chemistry. This book aims to give an overview of the most recent advances in emulsion science. The basic principles, covering aspects of emulsions from their preparation to their destruction, are presented in close relation to both the fundamental physics and the applications of these materials. The book is intended to help scientists and engineers in formulating new materials by giving them the basics of emulsion science.

  5. Basic Principles - Chapter 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This chapter described at a very high level some of the considerations that need to be made when designing algorithms for a vehicle health management application....

  6. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles. Bhaskar G Maiya. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0006-0018 ...

  7. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, J.B. van

    1997-01-01

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report)

  8. Thermionics basic principles of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J; Ashhurst, W

    2013-01-01

    Basic Principles of Electronics, Volume I : Thermionics serves as a textbook for students in physics. It focuses on thermionic devices. The book covers topics on electron dynamics, electron emission, and the themionic vacuum diode and triode. Power amplifiers, oscillators, and electronic measuring equipment are studied as well. The text will be of great use to physics and electronics students, and inventors.

  9. The basic principles of migration health: Population mobility and gaps in disease prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacPherson Douglas W

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, migrants and other mobile individuals, such as migrant workers and asylum seekers, are an expanding global population of growing social, demographic and political importance. Disparities often exist between a migrant population's place of origin and its destination, particularly with relation to health determinants. The effects of those disparities can be observed at both individual and population levels. Migration across health and disease disparities influences the epidemiology of certain diseases globally and in nations receiving migrants. While specific disease-based outcomes may vary between migrant group and location, general epidemiological principles may be applied to any situation where numbers of individuals move between differences in disease prevalence. Traditionally, migration health activities have been designed for national application and lack an integrated international perspective. Present and future health challenges related to migration may be more effectively addressed through collaborative global undertakings. This paper reviews the epidemiological relationships resulting from health disparities bridged by migration and describes the growing role of migration and population mobility in global disease epidemiology. The implications for national and international health policy and program planning are presented.

  10. Designing health care environments: Part I. Basic concepts, principles, and issues related to evidence-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2009-06-01

    A 2001 Institute of Medicine report captured the nation's attention regarding the dangers that can result from the health care environment. This report, fueled by the need for new facilities to be constructed, led to an explosion of research that now links the physical structure and design of health care facilities to the health and well-being of patients, nurses, other health care workers, and visitors. Continuing nursing education that highlights the importance of evidence-based design has been associated with measurable improvement in health care facilities' clinical outcomes, economic performance, employee productivity, customer satisfaction, and cultural congruency. Three major categories of outcomes can be impacted by evidence-based design: stress reduction, safety, and overall health care quality and ecology. In this article, Part I of a two-part series, the basic concepts, principles, and issues related to evidence-based design are introduced. Part II will describe continuing education programs available for nurses.

  11. 5 CFR 551.401 - Basic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basic principles. 551.401 Section 551.401 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work General Provisions § 551.401 Basic principles. (a) All time...

  12. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  13. Basic principles of radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The major goal of radiation protection in Canada is to ensure that individuals are adequately protected against the harm that might arise from unwarranted exposure to ionizing radiation. This report deals with the basic principles and organizations involved in protection against ionizing radiation. Three basic principles of radiation protection are: 1) that no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit for society, 2) that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, relevant economic and social factors being taken into account, and 3) that doses to individuals should not exceed specified annual limits. The limit for radiation workers is currently 50 mSv per year, and exposures of the general public should not exceed a small fraction of that of radiation workers. Other specific areas in radiation protection which have received considerable attention in Canada include limitations on collective dose (the sum of the individual doses for all exposed individuals), exemption rules for extremely small radiation doses or amounts of radioactive materials, occupational hazards in uranium mining, and special rules for protection of the foetus in pregnant female radiation workers. Implementation of radiation protection principles in Canada devolves upon the Atomic Energy Control Board, the Department of National Health and Welfare, provincial authorities, licensees and radiation workers. A brief description is given of the roles of each of these groups

  14. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Health Insurance Basics What's ... advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  15. Basic photovoltaic principles and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersch, P.; Zweibel, K.

    1982-02-01

    This book presents a nonmathematical explanation of the theory and design of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and systems. The basic elements of PV are introduced: the photovoltaic effect, physical aspects of solar cell efficiency, the typical single-crystal silicon solar cell, advances in single-crystal silicon solar cells. This is followed by the designs of systems constructed from individual cells, including possible constructions for putting cells together and the equipment needed for a practical producer of electrical energy. The future of PV is then discussed. (LEW)

  16. Basic safety principles for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1989-01-01

    To ensure the safety operation of nuclear power plant, one should strictly adhere to the implelmentation of safety codes and the establishment of nuclear safety code system, as well as the applicable basic safety principles of nuclear power plants. This article briefly introduce the importance of nuclear codes and its economic benefits and the implementation of basic safety principles to be accumulated in practice for many years by various countries

  17. Basic principles of quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, M.

    1977-01-01

    After a brief review of the origin of the 'quality concept' and the historical development of quality assurance, questions such as 'what is QA' and 'why is QA so important in nuclear technology' as well as definitions and main requirements of relevant QA codes and standards are presented and discussed. By means of a project realization schematic, tasks, duties, responsibilities, and possible QA organigrammes as well as QA programme and manual requirements are explained and compared. From a QA point of view, it is shown that no basic difference exists between design and production or construction control activities. Special emphasis is layed upon active owner's participation in the implementation of QA programmes for NPP and the advantages offered are described and illustrated by typical examples. (RW) [de

  18. Basic principles of experimental animals welfare protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethical considerations of animal protection and welfare require that the use of experimental animals is limited as much as possible. Animal experiments should only be performed when no alternative is available and when the benefit of the experiment outweighs the suffering of the animal. This review paper describes the basic principles for the ethical use of experimental animals. These are: "Three Rs rule" (replacement, reduction and refinement, "five freedoms" for animals and "Solna principles". "Replacement" means the substitution for conscious living higher animals of insentient material. "Reduction" means reduction in the numbers of animals used to obtain information of a given amount and precision. "Refinement" means any decrease in the incidence or severity of inhumane procedures applied to those animals which still have to be used. The "five freedoms" are: freedom from hunger and thirst, freedom from adverse environmental impacts, freedom from disease and injury, freedom to exhibit normal behavior and freedom from adverse mental states. "Solna principles" state that tests for regulatory purposes need to reflect the following: biological Relevance (meaningfulness and usefulness of a test for a particular purpose, Reliability (reproducibility of results within and between laboratories, and Regulatory acceptability (suitability of a test for risk assessment purposes (human health /environment.

  19. Basic Principles of Animal Science. Reprinted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The reference book is designed to fulfill the need for organized subject matter dealing with basic principles of animal science to be incorporated into the high school agriculture curriculum. The material presented is scientific knowledge basic to livestock production. Five units contain specific information on the following topics: anatomy and…

  20. Phase equilibria basic principles, applications, experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Reisman, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Phase Equilibria: Basic Principles, Applications, Experimental Techniques presents an analytical treatment in the study of the theories and principles of phase equilibria. The book is organized to afford a deep and thorough understanding of such subjects as the method of species model systems; condensed phase-vapor phase equilibria and vapor transport reactions; zone refining techniques; and nonstoichiometry. Physicists, physical chemists, engineers, and materials scientists will find the book a good reference material.

  1. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)-Basic Principles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles. Bhaskar G Maiya. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0006-0018 ...

  2. Behavior Modification: Basic Principles. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David L.; Axelrod, Saul

    2005-01-01

    This classic book presents the basic principles of behavior emphasizing the use of preventive techniques as well as consequences naturally available in the home, business, or school environment to change important behaviors. This book, and its companion piece, "Measurement of Behavior," represents more than 30 years of research and strategies in…

  3. Basic principles simulators - concept training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkert, J.

    1986-01-01

    Basic Principles Simulators have the purpose of teaching general concepts, demonstrating and displaying the fundamental physical processes of a plant. They are used to illustrate theory to students and also to provide a preliminary training to the operators, to aquaint them with the basic dynamic interactions of the various systems during the normal operation of a plant, and to show the consequences of the most important and common transients and malfunctions. Basic principles simulators may vary in size from small desk cabinets to large panels. They represent with a certain detail the nuclear and thermohydraulic part of the plant. The availability of video displays allows to present detailed information about process parameters which are not shown on the control panels. In general the overall plant behaviour is represented well. Limitations are mostly found in the areas of logic and control. (orig./HP)

  4. Basic safety principles for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plant safety requires a continuing quest for excellence. All individuals concerned should constantly be alert to opportunities to reduce risks to the lowest practicable level. The quest, however, is most likely to be fruitful if it is based on an understanding of the underlying objectives and principles of nuclear safety, and the way in which its aspects are interrelated. This report is an attempt to provide a logical framework for such an understanding. The proposed objectives and principles of nuclear safety are interconnected and must be taken as a whole; they do not constitute a menu from which selection can be made. The report takes account of current issues and developments. It includes the concept of safety objectives and the use of probabilistic safety assessment. Reliability targets for safety systems are discussed. The concept of a 'safety culture' is crucial. Attention has been paid to the need for planning for accident management. The report contains objectives and principles. The objectives state what is to be achieved; the principles state how to achieve it. In each case, the basic principle is stated as briefly as possible. The accompanying discussion comments on the reasons for the principle and its importance, as well as exceptions, the extent of coverage and any necessary clarification. The discussion is as important as the principle it augments. 4 figs

  5. Basic principles of experimental animals welfare protection

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Marijana

    2007-01-01

    Ethical considerations of animal protection and welfare require that the use of experimental animals is limited as much as possible. Animal experiments should only be performed when no alternative is available and when the benefit of the experiment outweighs the suffering of the animal. This review paper describes the basic principles for the ethical use of experimental animals. These are: "Three Rs rule" (replacement, reduction and refinement), "five fr...

  6. Health insurance basic actuarial models

    CERN Document Server

    Pitacco, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Health Insurance aims at filling a gap in actuarial literature, attempting to solve the frequent misunderstanding in regards to both the purpose and the contents of health insurance products (and ‘protection products’, more generally) on the one hand, and the relevant actuarial structures on the other. In order to cover the basic principles regarding health insurance techniques, the first few chapters in this book are mainly devoted to the need for health insurance and a description of insurance products in this area (sickness insurance, accident insurance, critical illness covers, income protection, long-term care insurance, health-related benefits as riders to life insurance policies). An introduction to general actuarial and risk-management issues follows. Basic actuarial models are presented for sickness insurance and income protection (i.e. disability annuities). Several numerical examples help the reader understand the main features of pricing and reserving in the health insurance area. A short int...

  7. Basic principles of parliamentary psychological support of deputies

    OpenAIRE

    Kibak, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the basic principles of recruitment of the deputies for parliamentary psychological support. It suggests the author's approach to recruitment of the deputies for parliamentary psychological support, which is built according to the basic principles and norms of parliamentary ethics: the principle of awareness, principle of voluntariness, the principle of psychological optimism, the principle of impartiality, the principle of friendly, correct and non-evolutional attitude...

  8. Basic principle of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The use of computed tomography for dental procedures has increased recently. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the dentomaxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing high resolution in images of high diagnostic quality. This technology allows for 3-dimensional representation of the dentomaxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion, but at lower equipment cost, simpler image acquisition and lower patient dose. Because this technology produces images with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution, it is ideally suited for dedicated dentomaxillofacial imaging. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of cone beam scanning technology and compare it with the fan beam scanning used in conventional CT and the basic principles of currently available CBCT systems

  9. Ethics of Plant Breeding: The IFOAM Basic Principles as a Guide for the Evolution of Organic Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.

    2010-01-01

    The basic values of organic agriculture is laid down in the IFOAM four basic principles: the principle of health, the principle of ecology, the principle of fairness and the principle of care. These principles and the consequences and challenges for the further development of organic plant breeding

  10. Basic design principles of colorimetric vision systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumzhiu, Alex M.

    1998-10-01

    Color measurement is an important part of overall production quality control in textile, coating, plastics, food, paper and other industries. The color measurement instruments such as colorimeters and spectrophotometers, used for production quality control have many limitations. In many applications they cannot be used for a variety of reasons and have to be replaced with human operators. Machine vision has great potential for color measurement. The components for color machine vision systems, such as broadcast quality 3-CCD cameras, fast and inexpensive PCI frame grabbers, and sophisticated image processing software packages are available. However the machine vision industry has only started to approach the color domain. The few color machine vision systems on the market, produced by the largest machine vision manufacturers have very limited capabilities. A lack of understanding that a vision based color measurement system could fail if it ignores the basic principles of colorimetry is the main reason for the slow progress of color vision systems. the purpose of this paper is to clarify how color measurement principles have to be applied to vision systems and how the electro-optical design features of colorimeters have to be modified in order to implement them for vision systems. The subject of this presentation far exceeds the limitations of a journal paper so only the most important aspects will be discussed. An overview of the major areas of applications for colorimetric vision system will be discussed. Finally, the reasons why some customers are happy with their vision systems and some are not will be analyzed.

  11. Basic principles for regulating nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The AECB has developed as its mission statement: 'To ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment'. This report proposes eleven qualitative principles for regulating nuclear activities whose achievement would satisfy the broad policy enunciated in the statement. They would further provide a basis for the specific regulatory requirements expressed by the AECB in its Regulations and other documents. They would thus represent a connecting link between the policy enunciated in the mission statement and the requirements. The proposed principles are largely concerned with how the allowable risk should be set for members of the public, for industry workers, for society as a whole, and for the environment. In making these recommendations the risks from normal operation of the licensed facility and those from a possible serious accident are considered separately. The distribution of risk between geographic communities and between generations is also addressed in the proposed principles. These are listed in the final section of the report. 23 refs

  12. Basic surgical principles with ITI implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buser, D; von Arx, T; ten Bruggenkate, C; Weingart, D

    2000-01-01

    The basic surgical principles governing the placement of ITI implants are based on research-oriented developments in harmony with evidence-based and outcome-oriented clinical procedures. In the past 15 years, the range of implant indications has been significantly widened, and partially edentulous patients clearly represent the majority of patients seeking treatment with dental implants today. An important aspect of the successful rehabilitation of patients with ITI implants is the careful selection of implant candidates with respect to systemic and local risk factors. These factors are presented based on current knowledge. Today, solid-screw implants in various screw dimensions and neck configurations comprise the ITI Dental Implant System. These different implant types are necessary to handle the full range of implant indications, in particular in partially edentulous patients. The main clinical factors are presented for the selection of the appropriate implant type, length and diameter. These implants are utilized both in a non-submerged and in a submerged approach. The main goal of surgical therapy is low trauma and the least demanding surgical procedure for patient and clinician to optimize the cost-effectiveness of implant therapy. Hence, a non-submerged approach is preferred in all sites without esthetic priority, such as in fully edentulous patients or in posterior sites of partially edentulous patients. These indications clearly represent the majority of implant patients. In esthetic sites, a submerged approach is utilized to satisfy the specific esthetic demands. The possibility to successfully utilize short implants (6 and 8 mm) and a reduced healing period of 3 months are further advantages of ITI implants due to favorable properties of the rough TPS surface. With the introduction of the microrough SLA surface, a reduction of the healing period to 6 weeks facilitates further progress towards simplification of implant therapy. In summary, the ITI Dental

  13. Basic Concepts and Principles of Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beder, Hal

    1986-01-01

    Presents an overview of marketing concepts and principles. These include (1) organizational objectives, (2) exchange, (3) value, (4) market segmentation, (5) market position, (6) consumer analysis, (7) product, (8) promotion, (9) place, and (10) price. (CH)

  14. Basic principles of solar water heating

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page-Shipp, RJ

    1980-09-10

    Full Text Available This article correctly reflects the principles of Solar Water Heating as they pertain to South African conditions. However, it was written in 1980 and the global energy situation has changed considerably. Furthermore, modern commercial units...

  15. Basic principles of chemistry and physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    A course designed to provide communications between the designer of a system such as a mechanical engineer or a physicist and the material scientist such as a chemist or chemical engineer is presented. The topics discussed are stoichiometric principles, behavior of ideal gases, vapor pressure, humidity and saturation, solubility of gases in liquids, diffusion of gases, chemical reaction kinetics, and application of concepts to compatibility problems. The appendix provides problems to be used in conjunction with TV lectures

  16. Basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Safety Guide sets forth the objectives of an adequate strategy for monitoring internal and external radiation exposures of workers. It covers individual monitoring, and workplace monitoring to the extent required for assessment and control of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing the monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, and brief descriptions are given of the rules governing the implementation of monitoring methods. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibrating techniques, methods of record keeping and related aspects

  17. Basic principles of applied nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    The technological applications of radioactive isotopes and radiation in South Africa have grown steadily since the first consignment of man-made radioisotopes reached this country in 1948. By the end of 1975 there were 412 authorised non-medical organisations (327 industries) using hundreds of sealed sources as well as their fair share of the thousands of radioisotope consignments, annually either imported or produced locally (mainly for medical purposes). Consequently, it is necessary for South African technologists to understand the principles of radioactivity in order to appreciate the industrial applications of nuclear techniques [af

  18. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint.

  19. Grounding language processing on basic neurophysiological principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederici, Angela D; Singer, Wolf

    2015-06-01

    In animal models the neural basis of cognitive and executive processes has been studied extensively at various hierarchical levels from microcircuits to distributed functional networks. This work already provides compelling evidence that diverse cognitive functions are based on similar basic neuronal mechanisms. More recent data suggest that even cognitive functions realized only in human brains rely on these canonical neuronal mechanisms. Here we argue that language, like other cognitive functions, depends on distributed computations in specialized cortical areas forming large-scale dynamic networks and examine to what extent empirical results support this view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Basic Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging with its superior soft tissue contrast resolution and absence of beam hardening artifacts, combined with its ability to perform multiplanar imaging, is now effective tool in diagnostic imagings. Magnetic resonance is primarily a phenomenon that involves atomic nuclei. It provides totally new clinical information with no known hazards through the use of very weak interactions with endogenous stable magnetic atomic nuclei. This article briefly summarized the basic mechanism of generation and detection of the signals and general sorts of tissue properties which can influence the signals and thereby give rise to tissue contrast. It also describes how the machine-operating parameters can be used to manipulate the tissue contrast observed in the image.

  1. Application of Basic Principles for Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanata, D.; Sinka, D.; Jurkovic, I.-A.

    1998-01-01

    The paper deals with the basic terms which are within scope of activities of the expert group for risk analysis and assessment of potential consequences of a nuclear accident. The expert group is a part of the Technical Support Center which is going to be established within a new croatian national emergency response plan as the Lead Technical Agency in case of a nuclear emergency. Terms such as protective measures (urgent and long-term), intervention levels (generic and operational), projected and avertable doses are considered. Potential accident in the Krsko NPP, as an example for implementation of mentioned terms, is analyzed and a rapid approach for assessment in pretective measures which would be taken is applied. It is emphasized that rapid methods are characterized by a high degree of uncertainty. It is concluded that the time factor remains the most critical one in the entire accident response process. In order to optimize the time necessary for decision making, implementation and surveillance of protective measures, a set of requirements are pointed out. (author)

  2. Description of basic mining legal principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The Federal Mining Act manages access, via the system of mining concessions, to areas free for mining natural resources that do not belong to the surface property and deposits' owner. These cover especially important natural resources for the economy, including coal, ore, salt, crude oil and natural gas, and also terrestrial heat. For mining operations there exist, however, the same decrees for natural resources in the property of the surface owners, which are predominantly higher-value industrial minerals such as roofing slate, basalt, quartz sand, and clays for the fireproofing industry. In the case of mining laws, administrative procedures such as issuing mining concessions, approving operating plans, and issuing permits or licenses to explore according to water rights or the Federal Immission Control Act, those authorities and departments in whose remit the projects fall are dealt with by the Mining Authority. This means that the Mining Authority is the only state point of contact for the applicant, essentially an "all-in-one" service as it will itself instigate any further participation procedures required. The classic licensing procedure of mining is the operations plan procedure, whereby the operator submits an operating plan to the Mining Authority, which then examines it to ensure it fulfills mandatory legal safety objectives. If necessary these safety objectives can be met during licensing of the operating plans by stipulating additional requirements, Depending on the subject and validity period there are overall operating plans having the widest possible remit with comprehensive participation by the authorities and basic operating plans that form the basis for every mining works. There are also special operating plans, which owing to the dynamics of mining, resolve matters that suddenly become necessary or when the basic operating plans as originally conceived were not relevant. The closing-down operating plan is the designated tool for closing down

  3. Health Literacy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Health Outcomes Strategies Resources What is health literacy? Health literacy is the degree to which individuals ... to be retained. Back to Top What is literacy? Literacy can be defined as a person's ability ...

  4. Basic Principles of the International Labour Organization Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Sh. Matchanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to the basic principles on which activities of one of UN specialized agencies – the International Labour Organization are based. The principles formulated in the Charter of the ILO, the Declaration on the purposes and tasks of the ILO, the Declaration of the ILO on the fundamental principles and the rights in the sphere of work are stated. Special attention is paid to the principles according to which activities of the ILO are directly performed: universality, ripartism, control of observance of conventions.

  5. Basic economic principles of road pricing: From theory to applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwendal, J.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents, a non-technical introduction to the economic principles relevant for transport pricing design and analysis. We provide the basic rationale behind pricing of externalities, discuss why simple Pigouvian tax rules that equate charges to marginal external costs are not optimal in

  6. Clinical teachers' tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T; Steinert, Y; Schuwirth, L; McLeod, A H

    2004-02-01

    Academic faculty members in medical schools rarely receive formal instruction in basic pedagogic principles; nevertheless many develop into competent teachers. Perhaps they acquire tacit knowledge of these principles with teaching experience. This study was designed to assess clinical teachers' tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles and concepts. The authors developed a multiple-choice question (MCQ) exam based on 20 pedagogic principles judged by a panel of education experts to be important for clinical teaching. Three groups of clinician-educators sat the test: (1) clinicians with advanced education training and experience; (2) internal medicine specialists; (3) surgical specialists. All four groups of clinicians-educators passed the test, indicating that they possess a reasonable tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles. Those with advanced education training performed much better than members of the other two groups while specialists and residents working in teaching hospitals outperformed specialists from non-teaching hospitals. It is possible that converting this tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge may improve individual teaching effectiveness.

  7. [Etiopathogenesis of diarrhea and basic principles of diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, J

    2002-06-01

    Acute diarrhoea is worldwide the second most frequent disease after acute inflammations of the airways. Chronic diarrhoea is a less frequent disease, nevertheless the GP, specialist in internal medicine or gastroenterologist encounters it very frequently. For correct understanding of basic diagnostic and therapeutic principles of diarrhoea knowledge of its etiopathogenesis is necessary. In the submitted review the author mentions the functions of the small and large intestine and their part in the development of diarrhoea. He gives also the definition and classification of diarrhoea. The author presents the basic characteristics of osmotic, secretory, inflammatory, motor diarrhoea and diarrhoea associated with increased intestinal filtration. The basic diagnostic and therapeutic principles are in the last part of the review which has an educational character.

  8. Some Basic Principles of Fish processing in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    J.F.N. Abowei; C.C. Tawari

    2011-01-01

    Some basic principles offish processing in Nigeria is reviewed to provide information for fish culturist to effectively manage the processing of their products. Processing of fish into forms for human consumption or suitable to be used as a supplement in animal food has been neglected in fish culture practices. This may be due to the high technology required in some of the processes and the fact that those involved in actual fish production are ignorant of the different processing methods. In...

  9. THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH IN NEUROEDUCATION STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Nouri

    2016-01-01

    The present paper assembles contributions from the areas of education, psychology, cognitive science, and of course, neuroeducation itself to introduce the basic principles of research in the field of neuroeducation studies. It is particularly important, as such it is a useful way to justify researchers about what neuroeducation as a specific domain do that no other field can do as well or cannot do at all. Based on the literature reviewed, neuroeducational research can be understood as an inte...

  10. Basic safety principles of KLT-40C reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliaev, V.; Polunichev, V.

    2000-01-01

    The KLT-40 NSSS has been developed for a floating power block of a nuclear heat and power station on the basis of ice-breaker-type NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) with application of shipbuilding technologies. Basic reactor plant components are pressurised water reactor, once-through coil-type steam generator, primary coolant pump, emergency protection rod drive mechanisms of compensate group-electromechanical type. Basic RP components are incorporated in a compact steam generating block which is arranged within metal-water shielding tank's caissons. Domestic regulatory documents on safety were used for the NSSS design. IAEA recommendations were also taken into account. Implementation of basic safety principles adopted presently for nuclear power allowed application of the KLT-40C plant for a floating power unit of a nuclear co-generation station. (author)

  11. Basic biology in health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.

    1976-10-01

    This report describes the consequences of the interaction of ionizing radiation with living cells and tissues. The basic processes of living cells, which are relevant to an understanding of health physics problems, are outlined with particular reference to cell-death, cancer induction and genetic effects. (author)

  12. Basic principles for intervention after a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Per Hedemann Jensen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles for intervention after a nuclear accident or radiological emergency and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident are reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The radiation protection philosophy of today distinguishes between practices and interventions. The radiological protection system of intervention includes justification of the protective action and optimization of the level of protection achieved by that action. Dose limits do not apply in intervention situations. The inputs to justification and optimization studies include factors that are related to radiological protection, whereas the final decisions on introduction of countermeasures would also depend on other factors. The basic principles for intervention as recommended by international organisations are discussed in detail and the application of the principles on a generic basis is illustrated for long-term protective actions. The concepts of intervention level, operational intervention level and action level are presented and the relation between these quantities is illustrated. The numerical guidance on intervention in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency or a chronic exposure situation given by ICRP, IAEA and in the Basic Safety Standards is presented. (author)

  13. An Embalse nuclear power plant basic principles simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Oscar; Galdoz, Erwin; Flury, Celso; Fontanini, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear power plant basic principles simulator is a package of programs that numerically solve the dynamic equations of the simulated plant. This kind of tools is mainly used in the first step of training of operational personnel, to allow mental representation of physical phenomena governing the plant. They are also used for students or professional training, and experienced operators can also improve there performance under abnormal operation situations using the simulator. For the Embalse nuclear power plant, mainly the thermohydraulic behaviour, is simulated. The mathematical model was adapted from MANUVR, a code developed at the Electric Systems and Control Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). (Author) [es

  14. Data presentation in the WWER-440 Basic Principle Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bota, J.; Gossanyi, A.; Vegh, E.

    1986-09-01

    At the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest, Hungary, a Basic Principle Simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power plants is under development. The input/output subsystem of the simulator is described. This subsystem is a control desk-shaped special periphery representing each main parameter of the model. During development special attention was paid to the hardware support of the controllers as this part of the model is regarded as most time consuming. A short summary on the hardware configuration of the simulator is also presented. (author)

  15. Real-time Executive for a basic principle simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, L.; Szegi, Zs.; Vegh, E.

    1987-09-01

    A basic principle simulator for WWER-440 type nuclear power plants is under development in the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. So far the technological models of both to primary and secondary circuits are ready and this paper presents the Real-time Executive and the on-line operating environment which controls the simulator. This executive system contains eight programs and the detailed structure of the data base is presented. The control of the execution of the model programs, their timing and the error recoveries are also discussed. (author) 5 refs

  16. Ion-Exchange Chromatography: Basic Principles and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Philip M; Rochfort, Keith D; O'Connor, Brendan F

    2017-01-01

    Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEC) allows for the separation of ionizable molecules on the basis of differences in charge properties. Its large sample-handling capacity, broad applicability (particularly to proteins and enzymes), moderate cost, powerful resolving ability, and ease of scale-up and automation have led to it becoming one of the most versatile and widely used of all liquid chromatography (LC) techniques. In this chapter, we review the basic principles of IEC, as well as the broader criteria for selecting IEC conditions. By way of further illustration, we outline basic laboratory protocols to partially purify a soluble serine peptidase from bovine whole brain tissue, covering crude tissue extract preparation through to partial purification of the target enzyme using anion-exchange chromatography. Protocols for assaying total protein and enzyme activity in both pre- and post-IEC fractions are also described.

  17. Progress in basic principles of limitation in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzaev, P.V.; Tarasov, S.I.; Troitskaya, M.N.; Ermolaeva, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    For purposes of limitation of harmful factors, e.g. radiation, it is proposed to divide all countless numbers of biological effects into three groups: 1) social important effects (ultimate and effects); 2) intermediate effects (different diseases etc.), which are connected with and controlled by the first group; 3) pure biological effects, importance of which is not known. To determine the first group effects there are identified four indices describing all significant sides of human life: time of life, life-time integral of mental and physical capacity for work, aesthetical satisfaction from organism itself, reproduction of descendants. They reflect the main social and individual interests related to functioning of organism. On the base of weighing these indices it is suggested the united general index of health in form of time of a full life. The united index can be used for different principles of limitation (based on threshold, acceptable risk, maximum benefit). To realize the principle of maximum public benefit as ideal principle in the future limitation all benefit and detriment from utilization of harmful sources must be expressed in the united index of health (instead of money), which is the greatest value of individual and society. Authors suggest to standartize ionizing radiation on the general methodological approaches that were acceptable to non-ionizing factors too

  18. Expert systems - basic principles and possible applications in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.; Schmidt, F.

    1987-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the application of mathematical methods and computational techniques in reactor physics is the effective and accurate solution of the neutron diffusion equation under various conditions. To reach this goal still requires much skill, experience, knowledge and imagination as can be seen from various contributions at this and other conferences. Experts are necessary. Will expert systems replace them. We shall discuss this question by describing the basic principles of problem solving by expert systems as compared to problem solving by mathematical and computational methods. From this we shall identify areas of possible applications of the new techniques in nuclear energy and develop some thoughts on present limitations. As a result we conclude that expert systems will not be able to replace experts as long as the experts use the systems to improve their own expertise

  19. CEST: From basic principles to applications, challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Elena; Sherry, A. Dean; Lenkinski, Robert E.

    2013-04-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) offers a new type of contrast for MRI that is molecule specific. In this approach, a slowly exchanging NMR active nucleus, typically a proton, possessing a chemical shift distinct from water is selectively saturated and the saturated spin is transferred to the bulk water via chemical exchange. Many molecules can act as CEST agents, both naturally occurring endogenous molecules and new types of exogenous agents. A large variety of molecules have been demonstrated as potential agents, including small diamagnetic molecules, complexes of paramagnetic ions, endogenous macromolecules, dendrimers and liposomes. In this review we described the basic principles of the CEST experiment, with emphasis on the similarity to earlier saturation transfer experiments described in the literature. Interest in quantitative CEST has also resulted in the development of new exchange-sensitive detection schemes. Some emerging clinical applications of CEST are described and the challenges and opportunities associated with translation of these methods to the clinical environment are discussed.

  20. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  1. PET/TAC: Basic principles, physiological variants and artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation is about the basic principles, physiologic variants and devices that work in the PET/TAC technique. Next the conclusions obtained in the same one are presented: For a correct evaluation of the PET/TAC images with FDG is necessary the knowledge of the image acquisition technique, as well as of the physiologic distribution of the FDG, variants of the normality, benign causes of captation and more frequent devices. The introduction of this hybrid procedure allows the correct anatomical localization and identification of the deposits of FDG largely avoiding false or doubtful interpretations, but it can also originate not specific devices existent in the conventional PET. The previous knowledge of the possible devices will make possible in certain cases its elimination and in other its identification avoiding incorrect interpretations. (Author)

  2. Basic principles of aggressive rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation after ACL (anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has drastically changed over the last decade, with the adoption of a more aggressive approach, right from the first day after surgery. Progress in the effectiveness of rehabilitation is based on improvements in operative techniques, as well as on the encouraging results of histological studies regarding graft healing. Despite a huge amount of research papers on this topic, a rehabilitation golden standard still has not been established, due to the complexity of this problem. In this review, we point out the basic principles of rehabilitation after arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction based on actual practices, as well as the importance of specific procedures for the prevention of complications during the postoperative period. The importance of range-of-motion exercises, early weight bearing, an appropriate gait scheme, patella mobilisation, pain and oedema control, as well as stretching and balance exercises is explained. The functional advantages of closed kinetic chain exercises, as well as their influence on the graft are also described, in comparison to open kinetic chain exercises. The fundamentals of returning to sports are revealed and the specific aspects of rehabilitation regarding graft choice are pointed out. While waiting for new clinical investigations, which are expected to enable the establishment of a rehabilitation golden standard, the outlined principles should be followed. The complexity of this injury requires treatment in highly specialised institutions.

  3. Principle and basic property of the sequential flow pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shintaro; Maeno, Erina; Li, Xinyang; Yurimoto, Terumi; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    In the emergency care field, early treatment of acute heart or respiratory failure has been a global concern. In severe cases, patients are frequently required to be on an extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) life support. To make the ECMO system more compact and portable, we proposed a sequential flow-type centrifugal pump named the sequential flow pump (SFP). In this study, principle and basic properties of this novel blood pump were examined by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis and an experimental model. In the SFP, fluid is given centrifugal force sequentially twice with a single closed impeller. This sequential pressurization mechanism enables high-pressure output without high impeller speed. To realize easy integration of a blood pump with an artificial lung, the inlet and outlet ports are located at lateral side and center of the pump, respectively, which is the reverse configuration of conventional centrifugal pumps. The computational model was composed for CFD analysis and the experimental model was developed for the experiment of the actual pump. For both models, dimension of the impeller and volute was designed to be equal. In the CFD analysis, the SFP could generate higher performance than the single pressurization model with the same rotational speed of the impeller. Basic property of the experimental model was very similar to that of the computational model. The results showed the possibility that the SFP would be more suitable for the compact ECMO system than conventional centrifugal pumps.

  4. How Many Principles for Public Health Ethics?

    OpenAIRE

    Coughlin, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    General moral (ethical) principles play a prominent role in certain methods of moral reasoning and ethical decision-making in bioethics and public health. Examples include the principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. Some accounts of ethics in public health have pointed to additional principles related to social and environmental concerns, such as the precautionary principle and principles of solidarity or social cohesion. This article provides an overview...

  5. Introduction to basic immunological methods : Generalities, Principles, Protocols and Variants of basic protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejri, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript is dedicated to student of biological sciences. It provides the information necessary to perform practical works, the most commonly used in immunology. During my doctoral and post-doctoral periods, panoply of methods was employed in diverse subjects in my research. Technical means used in my investigations were diverse enough that i could extract a set of techniques that cover most the basic immunological methods. Each chapter of this manuscript contains a fairly complete description of immunological methods. In each topic the basic protocol and its variants were preceded by background information provided in paragraphs concerning the principle and generalities. The emphasis is placed on describing situations in which each method and its variants were used. These basic immunological methods are useful for students and even researchers studying the immune system of human, nice and other species. Different subjects showed not only detailed protocols but also photos or/and shemas used as support to illustrate some knowledge or practical knowledge. I hope that students will find this manual interesting, easy to use contains necessary information to acquire skills in immunological practice. (Author)

  6. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  7. THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH IN NEUROEDUCATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nouri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper assembles contributions from the areas of education, psychology, cognitive science, and of course, neuroeducation itself to introduce the basic principles of research in the field of neuroeducation studies. It is particularly important, as such it is a useful way to justify researchers about what neuroeducation as a specific domain do that no other field can do as well or cannot do at all. Based on the literature reviewed, neuroeducational research can be understood as an interdisciplinary endeavor to develop an insightful understanding and holistic picture of problems related to learning and education. It thus epistemologically is based on an integrated methodological pluralism paradigm. This requires researchers to understand multiple methods and methodologies and employ as they formulate their own research projects. Researchers have a critical role to play in providing systematic evidence and conclusions that are scientifically valid and reliable and educationally relevant and usable. One significant implication of this argument is the need to strengthen the quality of the research component in graduate programs of the field and train interested researchers in the identification and formulation of relevant research questions.

  8. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORT TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Martsenyuk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Undeveloped infrastructure and the system of public and tourist transport services prevent boom and spread of tourism glory of the country. Therefore, the development of tourist infrastructure and transport communication routes is a priority task. Methodology. Article methodology is based on the use of consequent methodological technique. Findings. Author analyzed the situation of tourism industry in Ukraine, set the basic principles for the tourism development and its priorities. The article contains the author's point of view on the fact that the tourism industry is of paramount importance to the state economics, and the development of this sector of public life should be a priority task for the near future. Originality. According to the author, the development of the inbound tourism is more reasonable, because it provides additional workplaces and exchange earnings. The author insists that the raise of quality level of domestic tourist services to the European standards would accelerate the development of Ukrainian tourism and would attract more holidaymakers from Ukraine and neighbouring countries. Practical value. The rational measures, which were taken regarding the proposed directions for the tourism development, can improve competitiveness of the Ukrainian tourist industry on the European tourist market.

  9. The intraoperative gamma probe: basic principles and choices available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzonico, P; Heller, S

    2000-01-01

    By taking advantage of the proximity to radioactive sentinel nodes and occult tumors achievable in an operative setting, intraoperative probes are becoming increasingly important in the surgical management of cancer. This article begins with a discussion of the statistical limitations of radiation detection and measurement and of the key performance parameters (sensitivity, energy resolution, and spatial resolution) that characterize detectors. The basic design and operating principle of radiation detectors used in intraoperative probes, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, are then reviewed. Scintillation detector-based intraoperative probes, generally using a NaI(T1) or a CsI(T1) crystal connected to a photomultiplier tube by a fiberoptic cable, have the advantages of reliability, relatively low cost, and high sensitivity, especially for medium- to high-energy photons. Disadvantages include poor energy resolution and scatter rejection, and bulkiness. Semiconductor (CdZn, CdZnTe, HgI2)-based probes are compact and have excellent energy resolution and scatter rejection, but with complex energy spectra reflecting charge-carrier trapping. Their main disadvantage is lower sensitivity. The performance parameters of various commercially available intraoperative probes are then compared. The article concludes with a discussion of the practical considerations in selecting and using intraoperative probes, including ergonomic and other design features, as well as performance parameters.

  10. The notion and basic principles of restorative justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćopić Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important achievements of the contemporary criminal justice system and criminal policy is development of the concept of restorative justice. Contemporary concept of restorative justice was developed in 1970s on the basis of the criticism of the traditional criminal law and criminal justice system. Since that time, it has been developing through different programs in many countries. Reform of the criminal justice system in Serbia staring from 2002 went into direction of entering elements of restorative justice into existing criminal justice system. In that sense, development of restorative justice is still at the beginning in our country. However, it can be noticed that there is a low level of awareness on the nature and importance of restorative forms of response to crime among our professionals, as well as a lack of understanding of the concept itself. Due to that, the aim of the paper is to enable better understanding of restorative concept in general through defining restorative justice and basic principles it relies on. That may put a basis for further recognition of restorative elements in our criminal justice system, which may provide adequate implementation of relevant provisions of restorative character in practice. .

  11. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Pt. 272, App. A Appendix A to Part 272—Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic...

  12. New mental health legislation in South Africa - principles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mental Health Care Act has been passed by parliament. There are a number of changes from the Mental Health Act (Act 18 of 1973) and this article outlines the basic principles of the new legislation and several of the procedural modifications which follow. The legislation has a strong human rights focus and addresses ...

  13. How Many Principles for Public Health Ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    General moral (ethical) principles play a prominent role in certain methods of moral reasoning and ethical decision-making in bioethics and public health. Examples include the principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. Some accounts of ethics in public health have pointed to additional principles related to social and environmental concerns, such as the precautionary principle and principles of solidarity or social cohesion. This article provides an overview of principle-based methods of moral reasoning as they apply to public health ethics including a summary of advantages and disadvantages of methods of moral reasoning that rely upon general principles of moral reasoning. Drawing upon the literature on public health ethics, examples are provided of additional principles, obligations, and rules that may be useful for analyzing complex ethical issues in public health. A framework is outlined that takes into consideration the interplay of ethical principles and rules at individual, community, national, and global levels. Concepts such as the precautionary principle and solidarity are shown to be useful to public health ethics to the extent that they can be shown to provide worthwhile guidance and information above and beyond principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice, and the clusters of rules and maxims that are linked to these moral principles. Future directions likely to be productive include further work on areas of public health ethics such as public trust, community empowerment, the rights of individuals who are targeted (or not targeted) by public health interventions, individual and community resilience and wellbeing, and further clarification of principles, obligations, and rules in public health disciplines such as environmental science, prevention and control of chronic and infectious diseases, genomics, and global health. PMID:20072707

  14. Basic Modelling principles and Validation of Software for Prediction of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2000-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software....

  15. The Cyclical Relationship Approach in Teaching Basic Accounting Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golen, Steven

    1981-01-01

    Shows how teachers can provide a more meaningful presentation of various accounting principles by illustrating them through a cyclical relationship approach. Thus, the students see the entire accounting relationship as a result of doing business. (CT)

  16. EVALUATION OF STREET FURNITURE ACCORDING TO BASIC DESIGN PRINCIPLES

    OpenAIRE

    GHORAB, Peyman; YÜCEL CAYMAZ, Gökçen Firdevs

    2014-01-01

    In the urban context, it is important to create more comfortable and livable environments with proper planning, design and application. Because aesthetic considerations are of more importance today, designing urban furniture to give a more beautiful appearance to cities is of high priority; designers and those working in related disciplines must be careful to observe these principles throughout the design process. This paper describes research conducted to review the aesthetic principles invo...

  17. Basic principles of test-negative design in evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-08-24

    Based on the unique characteristics of influenza, the concept of "monitoring" influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) across the seasons using the same observational study design has been developed. In recent years, there has been a growing number of influenza VE reports using the test-negative design, which can minimize both misclassification of diseases and confounding by health care-seeking behavior. Although the test-negative designs offer considerable advantages, there are some concerns that widespread use of the test-negative design without knowledge of the basic principles of epidemiology could produce invalid findings. In this article, we briefly review the basic concepts of the test-negative design with respect to classic study design such as cohort studies or case-control studies. We also mention selection bias, which may be of concern in some countries where rapid diagnostic testing is frequently used in routine clinical practices, as in Japan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The Basic Principles and Present Practice of Conductive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Ildiko

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the origins, principles, and present practice of conductive education (CE), an educational system to rehabilitate people with motor disabilities caused by early damage to the central nervous system. Numerous variants of CE and an increasing demand for CE are noted. International cooperation, quality management, and monitoring…

  19. Basic principles of medical aid in cases of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, E.; Mikhajlov, M.A.; Bliznakov, V.

    1979-01-01

    A model scheme has been presented of medical aid organization in emergency cases of irradiation. The tasks of medical service have been pointed out in connection with evacuation stages, bulk of medical aid depending on the natur of radiation damages, first aid and some general principles of radiation sickness treatment. (author)

  20. Using General Semantics Principles in the Basic News Reporting Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Charles G.; Many, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Shows how certain principles of the study of semantics might be employed in the journalism curriculum as a means of enhancing student reporters' understanding that their perceptions are limited and subject to distortion. Provides a model for explaining these limitations. (HB)

  1. On a new formulation of microphenomena: Basic principles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a series of essays, beginning with this article, we are going to develop a new formulation of microphenomena based on the principles of reality and causality. The new theory provides us with a new depiction of microphenomena assuming a unified concept of information, matter and energy. So, we suppose that in a ...

  2. Sensitization as a Basic Principle of Vestibular Adaptation to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Eberhard R.

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of basic mechanisms of physiological adaptation to weightlessness suffers (1) on the rare flight opportunities, and (2) on the collection of data with a rough time resolution. The comparative approach using data from animal and human research might be helpful to overcome these problems even for human research. The advantage of the comparative approach became obvious for vestibular adaptation to microgravity. Neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, behavioural and psychophysical studies in snails, fish, amphibian, rodents, monkey and men clearly revealed vestibular sensitization as a basic mechanism of adaptation to weightlessness.

  3. On a new formulation of microphenomena: Basic principles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    why the field has a probabilistic objective nature. The basic elements of this new formulation, its application for some stationary states and its nonlinear generalization for conservative systems are discussed here. Keywords. Quantum foundation; causality; deterministic hidden-variable theory; particle–field association.

  4. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF THE PYRAMIDS TEMPORAL BONE RADIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Krstić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the possibilities and advantages of certain methods of temporal bone radiography in diagnosing pathological conditions and diseases of temporal bones, with description of basic techniques of radiological examinations: Mayer’s axial view of the pyramids, the Stenvers view of the pyramids, the Arcelini view of the pyramids, comparative pyramid radiography by Hass, comparative pyramid radiography by Gras-hey, comparative pyramid radiography in submentovertical projection and comparative pyramid radiography in verticosubmental projection.

  5. Welding As Science: Applying Basic Engineering Principles to the Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum provides sample problems illustrating ways in which basic engineering science has been applied to the discipline of welding. Perhaps inferences may be drawn regarding optimal approaches to particular welding problems, as well as for the optimal education for welding engineers. Perhaps also some readers may be attracted to the science(s) of welding and may make worthwhile contributions to the discipline.

  6. Integrality: life principle and right to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Selma Maria Fonseca; Penna, Cláudia Maria de Mattos

    2015-01-01

    To understand the health integrality in the daily work of Family Health Strategy (FHS) and its concept according to the managers in Jequitinhonha Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil. This is a multiple case study of holistic and qualitative approach based on the Quotidian Comprehensive Sociology. The subjects were workers of the Family Health Strategy teams, the support team and managers in a total of 48. The results show the integrality as a principle of life and right to health and to contemplate it in the quotidian of doings in health, others principles of the Unified Health System may be addressed consecutively. The universal right to health care needs is declared in contemplation of integrity of being, the idealization of a subject-centered care, one that is our aim in health care, which signals a step towards a change of attitude in seeking comprehensive care. It is considered that the principle of integrality is a difficult accomplishment in its dimensions.

  7. Ions in solution basic principles of chemical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J

    1999-01-01

    This outline of the principles and chemical interactions in inorganic solution chemistry delivers a course module in an area of considerable complexity. Problems with solutions and tutorial hints to test comprehension have been added as a feature to check readers' understanding and assist self-study. Exercises and projects are also provided to help readers deepen and extend their knowledge and understanding. Inorganic solution chemistry is treated thoroughly Emphasis is placed upon NMR, UV-VIS, IR Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and such topics as acid-base behaviour, stability constants and kinetics.

  8. Basics and principles of radiopharmaceuticals for PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsak, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: markus.mitterhauser@meduniwien.ac.at

    2010-03-15

    The presented review provides general background on PET radiopharmaceuticals for oncological applications. Special emphasis is put on radiopharmacological, radiochemical and regulatory aspects. This review is not meant to give details on all different PET tracers in depth but to provide insights into the general principles coming along with their preparation and use. The PET tracer plays a pivotal role because it provides the basis both for image quality and clinical interpretation. It is composed of the radionuclide (signaller) and the molecular vehicle which determines the (bio-)chemical properties (e.g. binding characteristics, metabolism, elimination rate)

  9. Seven Foundational Principles of Population Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dru; Bhatt, Jay

    2017-10-01

    In 2016, Keyes and Galea issued 9 foundational principles of population health science and invited further deliberations by specialists to advance the field. This article presents 7 foundational principles of population health policy whose intersection with health care, public health, preventive medicine, and now population health, presents unique challenges. These principles are in response to a number of overarching questions that have arisen in over a decade of the authors' collective practice in the public and private sectors, and having taught policy within programs of medicine, law, nursing, and public health at the graduate and executive levels. The principles address an audience of practitioners and policy makers, mindful of the pressing health care challenges of our time, including: rising health-related expenditures, an aging population, workforce shortages, health disparities, and a backdrop of inequities rooted in social determinants that have not been adequately translated into formal policies or practices among the key stakeholders in population health. These principles are meant to empower stakeholders-whether it is the planner or the practitioner, the decision maker or the dedicated caregiver-and inform the development of practical tools, research, and education.

  10. [Introduction to palliative care for the oncologist-history and basic principles of palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Yasuo

    2010-10-01

    The basic principle of palliative care has evolved over time and is the historical origin of the modern hospice. WHO proposed the first definition of palliative care in 1989, and the definition was revised in 2002. These definitions have something in common. Both relieve the pain and suffering to improve QOL. Palliative care is also good for any kind of life-threatening disease, regardless of whether it requires short or long term recuperation. That also need to be able to accept equally all the people of the community. The provision of general palliative care is the responsibility of all medical, nursing, and health professionals for the welfare of all patients with life-threatening disease. Specialist palliative care is based on the basic principles of palliative care, intensive clinical training, and systematic acquisition of knowledge and skills training to support palliative care education, clinical research and training provided by the profession. It has been established by nursing and medical experts in palliative care that palliative care can provide expertise in interdisciplinary teams in different settings. It is necessary that the medical system.

  11. Health promotion settings: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scriven, Angela; Hodgins, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    ...: www.sagepublications.comHealth Promotion Settings Principles and Practice Edited by Angela Scriven and Margaret HodginsEditorial arrangement, Introduction to Part II © Angela Scriven and Margaret...

  12. Assessment of Cardiac Function--Basic Principles and Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinale, Francis G

    2015-09-20

    Increased access and ability to visualize the heart has provided a means to measure a myriad of cardiovascular parameters in real or near real time. However, without fundamental knowledge regarding the basis for cardiac contraction and how to evaluate cardiac function in terms of loading conditions and inotropic state, appropriate interpretation of these cardiovascular parameters can be difficult and can lead to misleading conclusions regarding the functional state of the cardiac muscle. Thus, in this series of Comprehensive Physiology, the basic properties of cardiac muscle function, the cardiac cycle, and determinants of pump function will be reviewed. These basic concepts will then be integrated by presenting approaches in which the effects of preload, afterload, and myocardial contractility can be examined. Moreover, the utility of the pressure-volume relation in terms of assessing both myocardial contractility as well as critical aspects of diastolic performance will be presented. Finally, a generalized approach for the assessment and interpretation of cardiac function within the intact cardiovascular system will be presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Basic principles of MR spectroscopy; Grundlagen der MR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backens, M. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive method for investigating tissue metabolism. In the clinical setting proton spectroscopy based on the hydrogen nucleus ({sup 1}H) is primarily used for determining concentrations of important brain metabolites. This paper illustrates the physicochemical principles of MRS and the requirements for high quality spectra. Moreover, different techniques for acquiring localized spectra are demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die MR-Spektroskopie (MRS) ist eine nichtinvasive Methode zur Untersuchung von Stoffwechselvorgaengen im Gewebe. In der klinischen Diagnostik wird v. a. die auf dem Wasserstoffkern ({sup 1}H) basierende Protonenspektroskopie verwendet, um die Konzentration wichtiger Metabolite im Gehirn zu bestimmen. In diesem Beitrag werden die physikalisch-chemischen Grundlagen der MRS und die Bedingungen fuer eine hohe Spektrenqualitaet erlaeutert. Ausserdem werden die verschiedenen Techniken zur Gewinnung lokalisierter Spektren aufgezeigt. (orig.)

  14. Optical properties of metallic nanoparticles basic principles and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Trügler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fascinating world of plasmonics and physics at the nanoscale, with a focus on simulations and the theoretical aspects of optics and nanotechnology. A research field with numerous applications, plasmonics bridges the gap between the micrometer length scale of light and the secrets of the nanoworld. This is achieved by binding light to charge density oscillations of metallic nanostructures, so-called surface plasmons, which allow electromagnetic radiation to be focussed down to spots as small as a few nanometers. The book is a snapshot of recent and ongoing research and at the same time outlines our present understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles, ranging from the tunability of plasmonic resonances to the ultrafast dynamics of light-matter interaction. Beginning with a gentle introduction that highlights the basics of plasmonic interactions and plasmon imaging, the author then presents a suitable theoretical framework for the description of metallic nanostructu...

  15. Solid-state NMR basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has proved to be a uniquely powerful and versatile tool for analyzing and characterizing chemicals and materials of all kinds. This book focuses on the latest developments and applications for "solid-state" NMR, which has found new uses from archaeology to crystallography to biomaterials and pharmaceutical science research. The book will provide materials engineers, analytical chemists, and physicists, in and out of lab, a survey of the techniques and the essential tools of solid-state NMR, together with a practical guide on applications. In this concise introduction to the growing field of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy The reader will find: * Basic NMR concepts for solids, including guidance on the spin-1/2 nuclei concept * Coverage of the quantum mechanics aspects of solid state NMR and an introduction to the concept of quadrupolar nuclei * An understanding relaxation, exchange and quantitation in NMR * An analysis and interpretation of NMR data, with e...

  16. Photoelectrochemical solar water splitting: From basic principles to advanced devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Y.Alfaifi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical water splitting (PEC offers a promising path for sustainable generation of hydrogen fuel. However, improving solar fuel water splitting efficiency facing tremendous challenges, due to the energy loss related to fast recombination of the photogenerated charge carriers, electrode degradation, as well as limited light harvesting. This review focuses on the brief introduction of basic fundamental of PEC water splitting and the concept of various types of water splitting approaches. Numerous engineering strategies for the investgating of the higher efficiency of the PEC, including charge separation, light harvesting, and co-catalysts doping, have been discussed. Moreover, recent remarkable progress and developments for PEC water splitting with some promising materials are discussed. Recent advanced applications of PEC are also reviewed. Finally, the review concludes with a summary and future outlook of this hot field.

  17. Embarrassment as a key to understanding cultural differences. Basic principles of cultural analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    1995-01-01

    I introduce here the principles I use in my investigation of intercultural marketing and management. I explain how I discovered them, and show how they spring from a theoretical understanding of the dynamic of cultural differences. One of the basic methodological principles for my analysis...

  18. Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collaborative learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we suggest that these seemingly different strategies share important underlying characteristics and can be viewed as complimentary components of a broader approach to classroom instruction called transformational teaching. Transformational teaching involves creating dynamic relationships between teachers, students, and a shared body of knowledge to promote student learning and personal growth. From this perspective, instructors are intellectual coaches who create teams of students who collaborate with each other and with their teacher to master bodies of information. Teachers assume the traditional role of facilitating students’ acquisition of key course concepts, but do so while enhancing students’ personal development and attitudes toward learning. They accomplish these goals by establishing a shared vision for a course, providing modeling and mastery experiences, challenging and encouraging students, personalizing attention and feedback, creating experiential lessons that transcend the boundaries of the classroom, and promoting ample opportunities for preflection and reflection. We propose that these methods are synergistically related and, when used together, maximize students’ potential for intellectual and personal growth. PMID:23162369

  19. Hot-melt extrusion--basic principles and pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Bo; McGinity, James W; Williams, Robert O

    2014-09-01

    Originally adapted from the plastics industry, the use of hot-melt extrusion has gained favor in drug delivery applications both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Several commercial products made by hot-melt extrusion have been approved by the FDA, demonstrating its commercial feasibility for pharmaceutical processing. A significant number of research articles have reported on advances made regarding the pharmaceutical applications of the hot-melt extrusion processing; however, only limited articles have been focused on general principles regarding formulation and process development. This review provides an in-depth analysis and discussion of the formulation and processing aspects of hot-melt extrusion. The impact of physicochemical properties of drug substances and excipients on formulation development using a hot-melt extrusion process is discussed from a material science point of view. Hot-melt extrusion process development, scale-up, and the interplay of formulation and process attributes are also discussed. Finally, recent applications of hot-melt extrusion to a variety of dosage forms and drug substances have also been addressed.

  20. Basic organization principles of the VOR: lessons from frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, H; Dieringer, N

    2004-07-01

    Locomotion is associated with a number of optical consequences that degrade visual information processing in the absence of appropriate compensatory movements. The resulting retinal image flow is counteracted by coordinated eye-head reflexes that are initiated by optokinetic and vestibular inputs. The contribution of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) for stabilizing retinal images is relatively small in amplitude in frogs but important in function by compensating for the non-linearities of the neck motor system. The spatial tuning of the VOR networks underlying the angular (AVOR) and linear (LVOR) with respect to canal and extraocular motor coordinates is organized in a common, canal-related reference frame. Thereby, the axes of head and eye rotation are aligned, principle and auxiliary VOR connections transform vestibular into motor signals and parallel AVOR and LVOR circuits mediate vergence and version signals separately. Comparison of these results with data from other vertebrates demonstrates a number of fundamental organization principles common to most vertebrates. However, the fewer degrees of behavioral freedom of frogs are reflected by the absence of, e.g. a functioning velocity storage network or of a fixation suppression of the VOR. In vitro experiments with the isolated brainstem and branches of N.VIII attached were used to study the putative transmitters of vestibular nerve afferent inputs, the postsynaptic receptor subtypes of second-order vestibular neurons and their dynamic response properties. Evidence is presented that suggests that afferent vestibular nerve fibers with different dynamic response properties activate different subtypes of glutamate receptors. The convergence pattern of monosynaptic afferent nerve inputs from different labyrinthine organs onto second-order vestibular neurons is remarkably specific. As a rule, second-order vestibular neurons receive converging afferent nerve inputs from one semicircular canal and from a specific

  1. Ultra-high energy physics and standard basic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It has not yet been elucidated whether the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above ≃ 4 x 1019 eV is a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or a consequence of other phenomena. In both cases, violations of the standard fundamental principles of Physics can be present and play a significant role. They can in particular modify cosmic-ray interactions, propagation or acceleration at very high energy. Thus, in a long-term program, UHECR data can hopefully be used to test relativity, quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum properties... as well as the elementariness of standard particles. Data on cosmic rays at energies ≃ 1020 eV may also be sensitive to new physics generated well beyond Planck scale. A typical example is provided by the search for possible signatures of a Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV associated to a privileged local reference frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF. If a VRF exists, the internal structure of standard particles at ultra-high energy can undergo substantial modifications. Similarly, the conventional particle symmetries may cease to be valid at such energies instead of heading to a grand unification and the structure of vacuum may no longer be governed by standard quantum field theory. Then, the question whether the notion of Planck scale still makes sense clearly becomes relevant and the very grounds of Cosmology can undergo essential modifications. UHECR studies naturally interact with the interpretation of WMAP and Planck observations. Recent Planck data analyses tend to confirm the possible existence of a privileged space direction. If the observed phenomenon turns out to be a signature of the spinorial space-time (SST we suggested in 1996-97, then conventional Particle Physics may correspond to the local properties of standard matter at low enough energy and large enough distances. This would clearly strengthen the cosmological

  2. Basic principles of forward and inverse geochemical modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, M.J.; Pena, J.

    1994-01-01

    Geochemical modeling consists in the application of thermodynamic and physicochemical principles in the hydrogeochemical systems interpretation. It has been developed following two different approaches: a) inverse modeling (or mass balance calculations), which uses observed chemical and isotopic data from waters and rocks to identify geochemical reactions responsible of them, in a quantitative way; and b) forward modeling, which attempts to predict water compositions and mass transfer that can result from hypothesized reactions, from observed initial conditions on water-rock system compositions. Both of them have intrinsic uses and limitations which drive to their use in specific problems. For systems with adequate chemical, isotopic, and mineralogic data, the inverse modeling approach of speciation and mass-balance modeling provides the most direct means of determining quantitative geochemical reaction models. In contrast, for systems with missing or inadequate data, reaction-path modeling provides an a priori method of predicting geochemical reactions. In some cases it is useful to combine forward modeling with the results from inverse models. The mass-balance results determine the net mass transfer along the flow path, but these results are only partially constrained by thermodynamics. The forward modeling can be used both, to prove thermodynamic consistency for them, and to predict water quality at points where there are no enough data. Recent advances in geochemical modeling are focused on finding the most efficient numerical procedures for coupling geochemical reactions (both equilibrium and kinetic) with the hydrodynamic transport equations in compositionally-complex systems, on uncertainty analysis, and on model validation for actual geochemical systems

  3. Environmental radiation: basic principles, biological facts, potential risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodemann, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    This book describes the complex processes that underlie the effects of different types of radiation at the cellular, organ and organismic level. Technical terms central to the subject matter are printed in italicize and explained in a glossary along with all physical quantities and dimensional units referred to. Through a systematic presentation of various aspects of the effects of environmental radiation on humans the author has endeavoured to make it clear that any discussion on potential health hazards must be conducted specific to the type of radiation in question. Furthermore, to study these issues meaningfully one must have a knowledge of the scientific basis of interactions between the various types of radiation and biological systems and be able to assess the relative impact of environmental radiation compared with other environmental health hazards

  4. Basic principles regarding strength, flexibility, and stability exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheo, William; Baerga, Luis; Miranda, Gerardo

    2012-11-01

    Strength, flexibility, and stability are physiologic parameters associated with health-related physical fitness. Each of these domains affects health in general, the risk of injury, how an injury is treated, and performance in activities of daily living and sports. These domains are affected by individual phenotype, age, deconditioning, occupational activity, and formal exercise. Deficits or loss of strength, flexibility, and stability can be prevented or reduced with exercise programs. Normal muscle strength has been associated with general health benefits, increased life expectancy, psychological benefits, prevention of illness, and reduction of disability in older adults. Static flexibility programs have been shown to improve joint range of motion and tolerance to stretch but do not appear to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injury and may impair muscle performance immediately after a static stretch. Dynamic flexibility, on the other hand, may enhance power and improve sports-specific performance. Stability training leads to improved balance and neuromuscular control, may prevent injury to the knee and ankle joints, and can be used for treatment of patients with low back pain. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Public health genomics: origins and basic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Zimmern

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and technologies arising from the Human Genome Project promise in time to offer new opportunities for the treatment and prevention of disease. The enterprise of public health genomics aims to bridge the gap between advances in basic research and their responsible and effective implementation in clinical services and public health programmes. Public health genomics stresses the importance of understanding how genes and environment act together to influence health; avoiding genetic exceptionalism; appreciating the social and political context of genomic advances; and encouraging critical evaluation of proposed new tests and interventions. New international networks and collaborations are being established to develop public health genomics and further its aims.

  6. Spillover effects of supplementary on basic health insurance: Evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-F. Roos (Anne-Fleur); F.T. Schut (Erik)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLike many other countries, the Netherlands has a health insurance system that combines mandatory basic insurance with voluntary supplementary insurance. Both types of insurance are founded on different principles. Since basic and supplementary insurance are sold by the same health

  7. A pilot study designed to acquaint medical educators with basic pedagogic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, P J; Brawer, J; Steinert, Y; Chalk, C; McLeod, A

    2008-02-01

    Faculty development activities in medical schools regularly target teaching behaviours but rarely address basic pedagogic principles underlying those behaviours. Although many teachers have an intuitive or tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles, overt knowledge of fundamental educational principles is rare. We conducted a short-term pilot study designed to transform teachers' tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge of pedagogic principles. We hypothesized that conscious awareness of these principles will positively influence their teaching effectiveness. The intervention included a workshop, provision of a workbook on pedagogic principles and free access to educational consultants. For the intervention, we chose a purposive sample of experienced teachers at our medical school. Evaluation of the impact of the intervention using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews revealed three notable findings; 1. Participants were surprised to discover the existence of an extensive body of pedagogic science underlying teaching and learning. 2. They were enthusiastic about the intervention and expressed interest in learning more about basic pedagogic principles. 3. The knowledge acquired had an immediate impact on their teaching.

  8. [The issues and basic principles of training of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, V T; Naumova, E V

    2012-07-01

    The article considers the main positions concerning the clinical laboratory diagnostics as an independent clinical specialty and the principles of professional training and improvement of specialists. The basic issues complicating the training and improvement of personnel to be kept in line with actual needs of laboratory service of public health system are discussed. Among them are the availability of laboratory academic sub disciplines demanding a profound special theoretical education and technical skills; the need to account in the process of professional training the variety of forms, sizes and types of laboratory structures in different medical institutions; the need of special training programs for numerous specialists with non-medical basic education. The combination of the present system of postgraduate training of specialists on chairs of state educational organizations with initiative involvement of specialists in various public forms of permanent professional improvement (professional scientific societies meetings, research conferences, internet seminars, etc.) is supported Along with a positive appraisal of the existing system of training in the state educational institutions and corresponding regulation documents, a critique is expressed regarding certain actual documents which improperly limit the administrative functions of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics and complicate training of bacteriologists for clinical laboratories.

  9. Basic principles of water-use licensing - Summary of economical and legal expert opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter Ott, O.; Staub, C.; Leimbacher, J.

    2008-01-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the basic principles behind the definition of monetary compensation for the use of water resources in Switzerland for power generation. The basic aims of such compensation are briefly discussed as are the general economical and technical principles involved. Ownership of the rights pertaining to the use of water resources and the various definitions of licence fees and water taxes and their application are reviewed. Additional remuneration for water storage and appropriation is also discussed.

  10. Oncology. Pt. 1. General part, epidemiology - pathogenesis - basic principles of therapy. 2. upd. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Bartram Claus R.

    2010-01-01

    The book Oncology is aimed to communicate the compiled knowledge on tumor development and cancer: fundamental knowledge base, practice related know-how for diagnostics and therapy. Part 1 includes the following chapters: epidemiology and pathogenesis, basic principles of diagnostics, basic principles of therapy, complication of malign growth, tumors in the gastrointestinal tract, female genital carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract carcinomas, respiratory tract and lung carcinomas, carcinomas in the head - neck area, bone and soft tissue carcinomas, pediatric tumors, hematological neoplasm, other carcinomas. The book can be used as reference for clinical work. [de

  11. The Basic Principles and Methods of the System Approach to Compression of Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenets, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The task of data compressing of measurement data is still urgent for information-measurement systems. In paper the basic principles necessary for designing of highly effective systems of compression of telemetric information are offered. A basis of the offered principles is representation of a telemetric frame as whole information space where we can find of existing correlation. The methods of data transformation and compressing algorithms realizing the offered principles are described. The compression ratio for offered compression algorithm is about 1.8 times higher, than for a classic algorithm. Thus, results of a research of methods and algorithms showing their good perspectives.

  12. Doing it right – or are we? Basic principles in the acquisition, care of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The photograph collection of the University Archives, University of KwaZulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg Campus), is introduced as an example of a collection. Basic principles for the acquisition, storage, provision of access, and handling and use of photographs, are presented. The applicability of 'acceptable' American and ...

  13. Balancing knowledge and basic principles in veterinary parasitology - Competencies for future Danish veterinary graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Johansen, Maria Vang; Nejsum, Peter

    2018-01-01

    to get students to acquire enough active knowledge of the most common parasites and an understanding of the basic principles in relation to, for example, transmission and control. Even though information is readily accessible through books and on-line resources, we still believe that a competent...

  14. Basic Principles and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Backens, Martin; Ahlhelm, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to assist daily clinical diagnostics. This review is intended to give an overview on basic principles of the technology, discuss some of its technical aspects, and present typical applications in daily clinical routine in neuroradiology.

  15. [Basic principles in rheumatologic patient education. Theoretical principles and didactic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlebracht-König, I; Bönisch, A

    2002-02-01

    Nowadays, the handling of a chronic disease is seen as a process, influenced by a variety of factors. Case studies, taken from health behavior, help to illustrate the conduct of patients suffering from chronic diseases and develop strategies of how to increase a patient's skills in coping with his illness. The concept of self-efficacy beliefs is of great importance and will be discussed in detail. In addition, possible effects of patient education in the comprehensive treatment of rheumatic diseases will be presented. In teaching methods, equal emphasis is placed on the transmission of information as on the development of practical know-how. They are on a par with emotional support, motivation, assistance in accepting the disease and coping with fear. The special methods and media required will be discussed, along with the framework for training methods and qualification required of the staff in charge of training.

  16. Assessment of IAEA safety series no. 75-INSAG-3 - ''basic safety principles for nuclear power plants''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Series No. 75-INSAG--3, 'Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants' is reviewed in the light of the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety reports ACNS--2, 'Safety Objectives for Nuclear Activities in Canada', and ACNS--4, 'Recommended General Safety Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants'. The INSAG safety objectives are consistent with the safety objectives stated in ACNS--2 but are less general, applying only to nuclear power plants. The INSAG safety principles are, in general, consistent with the requirements stated in ACNS--4 but put more emphasis on 'safety culture'. They give little attention to reactor plant effluents, waste management, or decommissioning. (fig., 5 refs.)

  17. Technology insight: metabonomics in gastroenterology-basic principles and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Nielsen, Ole H; Wang, Yulan L

    2008-01-01

    successfully to the study of human diseases, toxicology, microbes, nutrition, and plant biology. This Review introduces the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and commonly used tools for multivariate data analysis, before considering the applications and future potential....... Metabonomics, especially when based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, has the potential to identify biomarkers and prognostic factors, enhance clinical diagnosis, and expand hypothesis generation. As a consequence, the use of metabonomics has been extensively explored in the past decade, and applied...... of metabonomics in basic and clinical research, with emphasis on applications in the field of gastroenterology....

  18. Examining the Ethical Dilemmas in Terminating the Pregnancy Through the Basic Ethical Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Termination of pregnancy is an event that takes place at the request of expectant parents or due to reasons beyond their desire. However, in the presence of appropriate indications, there is no need for abortion debate. In this case, it is important to terminate the pregnancy with the request of expectant parents. Even if cessation of the pregnancy is performed within a legal framework, basic ethical principles, such as autonomy, do no harm, being useful and fairness should be applied. Precisely the problem for physicians already emerges at this point and the physicians can fall in a dilemma about how to behave with the mother or the fetus. In this article, ethical dilemmas that may arise in termination of pregnancy will be discussed briefly in accordance with the basic ethical principles.

  19. Basic Principles of Industrial Electric Power Network Computer Aided Design and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fursanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model for a computer aided design and engineering system has been developed in the paper. The paper presents basic automation process principles including a graphical representation   network and calculation results, convenient user interface, automatic mode calculation, selection of transformer rated power and cross-section area of wires. The developed algorithm and program make it possible to save time and improve quality of project implementation.

  20. Environment, health and safety guiding principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) has taken a leadership role in promoting responsible planning, management and work practices that meet the pipeline industry's environment, health and safety objectives. This brochure contains CEPA's environment, health and safety statement. It lists the guiding principles developed and endorsed by CEPA and its member companies in support of protecting the environment and the health and safety of its employees and the public. The 11 CEPA member companies are: Alberta Natural Gas Company Ltd., ATCO Gas Services Ltd., Foothills Pipe Lines Ltd., Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., NOVA Gas Transmission Limited, TransGas Limited, Trans Mountain Pipe Line Company Ltd., Trans-Northern Pipelines Inc., Trans Quebec and Maritimes Pipeline Inc., and Westcoast Energy Inc

  1. UPDATING THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PROJECT EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY IN FUTURE MUSIC TEACHERS’ VOCAL AND CHORAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Haiye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to characterizing features of implementing project technology into future music teachers’ vocal and choral training. The analysis of scientific papers of outstanding scientists in philosophy, psychology, and art education, which deal with modern directions of using project technology, highlight its role in art education process. A methodological base is supported by considering contemporary scientific researches, in particular the theory and methodology of musical studies in accordance with forming students’ independence in the process of solving educational problems by means of project technology; developing principles of students’ professional training optimization on the basis of project activity; innovative development of future music teachers’ professional training that gives to the presented material novelty and presentable appearance. Studying future music teachers’ vocal and choral training as a process of constructing that has a special purpose of improving the quality descriptions of educational vocal and choral collective sound functioning, the author of the article discloses the basic principles of implementing project technology into future music teachers’ vocal and choral training. The author of the article pays the special attention to revealing specific features and maintenance of project technology in vocal and choral training of future leaders of child's art groups. An emphasis is made on the following basic factors that influence development of students’ creative individuality: constructing projects of their own becoming; setting aims, tasks, strategies and facilities of vocal and choral work; directing to the result; independent creative activity; presentation, reflection and correction of a project. On the basis of the obtained data the following principles of project technology are put forward in future music teachers’ vocal and choral training: principle of independence; principle of

  2. An assessment of adherence to basic ecological principles by payments for ecosystem service projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, C M; Varga, A; Olmsted, P; Ingram, J C; Cattau, M; Freund, C; Wynn-Grant, R; Naeem, S

    2016-08-01

    Programs and projects employing payments for ecosystem service (PES) interventions achieve their objectives by linking buyers and sellers of ecosystem services. Although PES projects are popular conservation and development interventions, little is known about their adherence to basic ecological principles. We conducted a quantitative assessment of the degree to which a global set of PES projects adhered to four ecological principles that are basic scientific considerations for any project focused on ecosystem management: collection of baseline data, identification of threats to an ecosystem service, monitoring, and attention to ecosystem dynamics or the formation of an adaptive management plan. We evaluated 118 PES projects in three markets-biodiversity, carbon, and water-compiled using websites of major conservation organizations; ecology, economic, and climate-change databases; and three scholarly databases (ISI Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, and Google Scholar). To assess adherence to ecological principles, we constructed two scientific indices (one additive [ASI] and one multiplicative [MSI]) based on our four ecological criteria and analyzed index scores by relevant project characteristics (e.g., sector, buyer, seller). Carbon-sector projects had higher ASI values (P < 0.05) than water-sector projects and marginally higher ASI scores (P < 0.1) than biodiversity-sector projects, demonstrating their greater adherence to ecological principles. Projects financed by public-private partnerships had significantly higher ASI values than projects financed by governments (P < 0.05) and marginally higher ASI values than those funded by private entities (P < 0.1). We did not detect differences in adherence to ecological principles based on the inclusion of cobenefits, the spatial extent of a project, or the size of a project's budget. These findings suggest, at this critical phase in the rapid growth of PES projects, that fundamental ecological principles should be

  3. Principles of Child Health Care Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Mark L; Helm, Mark E; White, Patience H

    2017-09-01

    After passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more children and young adults have become insured and have benefited from health care coverage than at any time since the creation of the Medicaid program in 1965. From 2009 to 2015, the uninsurance rate for children younger than 19 years fell from 9.7% to 5.3%, whereas the uninsurance rate for young adults 19 to 25 years of age declined from 31.7% to 14.5%. Nonetheless, much work remains to be done. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that the United States can and should ensure that all children, adolescents, and young adults from birth through the age of 26 years who reside within its borders have affordable access to high-quality and comprehensive health care, regardless of their or their families' incomes. Public and private health insurance should safeguard existing benefits for children and take further steps to cover the full array of essential health care services recommended by the AAP. Each family should be able to afford the premiums, deductibles, and other cost-sharing provisions of the plan. Health plans providing these benefits should ensure, insofar as possible, that families have a choice of professionals and facilities with expertise in the care of children within a reasonable distance of their residence. Traditional and innovative payment methodologies by public and private payers should be structured to guarantee the economic viability of the pediatric medical home and of other pediatric specialty and subspecialty practices to address developing shortages in the pediatric specialty and subspecialty workforce, to promote the use of health information technology, to improve population health and the experience of care, and to encourage the delivery of evidence-based and quality health care in the medical home, as well as in other outpatient, inpatient, and home settings. All current and future health care insurance plans should incorporate the principles for child

  4. Zebrafish housing systems: a review of basic operating principles and considerations for design and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christian; Mason, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The strategies for housing zebrafish used in biomedical research have evolved considerably over the past three decades. To keep pace with the rapid expansion and development of the zebrafish model system, the field has generally moved from keeping fish at the level of aquarium hobbyist to that of industrialized, recirculating aquaculture. Numerous commercial system vendors now offer increasingly sophisticated housing systems based on design principles that maximize the number of animals that can be housed in a given space footprint, and they are thus able to support large and diverse research programs. This review is designed to provide managers, lab animal veterinarians, investigators, and other parties responsible for care and use of these animals with a comprehensive overview of the basic operating and design principles of zebrafish housing systems. This information can be used to help plan the construction of new facilities and/or the upgrade and maintenance of existing operations.

  5. Oral Health: Brush Up on Dental Care Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basics and what you can do to promote oral health. By Mayo Clinic Staff Your smile depends on ... right techniques? Follow these steps to protect your oral health. Oral health begins with clean teeth. Keeping the ...

  6. Basic principles on the safety evaluation of the HTGR hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazutaka; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Tazawa, Yujiro; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2009-03-01

    As HTGR hydrogen production systems, such as HTTR-IS system or GTHTR300C currently being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency, consists of nuclear reactor and chemical plant, which are without a precedent in the world, safety design philosophy and regulatory framework should be newly developed. In this report, phenomena to be considered and events to be postulated in the safety evaluation of the HTGR hydrogen production systems were investigated and basic principles to establish acceptance criteria for the explosion and toxic gas release accidents were provided. Especially for the explosion accident, quantitative criteria to the reactor building are proposed with relating sample calculation results. It is necessary to treat abnormal events occurred in the hydrogen production system as an 'external events to the nuclear plant' in order to classify the hydrogen production system as no-nuclear facility' and basic policy to meet such requirement was also provided. (author)

  7. Computational anatomy based on whole body imaging basic principles of computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Masutani, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with computational anatomy, an emerging discipline recognized in medical science as a derivative of conventional anatomy. It is also a completely new research area on the boundaries of several sciences and technologies, such as medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics. Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging highlights the underlying principles, basic theories, and fundamental techniques in computational anatomy, which are derived from conventional anatomy, medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics, in addition to various examples of applications in clinical data. The book will cover topics on the basics and applications of the new discipline. Drawing from areas in multidisciplinary fields, it provides comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to computational anatomy. As well,Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging serves as a valuable resource for researchers including graduate students in the field and a connection with ...

  8. Ten Principles to Guide Health Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Joe K

    2017-03-01

    Americans face inevitable trade-offs between health care affordability, accessibility, and innovation. Although numerous reforms have been proposed, universal principles to guide decision-making are lacking. Solving the challenges that confront us will be difficult, owing to intense partisan divisions and a dysfunctional political process. Nevertheless, we must engage in reasoned debate that respects deeply held differences of opinion regarding our individual and collective obligations to promote healthy living and ensure affordable access to health care. Otherwise, our decisions will be expressed through political processes that reflect the preferences of narrow interests rather than the general public. Our health care system can be made more efficient and equitable by incentivizing consumers and providers to utilize high-value care and avoid low-value care. To accomplish this, we must understand the determinants of consumer and provider behavior and implement policies that encourage, but do not force, optimal decision-making. Although distinguishing between low- and high-value treatments will invariably threaten established interests, we must expand our capacity to make such judgements. Throughout this process, consumers, taxpayers, and policy makers must maintain realistic expectations. Although realigning incentives to promote high-value care will improve efficiency, it is unlikely to control increasing medical expenditures because they are not primarily caused by inefficiency. Rather, rising medical expenditures are driven by medical innovation made possible by increasing incomes and expanding health insurance coverage. Failure to recognize these linkages risks adopting indiscriminate policies that will reduce spending but slow innovation and impair access to needed care.

  9. A CAL Program to Teach the Basic Principles of Genetic Engineering--A Change from the Traditional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, D. G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program written for the BBC microcomputer to teach the basic principles of genetic engineering is described. Discussed are the hardware requirements software, use of the program, and assessment. (Author/CW)

  10. Effects of an additional small group discussion to cognitive achievement and retention in basic principles of bioethics teaching methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Afandi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim The place of ethics in undergraduate medical curricula is essential but the methods of teaching medical ethics did not show substantial changes. “Basic principles of bioethics” is the best knowledge to develop student’s reasoning analysis in medical ethics In this study, we investigate the effects of an additional small group discussion in basic principles of bioethics conventional lecture methods to cognitive achievement and retention. This study was a randomized controlled trial with parallel design. Cognitive scores of the basic principles of bioethics as a parameter was measured using basic principles of bioethics (Kaidah Dasar Bioetika, KDB test. Both groups were attending conventional lectures, then the intervention group got an additional small group discussion.Result Conventional lectures with or without small group discussion significantly increased cognitive achievement of basic principles of bioethics (P= 0.001 and P= 0.000, respectively, and there were significant differences in cognitive achievement and retention between the 2 groups (P= 0.000 and P= 0.000, respectively.Conclusion Additional small group discussion method improved cognitive achievement and retention of basic principles of bioethics. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 48-52Keywords: lecture, specification checklist, multiple choice questions

  11. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Home Health Beneficiary PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Home Health Agency (HHA) Beneficiary Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare HHA claims. The CMS BSA...

  12. Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  13. Instructor support and malfunction handling in the WWER-440 Basic Principles Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacs, A.; Szabo, G.; Vegh, E.

    1988-09-01

    This research is part of the coordinated research program on 'Development of common modelling approaches for nuclear power plant training simulators' of the International Atomic Energy Agency. A Basic Principles Simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power reactors has been completed in the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. The instructor plays a significant role when a training simulator is used for educating a complex technological process. The Instructor System of the simulator is described. A screen driven system was developed for providing a simple yet powerful tool to control the running of this simulator. One of the most complex problems is malfunction control of a reactor, therefore this case is treated in the Instructor System description. (R.P.) 5 figs

  14. Three-dimensional attached viscous flow basic principles and theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschel, Ernst Heinrich; Kordulla, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Viscous flow is usually treated in the frame of boundary-layer theory and as a two-dimensional flow. At best, books on boundary layers provide the describing equations for three-dimensional boundary layers, and solutions only for certain special cases.   This book presents the basic principles and theoretical foundations of three-dimensional attached viscous flows as they apply to aircraft of all kinds. Though the primary flight speed range is that of civil air transport vehicles, flows past other flying vehicles up to hypersonic speeds are also considered. Emphasis is put on general three-dimensional attached viscous flows and not on three-dimensional boundary layers, as this wider scope is necessary in view of the theoretical and practical problems that have to be overcome in practice.   The specific topics covered include weak, strong, and global interaction; the locality principle; properties of three-dimensional viscous flows; thermal surface effects; characteristic properties; wall compatibility con...

  15. A Symbiosis of Islamic Principles and Basic Human Values on Work and Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokis Rohaiza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses some basic issues on work and life based on Islamic and non-religious principles. Work and life are inseparable facets of and for human existence. Work derives from the demands of life, and thus it becomes a responsibility for every individual person. The article attempts to relate some highlighted Qur’anic verses and Hadith with basic occupational values such as honesty, modesty and innovativeness, among others, at workplaces. In the end, it makes an effort to understand the working of the subconscious mind on work to make life worthwhile. The plan for this article is to lay emphasis that the presence of human beings, which includes their mind, energy and whatever they can offer in the forms of work, benefits all. In such a case, not only those humans may be seen as successful in fulfilling the work-needs, but also victorious in completing the life-demands as human beings. “Virtuous workplace” is the most ideal platform for such purpose.

  16. Basic Versus Supplementary Health Insurance : Moral Hazard and Adverse Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a tractable model of health insurance with both moral hazard and adverse selection. We show that government sponsored universal basic insurance should cover treatments with the biggest adverse selection problems. Treatments not covered by basic insurance can be covered on the

  17. Basic versus supplementary health insurance : Moral hazard and adverse selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    This paper introduces a tractable model of health insurance with both moral hazard and adverse selection. We show that government sponsored universal basic insurance should cover treatments with the biggest adverse selection problems. Treatments not covered by basic insurance can be covered on the

  18. The Impact of Emotion on Learners' Application of Basic Science Principles to Novel Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Meghan M; Monteiro, Sandra; Pottruff, Molly M; Neville, Alan; Norman, Geoff R; Eva, Kevin W; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan

    2016-11-01

    Training to become a physician is an emotionally laden experience. Research in cognitive psychology indicates that emotions can influence learning and performance, but the materials used in such research (e.g., word lists) rarely reflect the complexity of material presented in medical school. The present study examined whether emotions influence learning of basic science principles. Fifty-five undergraduate psychology students were randomly assigned to write about positive, negative, or neutral life events for nine minutes. Participants were then taught three physiological concepts, each in the context of a single organ system. Testing consisted of 13 clinical cases, 7 presented with the same concept/organ system pairing used during training ("near transfer") and 6 with novel pairings ("far transfer"). Testing was repeated after one week with 13 additional cases. Forty-nine students provided complete data. Higher test scores were found when the concept/organ system pairing was held constant (near transfer = 51% correct vs. far = 33%; P concepts by novices. Demands on working memory and subsequent cognitive load provide a potential explanation. Future work will examine the extent to which these findings generalize to medical trainees.

  19. Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Part 1: Basic science and principles of assessment and clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röijezon, Ulrik; Clark, Nicholas C; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Impaired proprioception has been reported as a feature in a number of musculoskeletal disorders of various body parts, from the cervical spine to the ankle. Proprioception deficits can occur as a result of traumatic damage, e.g., to ligaments and muscles, but can also occur in association with painful disorders of a gradual-onset nature. Muscle fatigue can also adversely affect proprioception and this has implications for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Due to the importance of proprioception for sensorimotor control, specific methods for assessment and training of proprioception have been developed for both the spine and the extremities. The aim of this first part of a two part series on proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation is to present a theory based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, assessment, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal disorders and general principles of interventions targeting proprioception. An understanding of the basic science of proprioception, consequences of disturbances and theories behind assessment and interventions is vital for the clinical management of musculoskeletal disorders. Part one of this series supplies a theoretical base for part two which is more practically and clinically orientated, covering specific examples of methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and the extremities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linear and non-linear spectroscopy of microparticles: basic principles, new techniques and promising applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Richard K; Pan, Yong-Le

    2008-01-01

    In the introduction a brief recollection is made of how one of us (RKC), accidentally, got into this field of linear and nonlinear spectroscopy of a dielectric micro-particle that can be treated as a micro-cavity or a micro-resonator. The basic principles of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and their relationship with electromagnetic theory are presented. To simplify the mathematics, we only discuss an example from a 2-d case of light illumination perpendicular to the fiber axis. This 2-d example has relevance to semiconductor circular disk lasers, nonlinear optics in torroids, fibers and spheres at the tip of a fiber. The internal and near-field distribution of a WGM are graphically plotted to give the reader a chance to get a physical understanding of the spatial distribution as well as spectral distribution of WGMs. Several new techniques that enable the measurements of: (1) nanometer changes in the cladding diameter over a centimeter length of fiber; (2) some aspects of the morphology of micro-particles by elastic scattering; and (3) biochemical reactions at the interface of liquid media with a sphere at the end of a fiber. A few interesting nonlinear optical experimental results pertaining to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) are touched upon. We present some preliminary results for promising applications in the area of bioaerosols. These include ambient aerosol characterization and identification with elastic scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other optical and/or biochemical identifiers.

  1. Insuring America's health: principles and recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance; Board on Health Care Services; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    .... Being uninsured is associated with a range of adverse health, social, and economic consequences for individuals and their families, for the health care systems in their communities, and for the nation as a whole...

  2. [Basic health care. AIDS and children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pasch, T

    1994-02-17

    The total number of children in Africa who died of AIDS is estimated at 700,000. Based on a 30% rate of maternal transmission of HIV infection to children and an annual birth rate of 40/1000, in urban areas about 120,000 children are born with HIV infection. In rural areas the figure is 240,000. In addition, another 120,000 die because of diminished care, thus it is estimated that a total of 480,000 children die of AIDS per year, 30-40% of child mortality of the continent. In the AIDS-affected areas, 30% of children have become orphans. In Katete, Zambia, with a population of 157,000, there are 20,000 orphans, half of whom lost one or both parents because of AIDS, and 2400 of whom lost both parents. A project was designed with the objective of helping orphans. First they had to be counted, using an interview team of 39 persons who visited 450 households in five villages. There were a total of 311 orphans of whom 148 were AIDS orphans. 62% of the 20,000 orphans in the district of Katete do not go to school. In Lusaka in 1990, orphans made up 10% of all children, but 3 years later in Katete, 23% of all children were orphans. The girls are often kept away from school in order to take of their sick mothers. When the father is also sick, there is no more money for school uniforms or fees. In the plans of the St. Francis Hospital AIDS project for 1994-98, a great deal of attention was given to the care of orphans. This will be carried out by local health workers who have taken a course in the hospital and have solid work experience. They will deliver a package containing the most essential necessities for the orphans: school uniform, books, pens, soap, flour, milk powder, and dried beans. There are more projects in the program, including a women's group that wants to sew school uniforms and a health education plan.

  3. A Study to Determine the Current Level of Implementation of Eighteen Basic Middle School Principles in the State of Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Vernal G.

    The current level of implementation of 18 basic middle school principles in the 147 Missouri schools that met the definition of middle schools is the focus of this study. Questionnaire responses were received from 101 of the schools' administrators. Mean scores, standard deviations, and mean percentages of the maximum possible scores yielded by…

  4. Integrating mental health into the basic nursing curriculum: Benefits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integration of mental health into the basic nursing curricula provides an environment for and affords students an opportunity to learn how a client should be treated holistically. Nurses constitute the largest proportion of health workers in most countries of the world. They work in the remotest areas where there are hardly any ...

  5. The presence of communication in the basic organizational principles of the University of Zulia towards the student sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Castellano Ramírez

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is centered in detecting the presence of comunication towards the student sector, like a formal element in the redaccion of the organization basic principles (OBP of La Universidad del Zulia, such as Mision, Vision, Values, Polítics, Objectives and Strategies. Starting from the theoric approach of that the OBP conform the basic component of the Corporative Identity, in wish are rised the other three: the organizational beheivier, the simbology or visual identity and the comunication. Through the documentary research it has concluded that the communication towards the student community is not taken in count in the redaction of the basic principles, it is mentioned only in the comunicational politic but in a very general way.

  6. Health economic evaluation: important principles and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Drummond, Michael

    2013-06-01

    To discuss health economic evaluation and improve the understanding of common methodology. This article discusses the methodology for the following types of economic evaluations: cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-benefit, and economic modeling. Topics include health-state utility measures, the quality-adjusted life year (QALY), uncertainty analysis, discounting, decision tree analysis, and Markov modeling. Economic evaluation is the comparative analysis of alternative courses of action in terms of both their costs and consequences. With increasing health care expenditure and limited resources, it is important for physicians to consider the economic impact of their interventions. Understanding common methodology involved in health economic evaluation will improve critical appraisal of the literature and optimize future economic evaluations. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. The Team Of The Family Health Strategy And The Doctrinal Principles Of The Unified Health System: Perceptions And Applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woneska Rodrigues Pinheiro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The SUS, which was guaranteed by the Brazilian Constitution of 1988 and regulated by organic laws of health, offers a system governed of doctrinal principles (universality, fairness and completeness concerning the philosophy of the system and extend the concept of health and the right to it. On the promotion of these principles, the municipalization of health is referred to as a policy of decentralization which incorporates basic health attention, permeated by the principles of the SUS, where inserts in this context the basic health units (UBS that are entrance doors of the population to the system. When considering that the proposals brought by the family health strategy (FHS are great potential to restructure the welfare model and the Organization of health services, and these proposals based on the principles governing the SUS, becomes essential, inter alia, that the worker member of this team have involvement and knowledge of the project, as well as on its goals and principles governing it. Objective: Check the knowledge and promotion of doctrinal principles of the SUS by active team of FHS in the town of Juazeiro do Norte in the State of Ceará (CE, Brazil.  Method: This work deals with a transversal nature study exploratory, qualitative approach. The survey was conducted in the family health strategy of the city of Juazeiro do Norte-CE, with top level professionals (physician, nurses and dentists who work on units during the collection period. The collection was performed through a semi structured interview and the data analyzed by means of the collective subject discourse. This study was submitted to the Ethics Committee of the College Lion Sa, having the opinion of approved (nº: 1.067.638.  Results: the results showed that the professionals have demonstrated no knowledge of, nor promote some doctrinal principles of the SUS coherently. The knowledge that they have are fragmented and incipient, and Praxis (theory

  8. [Games as an alternative for teaching basic health concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Lizardo, J M; Rodríguez-Morán, M; Guerrero-Romero, F

    2001-05-01

    To determine, for the teaching of basic health concepts to school-age children, the effectiveness of an educational strategy based on traditional children's games. Intervention study carried out in the city of Durango, Mexico, in June 2000 with 300 children from 9 to 11 years old. The children were randomly divided into two groups. The children in Group A used a modified version of a Mexican popular game called Serpientes y Escaleras (Snakes and Ladders) that included messages on basic health concepts; the children in Group B made up the control group and did not play the modified game. At baseline there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, grade level, or their scores on a knowledge test of basic health concepts. After the educational intervention, the health concepts test scores, out of a maximum possible of 10, were 9.3 +/- 0.8 for Group A and 7.5 +/- 1.1 for Group B (P games that include health and hygiene messages can be an alternative for teaching basic health concepts.

  9. Principles in wireless building health monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentaris, F. P.; Makris, J. P.; Stonham, J.; Vallianatos, F.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring the structural state of a building is essential for the safety of the people who work, live, visit or just use it as well as for the civil protection of urban areas. Many factors can affect the state of the health of a structure, namely man made, like mistakes in the construction, traffic, heavy loads on the structures, explosions, environmental impacts like wind loads, humidity, chemical reactions, temperature changes and saltiness, and natural hazards like earthquakes and landslides. Monitoring the health of a structure provides the ability to anticipate structural failures and secure the safe use of buildings especially those of public services. This work reviews the state of the art and the challenges of a wireless Structural Health Monitoring (WiSHM). Literature review reveals that although there is significant evolution in wireless structural health monitoring, in many cases, monitoring by itself is not enough to predict when a structure becomes inappropriate and/or unsafe for use, and the damage or low durability of a structure cannot be revealed (Chintalapudi, et al., 2006; Ramos, Aguilar, & Lourenço, 2011). Several features and specifications of WiSHM like wireless sensor networking, reliability and autonomy of sensors, algorithms of data transmission and analysis should still be evolved and improved in order to increase the predictive effectiveness of the SHM (Jinping Ou & Hui Li, 2010; Lu & Loh, 2010) . Acknowledgments This work was supported in part by the ARCHEMEDES III Program of the Ministry of Education of Greece and the European Union in the framework of the project entitled «Interdisciplinary Multi-Scale Research of Earthquake Physics and Seismotectonics at the front of the Hellenic Arc (IMPACT-ARC) ».

  10. Microeconomic principles in the health sector: The demand for health services in the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Health has become a dominant economic and political issue over the past years, where many nations experience rapid rises in health care spending. The main reason why the health care sector does not operate entirely in accordance with economic market principles is the fact that inequalities in health and access to health care are understood as the lack of humanity and justice. Health care demands might seem as quite inelastic, but because of the health insurance, it shows a certain degree of price, income, cross - price and time elasticity. The subject of this study was the demand for health services in the Republic of Serbia in order to assess the ability of the public sector to meet the demand for providing these services. The underlying assumption was that public health can not adequately meet the needs of citizens due to insufficient investment in the sector and inefficient allocation of resources. To confirm this assumption, basic characteristics of health care market and the factors affecting the supply and demand for health services were discussed. Based on the analysis of investment in the health sector, the existing capacity and organization of health services, our research has shown that the public health system in the Republic of Serbia is not able to adequately meet the demand for health services. In the current economic situation in the Republic of Serbia, which already spends a significant portion of its GDP on health, there is no realistic possibility of increased spending on public health care system, although it can be expected that there will be increasing demand for health services and increase of costs. The health sector is not, and does not have the ability to be a perfectly competitive market, and the questions of its financing, rational and efficient organization is extremely delicate. However, health care economists and experts in health economics should give a significantly higher contribution in organizing health sector

  11. Investigating underlying principles to guide health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Ali; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Harris, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Many countries conduct Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of their projects and policies to predict their positive and negative health impacts. In recent years many guides have been developed to inform HIA practice, largely reflecting local developments in HIA. These guides have often been designed for specific contexts and specific need, making the choice between guides difficult. The objective of the current study is to identify underlying principles in order to guide HIA practice in Iran. This study was conducted in three stages: 1) Studies comparing HIA guidelines were reviewed to identify criteria used for comparison seeking emphasized principles. 2) The HIA characteristics extracted from published papers were categorized in order to determine the principles that could guide HIA practice. 3) Finally, these principles were agreed by experts using nominal group technique. The review of the studies comparing HIA guides demonstrated there are no clear comparison criteria for reviewing HIA guides and no study mentioned HIA principles. Investigating the HIA principles from peer-reviewed papers, we found 14 issues. These were, considering of general features in planning and conducting HIAs such as HIA stream, level, timing and type, considering of the wider socio-political and economic context, considering of economic, technical and legal aspects of HIA and capacities for HIA, rationality and comprehensiveness, using appropriate evidence, elaborating on HIA relation to other forms of Impact Assessment, considering of equity, and encouraging intersectoral and interdisciplinary cooperation, involvement of stakeholders and transparency as underlying principles to guide HIA practice. The results emphasize how critical these technical as well as tactical considerations are in the early scoping step of an HIA which plans the conduct of the HIA in reponse to local contextual issues. Determining the principles of HIA from peer-reviewed papers provides an opportunity for guiding

  12. Investigating Underlying Principles to Guide Health Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fakhri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Many countries conduct Health Impact Assessment (HIA of their projects and policies to predict their positive and negative health impacts. In recent years many guides have been developed to inform HIA practice, largely reflecting local developments in HIA. These guides have often been designed for specific contexts and specific need, making the choice between guides difficult. The objective of the current study is to identify underlying principles in order to guide HIA practice in Iran. Methods This study was conducted in three stages: 1 Studies comparing HIA guidelines were reviewed to identify criteria used for comparison seeking emphasized principles. 2 The HIA characteristics extracted from published papers were categorized in order to determine the principles that could guide HIA practice. 3 Finally, these principles were agreed by experts using nominal group technique. Results The review of the studies comparing HIA guides demonstrated there are no clear comparison criteria for reviewing HIA guides and no study mentioned HIA principles. Investigating the HIA principles from peer-reviewed papers, we found 14 issues. These were, considering of general features in planning and conducting HIAs such as HIA stream, level, timing and type, considering of the wider socio-political and economic context, considering of economic, technical and legal aspects of HIA and capacities for HIA, rationality and comprehensiveness, using appropriate evidence, elaborating on HIA relation to other forms of Impact Assessment, considering of equity, and encouraging intersectoral and interdisciplinary cooperation, involvement of stakeholders and transparency as underlying principles to guide HIA practice. The results emphasize how critical these technical as well as tactical considerations are in the early scoping step of an HIA which plans the conduct of the HIA in reponse to local contextual issues. Conclusion Determining the principles of HIA from

  13. Ten guiding principles for youth mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frank; Hebel, Lisa; Badcock, Paul; Parker, Alexandra G

    2017-04-12

    Guiding principles are arguably central to the development of any health service. The aim of this article is to report on the outcomes of a youth mental health (YMH) community of practice (CoP), which identified a range of guiding principles that provide a clear point of comparison for the only other set of principles for YMH service delivery proposed to date. A YMH CoP was established in 2010 as part of the Victorian State Government approach to improving YMH care. An initial literature search was undertaken to locate articles on YMH service delivery. A number of common themes were identified, which the YMH community of practice (YMHCoP) members then elaborated upon by drawing from their collective experience of the YMH sector. The resultant themes were then refined through subsequent group discussions to derive a definitive set of guiding principles. These principles were then augmented by a second literature search conducted in July 2015. Fifteen key themes were derived from the initial literature search and YMH CoP discussions. These were refined by the YMH CoP to produce 10 guiding principles for YMH service development. These are discussed through reference to the relevant literature, using the only other article on principles of YMH service delivery as a notable point of comparison. The 10 principles identified may be useful for quality improvement and are likely to have international relevance. We suggest the timely pursuit of an international consensus on guiding principles for service delivery under the auspices of a peak body for YMH. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Basic income guarantee: a review of implications for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-An; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2018-12-01

    To: a) Familiarize readers with the concept of a basic income guarantee (BIG) and its different forms; b) Consider how BIG could improve oral health and decrease oral health disparities; c) Motivate readers to advocate for the evaluation of oral health outcomes in BIG experiments. Published articles and book chapters that have analyzed and reviewed data from past BIG pilot projects were examined for their findings on health and socioeconomic outcomes. Our findings suggest various areas and mechanisms whereby BIG can influence oral health-related outcomes, whether through impacts on work, illness and injury, education, a social multiplier effect, expenditure behavior, and/or mental illness and other health outcomes. Our findings illustrate the importance of assessing oral health-related outcomes in future BIG pilot projects. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. Situational Analysis of Post Basic Bachelorate Health Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background :In a higher institution like Jimma university frequent revision of its programs is inevitable to meet its goal and keep up its standard nationally as well as globally. Objective: This study is then intended to evaluate the teaching and learning situations of the four post basic BSc health programs in line with their ...

  16. Circadian timekeeping : from basic clock function to implications for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Eliane Alinda

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, circadian rhythms and sleep are often disturbed, which may negatively affect health. This thesis examines these associations and focuses on the basic functioning of sleep and the circadian system in mice and in humans. Circadian rhythms are orchestrated by ~20,000 neurons in the

  17. SPECIALIZED MAPPING OF CRUSTAL FAULT ZONES. PART 1: BASIC THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies of shear zones have included collection of data on fractures showing no indication of displacement which are termed as 'blank' fractures. A method aimed at mapping fault structures and stress fields has been developed on the basis of results of paragenetic analysis of measurements of abundant fractures. The method is termed as 'specialized mapping', firstly, due to its specific structural goal so that to distinguish it from the conventional geological mapping of regions in nature, and, secondly, because of the specific procedure applied to refer to fractures as references to decipher fault-block patterns of natural regions. In Part 1, basic theoretical concepts and principles of specialized mapping are described. Part 2 is being prepared for publication in one of the next issues of the journal; it will cover stages of the proposed method and describe some of the cases of its application.In terms of general organizational principles, specialized mapping is similar to other methods based on structural paragenetic analysis and differs from such methods in types of paragenesises viewed as references to reveal crustal fault zones. Such paragenesises result from stage-by-stage faulting (Fig 2 and Fig. 7 during which stress fields of the 2nd order are regularly changeable within the shear zone. According to combined experimental and natural data, a complete paragenesis of fractures in the shear zone includes a major (1st order fault plane and fractures of other seven types, R, R’, n, n’, t, t’ and T (2nd order (Fig. 4 and Fig 8. At the fracture level, each of them corresponds to a paragenesis including three nearly perpendicular systems of early ruptures (Fig. 1, which are based on two classical patterns of conjugated fractures, one of which is consistent with the position of the fault plane (Fig. 3. Taking into account that strike-slip, reverse and normal faults are similar in terms of mechanics (i.e. they are formed due to

  18. BASIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Schmidt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    BPP. Tilgangen består dels af den overordnede proces-model BASIC og dels af et iboende framework, ABCD, der er en model for systematisk adfærdsanalyse, udvikling, test og implementering af adfærdsrettede løsningskoncepter. Den samlede model gør det muligt for forskere såvel som offentligt ansatte...

  19. MAPPING A BASIC HEALTH UNIT: AN EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Carvalho Malheiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: This study is an experience report on the construction of a map of a Basic Health Unit (BHU. The objective was to understand the relevance and/or importance of mapping a BHU and acquire more knowledge on the health-disease status of the registered population and identify the importance of cartography as a working tool. Case description: After reading some texts, evaluating information systems and on-site visits, it was possible to identify the health status of the population of the neighborhoods. The proposed objectives were considered to be achieved, considering the mapping of the assessed population’s health-disease situation with a closer-to-reality viewpoint, identifying the number of individuals, the diseases, living situation and health care. Conclusion: The mapping approach is a powerful working tool for allowing the planning of strategic interventions that enables the development of assistance activities, aiming to promote health and disease prevention. KEYWORDS: Mapping; Basic Health Unit; Health Planning.

  20. Basic principles of STT-MRAM cell operation in memory arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvalkovskiy, A V; Apalkov, D; Watts, S; Chepulskii, R; Beach, R S; Ong, A; Tang, X; Driskill-Smith, A; Lottis, D; Chen, E; Nikitin, V; Krounbi, M; Butler, W H; Visscher, P B

    2013-01-01

    For reliable operation, individual cells of an STT-MRAM memory array must meet specific requirements on their performance. In this work we review some of these requirements and discuss the fundamental physical principles of STT-MRAM operation, covering the range from device level to chip array performance, and methodology for its development. (paper)

  1. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal Conduction with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Basic Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, S.; Peller, M.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2010-01-01

    Here we review how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used in clinical practice to examine the functional integrity of the fast conducting fibres of the human corticomotor path ways. We first summarise the technical and physiological principles of TMS that are relevant to its clinical use...

  2. Effect of an intervention based on basic Buddhist principles on the spiritual well-being of patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimluang, Janya; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Akkayagorn, Lanchasak; Upasen, Ratchaneekorn; Pudtong, Noppamat; Tantitrakul, Wilailuck

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of an intervention based on basic Buddhist principles on the spiritual well-being of patients with terminal cancer. This quasi-experimental research study had pre- and post-test control groups. The experimental group received conventional care and an intervention based on basic Buddhist principles for three consecutive days, including seven activities based on precept activities, concentration activities and wisdom activities. The control group received conventional care alone. Forty-eight patients participated in this study: 23 in the experimental group and 25 in the control group. Their mean age was 53 (standard deviation 10) years. The spiritual well-being of participants in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of participants in the control group at the second post-test (P principles improved the spiritual well-being of patients with terminal cancer. This result supports the beneficial effects of implementing this type of intervention for patients with terminal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Video Games to Support Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Learning of Basic Physics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janice; Barnett, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to share our findings in using video gaming technology to facilitate the understanding of basic electromagnetism with pre-service elementary teachers. To this end we explored the impact of using a game called "Supercharged!" on pre-service teachers' understanding of electromagnetic concepts compared to students who…

  4. Ten Commandments of Internet Law revisited: Basic Principles for Internet Lawyers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Internet Lawyers are specialized in issues on the intersection of Law and the Internet. The connection between knowledge of the law and understanding of the Internet is one of constant interaction. Scholars can approach Internet Law basically from two angles. First, the classic legal approach is to

  5. Micro-electromembrane extraction across free liquid membranes. Instrumentation and basic principles

    OpenAIRE

    Kubáň, P. (Pavel); Boček, P. (Petr)

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental principles and instrumental set-up of a novel concept of electromembrane extraction downscaled to a micro-format is presented. In this set-up, free liquid membranes are applied, which are not anchored in any supporting material and their dimensions can be precisely defined. The extraction system is examined with a set of two, which enable real-time visualizations using a USB microscope camera.

  6. Fundamental Differences Between Application of Basic Principles of Quantum Mechanics on Atomic and Higher Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulov, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    Superconductivity is macroscopic quantum phenomenon. From force of habit most physicists pay no heed to a paradoxicality of this fact. Niels Bohr considered quantum mechanics as atomic physics and the paradoxical quantum principles may be admissible on this level. But they seem quite strange on the macroscopic level. In the last years some experts, A. J. Leggett and other, attract our attention to a contradiction between quantum mechanics and macroscopic realism. In this paper I try to draw r...

  7. A statement of principles for health care journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Many journalism organizations have published codes of ethics in recent years. The Association of Newspaper Editors, for example, lists 47 different codes on its website. But an organization of health care journalists felt that none of those codes addressed the unique challenges of covering complex health care topics. The Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing public understanding of health care issues. Its mission is to improve the quality, accuracy and visibility of health care reporting, writing and editing. AHCJ has written a statement of principles for its 750 members. In it, AHCJ states some of the unique challenges faced by journalists covering health care, and offers suggestions on how to face those challenges. Bioethicists are invited to comment on the statement, and to help generate continued discussion of the issues addressed therein.

  8. Use of basic principle of nucleation in determining temperature-threshold neutron energy relationship in superheated emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Chatterjee, B K; Roy, S C

    2003-01-01

    Detection of neutrons through use of superheated emulsions has been known for about two decades. The minimum neutron energy (threshold) required to nucleate drops of a given liquid has a dependence on the temperature of the liquid. The basic principle of nucleation has been utilized to find the relationship between the operating temperature and threshold neutron energy for superheated emulsions made of R-114 liquid. The threshold energy thus determined for different temperatures has been compared with accurate experimental results obtained using monoenergetic neutron sources. The agreement is found to be satisfactory and confirms the applicability of the present simple method to other liquids.

  9. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  10. Neutrons in studies of phospholipid bilayers and bilayer–drug interaction. I. Basic principles and neutron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belička M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our paper, we demonstrate several possibilities of using neutrons in pharmaceutical research with the help of examples of scientific results achieved at our University. In this first part, basic properties of neutrons and elementary principles of elastic scattering of thermal neutrons are described. Results of contrast variation neutron diffraction on oriented phospholipid bilayers with intercalated local anaesthetic or cholesterol demonstrate the potential of this method at determination of their position in bilayers. Diffraction experiments with alkan-1-ols located in the bilayers revealed their influence on bilayer thickness as a function of their alkyl chain length.

  11. Translating molecular medicine into clinical tools: doomed to fail by neglecting basic preanalytical principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannello Ferdinando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This commentary discusses a study on measurements of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 in serum of pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients recently published in Journal of Molecular Medicine. This study can be considered the typical "obstacle" to effective translational medicine as previously documented in JTM journal. Although serum has been frequently proven as inappropriate sample for determining numerous circulating MMPs, among them MMP-9, there are over and over again studies, as in this case, that measure MMP-9 in serum. Comparative measurements in serum and plasma samples demonstrated higher concentrations for MMP-9 in serum due to the additional release from leukocytes and platelets following the coagulation/fibrinolysis process. From this example it can be concluded that translating basic research discoveries into clinical tools needs a more intensive exchange between basic biomedical research and clinical scientists already in an early stage. Otherwise a lost of translation, as discussed in JTM journal, seems to be inevitable.

  12. Health recommender systems: concepts, requirements, technical basics and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2014-03-03

    During the last decades huge amounts of data have been collected in clinical databases representing patients' health states (e.g., as laboratory results, treatment plans, medical reports). Hence, digital information available for patient-oriented decision making has increased drastically but is often scattered across different sites. As as solution, personal health record systems (PHRS) are meant to centralize an individual's health data and to allow access for the owner as well as for authorized health professionals. Yet, expert-oriented language, complex interrelations of medical facts and information overload in general pose major obstacles for patients to understand their own record and to draw adequate conclusions. In this context, recommender systems may supply patients with additional laymen-friendly information helping to better comprehend their health status as represented by their record. However, such systems must be adapted to cope with the specific requirements in the health domain in order to deliver highly relevant information for patients. They are referred to as health recommender systems (HRS). In this article we give an introduction to health recommender systems and explain why they are a useful enhancement to PHR solutions. Basic concepts and scenarios are discussed and a first implementation is presented. In addition, we outline an evaluation approach for such a system, which is supported by medical experts. The construction of a test collection for case-related recommendations is described. Finally, challenges and open issues are discussed.

  13. Health Recommender Systems: Concepts, Requirements, Technical Basics and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wiesner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades huge amounts of data have been collected in clinical databases representing patients’ health states (e.g., as laboratory results, treatment plans, medical reports. Hence, digital information available for patient-oriented decision making has increased drastically but is often scattered across different sites. As as solution, personal health record systems (PHRS are meant to centralize an individual’s health data and to allow access for the owner as well as for authorized health professionals. Yet, expert-oriented language, complex interrelations of medical facts and information overload in general pose major obstacles for patients to understand their own record and to draw adequate conclusions. In this context, recommender systems may supply patients with additional laymen-friendly information helping to better comprehend their health status as represented by their record. However, such systems must be adapted to cope with the specific requirements in the health domain in order to deliver highly relevant information for patients. They are referred to as health recommender systems (HRS. In this article we give an introduction to health recommender systems and explain why they are a useful enhancement to PHR solutions. Basic concepts and scenarios are discussed and a first implementation is presented. In addition, we outline an evaluation approach for such a system, which is supported by medical experts. The construction of a test collection for case-related recommendations is described. Finally, challenges and open issues are discussed.

  14. Basic strategical principles regarding Romanian power development after the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotopeleanu, S.; Petrescu, C.

    1996-01-01

    This study deals with the the basic strategies for long term power planning in Romanian economy taking into account socio-economic factors, refurbishment and restructuring, having in view the requirements of free market economy transition. The main directions of this strategy refer to the development of the present power capacities based on fossil fuel burning and hydroelectric power and also to the development of nuclear power plants based on CANDU type reactors. (author) 3 tabs

  15. High-energy cosmic rays and tests of basic principles of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the present understanding of data, the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above 4.1019 eV can be a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or be related to a similar mechanism. But it may also correspond, for instance, to the maximum energies available at the relevant sources. In both cases, violations of special relativity modifying cosmic-ray propagation or acceleration at very high energy can potentially play a role. Other violations of fundamental principles of standard particle physics (quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum homogeneity and “static” properties, effective space dimensions, quark confinement… can also be relevant at these energies. In particular, UHECR data would in principle allow to set bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV in patterns incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the “vacuum rest frame”, VRF. But the precise analysis is far from trivial, and other effects can also be present. The effective parameters can be related to Planckscale physics, or even to physics beyond Planck scale, as well as to the dynamics and effective symmetries of LSV for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon. LSV can also be at the origin of GZK-like effects. In the presence of a VRF, and contrary to a “grand unification” view, LSV and other violations of standard principles can modify the internal structure of particles at very high energy and conventional symmetries may cease to be valid at energies close to the Planck scale. We present an updated discussion of these topics, including experimental prospects, new potentialities for high-energy cosmic ray phenomenology and the possible link with unconventional pre-Big Bang scenarios, superbradyon (superluminal preon patterns… The subject of a possible superluminal propagation of neutrinos at accelerator energies is also dealt with.

  16. The Emerging Role of Tractography in Deep Brain Stimulation: Basic Principles and Current Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson B. Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is an MRI-based technique that delineates white matter tracts in the brain by tracking the diffusion of water in neural tissue. This methodology, known as “tractography”, has been extensively applied in clinical neuroscience to explore nervous system architecture and diseases. More recently, tractography has been used to assist with neurosurgical targeting in functional neurosurgery. This review provides an overview of DTI principles, and discusses current applications of tractography for improving and helping develop novel deep brain stimulation (DBS targets.

  17. [Basic family health program in Magdalena Medio y Bajo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, R

    1992-12-01

    The Program of Information, Education, and Services for Basic Family Health Care in Magdalena Medio and Bajo was designed to increase knowledge and use of contraception and to improve basic health practices and nutrition in the region, which includes municipios belonging to 9 different departments and a total population of 1,720,000. Poverty levels in the area are high. During the 1st year of the project, which was underway from February 1988-May 1991, home visits were made to inform each family about basic family health, to weigh and measure children under 5 not receiving health care elsewhere, and to refer families to the nearest health services. Talks were presented to small groups on family planning, intestinal parasites, sexually transmitted diseases, nutrition, vaccination, cancer prevention, malaria, acute diarrhea, and acute respiratory infection. Community workshops were presented in the 2nd year. Community distribution posts were created for contraceptive and other health product distribution. Information and communication materials from PROFAMILIA were used, and other materials were specially designed for the project by the Foundation for Development of Health Education in Colombia. PROFAMILIA's system of service statistics was used for quantitative evaluation of the information and education activities and sales of contraceptives, antiparasitics, and oral rehydration packets of each instructor. In the 3 years of the program, 89.086 cycles of pills, 398,772 condoms, 29,080 vaginal tablets, 209.791 antiparasitics, and 49,305 oral rehydration packets were sold. 9295 talks were presented to 143,227 residents of the region. 22,000 children were enrolled in the growth monitoring program, and almost 40,000 women were referred for prenatal care and cytology. The instructors gave 900 talks to distributors of contraceptives, antiparasitics, and oral rehydration packets. Surveys of women aged 15-49 residing in the municipios covered by the project were conducted

  18. Basic webliography on health promotion and disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ferreira Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To introduce a basic webliography to access highly qualified evidence-based material on health promotion and disease prevention, aiming at the continuing education of health professionals. Methods: By means of Google® browser, applying the descriptors in sequence to progressively refine the search on Internet and key concepts to be learned, all previously defined by the authors themselves, we proceeded a qualitative analyses of the 20 first listed links for each searched issue and the final selection of the most scientifically relevant ones. Results: The 34 selected links are presented in 4 groups: 23 portals, 5 guides and recommendations, 4 scientific journals and 3 blogs that allow free access to health promotion and disease prevention related subjects, such as: concepts; national and international public policies; epidemiology, statistics and health indicators; diseases screening and prophylaxis; counseling for behavior change of health related habits; and interdisciplinary work. Among the selected links 10 (29% are written in English while the others are in Portuguese. Conclusions: The identification of reading materials on health promotion and disease prevention available on Internet, many in Portuguese, allowed us toselect relevant scientifically qualified literature and turn it accessible to health professionals, enabling the acquisition of new knowledge or quick update.

  19. All different, all equal: changing basic principles of the authority control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlata Dimec

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To enable the collocation function of the catalogue, the uniform heading was introduced by the Paris Principles, and later on became one of the key elements for the Universal Bibliographic Control project. Some national cataloguing rules, based on the Paris Principles, considered their provisions quite strictly, while others (e.g. AACR insisted on establishing headings preferably in the language closest to the users. From the same AACR community arose the idea that the modern technology will link different headings for the same entity and enable access to authority files on the Internet in order to choose the most appropriate authority records. Supported by IFLA, this conceptual change resulted in the project for the revised edition of Guidelines for authority and reference entries which is now ready under the new title Guidelines for authority records and references. The uniform heading is keeping its meaning within the same cataloguing rules but authorised heading is introduced as relevant for linking authority records internationally. It does not prescribe any change of the existing rules for establishing headings, and different displays can still be made available to users. The IFLA study on functional requirements for bibliographic records however settles for new provisions in the whole area of cataloguing.

  20. Primary prevention in public health: an analysis of basic assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, J; Wallack, L

    1985-01-01

    The common definition of primary prevention is straightforward; but how it is transformed into a framework to guide action is based on personal and societal feelings and beliefs about the basis for social organization. This article focuses on the two contending primary prevention strategies of health promotion and health protection. The contention between the two strategies stems from a basic disagreement about disease causality in modern society. Health promotion is based on the "lifestyle" theory of disease causality, which sees individual health status linked ultimately to personal decisions about diet, stress, and drug habits. Primary prevention, from this perspective, entails persuading individuals to forgo their risk-taking, self-destructive behavior. Health protection, on the other hand, is based on the "social-structural" theory of disease causality. This theory sees the health status of populations linked ultimately to the unequal distribution of social resources, industrial pollution, occupational stress, and "anti-health promotion" marketing practices. Primary prevention, from this perspective, requires changing existing social and, particularly, economic policies and structures. In order to provide a basis for choosing between these contending strategies, the demonstrated (i.e., past) impact of each strategy on the health of the public is examined. Two conclusions are drawn. First, the health promotion strategy shows little potential for improving the public health, because it systematically ignores the risk-imposing, other-destructive behavior of influential actors (policy-makers and institutions) in society. And second, effective primary prevention efforts entail an "upstream" approach that results in far-reaching sociopolitical and economic change.

  1. Fractals in the Neurosciences, Part I: General Principles and Basic Neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Grizzi, Fabio; Jelinek, Herbert; Pellionisz, Andras J; Losa, Gabriele Angelo

    2014-08-01

    The natural complexity of the brain, its hierarchical structure, and the sophisticated topological architecture of the neurons organized in micronetworks and macronetworks are all factors contributing to the limits of the application of Euclidean geometry and linear dynamics to the neurosciences. The introduction of fractal geometry for the quantitative analysis and description of the geometric complexity of natural systems has been a major paradigm shift in the last decades. Nowadays, modern neurosciences admit the prevalence of fractal properties such as self-similarity in the brain at various levels of observation, from the microscale to the macroscale, in molecular, anatomic, functional, and pathological perspectives. Fractal geometry is a mathematical model that offers a universal language for the quantitative description of neurons and glial cells as well as the brain as a whole, with its complex three-dimensional structure, in all its physiopathological spectrums. For a holistic view of fractal geometry of the brain, we review here the basic concepts of fractal analysis and its main applications to the basic neurosciences. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Basic survey method according to World Health Organization (WHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmidar Samad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, World Health Organization (WHO released its fifth and latest manual guideline of basic survey method for oral health survey. Therefore aim of this paper is to sosialized/inform the manual guideline to dentist. The manual not only provide reliable information on survey of oral health status and also on self-assessment regarding oral health and risk factors for dentist but also emphasizes Stepwise Approach of Surveillance (STEPS that acquired both subjective data in the form of questionnaire and objective data such as clinical assessment and biochemical analysis. The manual is divided into three sections in and starts with detailed explanation on planning oral health surveys and insights on clinical examination on major oral conditions such as caries, periodontitis, and other oral mucosal lesions. assessment of oral health status comprises of the standard forms, standard codes, oral health assessment form, and clinical examinations such as dentition status, periodontal statusin the form of Community Periodontal Index (CPI, loss of attachment, enamel fluorosis, etc., including steps to be taken when intervention urgency or emergency occurs.Since self-assessment of oral health and risks is an integral part of the STEPS, the second section discusses about oral health questionnaires from both patient’s and surveyor’s standpoint together with the importance of training and supervision of interviewers. The manual has specific questionnaire and the clinical examination guideline for both adults and children. The third section concludes with information on obtaining assistance from the WHO and on reporting of the survey.

  3. Does team training work? Principles for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; DiazGranados, Deborah; Weaver, Sallie J; King, Heidi

    2008-11-01

    Teamwork is integral to a working environment conducive to patient safety and care. Team training is one methodology designed to equip team members with the competencies necessary for optimizing teamwork. There is evidence of team training's effectiveness in highly complex and dynamic work environments, such as aviation and health care. However, most quantitative evaluations of training do not offer any insight into the actual reasons why, how, and when team training is effective. To address this gap in understanding, and to provide guidance for members of the health care community interested in implementing team training programs, this article presents both quantitative results and a specific qualitative review and content analysis of team training implemented in health care. Based on this review, we offer eight evidence-based principles for effective planning, implementation, and evaluation of team training programs specific to health care.

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Nano-Optics : Principles Enabling Basic Research and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, John; Silvestri, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of nano-optics, including basic theory, experiment and applications, particularly in nanofabrication and optical characterization. The contributions clearly demonstrate how advances in nano-optics and photonics have stimulated progress in nanoscience and -fabrication, and vice versa. Their expert authors address topics such as three-dimensional optical lithography and microscopy beyond the Abbe diffraction limit, optical diagnostics and sensing, optical data- and telecommunications, energy-efficient lighting, and efficient solar energy conversion. Nano-optics emerges as a key enabling technology of the 21st century. This work will appeal to a wide readership, from physics through chemistry, to biology and engineering. The contributions that appear in this volume were presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in Erice, 4-19 July, 2015.

  5. Chemistry Cube Game - Exploring Basic Principles of Chemistry by Turning Cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus T

    2018-02-01

    The Chemistry Cube Game invites students at secondary school level 1 and 2 to explore basic concepts of chemistry in a playful way, either as individuals or in teams. It consists of 15 different cubes, 9 cubes for different acids, their corresponding bases and precursors, and 6 cubes for different reducing and oxidising agents. The cubes can be rotated in those directions indicated. Each 'allowed' vertical or horizontal rotation of 90° stands for a chemical reaction or a physical transition. Two different games and playing modes are presented here: First, redox chemistry is introduced for the formation of salts from elementary metals and non-metals. Second, the speciation of acids and bases at different pH-values is shown. The cubes can be also used for games about environmental chemistry such as the carbon and sulphur cycle, covering the topic of acid rain, or the nitrogen cycle including ammoniac synthesis, nitrification and de-nitrification.

  6. Advanced Energy Storage Devices: Basic Principles, Analytical Methods, and Rational Materials Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jilei; Wang, Jin; Xu, Chaohe; Jiang, Hao; Li, Chunzhong; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been dedicated into the development of high-performance energy storage devices with nanoscale design and hybrid approaches. The boundary between the electrochemical capacitors and batteries becomes less distinctive. The same material may display capacitive or battery-like behavior depending on the electrode design and the charge storage guest ions. Therefore, the underlying mechanisms and the electrochemical processes occurring upon charge storage may be confusing for researchers who are new to the field as well as some of the chemists and material scientists already in the field. This review provides fundamentals of the similarities and differences between electrochemical capacitors and batteries from kinetic and material point of view. Basic techniques and analysis methods to distinguish the capacitive and battery-like behavior are discussed. Furthermore, guidelines for material selection, the state-of-the-art materials, and the electrode design rules to advanced electrode are proposed.

  7. Evolution in health and medicine Sackler colloquium: Making evolutionary biology a basic science for medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Randolph M; Bergstrom, Carl T; Ellison, Peter T; Flier, Jeffrey S; Gluckman, Peter; Govindaraju, Diddahally R; Niethammer, Dietrich; Omenn, Gilbert S; Perlman, Robert L; Schwartz, Mark D; Thomas, Mark G; Stearns, Stephen C; Valle, David

    2010-01-26

    New applications of evolutionary biology in medicine are being discovered at an accelerating rate, but few physicians have sufficient educational background to use them fully. This article summarizes suggestions from several groups that have considered how evolutionary biology can be useful in medicine, what physicians should learn about it, and when and how they should learn it. Our general conclusion is that evolutionary biology is a crucial basic science for medicine. In addition to looking at established evolutionary methods and topics, such as population genetics and pathogen evolution, we highlight questions about why natural selection leaves bodies vulnerable to disease. Knowledge about evolution provides physicians with an integrative framework that links otherwise disparate bits of knowledge. It replaces the prevalent view of bodies as machines with a biological view of bodies shaped by evolutionary processes. Like other basic sciences, evolutionary biology needs to be taught both before and during medical school. Most introductory biology courses are insufficient to establish competency in evolutionary biology. Premedical students need evolution courses, possibly ones that emphasize medically relevant aspects. In medical school, evolutionary biology should be taught as one of the basic medical sciences. This will require a course that reviews basic principles and specific medical applications, followed by an integrated presentation of evolutionary aspects that apply to each disease and organ system. Evolutionary biology is not just another topic vying for inclusion in the curriculum; it is an essential foundation for a biological understanding of health and disease.

  8. [BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC WOUNDS – SHARP DEBRIDEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinović, M; Fumić, N; Laginja, S; Smokrović, E; Bakota, B; Bekić, M; Čoklo, M

    2016-01-01

    The ever improving health standards in terms of quality and more efficient health care result in an increase in life expectancy, thus increasing the number of elderly people in the population. A higher level of activity in elderly population leads to greater incidence of injuries, and on the other hand, there is an increasing number of comorbidities. Circulatory disorders, diabetes mellitus, metabolic imbalances, etc. and a reduced biological potential of tissue regeneration result in an increased number of chronic wounds that pose a significant health, social and economic burden on the society. These conditions require significant involvement of medical and non-medical staff in pre-hospital institutions. Significant material and other health care resources are allocated for the treatment of chronic wounds. These conditions result in a lower quality of life of patients and their families and caregivers. Debridement is a crucial medical procedure for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. The result of debridement is removal of all barriers within and around the wound that obstruct physiological processes of wound healing. Debridement is a repeating process when indicated. There are several types of debridement, each with its advantages and disadvantages. The method of debridement should be determined by the physician or other professional trained person on the basis of wound characteristics and in accordance with their expertise and capabilities. In the same wound, we can combine different types of debridement, all with the goal of faster and better wound healing.

  9. The assessment and measurement of adult life stress: Basic premises, operational principles, and design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Kate L; Monroe, Scott M

    2016-07-01

    Life stress is a central factor in the onset and course of a wide range of medical and psychiatric conditions. Determining the precise etiological and pathological consequences of stress, though, has been hindered by weaknesses in prevailing definitional and measurement practices. The purpose of the current paper is to evaluate the primary strategies for defining and measuring major and minor acute life events, chronic stressors, and daily hassles as informed by 3 basic scientific premises. The first premise concerns the manner in which stress is conceptualized and operationally defined, and specifically we assert that stress measures must not conflate the stress exposure with the stress response. The second premise concerns how stress exposures are measured, and we provide guidelines for optimizing standardized and sensitive indicators of life stress. The third premise addresses the consequences of variations in the procedures for life event measurement with regard to the validity of the research designs employed. We show that life stress measures are susceptible to several sources of bias, and if these potential sources of bias are not controlled in the design of the research, spurious findings may result. Our goal is to provide a useful guide for researchers who consider life stress to be an important factor in their theoretical models of disease, wish to incorporate measures of life stress in their research, and seek to avoid the common pitfalls of past measurement practices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Using Video Games to Support Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Learning of Basic Physics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janice; Barnett, Michael

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to share our findings in using video gaming technology to facilitate the understanding of basic electromagnetism with pre-service elementary teachers. To this end we explored the impact of using a game called Supercharged! on pre-service teachers' understanding of electromagnetic concepts compared to students who conducted a more traditional inquiry oriented investigation of the same concepts. This study was a part of a larger design experiment examining the pedagogical potential of Supercharged! the control group learned through a series of guided inquiry methods while the experimental group played Supercharged! during the laboratory sections of the science course. There was significant difference F(2,134) = 4.8, p video games can lead to positive learning outcomes, as demonstrated by the increase in test scores from pre- to post-assessment. Additionally, this study also suggests that a complementary approach, in which video games and hands-on activities are integrated, with each activity informing the other, could be a very powerful technique for supporting student scientific understanding. Further, our findings suggest that video game designers should embed meta-cognitive activities such as reflective opportunities into educational video games to provide scaffolds for students and to reinforce that they are engaged in an educational learning experience.

  11. Goal Commitments and the Content of Thoughts and Dreams: Basic Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eKlinger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A few empirically supported principles can account for much of the thematic content of waking thought, including rumination, and dreams. (1 An individual’s commitments to particular goals sensitize the individual to respond to cues associated with those goals. The cues may be external or internal in the person’s own mental activity. The responses may take the form of noticing the cues, storing them in memory, having thoughts or dream segments related to them, and/or taking action. Noticing may be conscious or not. Goals may be any desired endpoint of a behavioral sequence, including finding out more about something, i.e., exploring possible goals, such as job possibilities or personal relationships. (2 Such responses are accompanied and perhaps preceded by protoemotional activity or full emotional arousal, the amplitude of which determines the likelihood of response and is related to the value placed on the goal. (3 When the individual is in a situation conducive to making progress toward attaining the goal, the response to goal cues takes the form of actions or operant mental acts that advance the goal pursuit. (4 When circumstances are unfavorable for goal-directed operant behavior, the response remains purely mental, as in mind-wandering and dreaming, but still reflects the content of the goal pursuit or associated content. (5 Respondent responses such as mind-wandering are more likely when the individual is mentally unoccupied with ongoing tasks and less likely the more that is at stake in the ongoing task. The probability of respondent thought is highest during relaxed periods, when the brain’s default-mode network dominates, or during sleep. The article briefly summarizes neurocognitive findings that relate to mind-wandering and evidence regarding adverse effects of mind-wandering on task performance as well as evidence suggesting adaptive functions in regard to creative problem-solving, planning, resisting delay discounting, and

  12. Plant specific basic principle simulator as a first step to plant specific full scope simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnc, B.; Pribozic, F.; Novsak, M.

    1996-01-01

    Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) decided to enhance the quality and scope of initial training of NEK technical personnel, mainly in so called Phase 1 and 2 of training for licensed personnel. This training is a prerequisite for further training on the full scope simulator for future operators and is also given to larger number of engineers, working in different important areas where thorough knowledge of nuclear technology and plant systems is required. Due to that it was decided that plant specific Basis Principle Simulators (BPS) should be developed. The other important reason for such decision was an indication that NEK specific full scope simulator will have to be purchased. Based on that it was concluded that BPS should serve as a good opportunity to learn about the state of the art approaches in the modeling area, to see in which direction development of software in conjunction with state of the art hardware is going and in particular to the extent possible verify the existence of required plant documentation in support BPS and later plant specific full scope simulator. In this paper the scope of NEK BPS simulation, experience in initial data gathering, experience with know-how transfer based on direct involvement of NEK and Izobrazevalni Center za Jedrsko Tehnnologijo (ICJT) personnel in modeling of instrumentation and control will be presented. Lessons learned, particularly in light of coming project for NEK full scope simulator, will also be addressed. The future use of the BPS in the NEK training programs will be described. It can be concluded that due to very complex technology, phase approaches in training of key NEK technical personnel, the development of NEK plant specific BPS is justifiable, regardless of the fact that NEK will also obtain specific full scope simulator. It has to be pointed out that BPS can not be supplement for plant specific full scope simulator, due to number of reasons discussed in the paper. (author)

  13. Maquila Workers’ Health: Basic Issues, What is Known, and a Pilot Study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Blanco R.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health issues identified in maquilas include respiratory, musculoskeletal, psychological problems, and accidents. This study identifies the basic health issues, as well as the sources and investigational methods needed for drafting health standards for maquilas. It sets out conceptual guidelines, suggesting general methodological strategies appropriate for studies of workers’ health and its determinants in the maquiladora sector. The conceptual-methodological model is based on 1 a review of relevant studies, 2 a mixed methods pilot feasibility study within the community of workers and social actors of a textile maquila in Nicaragua, and 3 the conceptual-methodological integration of a literature review with the results of the pilot study. The main issues identified are the organization of work, health, governmental regulation, family and gender, infrastructure and environment. Methodological recommendations focus on the principle of triangulation; the use of anonymous questionnaires and focus groups to examine specific issues; individual interviews with management personnel and members of the community; and the value of family members as key informers on the impact on family, environment and community. Observation of actual work procedures is ideal but not always possible. A joint health and safety committee and a health services unit would be key instruments in the prevention of accidents and illness and in health promotion and care.

  14. Consensus drug resistance mutations for epidemiological surveillance: basic principles and potential controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Bennett, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    Programmes that monitor local, national and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programmes. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established a global programme for genotypic surveillance of HIV-1 drug resistance and has recommended the adoption of a consensus definition of genotypic drug resistance. Such a definition is necessary to accurately compare transmitted drug resistan...

  15. Basic principles of confocal microscopy of cаlcium signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Шкрыль

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study of fast processes occurring in living cells, for example, the dynamics of calcium ions or other ions, is actual for modern biophysics, physiology and medicine and can be carried out by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy as a method of studying biological objects has a number of features requiring an understanding of the delicate mechanisms underlying it. Objectives: The aim of the work is the description of principles and details of measurements of calcium signals in the living cells using laser scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescent indicators. Materials and methods: The analysis of the methodological and practical aspects of studies of calcium signals was carried out by confocal microscopy in the work. Results: Confocal microscopy allows to study the changes in the concentration of free calcium within the cell and even a small part of it by a fluorescent dye, which increases the contrast in comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy through an additional confocal aperture located in the front of the detector and the use of laser light source and scanning the object. To register calcium signals it is necessary to make a selection of a number of adequate parameters: the registration frequency, the size of a single scanning element (pixel, the sensitivity of the detector, the intensity of laser irradiation, the diameter of the confocal gap, the corresponding filters for exciting and emitting the fluorescent dye used and the corresponding dichroic mirror. An important stage of a setup of a confocal system is the determination of the value of the scattering function of a point. Compensation of the process of bleaching of the fluorescence dye and reduction of phototoxicity, minimization of the scattering process of the image allow to increase a reproducibility of the experiments. Conclusions: Using modern laser scanning confocal microscopes for registration of calcium signals from a small

  16. [Rational structures in health education models: basics and systematization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Moreno, A; Ramos García, E; Sánchez Estévez, V; Marset Campos, P

    1995-01-01

    The different Health Education (HE) models appeared in the scientific literature are analyzed, trying to eliminate the confusion produced by its great diversity, applying a general and systematic point of view. Due to the relevance of that topic in the activities of Health Promotion in Primary Health Care it is urgent a deep reappraisal due the heterogeneity of scientific papers dealing with that topic. The curriculum, as the confluence of thought and action in Health Education, is the basic concept thanks to which it is possible to integrate both scientific logic, the biological one and that pertaining to the social sciences. Of particular importance have been the different paradigms that have emerged in the field of HE from the beginning of the present century: a first generation with a "normative" point of view, a second one orientated from positivistic bases, and a third generation adopting an hermeneutic and critic nature. This third generation of paradigms in HE has taken distances from the behaviouristic and cognitive perspectives being more critical and participative. The principal scientific contributors in the field of HE, internationals as well as spaniards are studied and classified. The main conclusions obtained from this Health Education paradigm controversy are referred to both aspects: 1) planning, programming and evaluating activities, and 2) models, qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Emphasis is given to the need of including Community Participation in all phases of the process in critic methodologies of HE. It is postulated the critic paradigm as the only one able to integrate the rest of the scientific approaches in Health Education.

  17. [Aspects of vascular physiology in clinical and vascular surgical practice: basic principles of vascular mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocke, H; Meyer, F; Lessmann, V

    2014-10-01

    To be able to evaluate properly a vascular problem, basic concepts of vascular physiology need to be considered, as they have been taught in physiology for a long time. This article deals with selected definitions and laws of passive vascular mechanics, subdivided into parameters of vascular filling and parameters of vascular flow. PARAMETERS OF VASCULAR FILLING: During vascular filling the transmural pressure distends the vascular wall until it is balanced by the wall tension. The extent of this distension up to the point of balance depends on the elasticity of the wall. Transmural pressure, wall tension and elasticity are defined, and their respective importance is described by clinical examples, e.g. aneurysm and varix. PARAMETERS OF VASCULAR FLOW: The vascular flow can be divided into stationary and pulsating components. Both components are relevant for the bloodstream. Since the blood flow is directed in the circuit, it can be understood in first approximation as stationary ("direct current").The direct current model uses only the average values of the pulsating variables. The great advantage of the direct current model is that it can be described with simple laws, which are not valid without reservation, but often allow a first theoretical approach to a vascular problem: Ohm's law, driving pressure, flow resistance, Hagen-Poiseuille law, wall shear stress, law of continuity, Bernoulli's equation and Reynold's number are described and associated with clinical examples.The heart is a pressure-suction pump and produces a pulsating flow, the pulse. The pulse runs with pulse wave velocity, which is much larger than the blood flow velocity, through the arterial vascular system. During propagation, the pulse has to overcome the wave resistance (impedance). Wherever the wave resistance changes, e.g., at vascular bifurcations and in the periphery, it comes to reflections. The incident (forward) and reflected (backward) waves are superimposed to yield the resulting

  18. Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion. Volume I; Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry C (Editor); Hibbard, Robert R (Editor)

    1955-01-01

    The report summarizes source material on combustion for flight-propulsion engineers. First, several chapters review fundamental processes such as fuel-air mixture preparation, gas flow and mixing, flammability and ignition, flame propagation in both homogenous and heterogenous media, flame stabilization, combustion oscillations, and smoke and carbon formation. The practical significance and the relation of these processes to theory are presented. A second series of chapters describes the observed performance and design problems of engine combustors of the principal types. An attempt is made to interpret performance in terms of the fundamental processes and theories previously reviewed. Third, the design of high-speed combustion systems is discussed. Combustor design principles that can be established from basic considerations and from experience with actual combustors are described. Finally, future requirements for aircraft engine combustion systems are examined.

  19. Does this interface make my sensor look bad? Basic principles for designing usable, useful interfaces for sensor technology operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Laura A.; Berg, Leif; Butler, Karin; Klein, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Even as remote sensing technology has advanced in leaps and bounds over the past decade, the remote sensing community lacks interfaces and interaction models that facilitate effective human operation of our sensor platforms. Interfaces that make great sense to electrical engineers and flight test crews can be anxiety-inducing to operational users who lack professional experience in the design and testing of sophisticated remote sensing platforms. In this paper, we reflect on an 18-month collaboration which our Sandia National Laboratory research team partnered with an industry software team to identify and fix critical issues in a widely-used sensor interface. Drawing on basic principles from cognitive and perceptual psychology and interaction design, we provide simple, easily learned guidance for minimizing common barriers to system learnability, memorability, and user engagement.

  20. PET/TAC: Basic principles, physiological variants and artifacts; PET/TAC: Generalidades, variantes fisiologicas y artefactos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, A.M. [Especialista en Medicina Nuclear, Profa. Depto. Radiologia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation is about the basic principles, physiologic variants and devices that work in the PET/TAC technique. Next the conclusions obtained in the same one are presented: For a correct evaluation of the PET/TAC images with FDG is necessary the knowledge of the image acquisition technique, as well as of the physiologic distribution of the FDG, variants of the normality, benign causes of captation and more frequent devices. The introduction of this hybrid procedure allows the correct anatomical localization and identification of the deposits of FDG largely avoiding false or doubtful interpretations, but it can also originate not specific devices existent in the conventional PET. The previous knowledge of the possible devices will make possible in certain cases its elimination and in other its identification avoiding incorrect interpretations. (Author)

  1. Basic principles in approaching patient and his family in the terminal phase of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencova, V.

    2016-01-01

    Serious life threatening disease including cancer appears to be not exclusively a medical problem. The stepwise treatment failure opens up a dilemma for patient and physician on how to cope with the new situation. Especially, disclosure of the reality by health care providers with an emphatic feeling is coupled with emotional pressure that is for many caregivers difficult to accept. The decision around the termination of curative treatment and the transition to palliative care is the most stressful event in the relation of caregivers to the the patient and his family. The patient being in the terminal phase of his disease is suffering from deep psychosocial crisis and the doctor patient communication remains the only possibility of helping patient to accept the reality of approaching death. The disclosure of „bad news“ is a stressful moment for caregivers themselves, that, besides of empathy, deserve communication skills and theoretical and professional preparedness. The aim of this paper is to open up a discussion about the most stressful life phase – dying and death – in the context of biomedical and psychosocial care of patients with serious life threatening disease. (author)

  2. Active-involvement principle in dental health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1985-01-01

    A basic problem in dental health education (DHE) is that the effect usually disappears shortly after the termination of a program. The purpose of the present study was to obtain long-term effect of a DHE-program by emphasizing the active involvement of the participants. The sample comprised...... an experimental and a control group, each of 68 unskilled workers, aged 18-64. Active participation was obtained by various means: Teaching was carried out in pre-existing peer groups, the participants' own goals and needs were included, the traditional dentist-patient barriers were excluded, the traditional...... of active involvement of the participants in the DHE-program....

  3. Active-involvement principle in dental health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1985-01-01

    A basic problem in dental health education (DHE) is that the effect usually disappears shortly after the termination of a program. The purpose of the present study was to obtain long-term effect of a DHE-program by emphasizing the active involvement of the participants. The sample comprised...... dentist-patient roles were changed, and the sessions were repeated. No dental treatment was included. The control group did not participate in the DHE-programme. Plaque (PII) and gingivitis (GI) were scored before the program, immediately after, and 6 months and 31/2 yr after the last session...

  4. Health technology assessment: principles, methods and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoni, A; Bartolucci, L; Manna, A; Morbiducci, J; Ascoli, G

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the methodological and technical aspects of health technology assessment (HTA) as a tool for evaluating health technologies and procedures, with special reference to diagnostic imaging; describes the main experiences with HTA at the international and national level; outlines the most important HTA projects in Italy, and analyses the effects of HTA on health care strategies and policies. The work was carried out in three phases. In the first phase, the authors analysed the principles, methods and instruments of HTA; in the second, they evaluated the current status of HTA in different countries; and in the third, they defined the impact of HTA on the decision-making process in health care. Since the 1970s, technological innovation has been accompanied by the development of methods for the multidisciplinary assessment of the technical, scientific, economic, ethical and social aspects inherent in the use of new technologies. The method is implemented at an international level by a network of public and private bodies that carry out HTA in support of health care policies. Because the application of HTA is still in its early stages in Italy, it is necessary to promote its development by drawing on consolidated international experiences.

  5. Are Key Principles for improved health technology assessment supported and used by health technology assessment organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter J; Drummond, Michael F; Jönsson, Bengt; Luce, Bryan R; Schwartz, J Sanford; Siebert, Uwe; Sullivan, Sean D

    2010-01-01

    Previously, our group-the International Working Group for HTA Advancement-proposed a set of fifteen Key Principles that could be applied to health technology assessment (HTA) programs in different jurisdictions and across a range of organizations and perspectives. In this commentary, we investigate the extent to which these principles are supported and used by fourteen selected HTA organizations worldwide. We find that some principles are broadly supported: examples include being explicit about HTA goals and scope; considering a wide range of evidence and outcomes; and being unbiased and transparent. Other principles receive less widespread support: examples are addressing issues of generalizability and transferability; being transparent on the link between HTA findings and decision-making processes; considering a full societal perspective; and monitoring the implementation of HTA findings. The analysis also suggests a lack of consensus in the field about some principles--for example, considering a societal perspective. Our study highlights differences in the uptake of key principles for HTA and indicates considerable room for improvement for HTA organizations to adopt principles identified to reflect good HTA practices. Most HTA organizations espouse certain general concepts of good practice--for example, assessments should be unbiased and transparent. However, principles that require more intensive follow-up--for example, monitoring the implementation of HTA findings--have received little support and execution.

  6. Magnetoencephalography: Basic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG is the measurement of the magnetic field generated by the electrical activity of neurons. It is usually combined with a magnetic resonance imaging to get what is called magnetic source imaging. The technology that has helped record these minute magnetic fields is super-conducting quantum interference detector which is like a highly sensitive magnetic field meter. To attenuate the external magnetic noise the MEG is housed inside a magnetically shielded room. The actual sensors recording magnetic fields are magnetometers and/or gradiometers. MEG fields pass through the head without any distortion. This is a significant advantage of MEG over electroencephalography. MEG provides a high spatial and temporal resolution. The recording and identification information should be according to the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society guidelines published in 2011. MEG currently has two approved indications in the United States, one is for pre-operative brain mapping and the other is for use in epilepsy surgery. MEG studies have shown functional brain tissue inside brain tumors.

  7. Basic Economic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tideman, T. N.

    1972-01-01

    An economic approach to design efficient transportation systems involves maximizing an objective function that reflects both goals and costs. A demand curve can be derived by finding the quantities of a good that solve the maximization problem as one varies the price of that commodity, holding income and the prices of all other goods constant. A supply curve is derived by applying the idea of profit maximization of firms. The production function determines the relationship between input and output.

  8. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  9. Impedance plethysmography: basic principles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu J

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available Impedance Plethysmography technique has been discussed with explanation of two compartment model and parallel conductor theory for the estimation of peripheral blood flow and stroke volume. Various methods for signal enhancement to facilitate computation of blood flow are briefly described. Source of error in the estimation of peripheral blood flow is identified and the correction has been suggested.

  10. Technology integration performance assessment using lean principles in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Florentino; Yalcin, Ali; Eikman, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of an automated infusion system (AIS) integration at a positron emission tomography (PET) center based on "lean thinking" principles. The authors propose a systematic measurement system that evaluates improvement in terms of the "8 wastes." This adaptation to the health care context consisted of performance measurement before and after integration of AIS in terms of time, utilization of resources, amount of materials wasted/saved, system variability, distances traveled, and worker strain. The authors' observations indicate that AIS stands to be very effective in a busy PET department, such as the one in Moffitt Cancer Center, owing to its accuracy, pace, and reliability, especially after the necessary adjustments are made to reduce or eliminate the source of errors. This integration must be accompanied by a process reengineering exercise to realize the full potential of AIS in reducing waste and improving patient care and worker satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Principles for decisions involving environmental and health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Decision making with respect to safety is becoming more and more complex. The risk involved must be taken into account together with numerous other factors such as the benefits, the uncertainties and the public perception. Can the decision maker be aided by some kind of system, general rules of thumb, or broader perspective on similar decisions? This question has been addressed in a joint Nordic project relating to nuclear power. Modern techniques for risk assessment and management have been studied and parallels drawn to such areas as offshore safety and management of genotoxic chemicals in the environment. The topics include synoptic vs. incrementalistic approaches to decision making, health hazards from radiation and genotoxic chemicals, value judgments in decision making, definitions of low risks, risk comparisons, and principles for decision making when risks are involved. (author) 47 refs

  12. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  13. On the foundations of special theory of relativity - II. (The principle of covariance and a basic inertial frame)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, S.P.; Gulati, S.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt has been made to replace the principle of relativity with the principle of covariance. This amounts to modification of the theory of relativity based on the two postulates (i) the principle of covariance and (ii) the light principle. Some of the fundamental results and the laws of relativistic mechanics, electromagnetodynamics and quantum mechanics are re-examined. The principle of invariance is questioned. (A.K.)

  14. An introduction to aspects of health law: bioethical principles, human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioethical principles,1 human rights and the law are interlinked. Aspects of the principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice are included in the South African Constitution2 and the country's statutory and common law. A breach of these ethical principles and the Constitution may lead to an action for ...

  15. The stem-cell application in ischemic heart disease: Basic principles, specifics and practical experience from clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Longer life duration, different clinical presentations of coronary disease, as well as high incidence of comorbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease have led to an increase in the incidence of ischemic heart failure. Despite numerous and new treatment methods that act on different pathophysiological mechanisms that cause heart failure, and whose aim is to slowdown or stop the progression of this devastating disease, morbidity and mortality in these patients remain high. These facts have firstly led to the introduction of the experimental, and then clinical studies with the application of stem cells in patients with ischemic heart disease. Previous studies have shown that the application of stem cells is a feasible and safe method in patients with acute coronary syndrome, as well as in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, but the efficacy of these methods in both of the abovementioned clinical syndromes has yet to be established. This review paper outlines the basic principles of treatment of ischemic heart disease with stem cells, as well as the experience and knowledge gained in previous clinical studies.

  16. Children's Health in Brazil: orienting basic network to Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Simone Soares; Nóbrega, Vanessa Medeiros da; Coutinho, Simone Elizabeth Duarte; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva; Toso, Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de Oliveira; Collet, Neusa

    2016-09-01

    This is an integrative literature review that analyzed the scientific knowledge produced on the orientation of Brazilian basic care services to primary health care focusing on child health. Searches were carried out in SciELO, Lilacs and Medline databases using descriptors "primary health care", "family health program", "child health" and "evaluation of health services". Studies published in Portuguese, English and Spanish between 2000 and 2013 were selected. A total of 32 studies were chosen and characterized in relation to the features of primary health care, region of the country, type of study and authors' practice area. A thematic review of studies was conducted and resulted in two categories: child care in the context of Brazilian primary health care and primary health care features: limitations to child care. It can be understood that Brazilian primary health care services are heterogeneous regarding the presence and scope of essential child care characteristics. There is a lack of structural and process changes in the services to substantially plan child care actions in basic care.

  17. INTEGRATING HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES IN FORMULARY MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Monica; Khoo, Ai Leng; Zhao, Ying Jiao; Lin, Liang; Lim, Boon Peng

    2016-01-01

    Effective formulary management in healthcare institutions safeguards rational drug use and optimizes health outcomes. We implemented a formulary management program integrating the principles of health technology assessment (HTA) to improve the safe, appropriate, and cost-effective use of medicine in Singapore. A 3-year formulary management program was initiated in 2011 in five public healthcare institutions. This program was managed by a project team comprising HTA researchers. The project team worked with institutional pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees to: (i) develop tools for formulary drug review and decision making; (ii) enhance the HTA knowledge and skills of formulary pharmacists and members of P&T committees; (iii) devise a prioritization framework to overcome resource constraints and time pressure; and (iv) conceptualize and implement a framework to review existing formulary. Tools that facilitate drug request submission, drug review, and decision making were developed for formulary drug inclusion. A systematic framework to review existing formulary was also developed and tested in selected institutions. A competency development plan was rolled out over 2 years to enhance formulary pharmacists' proficiency in systematic literature search and review, meta-analysis, and pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The plan comprised training workshops and on-the-job knowledge transfer between the project team and institutional formulary pharmacists through collaborating on selected drug reviews. A resource guide that consolidated the tools and templates was published to encourage the adoption of best practices in formulary management. Based on the concepts of HTA, we implemented an evidence-based approach to optimize formulary management.

  18. Ebola Virus Disease: Essential Public Health Principles for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD has become a public health emergency of international concern. The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed guidance to educate and inform healthcare workers and travelers worldwide. Symptoms of EVD include abrupt onset of fever, myalgias, and headache in the early phase, followed by vomiting, diarrhea and possible progression to hemorrhagic rash, life-threatening bleeding, and multi-organ failure in the later phase. The disease is not transmitted via airborne spread like influenza, but rather from person-to-person, or animal to person, via direct contact with bodily fluids or blood. It is crucial that emergency physicians be educated on disease presentation and how to generate a timely and accurate differential diagnosis that includes exotic diseases in the appropriate patient population. A patient should be evaluated for EVD when both suggestive symptoms, including unexplained hemorrhage, AND risk factors within 3 weeks prior, such as travel to an endemic area, direct handling of animals from outbreak areas, or ingestion of fruit or other uncooked foods contaminated with bat feces containing the virus are present. There are experimental therapies for treatment of EVD virus; however the mainstay of therapy is supportive care. Emergency department personnel on the frontlines must be prepared to rapidly identify and isolate febrile travelers if indicated. All healthcare workers involved in care of EVD patients should wear personal protective equipment. Despite the intense media focus on EVD rather than other threats, emergency physicians must master and follow essential public health principles for management of all infectious diseases. This includes not only identification and treatment of individuals, but also protection of healthcare workers and prevention of spread, keeping in mind the possibility of other more common disease processes. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  19. On the Principles of English Teaching Reform in Higher Vocational Colleges Based on "The Basic Requirements of English Curriculum Teaching in Higher Vocational Colleges"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huijun; Ning, Yida

    2017-01-01

    English teaching reform is critical for the cultivation of skilled talents and the development of national economy. The paper attempts to analyze the guidance principles of English teaching reform in the higher vocational colleges underlying "The Basic Requirements of English Curriculum Teaching in Higher Vocational Colleges",…

  20. The lower saxony bank of health. rationale, principles, services, organization and architectural framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plischke, M; Wagner, M; Haarbrandt, B; Rochon, M; Schwartze, J; Tute, E; Bartkiewicz, T; Kleinschmidt, T; Seidel, C; Schüttig, H; Haux, R

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of a Focus Theme of METHODS of Information in Medicine on Health Record Banking. Poor communication of health care information between health care providers (HCP) is still a major problem. One recent approach is the concept of Health Record Banking. With this report we want to introduce the Lower Saxony Bank of Health (LSBH) to the international community. The main objective of this paper is to report and explain: 1) why this organization has been founded, 2) which basic principles have been set, 3) which services will be provided, 4) which type of organization has been chosen, and 5) which architectural framework has been selected. To report and discuss how we plan to achieve the intended objectives. The LSBH was founded as an entrepreneurial company, regarding itself as a neutral third-party information broker. The bank does not store medical documents on its central servers but offers a document registry with links to documents stored at participating health care providers. Subject to valid patient consent, the LSBH grants access to these documents to authorized health care providers. To implement our services, we chose the established technical frameworks of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative using cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS). Different approaches to establish health information exchange (HIE) are in early stages and some have failed in the past. Health Record Banking can address major challenges described in the literature about HIE. The future will show if our provider-sponsored business model is sustainable. After reaching a stable network, we intend to add additional HCPs, e.g., care homes or ambulance services, to the network.

  1. Teaching the basics: core competencies in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Megan A M; Battat, Robert; Brewer, Timothy F

    2011-06-01

    Compelling moral, ethical, professional, pedagogical, and economic imperatives support the integration of global health topics within medical school curriculum. Although the process of integrating global health into medical education is well underway at some medical schools, there remain substantial challenges to initiating global health training in others. As global health is a new field, faculties and schools may benefit from resources and guidance to develop global health modules and teaching materials. This article describes the Core Competencies project undertaken by the Global Health Education Consortium and the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada's Global Health Resource Group. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. 25 CFR 36.97 - What basic requirements must a program's health services meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What basic requirements must a program's health services meet? 36.97 Section 36.97 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.97 What basic requirements must a program's health...

  3. Integrating the Principles of Socioecology and Critical Pedagogy for Health Promotion Health Literacy Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; McDonald, Andrea; McKyer, Lisako

    2016-01-01

    While health literacy research has experienced tremendous growth in the last two decades, the field still struggles to devise interventions that lead to lasting change. Most health literacy interventions are at the individual level and focus on resolving clinician-patient communication difficulties. As a result, the interventions use a deficit model that treats health literacy as a patient problem that needs to be fixed or circumvented. We propose that public health health literacy interventions integrate the principles of socioecology and critical pedagogy to develop interventions that build capacity and empower individuals and communities. Socioecology operates on the premise that health outcome is hinged on the interplay between individuals and their environment. Critical pedagogy assumes education is inherently political, and the ultimate goal of education is social change. Integrating these two approaches will provide a useful frame in which to develop interventions that move beyond the individual level.

  4. Basic Principles of Creation of Topometrical Cards of Beam Therapy in the Cases of High-grade Malignant Supratentorial Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepa, Z.; Platkajis, A.; Apskalne, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background. High-grade malignant supratentorial gliomas: anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AO), anaplastic oligoatrocitomas (AOA), anaplastic ependimomas (AE), glioblastomas (GB) and other less occasional forms of gliomas are approximately 1,82% of all cases of malignant tumors. Life expectancy for such patients still is very low, for several forms of tumors -12-18 months. High-grade malignant gliomas need for combined approach, and one part of such approach is beam therapy. For reaching qualitative results of beam therapy, method of topometrical planning of beam therapy is crucial, because it allow planning therapy due to anatomic features of every patient. The aim of work was comparison of basic principles of creation of 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) topometrical cards of beam therapy. Material and methods. In the process of research, analyse of creation of 2D and 3D cards for patients in period 2000-2005 were made. For creation of 2D cards pelviometer, conturometer of head (Picture 1), pictures of tests of brains in the biggest cross - section of tumor (Picture 2) were used. For creation 3D cards computertomography LightSpeed Rt, which is suitable for topometry (Picture 3), planning system of 3D reconstruction ECLIPSE (Picture 4), 3D reconstruction by data from pre - surgery and/or after - surgery tests of brain (Picture 5), and matching in format of DICOM (Picture 6) were used. In this research 214 patients with supratentorial malign gliomas were covered (Table 1,2). Results. In 98 cases 2D topometrical cards were made, which allows creating only two contrary areas of entry of beams or two areas of entry under angle (Picture 7, 8). In 55 cases in 2D topographic cards two contrary areas of entry were made and in 43 cases plan of beam therapy with areas of entry under angle were made. 3D cards anatomic features of patient as well as location of critical organs were taken into account (picture 10). In case of 3D the number of

  5. On the Basic Principles of Creating a Regulatory Framework for Strategic Planning of Innovative Development of the Russian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Mishin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of the work is to substantiate methodological approaches to create the most important component of strategic planning – its regulatory framework. The relevance of the chosen topic of this article is due to the fact that in modern conditions, strategic planning is an important tool for ensuring sustainable development and increasing the competitiveness of the domestic economy. It allows you to identify the most important and priority areas of activity, distribute and ensure the effective use of available limited labor, material and, most importantly, financial resources. Today, domestic strategic planning has a number of significant shortcomings, the main one of which, in our opinion, is the lack of reliable initial information for forecasting and analytical calculations. Methods: the methodological basis is the dialectical method of scientific cognition, the systemic and institutional approach to building an effective information base of strategic planning. In the course of research of the current state and level of industrial rationing, methods of analysis and synthesis, comparisons and analogies were used. As a methodological basis of this article, regulatory legal documents were used in the field of strategic planning in Russia, as well as methodological documents that previously operated in the USSR on the regulation of resource consumption. Results: the result of the work are the goals, tasks and requirements for the strategic planning base proposed by the author. The relationship of production rationing with the basic principles of strategic planning is shown - balance and consistency in priorities, goals, objectives, activities, resources and timing; The effectiveness of methods and methods for achieving goals with the least expenditure of resources used. The possibility of the existence of a standardization of labor costs, the consumption of material and production resources, regardless of the form of ownership of the

  6. Evaluation of the principles of family counseling and community primary care child health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Mendes Daschevi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary attention is considered the first contact of individuals, their families and the population with the health system. As you approach the individuals and the community, your power to interact with the population can increase. It features four key attributes: first contact access, longitudinality, comprehensiveness and coordination, and three derivatives: family counseling, community orientation, and cultural competence. The family orientation consists in the knowledge of family factors related to the origin and care of diseases and community orientation on recognizing the needs in the community through epidemiological data and direct contact. The aim of the study was to evaluate the principles of family and community orientation of primary child health in primary health care units in Londrina, Paraná. A descriptive, quantitative, held on 39 basic units of the urban area, between August 2012 and January 2013 through an evaluation tool called PCATool Brazil-child version. A total of 609 interviews were answered by parents or primary caregivers of children under twelve, who used the service at least three times for consultation with a pediatrician or nurse. The score value for family counseling was 5.082 and community orientation 5.462, not reaching the ideal score (6.6. It was concluded that both attributes need to be developed, with improvement or installation of new measures, which may assist in improving the quality of primary care of the child.

  7. Basic health program: state administration of basic health programs; eligibility and enrollment in standard health plans; essential health benefits in standard health plans; performance standards for basic health programs; premium and cost sharing for basic health programs; federal funding process; trust fund and financial integrity. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-12

    This final rule establishes the Basic Health Program (BHP), as required by section 1331 of the Affordable Care Act. The BHP provides states the flexibility to establish a health benefits coverage program for low-income individuals who would otherwise be eligible to purchase coverage through the Affordable Insurance Exchange (Exchange, also called Health Insurance Marketplace). The BHP complements and coordinates with enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange, as well as with enrollment in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). This final rule also sets forth a framework for BHP eligibility and enrollment, benefits, delivery of health care services, transfer of funds to participating states, and federal oversight. Additionally, this final rule amends another rule issued by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (Secretary) in order to clarify the applicability of that rule to the BHP.

  8. Spatial accessibility to basic public health services in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Peter M; Ouma, Paul O; Gogo, Ezekiel G; Snow, Robert W; Noor, Abdisalan M

    2017-05-11

    At independence in 2011, South Sudan's health sector was almost non-existent. The first national health strategic plan aimed to achieve an integrated health facility network that would mean that 70% of the population were within 5 km of a health service provider. Publically available data on functioning and closed health facilities, population distribution, road networks, land use and elevation were used to compute the fraction of the population within 1 hour walking distance of the nearest public health facility offering curative services. This metric was summarised for each of the 78 counties in South Sudan and compared with simpler metrics of the proportion of the population within 5 km of a health facility. In 2016, it is estimated that there were 1747 public health facilities, out of which 294 were non-functional in part due to the on-going civil conflict. Access to a service provider was poor with only 25.7% of the population living within one-hour walking time to a facility and 28.6% of the population within 5 km. These metrics, when applied sub-nationally, identified the same high priority, most vulnerable counties. Simple metrics based upon population distribution and location of facilities might be as valuable as more complex models of health access, where attribute data on travel routes are imperfect or incomplete and sparse. Disparities exist in South Sudan among counties and those with the poorest health access should be targeted for priority expansion of clinical services.

  9. How can both the intervention and its evaluation fulfill health promotion principles? An example from a professional development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2013-07-01

    The emergence over the past 20 years of health promotion discourse poses a specific challenge to public health professionals, who must come to terms with new roles and new intervention strategies. Professional development is, among other things, a lever for action to be emphasized in order to meet these challenges. To respond to the specific training needs of public health professionals, a team from the Direction de santé publique de Montréal (Montreal Public Health Department) in Quebec, Canada, established in 2009 the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development project. An evaluative component, which supports the project's implementation by providing feedback, is also integrated into the project. This article seeks to demonstrate that it is possible to integrate the basic principles of health promotion into a professional development program and its evaluation. To this end, it presents an analytical reading of both the intervention and its evaluation component in light of the cardinal principles in this field. Initiatives such as the Health Promotion Laboratory and its evaluation are essential to consolidate the foundations of professional development and its assessment by concretely integrating health promotion discourse into these practices.

  10. Basic topical problems on health hazards from ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.; Paretzke, H.G.; Merkle, W.; Lechle, M.; Matthies, M.; Messerer, P.; Schindel, F.; Wirth, E.; Eisfeld, K.

    In the framework of this research contract, a number of important questions have been considered which have been of basic interest in radiological protection against low doses of ionizing radiation. In particular, research concentrated on the various statistical concepts for the evaluation of epidemiological data for the purpose of radiation risk analysis, derivation of dose-time-effect-relationships for certain somatic effects, time dependence of selected dose-conversion factors, radiation hazards of carbon-14, tritium, and of radon daughter products. The essential results have been reported in separate publications, and therefore will only be shortly summarized here. (orig./HP) [de

  11. The Basics of Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Julie; Stark, Deborah Roderick

    2017-01-01

    This article defines the concept of Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) and describes how it provides the foundation for lifelong health and well-being. The authors provide policy recommendations that include the need to: (a) establish cross-agency leadership for IECMH, (b) ensure Medicaid payment for IECMH services, (c) invest in…

  12. Universal Health Coverage and the Right to Health: From Legal Principle to Post-2015 Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Devi; McKee, Martin; Ooms, Gorik; Beiersmann, Claudia; Friedman, Eric; Gouda, Hebe; Hill, Peter; Jahn, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is widely considered one of the key components for the post-2015 health goal. The idea of UHC is rooted in the right to health, set out in the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. Based on the Covenant and the General Comment of the Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, which is responsible for interpreting and monitoring the Covenant, we identify 6 key legal principles that should underpin UHC based on the right to health: minimum core obligation, progressive realization, cost-effectiveness, shared responsibility, participatory decision making, and prioritizing vulnerable or marginalized groups. Yet, although these principles are widely accepted, they are criticized for not being specific enough to operationalize as post-2015 indicators for reaching the target of UHC. In this article, we propose measurable and achievable indicators for UHC based on the right to health that can be used to inform the ongoing negotiations on Sustainable Development Goals. However, we identify 3 major challenges that face any exercise in setting indicators post-2015: data availability as an essential criterion, the universality of targets, and the adaptation of global goals to local populations. © SAGE Publications 2015.

  13. Defining and incorporating basic nursing care actions into the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Jane; Aldrich, Kelly; Taylor, Cathy R

    2014-01-01

    To develop a definition of basic nursing care for the hospitalized adult patient and drive uptake of that definition through the implementation of an electronic health record. A team of direct care nurses, assisted by subject matter experts, analyzed nursing theory and regulatory requirements related to basic nursing care. The resulting list of activities was coded using the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system and incorporated into the electronic health record system of a 170-bed community hospital. Nine basic nursing care activities were identified as a result of analyzing nursing theory and regulatory requirements in the framework of a hypothetical "well" patient. One additional basic nursing care activity was identified following the pilot implementation in the electronic health record. The pilot hospital has successfully passed a post-implementation regulatory review with no recommendations related to the documentation of basic patient care. This project demonstrated that it is possible to define the concept of basic nursing care and to distinguish it from the interdisciplinary, problem-focused plan of care. The use of the electronic health record can help clarify, document, and communicate basic care elements and improve uptake among nurses. This project to define basic nursing care activities and incorporate into the electronic health record represents a first step in capturing meaningful data elements. When fully implemented, these data could be translated into knowledge for improving care outcomes and collaborative processes. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI: Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nechtelberger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7. Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT, we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals.

  15. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI): Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechtelberger, Andrea; Renner, Walter; Nechtelberger, Martin; Supeková, Soňa Chovanová; Hadjimarkou, Maria; Offurum, Chino; Ramalingam, Panchalan; Senft, Birgit; Redfern, Kylie

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7). Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT), we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals.

  16. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI): Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechtelberger, Andrea; Renner, Walter; Nechtelberger, Martin; Supeková, Soňa Chovanová; Hadjimarkou, Maria; Offurum, Chino; Ramalingam, Panchalan; Senft, Birgit; Redfern, Kylie

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7). Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT), we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals. PMID:29180977

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  18. Guiding principles for good practices in hospital-based health technology assessment units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Lach, Krzysztof; Pasternack, Iris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Health technology assessment (HTA) carried out for policy decision making has well-established principles unlike hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA), which differs from the former in the context characteristics and ways of operation. This study proposes principles for good practices in HB....... In total, 385 people from twenty countries have participated in defining the principles for good practices in HB-HTA units. RESULTS: Fifteen guiding principles for good practices in HB-HTA units are grouped in four dimensions. Dimension 1 deals with principles of the assessment process aimed at providing......- and long-term impact of the overall performance of HB-HTA units. Finally, nine core guiding principles were selected as essential requirements for HB-HTA units based on the expertise of the HB-HTA units participating in the project. CONCLUSIONS: Guiding principles for good practices set up a benchmark...

  19. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age.

  20. Nine key principles to guide youth mental health: development of service models in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Deborah; Batchelor, Samantha; Coates, Dominiek; Cashman, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Historically, the Australian health system has failed to meet the needs of young people with mental health problems and mental illness. In 2006, New South Wales (NSW) Health allocated considerable funds to the reform agenda of mental health services in NSW to address this inadequacy. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH), a service that provides mental health care for young people aged 12-24 years, with moderate to severe mental health problems, was chosen to establish a prototype Youth Mental Health (YMH) Service Model for NSW. This paper describes nine key principles developed by CYPMH to guide the development of YMH Service Models in NSW. A literature review, numerous stakeholder consultations and consideration of clinical best practice were utilized to inform the development of the key principles. Subsequent to their development, the nine key principles were formally endorsed by the Mental Health Program Council to ensure consistency and monitor the progress of YMH services across NSW. As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service. The nine key principles provide mental health services a framework for how to reorient services to accommodate YMH and provide a high-quality model of care. [Corrections added on 29 November 2013, after first online publication: The last two sentences of the Results section have been replaced with "As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service."]. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Joint Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download ... What is it? Points To Remember About Joint Replacement Surgery Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased ...

  2. Designing Novel Health ICTs to Support Work, Not Generate It: Five Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, David; Small, Serena; Wickham, Maeve; Bailey, Chantelle; Hohl, Corinne; Balka, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we offer five principles to inform how health ICT designers and healthcare organizations address and mitigate issues relating to clinician documentation burden. We draw on our experience and empirical work designing an ICT intervention, ActionADE, to illustrate how our team developed and will use these principles to ease documentation burden for clinician-users.

  3. Mobile and portable dental services catering to the basic oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobile and portable dental services catering to the basic oral health needs of the underserved population in developing countries: a proposed model. ... still seem to be the only way to reach every section of the community in the absence of national oral health policy and organized school dental health programs in India.

  4. Principles and framework for eHealth strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard E; Mars, Maurice

    2013-07-30

    Significant investment in eHealth solutions is being made in nearly every country of the world. How do we know that these investments and the foregone opportunity costs are the correct ones? Absent, poor, or vague eHealth strategy is a significant barrier to effective investment in, and implementation of, sustainable eHealth solutions and establishment of an eHealth favorable policy environment. Strategy is the driving force, the first essential ingredient, that can place countries in charge of their own eHealth destiny and inform them of the policy necessary to achieve it. In the last 2 years, there has been renewed interest in eHealth strategy from the World Health Organization (WHO), International Telecommunications Union (ITU), Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the African Union, and the Commonwealth; yet overall, the literature lacks clear guidance to inform countries why and how to develop their own complementary but locally specific eHealth strategy. To address this gap, this paper further develops an eHealth Strategy Development Framework, basing it upon a conceptual framework and relevant theories of strategy and complex system analysis available from the literature. We present here the rationale, theories, and final eHealth strategy development framework by which a systematic and methodical approach can be applied by institutions, subnational regions, and countries to create holistic, needs- and evidence-based, and defensible eHealth strategy and to ensure wise investment in eHealth.

  5. Basic Principles of Marine Diesel Engines, 8-2. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This volume of student materials for a secondary/postsecondary level course in principles of marine diesel engines is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose of the individualized, self-paced course is to acquaint…

  6. Evaluation of the principle of coordination in primary health care of the child in Londrina-Pr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisleine Tíemi Souza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary Care is a set of universally accessible services that promotes and protects health and prevents and treats diseases, and it is considered the initial access to the Health System. Four main essential attributes are present: accessibility, continuity, integrality and coordination. The coordination is the network of several health related services and actions that must be synchronized and continuous regardless of the location in which they occur. The goal of this study was to evaluate this coordination principle in Primary Care provided to children in 39 UBS (tr. From Basic Health Unit in the urban area of the city of Londrina. The research is multicentric (Londrina, Cascavel and João Pessoa, descriptive and quantitative – with use of PCATool-Brasil for children. In this instrument, coordination is subdivided in integration of care (which refers to the relation between Basic Health Care and specialties and the information system (which evaluates the health data and file availability. Amongst the 609 subjects submitted to interview, only 29.2% reported that a specialist examined the child. The coordination-integration of care score was 7.393 and the coordination-information system score was 7.620. From the eight questions concerning the coordination attribute that can be numeric-evaluated, three had scores below 6.6. The score should be higher than that to meet the concept of Primary Care. The conclusion is that the coordination attribute had a high score despite the three questions with a low score.

  7. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenkamer, Betty; Baan, Caroline; Putters, Kim; van Oers, Hans; Drewes, Hanneke

    2018-01-01

    Purpose A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative

  8. [Principles of health economic evaluation for use by caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derumeaux-Burel, Hélène; Derancourt, Christian; Rambhojan, Christine; Branchard, Olivier; Hayes, Nathalie; Bénard, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of health economic evaluation is to maximize health gains from limited resources. By definition, health economic evaluation is comparative, based on average costs and outcomes of compared interventions. Incremental costs and outcomes are used to calculate the cost-effectiveness ratio, which represents the average incremental cost per gained unit of effectiveness (i.e.: a year of life) with the evaluated intervention compared to the reference. The health economic rationale applies to all health domains. We cannot spend collective resources (health insurance) without asking ourselves about their potential alternative uses. This reasoning is useful to caregivers for understanding resources allocation decisions and healthcare recommandations. Caregivers should grab this field of expertise because they are central in this strategic reflection for defining the future French healthcare landscape. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Stem cells: basic research on health, from ethics to panacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naara Luna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though stem cell therapies are still under experimentation, the media has represented them as a panacea that would cure all diseases. This fact secured the authorization for using human embryos as research material. Therapies include manipulation of human material in tissue bioengineering, suggesting a representation of the body as a factory. This article describes stem cell research projects being carried out in the health sciences center of a higher education institution, focusing on field organization and on the system of values underlying scientific activity. Researchers at different levels were interviewed about perspectives on, and implications of, their research in order to analyze the discourse of the projects' participants. Experiments with adult stem cells enjoyed wide support, while the use of human embryos was disputed. The foundations of those arguments were sought in their relation both to the structure of the scientific field and to the researchers' religious background.

  10. Applying principles of health system strengthening to eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Blanchet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding Health systems have now become the priority focus of researchers and policy makers, who have progressively moved away from a project-centred perspectives. The new tendency is to facilitate a convergence between health system developers and disease-specific programme managers in terms of both thinking and action, and to reconcile both approaches: one focusing on integrated health systems and improving the health status of the population and the other aiming at improving access to health care. Eye care interventions particularly in developing countries have generally been vertically implemented (e.g. trachoma, cataract surgeries often with parallel organizational structures or specialised disease specific services. With the emergence of health system strengthening in health strategies and in the service delivery of interventions there is a need to clarify and examine inputs in terms governance, financing and management. This present paper aims to clarify key concepts in health system strengthening and describe the various components of the framework as applied in eye care interventions.

  11. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Administrator's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual guides an instructor in conducting a training course for first-line supervisors to familiarize them with six aspects relating to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970: (1) requirements of the Act, (2) compliance with its standards, (3) identification of health and safety hazards, (4) correction of adverse conditions, (5) record…

  12. Health Insurance: principles, models and the Nigerian National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Nigerian National Health Insurance scheme (NHIS) is planned to attract more resources to the health care sector and improve the level of access and utilization of healthcare services. It is also intended to protect people from the catastrophic financial implications of illnesses. However, whether it will work in ...

  13. The principles of Health Technology Assessment in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Giorgio; Belfiore, Patrizia; D'Amora, Maurizio; Liguori, Renato; Plebani, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a multi-professional and multidisciplinary evaluation approach designed to assess health technology in the broadest sense of the term, from its instruments to the rearranging of its organizational structures. It is by now an established methodology at national and international levels that involves several medical disciplines thanks to its versatility. Laboratory medicine is one of these disciplines. Such specialization was subjected, in recent years, to deep changes even from an organizational standpoint, in order to meet the health needs of the population, making them as effective and cost-effective as possible. In this regard, HTA was the tool used to assess implications in different areas.

  14. [Hypothyroidism in adults in a basic health area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Macías, I; Hidalgo-Requena, A; Pérez-Membrive, E; González-Rodríguez, M E; Bellido-Moyano, C; Pérula-de Torres, L A

    2017-08-29

    The objective of the present study is to study the prevalence, as well as the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of hypothyroid disease in adults using the computerised clinical records. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. The target population was the patients of the health centres of Lucena I and II (Córdoba). Patients 14 years or older, diagnosed with hypothyroidism, born and resident in Lucena. Two hundred and fourteen patients were recruited by random sampling, who then underwent a clinical interview using a questionnaire. The mean age of the patients was 49.71 years (SD 17.03; 95% CI 47.34-51.98), with 85.5% women. A diagnosis of sub-clinical hypothyroidism was found in 74.8%, compared to 18.7% of primary hypothyroidism, and 6.5% of secondary hypothyroidism. The 53.7% (95% CI 46.81-60.59) of patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism did not have thyroid antibodies results. However, 75.2% (95% CI 68.89-80.86) were being treated with levothyroxine. The prevalence of hypothyroidism was 5.7% (95% CI 5.46-5.96). Sub-clinical hypothyroidism is very common in Primary Care clinics. Many patients are not correctly diagnosed and many are over-medicated, suggesting a need to review the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Basic equations of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with the effects due to the Pauli principle and the phonon ground state correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang; Voronov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    A system of basic equations of the quasiparticle-phonon model is obtained for energies and a structure of excited states described by the wave functions containing one- and two-phonon components. The effects due to the Pauli principle for two-phonon components and the phonon ground state correlations of a spherical nucleus are taken here into account. The quantitative estimations of these effects are given by a simplified scheme. The relation between these equations with the results from other theoretical approaches is discussed

  16. How to interpret an unenhanced CT Brain scan. Part 1: Basic principles of Computed Tomography and relevant neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Osborne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to: Cover the basics of Computed Tomography (CT Brain imaging. Review relevant CT neuroanatomy. A CT image is produced by firing x-rays at a moving object which is then detected by an array of rotating detectors (Figure 1. The detected x-rays are then converted into a computerised signal which is used to produce a series of cross sectional images.

  17. Design principles for data- and change-oriented organisational analysis in workplace health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inauen, A; Jenny, G J; Bauer, G F

    2012-06-01

    This article focuses on organizational analysis in workplace health promotion (WHP) projects. It shows how this analysis can be designed such that it provides rational data relevant to the further context-specific and goal-oriented planning of WHP and equally supports individual and organizational change processes implied by WHP. Design principles for organizational analysis were developed on the basis of a narrative review of the guiding principles of WHP interventions and organizational change as well as the scientific principles of data collection. Further, the practical experience of WHP consultants who routinely conduct organizational analysis was considered. This resulted in a framework with data-oriented and change-oriented design principles, addressing the following elements of organizational analysis in WHP: planning the overall procedure, data content, data-collection methods and information processing. Overall, the data-oriented design principles aim to produce valid, reliable and representative data, whereas the change-oriented design principles aim to promote motivation, coherence and a capacity for self-analysis. We expect that the simultaneous consideration of data- and change-oriented design principles for organizational analysis will strongly support the WHP process. We finally illustrate the applicability of the design principles to health promotion within a WHP case study.

  18. Adult Basic Education and Health Literacy: Program Efforts and Perceived Student Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Poag, Meg

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This project examined health literacy efforts among adult basic education providers in Central Texas. Methods: A survey was conducted with all adult literacy providers in Central Texas (N = 58). Results: Most programs provide health-related information. Literacy programs see needs for helping students communicate with doctors, filling…

  19. Safety and health: Principles and practices in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrul Razi Ahmadun; Guan, Chuan Teong; Mohd Halim Shah Ismail

    2005-01-01

    Ignorance, carelessness or improper practices in the laboratory or the improper handling of hazardous or toxic materials may lead to work accidents and work-related ill-health. Laboratory users and administrators cannot afford to overlook these possible consequences due to the misconduct of laboratory practices and should decide how best to manage the health and safety aspects in the laboratory. This book has been written for safety representatives of colleges and universities, for lectures, teachers and students, and for researchers working in laboratories. It is also for everyone responsible for laboratory safety, laboratory accidents and their consequences. The emphasis is on hazards to health and safety, with the focus on the general hazards in the laboratory, how they arise and how to prevent, how to eliminate and control them. Special hazards will also be discussed such as radiation hazards and human factors. This book also provides information on governmental and non-governmental agencies and authorities, emergency contact numbers of relevant authorities, a list of Malaysia occupational safety and health related legislation and some useful occupational safety and health web sites. Readers will find that the information contained in this book will serve as the foundation for laboratory users safety policy. A set of Laboratory Safety Forms for a typical laboratory is also available in the appendix for reference. Laboratory users can use and adapt these forms for their own laboratory requirements. (author)

  20. Development of costs for complementary medicine after provisional inclusion into the Swiss basic health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Hans-Peter; Busato, André

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, 5 complementary procedures were included into the Swiss basic health insurance on a provisional basis. In consequence, many people expected a substantial increase of costs of up to CHF 110 million or even higher. Data on consultation costs at the expense of basic health insurance for the period of 1997-2003 were analyzed for 206 certified complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) physicians with 1 or multiple certificates for complementary medicine. The data was provided by the Swiss health insurers' data pool (santésuisse). The 2 major Swiss health insurers provided additional cost data of expenditures reimbursed by private health insurance for complementary medicine. This allowed a longitudinal analysis of consultation costs at the expense of basic health insurance and the costs of private health insurance of certified CAM physicians. Furthermore, those costs were compared to the respective costs of 119 non-certified CAM physicians and 145 physicians in conventional practices. The development of consultation costs of certified CAM physicians at the expense of basic health insurance showed a net annual increase of CHF 54,200 per physician between 1998 and 2002 and of CHF 35.9 million for all 663 certified CAM physicians. On the other hand, costs at the expense of private health insurance for complementary medicine decreased in the same period by CHF 34,300 per certified CAM physician and by CHF 22.8 million for all 663 certified CAM physicians. The inclusion of 5 complementary disciplines into the Swiss basic health insurance led to an increase of costs, which was, however, much lower than predicted. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Core principles of sexual health treatments in cancer for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The considerable prevalence of sexual health problems in men after cancer treatment coupled with the severity of impact and challenges to successful intervention make sexual dysfunction one of the most substantial health-related quality of life burdens in all of cancer survivorship. Surgeries, radiation therapies, and nontreatment (e.g., active surveillance) variously result in physical disfigurement, pain, and disruptions in physiological, psychological, and relational functioning. Although biomedical and psychological interventions have independently shown benefit, long-term, effective treatment for sexual dysfunction remains elusive. Recognizing the complex nature of men's sexual health in an oncology setting, there is a trend toward the adoption of a biopsychosocial orientation that emphasizes the active participation of the partner, and a broad-spectrum medical, psychological, and social approach. Intervention research to date provides good insight into the potential active ingredients of successful sexual rehabilitation programming. Combining a biopsychosocial approach with these active intervention elements forecasts an optimistic future for men's sexual rehabilitation programming within oncology. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of patient experience and appropriate sexual health intervention for gay men and men of diverse race and culture.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ...

  3. uSIMPK. An Excel for Windows-based simulation program for instruction of basic pharmacokinetics principles to pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocks, Dion R

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics can be a challenging topic to teach due to the complex relationships inherent between physiological parameters, mathematical descriptors and equations, and their combined impact on shaping the blood fluid concentration vs. time curves of drugs. A computer program was developed within Microsoft Excel for Windows, designed to assist in the instruction of basic pharmacokinetics within an entry-to-practice pharmacy class environment. The program is composed of a series of spreadsheets (modules) linked by Visual Basic for Applications, intended to illustrate the relationships between pharmacokinetic and in some cases physiological parameters, doses and dose rates and the drug blood fluid concentration vs. time curves. Each module is accompanied by a simulation user's guide, prompting the user to change specific independent parameters and then observe the impact of the change(s) on the drug concentration vs. time curve and on other dependent parameters. "Slider" (or "scroll") bars can be selected to readily see the effects of repeated changes on the dependencies. Topics covered include one compartment single dose administration (iv bolus, oral, short infusion), intravenous infusion, repeated doses, renal and hepatic clearance, nonlinear elimination, two compartment model, plasma protein binding and the relationship between pharmacokinetics and drug effect. The program has been used in various forms in the classroom over a number of years, with positive ratings generally being received from students for its use in the classroom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Basic principles and applications of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omami, Galal [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The Hong Kong University, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Tamimi, Dania [BeamReaders Inc., Orlando (United States); Branstette, Barton F. [Dept. of Otolaryngology and Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  5. Applied Ethics and eHealth: Principles, Identity, and RFID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Diane; Duquenoy, Penny

    The social and ethical implications of contemporary technologies are becoming an issue of steadily growing importance. This paper offers an overview in terms of identity and the field of ethics, and explores how these apply to eHealth in both theory and practice. The paper selects a specific circumstance in which these ethical issues can be explored. It focuses particularly on radio-frequency identifiers (RFID). It ends by discussing ethical issues more generally, and the practice of ethical consideration.

  6. Achieving Consensus on Principles of Good Practice for School Health in Independent Schools: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Miguel G.; Allegrante, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although the 8 components of the coordinated school health (CSH) framework have been implemented to various degrees in the nation's public schools, principles of good practice (PGPs) to guide health promotion efforts in independent schools do not exist. The purpose of this study was to generate PGPs and rate their feasibility of…

  7. Applying Lean principles and Kaizen rapid improvement events in public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gene; Poteat-Godwin, Annah; Harrison, Lisa Macon; Randolph, Greg D

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes a local home health and hospice agency's effort to implement Lean principles and Kaizen methodology as a rapid improvement approach to quality improvement. The agency created a cross-functional team, followed Lean Kaizen methodology, and made significant improvements in scheduling time for home health nurses that resulted in reduced operational costs, improved working conditions, and multiple organizational efficiencies.

  8. The search for underlying principles of health impact assessment: progress and prospects: Comment on "Investigating underlying principles to guide health impact assessment".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Mirko S; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-07-01

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a relatively young field of endeavour, and hence, future progress will depend on the planning, implementation and rigorous evaluation of additional HIAs of projects, programmes and policies the world over. In the June 2014 issue of the International Journal of Health Policy and Management, Fakhri and colleagues investigated underlying principles of HIA through a comprehensive review of the literature and expert consultation. With an emphasis on the Islamic Republic of Iran, the authors identified multiple issues that are relevant for guiding HIA practice. At the same time, the study unravelled current shortcomings in the understanding and definition of HIA principles and best practice at national, regional, and global levels. In this commentary we scrutinise the research presented, highlight strengths and limitations, and discuss the findings in the context of other recent attempts to guide HIA.

  9. The Search for Underlying Principles of Health Impact Assessment: Progress and Prospects; Comment on “Investigating Underlying Principles to Guide Health Impact Assessment”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko S. Winkler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Health Impact Assessment (HIA is a relatively young field of endeavour, and hence, future progress will depend on the planning, implementation and rigorous evaluation of additional HIAs of projects, programmes and policies the world over. In the June 2014 issue of the International Journal of Health Policy and Management, Fakhri and colleagues investigated underlying principles of HIA through a comprehensive review of the literature and expert consultation. With an emphasis on the Islamic Republic of Iran, the authors identified multiple issues that are relevant for guiding HIA practice. At the same time, the study unravelled current shortcomings in the understanding and definition of HIA principles and best practice at national, regional, and global levels. In this commentary we scrutinise the research presented, highlight strengths and limitations, and discuss the findings in the context of other recent attempts to guide HIA.

  10. The ethical basis of the precautionary principle in health care decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meulen, Ruud H.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the relation between the precautionary and health care decision making. Decision making in medical practice as well as health policy is characterized by uncertainty. On the level of clinical practice for example, one never knows in advance whether one has made the right diagnosis or has opted for the right treatment. Though medical decisions have a risk on serious harms and burdens, the precautionary principle is not applicable to health care. This principle holds that one should not act when there is no scientific proof that no harms will result from a medical act or a policy decision. However, in clinical practice there is a duty to act. Physicians have an obligation to do good to their patients and have to weigh the benefits against possible harms and burdens. The basis virtue of medical decision making is not avoidance of risks, as stated in the precautionary principle, but the prudent assessment of benefits, burdens, and harms, in relation to other ethical principles like respect for autonomy and justice. The precautionary principle does play a role in health care, but it should never rule medical decision making as an absolute principle. This is not only true for clinical decision making, but also for the area of health policy. Physicians and other health care decision makers need to have knowledge about the possible effects of treatments or the precision of diagnostic procedures in order to reduce harm and promote well-being. Evidence-based medicine may contribute to the wisdom of health care decision makers, but this evidence-based wisdom should always be applied under the guidance of prudence, which is the central virtue of health care decision making

  11. A critical narrative review of transfer of basic science knowledge in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jean-Marie; Park, Yoon Soo; Harris, Ilene; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Sood, Lonika; Clark, Maureen D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Brydges, Ryan; Norman, Geoffrey; Woods, Nicole

    2018-02-08

    'Transfer' is the application of a previously learned concept to solve a new problem in another context. Transfer is essential for basic science education because, to be valuable, basic science knowledge must be transferred to clinical problem solving. Therefore, better understanding of interventions that enhance the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is essential. This review systematically identifies interventions described in the health professions education (HPE) literature that document the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning, and considers teaching and assessment strategies. A systematic search of the literature was conducted. Articles related to basic science teaching at the undergraduate level in HPE were analysed using a 'transfer out'/'transfer in' conceptual framework. 'Transfer out' refers to the application of knowledge developed in one learning situation to the solving of a new problem. 'Transfer in' refers to the use of previously acquired knowledge to learn from new problems or learning situations. Of 9803 articles initially identified, 627 studies were retrieved for full text evaluation; 15 were included in the literature review. A total of 93% explored 'transfer out' to clinical reasoning and 7% (one article) explored 'transfer in'. Measures of 'transfer out' fostered by basic science knowledge included diagnostic accuracy over time and in new clinical cases. Basic science knowledge supported learning - 'transfer in' - of new related content and ultimately the 'transfer out' to diagnostic reasoning. Successful teaching strategies included the making of connections between basic and clinical sciences, the use of commonsense analogies, and the study of multiple clinical problems in multiple contexts. Performance on recall tests did not reflect the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning. Transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is an essential component of HPE that

  12. Nuclear power: Accidental releases - principles of public health action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is based on the collective knowledge and experience of the members of a Working Group, convened by WHO in collaboration with the Government of Belgium in Brussels on 23-27 November 1981, to discuss and appraise the different actions that might be taken following accidental radioactive releases from nuclear plants. It does not provide detailed technical data, but broadly surveys the rational basis for decision-making, indicating the present position as assessed by members of the Working Group. Four major disciplines (radiological protection, health physics, environmental science and technology, and human biology) and three main professional categories (physicians, engineers and physicists) were represented, providing a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the topic. The purpose of this report is to give guidance to national authorities on how to develop the capacity to take action in a nuclear emergency

  13. Health care priority setting: principles, practice and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Cam

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health organizations the world over are required to set priorities and allocate resources within the constraint of limited funding. However, decision makers may not be well equipped to make explicit rationing decisions and as such often rely on historical or political resource allocation processes. One economic approach to priority setting which has gained momentum in practice over the last three decades is program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA. Methods This paper presents a detailed step by step guide for carrying out a priority setting process based on the PBMA framework. This guide is based on the authors' experience in using this approach primarily in the UK and Canada, but as well draws on a growing literature of PBMA studies in various countries. Results At the core of the PBMA approach is an advisory panel charged with making recommendations for resource re-allocation. The process can be supported by a range of 'hard' and 'soft' evidence, and requires that decision making criteria are defined and weighted in an explicit manner. Evaluating the process of PBMA using an ethical framework, and noting important challenges to such activity including that of organizational behavior, are shown to be important aspects of developing a comprehensive approach to priority setting in health care. Conclusion Although not without challenges, international experience with PBMA over the last three decades would indicate that this approach has the potential to make substantial improvement on commonly relied upon historical and political decision making processes. In setting out a step by step guide for PBMA, as is done in this paper, implementation by decision makers should be facilitated.

  14. The rights of shareholders – basic principle of corporate governance by means of case-specific jurisprudence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Doru BÎGIOI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Respecting shareholders’ rights represents one of the fundamental principles of corporate governance, underpinning the establishment of economic entities, as a form of association of individuals and / or legal entities in order to carry out profit-oriented activities. However, there are situations in which the management, the other shareholders, or even the authorities, do not respect certain shareholders’ rights, leading to a number of negative effects, such as the closing of companies. Based on these considerations, in this paper, we set as research objective to analyze the circumstances, which may affect shareholders’ rights. To meet the research objectives, we analyzed the case-specific jurisprudence published by the courts of law till 31st of December 2015. The results of the study show that the shareholders’ rights, which are not respected, include: the property right, the right to receive dividends, the right to participate and vote in the general assemblies of shareholders, the right to be elected in the governing bodies, and not the least, the most important one in accounting terms, the right to be informed.

  15. Revisiting public health preparedness: Incorporating social justice principles into pandemic preparedness planning for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayman, Harvey; Ablorh-Odjidja, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Public health professionals are responsible for ensuring the health of the nation, which requires that planners for public health emergencies recognize that not including protection for underserved or marginalized communities poses a risk to the entire population. To assure the protection of these populations in the event of a pandemic outbreak, preparedness planning will benefit from the application of several principles of social justice in assuring the protection of all individuals. This article will review the history between public health and social justice, provide a brief review of pandemic preparedness planning efforts, discuss the importance of and make recommendations for the incorporation of principles of social justice in the development of pandemic preparedness plans, and highlight some of the challenges faced by public health in effectively and equitably meeting its charge to protect the nation's health.

  16. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software.

  17. Reflections on the concept of basic needs and primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenum, C A

    1981-01-01

    The notion or concept of need has different meanings according to the individual groups or ages to which it is applied. A need is something which man subjectively feels an urge to satisfy. Basic or primary needs are the minimum vital requirements which must be met to ensure dignified human existence. Basic needs relate both to individuals and communities. Although the needs of individuals and communities are contingent, they are not necessarily in harmony. One of the principal goals of socioeconomic development in general and health care development in particular is the satisfaction of the basic needs of the greatest number of people. Growth-oriented strategies have so far failed to reduce inequalities and physical, mental, and social destitution. Development strategies focusing on basic needs must: 1) eliminate social inequalities; 2) include coherent programs of activities relating to basic needs; and 3) undergo radical structural changes (a social revolution in community health). Promotion of health care for the most underprivileged segments of society necessitate: 1) production of goods necessary for the satisfaction of basic needs such as building materials or essential medicines; 2) construction of country roads; and 3) development of programs of rural health, water supply, literacy, and housing. Primary health care is essential care which is fundamental to basic needs. Policies, strategies, and plans of action should be formulated in order to develop primary health care. An excellent means of implementing primary health care is the choice of appropriate technology for health care. Choosing the appropriate technology for development entails finding the right balance between labor-intensive and capital-intensive technology; it should be the result of combining knowledge and practices which help improve the physical, mental, and social well-being of individuals, families, and communities. In most rural populations of the world, infections and epidemic and

  18. National Guidelines «Acute Kidney Injury: Basic Principles of the Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment (2015» Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Smirnov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main problems of acute kidney injury (AKI are considered. The necessity of introduction of the AKI concept into the practice of national health care is justified. Specific recommendations for the diagnosis, monitoring, prevention and treatment of this dangerous condition are given.

  19. Geriatrics and radiation oncology. Pt. 1. How to identify high-risk patients and basic treatment principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fels, Franziska; Kraft, Johannes W.; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Until the mid of this century, 33% of the Western population will be ≥ 65 years old. The percentage of patients being ≥ 80 years old with today 5% will triple until 2050. Therefore, radiation oncologists must be familiar with special geriatric issues to meet the increasing demand for multidisciplinary cooperation and to offer useful and individual treatment concepts. Patients and Methods: This review article will provide basic data on the definition, identification and treatment of geriatric cancer patients. Results: The geriatric patient is defined by typical multimorbidity (15 items) and by age-related increased vulnerability. Best initial identification of geriatric patients will be provided by assessment including the Barthel Index evaluating self-care and activity in daily life, by the Mini-Mental Status Test that will address cognitive pattern, and by the Timed 'Up and Go' Test for evaluation of mobility. As for chemotherapy, standard treatment was associated with increased toxicity, consequently, dose modifications and supportive treatment are of special importance. Conclusion: Geriatric cancer patients need to be identified by special assessment instruments. Due to increased toxicity following chemotherapy, supportive measures seem important. Radiation treatment as a noninvasive and outpatient-based treatment remains an important and preferable option. (orig.)

  20. Principles of health economic evaluations of lipid-lowering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Roberta; Basarir, Hasan; Ward, Sue Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Policy decision-making in cardiovascular disease is increasingly informed by the results generated from decision-analytic models (DAMs). The methodological approaches and assumptions used in these DAMs impact on the results generated and can influence a policy decision based on a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) threshold. Decision makers need to be provided with a clear understanding of the key sources of evidence and how they are used in the DAM to make an informed judgement on the quality and appropriateness of the results generated. Our review identified 12 studies exploring the cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical lipid-lowering interventions published since January 2010. All studies used Markov models with annual cycles to represent the long-term clinical pathway. Important differences in the model structures and evidence base used within the DAMs were identified. Whereas the reporting standards were reasonably good, there were many instances when reporting of methods could be improved, particularly relating to baseline risk levels, long-term benefit of treatment and health state utility values. There is a scope for improvement in the reporting of evidence and modelling approaches used within DAMs to provide decision makers with a clearer understanding of the quality and validity of the results generated. This would be assisted by fuller publication of models, perhaps through detailed web appendices.

  1. Agile, a guiding principle for health care improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolf, Sara; Nyström, Monica E; Tishelman, Carol; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased understanding of the concept agile and its potential for hospital managers to optimize design of organizational structures and processes to combine internal efficiency and external effectiveness. An integrative review was conducted using the reSEARCH database. Articles met the following criteria: first, a definition of agility; second, descriptions of enablers of becoming an agile organization; and finally, discussions of agile on multiple organizational levels. In total, 60 articles qualified for the final analysis. Organizational agility rests on the assumption that the environment is uncertain, ranging from frequently changing to highly unpredictable. Proactive, reactive or embracive coping strategies were described as possible ways to handle such uncertain environments. Five organizational capacities were derived as necessary for hospitals to use the strategies optimally: transparent and transient inter-organizational links; market sensitivity and customer focus; management by support for self-organizing employees; organic structures that are elastic and responsive; flexible human and resource capacity for timely delivery. Agile is portrayed as either the "new paradigm" following lean, the needed development on top of a lean base, or as complementary to lean in distinct hybrid strategies. Environmental uncertainty needs to be matched with coping strategies and organizational capacities to design processes responsive to real needs of health care. This implies that lean and agile can be combined to optimize the design of hospitals, to meet different variations in demand and create good patient management. While considerable value has been paid to strategies to improve the internal efficiency within hospitals, this review raise the attention to the value of strategies of external effectiveness.

  2. Using design principles to foster understanding of complex health concepts in consumer informatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rupananda; Mark, Jessica H; Khan, Sharib; Kukafka, Rita

    2010-11-13

    Consumer health informatics tools can only be effective if patients comprehend their content. Optimal design may foster better patient comprehension and health literacy, which can improve health outcomes. We developed a patient-centric decision aid, Tailored Lifestyle Conversations (TLC), to help patients comprehend behavioral risks and set behavior change priorities for reducing risk of cardiovascular disease. The TLC decision aid was developed using a design framework based on Gestalt Principles of Perception. Further iteration was informed by qualitative user feedback. Preliminary analysis showed that the TLC decision aid helped patients understand their risk and supported their decisions on health behavior change. We identified design elements that supported patient comprehension, and other elements that were not effective, to inform iterative revision. This paper describes an effective methodology for the development of consumer health informatics tools that includes grounding in design principles complemented by iterative revision based on user testing and feedback.

  3. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamer, Betty; Baan, Caroline; Putters, Kim; van Oers, Hans; Drewes, Hanneke

    2018-04-09

    Purpose A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative strategies to improve pharmaceutical care and the contextual factors and mechanisms through which these principles operate. Design/methodology/approach The evaluation was informed by a realist methodology examining the links between PHM strategies, their outcomes and the contexts and mechanisms by which these strategies operate. Guiding principles were identified by grouping context-specific strategies with specific outcomes. Findings In total, ten guiding principles were identified: create agreement and commitment based on a long-term vision; foster cooperation and representation at the board level; use layered governance structures; create awareness at all levels; enable interpersonal links at all levels; create learning environments; organize shared responsibility; adjust financial strategies to market contexts; organize mutual gains; and align regional agreements with national policies and regulations. Contextual factors such as shared savings influenced the effectiveness of the guiding principles. Mechanisms by which these guiding principles operate were, for instance, fostering trust and creating a shared sense of the problem. Practical implications The guiding principles highlight how collaboration can be stimulated to improve pharmaceutical care while taking into account local constraints and possibilities. The interdependency of these principles necessitates effectuating them together in order to realize the best possible improvements and outcomes. Originality/value This is the first study using a realist approach to understand the guiding principles underlying collaboration to improve pharmaceutical care.

  4. Barriers to the use of basic health services among women in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chifa; Labeeb, Shokria Adly; Higuchi, Michiyo; Mohamed, Asmaa Ghareds; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2013-08-01

    This cross-sectional study examined potential demand-side barriers to women's use of basic health services in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt). Face-to-face interviews with a structured questionnaire were carried out on 205 currently-married women, inquiring about their use of health facilities: regular antenatal care (ANC) during the last pregnancy and medical treatment services when they suffered from common illness. Questions about their perceptions of barriers to the use of health services were categorized into three primary dimensions: structural, financial, and personal/cultural barriers. Distance and transportation to health facilities (structural barriers) prevented about 30 % of the women from seeing a doctor. Forty-two percent of them felt the difficulty paying for health services (financial barriers). Approximately a quarter of women answered that gaining family permission, allocating time to go to health facilities, or concern about lack of female physicians (personal/cultural barriers) was a big problem for them. After controlling for potential confounding factors, structural barriers showed an inverse association with the use of health services. Financial barriers indicated a strong association (OR=0.18, Pbarriers had no statistical significance with women's use of health services. Although the Egyptian government had successfully extended basic health service delivery networks throughout the country, women in rural Upper Egypt were still facing various barriers to the use of the services, especially structural and financial barriers.

  5. Principles of macro-methodic of junior female gymnasts’ training to sport exercises for gymnastic all round competitions at specialized basic stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Potop

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: working out of principles of junior female gymnasts’ macro-methodic training to sport exercises for all round competitions at stage of specialized basic training. Material: in the research 19 girl-gymnasts from reserve of combined team of Romania participated. Measurements and assessment of technical fitness at training sessions and in conditions of competitions were conducted at 120 training sessions (10 sessions a week. Results: we worked out and realized experimentally and in training sessions principles of macro-methodic training to gymnastic exercises. Macro-methodic of training is presented in structure of long-term programs of training for all round competitions. Macro-methodic is presented as combination of elements of motor, technical, didactic and technological structures of sport exercises (in the present article it was described on material of vaults of Yurchenko’s type. Conclusions: macro-methodic permits to state optimal algorithm of mastering of theoretical and practical materials at training sessions. Besides, it permits to demonstrate steady growth of sport results at competitions. With it individual-age features of junior female gymnasts, tendencies and specialists’ requirements are considered.

  6. National Institutes of Health Update: Translating Basic Behavioral Science into New Pediatric Obesity Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric obesity increases the risk of later-life obesity and chronic diseases. Basic research to better understand factors associated with excessive weight gain in early life and studies translating research findings into preventive and therapeutic strategies are essential to our ability to better prevent and treat childhood obesity. This overview describes several National Institutes of Health efforts designed to stimulate basic and translational research in childhood obesity prevention and treatment. These examples demonstrate the value of research in early phase translational pediatric obesity research and highlight some promising directions for this important area of research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A conceptual framework of game-informed principles for health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H

    2016-01-01

    Games have been used for training purposes for many years, but their use remains somewhat underdeveloped and under-theorized in health professional education. This paper considers the basis for using serious games (games that have an explicit educational purpose) in health professional education in terms of their underlying concepts and design principles. These principles can be understood as a series of game facets: competition and conflict, chance and luck, experience and performance, simulation and make-believe, tactics and strategies, media, symbols and actions, and complexity and difficulty. Games are distinct and bound in ways that other health professional education activities are not. The differences between games and simulation can be understood in terms of the interconnected concepts of isomorphism (convergence with real-world practice) and anisomorphism (divergence from real-world practice). Gaming facets can extend the instructional design repertoire in health professional education.

  8. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Steenkamer (Betty); C.A. Baan (Caroline); K. Putters (Kim); H.A.M. Oers (Hans); H.W. Drewes (Hanneke W.)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractPurpose: A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying

  9. Propensity scores as a basis for equating groups: basic principles and application in clinical treatment outcome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Stephen G; Cham, Heining; Thoemmes, Felix; Renneberg, Babette; Schulze, Julian; Weiler, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    A propensity score is the probability that a participant is assigned to the treatment group based on a set of baseline covariates. Propensity scores provide an excellent basis for equating treatment groups on a large set of covariates when randomization is not possible. This article provides a nontechnical introduction to propensity scores for clinical researchers. If all important covariates are measured, then methods that equate on propensity scores can achieve balance on a large set of covariates that mimics that achieved by a randomized experiment. We present an illustration of the steps in the construction and checking of propensity scores in a study of the effectiveness of a health coach versus treatment as usual on the well-being of seriously ill individuals. We then consider alternative methods of equating groups on propensity scores and estimating treatment effects including matching, stratification, weighting, and analysis of covariance. We illustrate a sensitivity analysis that can probe for the potential effects of omitted covariates on the estimate of the causal effect. Finally, we briefly consider several practical and theoretical issues in the use of propensity scores in applied settings. Propensity score methods have advantages over alternative approaches to equating groups particularly when the treatment and control groups do not fully overlap, and there are nonlinear relationships between covariates and the outcome. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between basic protective health behaviours and health related quality of life in Greek urban hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tountas, Yannis; Manios, Yannis; Dimitrakaki, Christine; Tzavara, Chara

    2007-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the association between the presence of several protective health behaviors and physical and mental wellbeing/functioning among healthy hospital employees in Greece. A randomly selected representative sample of 395 employees working in seven hospitals, both public and private, within the wider region of Athens participated in the study. Participants were assigned to the following professional categories: administrative, auxiliary and technical personnel, medical doctors and nurses. Four basic protective health behaviors were examined: following the Mediterranean diet, exercising, no smoking and moderate alcohol drinking. Employees' health related quality of life was assessed with the self-administered SF-36 generic health status measure. Technical and administrative hospital personnel reported more healthy behaviors than medical and auxiliary personnel. There was an increased likelihood of scoring higher in almost all SF-36 Physical health subscales in the accumulation of the above four protective heath behaviors. In terms of mental health, even the presence of two or more protective health behaviors significantly increase the score on most SF-36 Mental health subscales. Results indicate that the protective role of basic health behaviors extends beyond physical health to mental wellbeing.

  11. Globalizing rehabilitation psychology: Application of foundational principles to global health and rehabilitation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Jacob A; Bruyère, Susanne M; LeBlanc, Jeanne; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2016-02-01

    This article reviewed foundational principles in rehabilitation psychology and explored their application to global health imperatives as outlined in the World Report on Disability (World Health Organization & World Bank, 2011). Historical theories and perspectives are used to assist with conceptual formulation as applied to emerging international rehabilitation psychology topics. According to the World Report on Disability (World Health Organization & World Bank, 2011), there are approximately 1 billion individuals living with some form of disability globally. An estimated 80% of persons with disabilities live in low- to middle-income countries (WHO, 2006). The primary messages and recommendations of the World Report on Disability have been previously summarized as it relates to potential opportunities for contribution within the field of rehabilitation psychology (MacLachlan & Mannan, 2014). Yet, undeniable barriers remain to realizing the full potential for contributions in low- to middle-income country settings. A vision for engaging in international capacity building and public health efforts is needed within the field of rehabilitation psychology. Foundational rehabilitation psychology principles have application to the service of individuals with disabilities in areas of the world facing complex socioeconomic and sociopolitical challenges. Foundational principles of person-environment interaction, importance of social context, and need for involvement of persons with disabilities can provide guidance to the field as it relates to global health and rehabilitation efforts. The authors illustrate the application of rehabilitation psychology foundational principles through case examples and description of ongoing work, and link foundational principles to discreet domains of intervention going forward. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Towards Principles-Based Approaches to Governance of Health-related Research using Personal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Graeme; Sethi, Nayha

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in the quality, availability and linkage potential of health data for research make the need to develop robust and effective information governance mechanisms more pressing than ever before; they also lead us to question the utility of governance devices used hitherto such as consent and anonymisation. This article assesses and advocates a principles-based approach, contrasting this with traditional rule-based approaches, and proposes a model of principled proportionate governance. It is suggested that the approach not only serves as the basis for good governance in contemporary data linkage but also that it provides a platform to assess legal reforms such as the draft Data Protection Regulation. PMID:24416087

  13. Advancing perinatal patient safety through application of safety science principles using health IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer; Sorensen, Asta; Sommerness, Samantha; Lasater, Beth; Mistry, Kamila; Kahwati, Leila

    2017-12-19

    The use of health information technology (IT) has been shown to promote patient safety in Labor and Delivery (L&D) units. The use of health IT to apply safety science principles (e.g., standardization) to L&D unit processes may further advance perinatal safety. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with L&D units participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ's) Safety Program for Perinatal Care (SPPC) to assess units' experience with program implementation. Analysis of interview transcripts was used to characterize the process and experience of using health IT for applying safety science principles to L&D unit processes. Forty-six L&D units from 10 states completed participation in SPPC program implementation; thirty-two (70%) reported the use of health IT as an enabling strategy for their local implementation. Health IT was used to improve standardization of processes, use of independent checks, and to facilitate learning from defects. L&D units standardized care processes through use of electronic health record (EHR)-based order sets and use of smart pumps and other technology to improve medication safety. Units also standardized EHR documentation, particularly related to electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) and shoulder dystocia. Cognitive aids and tools were integrated into EHR and care workflows to create independent checks such as checklists, risk assessments, and communication handoff tools. Units also used data from EHRs to monitor processes of care to learn from defects. Units experienced several challenges incorporating health IT, including obtaining organization approval, working with their busy IT departments, and retrieving standardized data from health IT systems. Use of health IT played an integral part in the planning and implementation of SPPC for participating L&D units. Use of health IT is an encouraging approach for incorporating safety science principles into care to improve perinatal safety and should be incorporated

  14. Towards Establishing Fiscal Legitimacy Through Settled Fiscal Principles in Global Health Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Attiya; Latif, Laila Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Scholarship on international health law is currently pushing the boundaries while taking stock of achievements made over the past few decades. However despite the forward thinking approach of scholars working in the field of global health one area remains a stumbling block in the path to achieving the right to health universally: the financing of heath. This paper uses the book Global Health Law by Larry Gostin to reflect and take stock of the fiscal support provided to the right to health from both a global and an African perspective. It then sets out the key fiscal challenges facing global and African health and proposes an innovative solution for consideration: use of the domestic principles of tax to design the global health financing system.

  15. The principles of the Brazilian Unified Health System, studied based on similitude analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pontes, Ana Paula Munhen; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Gomes, Antonio Marcos Tosoli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to analyze and compare the incorporation of the ethical-doctrinal and organizational principles into the social representations of the Unified Health System (SUS) among health professionals. Method a study grounded in Social Representations Theory, undertaken with 125 subjects, in eight health institutions in Rio de Janeiro. The free word association technique was applied to the induction term "SUS", the words evoked being analyzed using the techniques of the Vergès matrix and similitude analysis. Results it was identified that the professionals' social representations vary depending on their level of education, and that those with higher education represent a subgroup responsible for the process of representational change identified. This result was confirmed through similitude analysis. Conclusion a process of representational change is ongoing, in which it was ascertained that the professionals incorporated the principles of the SUS into their symbolic constructions. The similitude analysis was shown to be a fruitful technique for research in nursing. PMID:24553704

  16. The principles of the Brazilian Unified Health System, studied based on similitude analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Munhen de Pontes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to analyze and compare the incorporation of the ethical-doctrinal and organizational principles into the social representations of the Unified Health System (SUS among health professionals. METHOD: a study grounded in Social Representations Theory, undertaken with 125 subjects, in eight health institutions in Rio de Janeiro. The free word association technique was applied to the induction term "SUS", the words evoked being analyzed using the techniques of the Vergès matrix and similitude analysis. RESULTS: it was identified that the professionals' social representations vary depending on their level of education, and that those with higher education represent a subgroup responsible for the process of representational change identified. This result was confirmed through similitude analysis. CONCLUSION: a process of representational change is ongoing, in which it was ascertained that the professionals incorporated the principles of the SUS into their symbolic constructions. The similitude analysis was shown to be a fruitful technique for research in nursing.

  17. A game plan: Gamification design principles in mHealth applications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron S; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Seto, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Effective chronic disease management is essential to improve positive health outcomes, and incentive strategies are useful in promoting self-care with longevity. Gamification, applied with mHealth (mobile health) applications, has the potential to better facilitate patient self-management. This review article addresses a knowledge gap around the effective use of gamification design principles, or mechanics, in developing mHealth applications. Badges, leaderboards, points and levels, challenges and quests, social engagement loops, and onboarding are mechanics that comprise gamification. These mechanics are defined and explained from a design and development perspective. Health and fitness applications with gamification mechanics include: bant which uses points, levels, and social engagement, mySugr which uses challenges and quests, RunKeeper which uses leaderboards as well as social engagement loops and onboarding, Fitocracy which uses badges, and Mango Health, which uses points and levels. Specific design considerations are explored, an example of the efficacy of a gamified mHealth implementation in facilitating improved self-management is provided, limitations to this work are discussed, a link between the principles of gaming and gamification in health and wellness technologies is provided, and suggestions for future work are made. We conclude that gamification could be leveraged in developing applications with the potential to better facilitate self-management in persons with chronic conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Ultra‐processed food consumption in children from a Basic Health Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Sparrenberger; Roberta Roggia Friedrich; Mariana Dihl Schiffner; Ilaine Schuch; Mário Bernardes Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of ultra‐processed food (UPF) on the dietary consumption of children treated at a Basic Health Unit and the associated factors. Method: Cross‐sectional study carried out with a convenience sample of 204 children, aged 2–10 years old, in Southern Brazil. Children's food intake was assessed using a 24‐h recall questionnaire. Food items were classified as minimally processed, processed for culinary use, and ultra‐processed. A semi‐structured questionna...

  19. GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR GOOD PRACTICES IN HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT UNITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Lach, Krzysztof; Pasternack, Iris; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Cicchetti, Americo; Marchetti, Marco; Kidholm, Kristian; Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Rosenmöller, Magdalene; Wild, Claudia; Kahveci, Rabia; Ulst, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) carried out for policy decision making has well-established principles unlike hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA), which differs from the former in the context characteristics and ways of operation. This study proposes principles for good practices in HB-HTA units. A framework for good practice criteria was built inspired by the EFQM excellence business model and information from six literature reviews, 107 face-to-face interviews, forty case studies, large-scale survey, focus group, Delphi survey, as well as local and international validation. In total, 385 people from twenty countries have participated in defining the principles for good practices in HB-HTA units. Fifteen guiding principles for good practices in HB-HTA units are grouped in four dimensions. Dimension 1 deals with principles of the assessment process aimed at providing contextualized information for hospital decision makers. Dimension 2 describes leadership, strategy and partnerships of HB-HTA units which govern and facilitate the assessment process. Dimension 3 focuses on adequate resources that ensure the operation of HB-HTA units. Dimension 4 deals with measuring the short- and long-term impact of the overall performance of HB-HTA units. Finally, nine core guiding principles were selected as essential requirements for HB-HTA units based on the expertise of the HB-HTA units participating in the project. Guiding principles for good practices set up a benchmark for HB-HTA because they represent the ideal performance of HB-HTA units; nevertheless, when performing HTA at hospital level, context also matters; therefore, they should be adapted to ensure their applicability in the local context.

  20. [Health technology assessment for decision-making in Latin America: good practice principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon-Riviere, Andrés; Soto, Natalie C; Augustovski, Federico Ariel; García Martí, Sebastián; Sampietro-Colom, Laura

    2018-02-19

    Identify the most relevant, applicable, and priority good practice principles in health technology assessment (HTA) in Latin America, and potential barriers to implementing them in the region. HTA good practice principles postulated worldwide were identified and then explored through a deliberative process in a forum of evaluators, funders, and technology producers. Forty-two representatives from ten Latin American countries participated in the forum. The good practice principles postulated at the international level were considered valid and potentially applicable in Latin America. Five principles were identified as priorities and as having greater potential to be expanded at this time: transparency in carrying out HTA; involvement of stakeholders in the HTA process; existence of mechanisms to appeal decisions; existence of clear mechanisms for HTA priority-setting; and existence of a clear link between assessment and decision-making. The main challenge identified was to find a balance between application of these principles and available resources, to prevent the planned improvements from jeopardizing report production times and failing to meet decision-makers' needs. The main recommendation was to gradually advance in improving HTA and its link to decision-making by developing appropriate processes for each country, without attempting to impose, in the short term, standards taken from examples at the international level without adequate adaptation to the local context.

  1. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL CONSERVATISM

    OpenAIRE

    ŞEYHALIOĞLU, Hüseyin

    2011-01-01

    Enlightenment, Industrialization and French Revolution are the three most important stages in the world history in the last three centuries. Among which the French Revolution, a product of political demand, brought out the birth of Liberalism, Socialism and Conservatism. These theories have shaped the world from 1789 up to now. During this process, Political Conservatism, coming into being as a reaction to the French Revolution, has been widely accepted by the UK, Germany and the United State...

  2. Balancing economic freedom against social policy principles: EC competition law and national health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossialos, Elias; Lear, Julia

    2012-07-01

    EU Health policy exemplifies the philosophical tension between EC economic freedoms and social policy. EC competition law, like other internal market rules, could restrict national health policy options despite the subsidiarity principle. In particular, European health system reforms that incorporate elements of market competition may trigger the application of competition rules if non-economic gains in consumer welfare are not adequately accounted for. This article defines the policy and legal parameters of the debate between competition law and health policy. Using a sample of cases it analyses how the ECJ, national courts, and National Competition Authorities have applied competition laws to the health services sector in different circumstances and in different ways. It concludes by considering the implications of the convergence of recent trends in competition law enforcement and health system market reforms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  4. Time to right the wrongs: improving basic health care in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Sally

    2002-06-08

    Nigeria, once heralded as the beacon of Africa, has fallen somewhat short of this potential. Years of kleptocratic repressive dictators and military rule, coupled with widespread corruption, have resulted in large-scale neglect and deterioration of public services. Nowhere is this more apparent than within the health sector. Government-run health-care services barely function: half the population are unvaccinated for routine diseases, and a burgeoning epidemic of HIV/AIDS, only now being adequately addressed, leaves 3.5 million already infected and without access to the most basic of care. A poorly structured health service that relies on vertical programmes for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, means that coordination is chaotic, and already scant resources fail to reach the lower levels in which they are needed most. I visited Nigeria in October, 2001, with Médecins Sans Frontières, a humanitarian aid organisation that has been working in Nigeria since 1996. I witnessed the poor level of health care in Nigeria for myself--a country that is more than capable of providing effective services--and concluded that, even now, political priorities are being put ahead of the population's basic needs. The challenges to the new civilian government are monumental, and it is yet to show any solid commitment to improving the health of Africa's biggest nation.

  5. The role of basic data registers in cross-border interconnection of eHealth solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregar, Mirjana; Marčun, Tomaž; Dovžan, Irma; Cehovin, Lojzka

    2011-01-01

    The increasingly closer international business cooperation in the areas of production, trade, transport and activities such as tourism and education is promoting the mobility of people. This increases the need for the provision of health care services across borders. In order to provide increasingly safer and effective treatment that is of ever higher quality in these cases as well, it is necessary to ensure that data accompanies patients even when they travel to other regions, countries or continents. eHealth solutions are one of the key tools for achieving such objectives. When building these solutions, it is necessary to take into account the different aspects and limitations brought about by the differences in the environments where such a treatment of a patient takes place. In the debates on the various types of cross-border interoperability of eHealth solutions, it is necessary to bring to attention the necessity of suitable management and interconnection of data registers that form the basis of every information system: data on patients, health care service providers and basic code tables. It is necessary to promote well-arranged and quality data in the patient's domestic environment and the best possible options for transferring and using those data in the foreign environment where the patient is receiving medical care at a particular moment. Many of the discussions dealing with conditions for the interoperability of health care information systems actually start with questions of how to ensure the interconnectivity of basic data registers.

  6. Allergies And Asthma : Employing Principles Of Social Justice As A Guide In Public Health Policy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Behrmann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing epidemic of allergy and allergy-induced asthma poses a significant challenge to population health. This article, written for a target audience of policy-makers in public health, aims to contribute to the development of policies to counter allergy morbidities by demonstrat- ing how principles of social justice can guide public health initiatives in reducing allergy and asthma triggers. Following a discussion of why theories of social justice have utility in analyzing allergy, a step-wise policy assessment protocol formulated on Rawlsian principles of social jus- tice is presented. This protocol can serve as a tool to aid in prioritizing public health initiatives and identifying ethically problematic policies that necessitate reform. Criteria for policy assess- ment include: 1 whether a tentative public health intervention would provide equal health ben- efit to a range of allergy and asthma sufferers, 2 whether targeting initiatives towards particu- lar societal groups is merited based on the notion of ‘worst-off status’ of certain population seg- ments, and 3 whether targeted policies have the potential for stigmatization. The article con- cludes by analyzing three examples of policies used in reducing allergy and asthma triggers in order to convey the general thought process underlying the use of the assessment protocol, which public health officials could replicate as a guide in actual, region-specific policy development.

  7. Engaging Oral Health Students in Learning Basic Science Through Assessment That Weaves in Personal Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeatter, Delyse; Gao, Jinlong

    2018-04-01

    Learning basic science forms an essential foundation for oral health therapy and dentistry, but frequently students perceive it as difficult, dry, and disconnected from clinical practice. This perception is encouraged by assessment methods that reward fact memorization, such as objective examinations. This study evaluated use of a learner-centered assessment portfolio designed to increase student engagement with basic science in an oral health therapy program at the University of Sydney, Australia. The aim of this qualitative study based on focus groups was to investigate students' engagement with basic science courses following introduction of the portfolio. Three assessments were conducted in three subsequent semesters: one based on students' interest in everyday phenomena (one student, for example, explored why she had red hair); the second focussed on scientific evidence and understanding of systemic diseases; and the third explored relations between oral and general health. Students were encouraged to begin with issues from their personal experience or patient care, to focus on what they were curious about, and to ask questions they really cared about. Each student prepared a written report and gave an oral presentation to the entire cohort. After the portfolios were completed, the authors held focus groups with two cohorts of students (N=21) in 2016 and analyzed the results using Zepke's framework for student engagement research. The results showed that the students successfully interweaved personal experience into their studies and that it provided significant motivation for learning. The students described their learning in terms of connection to themselves, their peer community, and their profession. Many additional benefits were identified, from increased student engagement in all courses to appreciation of the relevance of basic science. The findings should encourage dental and allied dental educators to reconsider the effects of assessments and seek

  8. The role of ethical principles in health care and the implications for ethical codes.

    OpenAIRE

    Limentani, A E

    1999-01-01

    A common ethical code for everybody involved in health care is desirable, but there are important limitations to the role such a code could play. In order to understand these limitations the approach to ethics using principles and their application to medicine is discussed, and in particular the implications of their being prima facie. The expectation of what an ethical code can do changes depending on how ethical properties in general are understood. The difficulties encountered when ethical...

  9. [Principles and methods of mental health resource assessment in military personnel under conditions of demographic crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorona, A A; Syrkin, L D

    2011-03-01

    The article is devoted to developing the principles and methods of resource assessment of mental health military contingent in terms of demographic decline and reform of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. From the standpoint of the concept of the mutual influence of the value-semantic components and the level of psychological adaptation resources demonstrates the possibility of evaluating resource capabilities of the psyche of military contingent.

  10. Implementation of the principles of primary health care in a rural area of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Surona; Schneider, Marguerite

    2014-02-18

    The philosophy of primary healthcare forms the basis of South Africa's health policy and provides guidance for healthcare service delivery in South Africa. Healthcare service provision in South Africa has shown improvement in the past five years. However, it is uncertain as to whether the changes have reached rural areas and if primary healthcare is implemented successfully in these areas. The aim of this article is to explore the extent to which the principles of primary healthcare are implemented in a remote, rural setting in South Africa. A descriptive, qualitative design was implemented. Data were collected through interviews and case studies with 36 purposively-sampled participants, then analysed through Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Findings indicated challenges with regard to client-centred care, provision of health promotion and rehabilitation, the way care was organised, the role of the doctor, health worker attitudes, referral services and the management of complex conditions. The principles of primary healthcare were not implemented successfully. The community was not involved in healthcare management, nor were users involved in their personal health management. The initiation of a community-health forum is recommended. Service providers, users and the community should identify and address the determinants of ill health in the community. Other recommendations include the training of service managers in the logistical management of ensuring a constant supply of drugs, using a Kombi-type vehicle to provide user transport for routine visits to secondary- and tertiary healthcare services and increasing the doctors' hours.

  11. [Challenges to an interdisciplinary action in basic care: implications related to composition of family health teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Neckel, Gecioni; Seemann, Giane; Eidt, Helena Berton; Rabuske, Michelli Moroni; Crepaldi, Maria Aparecida

    2009-10-01

    The Family Health Program emerges as a new strategy of health care as well as a reorientation of the assistance model. Based on these presuppositions, this article reflects on the relationship between integrality in basic care and the composition of family health teams, in the view of the Family Health Program minimum team members, characterizing the possible fields of action and the contributions of other health professionals in the Family Health Program. Undergraduates and members of a Family Health Program team from a certain city in the south of Brazil participated in this research. The quality of personal or professional expertise of these professionals contributed to a better understanding of their intervention possibilities. The investigation also allowed the analysis of how the family health strategy has been reaching the members who constitute the minimum teams at local context. In addition to that, the research highlighted how the integrality and interdisciplinarity have been understood by the teams members, and the relationships between team arrangement and the (im)possibilities of action.

  12. Basic Concepts in the Taxonomy of Health-Related Behaviors, Habits and Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Alonso, Federico; Gomez, Rafael; Walsh, Carolyn O.; Almenara, José; Ruiz, Mencía; Abellán, María José

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health-related Habits (HrH) are a major priority in healthcare. However there is little agreement on whether exercise, diet, smoking or dental hygiene are better described as lifestyles, habits or behaviors, and on what is their hierarchical relationship. This research is aimed at representing the basic concepts which are assumed to constitute the conceptual framework enabling us to interpret and organize the field of HrH. Methods: A group of 29 experts with different backgrounds agreed on the definition and hierarchy of HrH following an iterative process which involved framing analysis and nominal group techniques. Results: Formal definitions of health-related behavior, habit, life-style and life-style profile were produced. In addition a series of basic descriptors were identified: health reserve, capital, risk and load. Six main categories of HrH were chosen based on relevance to longevity: diet/exercise, vitality/stress, sleep, cognition, substance use and other risk. Attributes of HrH are clinical meaningfulness, quantifiability, temporal stability, associated morbidity, and unitarity (non-redundancy). Two qualifiers (polarity and stages of change) have also been described. Conclusions: The concepts represented here lay the groundwork for the development of clinical and policy tools related to HrH and lifestyle. An adaptation of this system to define targets of health interventions and to develop the classification of person factors in ICF may be needed in the future. PMID:23670578

  13. Basic Concepts in the Taxonomy of Health-Related Behaviors, Habits and Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eVITAL group

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health-related Habits (HrH are a major priority in healthcare. However there is little agreement on whether exercise, diet, smoking or dental hygiene are better described as lifestyles, habits or behaviors, and on what is their hierarchical relationship. This research is aimed at representing the basic concepts which are assumed to constitute the conceptual framework enabling us to interpret and organize the field of HrH. Methods: A group of 29 experts with different backgrounds agreed on the definition and hierarchy of HrH following an iterative process which involved framing analysis and nominal group techniques. Results: Formal definitions of health-related behavior, habit, life-style and life-style profile were produced. In addition a series of basic descriptors were identified: health reserve, capital, risk and load. Six main categories of HrH were chosen based on relevance to longevity: diet/exercise, vitality/stress, sleep, cognition, substance use and other risk. Attributes of HrH are clinical meaningfulness, quantifiability, temporal stability, associated morbidity, and unitarity (non-redundancy. Two qualifiers (polarity and stages of change have also been described. Conclusions: The concepts represented here lay the groundwork for the development of clinical and policy tools related to HrH and lifestyle. An adaptation of this system to define targets of health interventions and to develop the classification of person factors in ICF may be needed in the future.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at ... Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain ...

  15. Principles of Assessment of Rehabilitation Services in Health Systems: Learning from experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Nugraha, Boya

    2017-06-28

    Strengthening of health-related rehabilitation services must start from the needs of persons with health conditions experiencing disability and should be implemented within health systems. The implementation of rehabilitation services in health systems should be planned and realized according to the World Health Organization's 6 constituents of health systems (i.e. health service delivery; health workforce; health information systems; essential medicines; financing; and leadership and governance). The development of recommendations based on situation analysis and best-available data is crucial. In order to facilitate such data collection at a national level, a checklist and a related questionnaire (Rehabilitation Service Assessment Tool (RSAT)) were developed and implemented. The following steps were followed to develop a checklist for implementation of rehabilitation services: a literature search, drafting, checking and testing the list, and development of the RSAT. The RSAT comprises 8 sections derived from 5 main domains of the most important areas of information (i.e. country profile; health system; disability and rehabilitation; national policies, laws, and responsibilities; and relevant non-governmental stakeholders). The implementation of RSAT in different missions has shown that the principles are working well and that RSAT is feasible and helpful. Further field testing is important and the development of an internationally agreed tool should be promoted.

  16. Principles of Assessment of Rehabilitation Services in Health Systems: Learning from experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Gutenbrunner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Strengthening of health-related rehabilitation services must start from the needs of persons with health conditions experiencing disability and should be implemented within health systems. The implementation of rehabilitation services in health systems should be planned and realized according to the World Health Organization’s 6 constituents of health systems (i.e. health service delivery; health workforce; health information systems; essential medicines; financing; and leadership and governance. The development of recommendations based on situation analysis and best-available data is crucial. Methods: In order to facilitate such data collection at a national level, a checklist and a related questionnaire (Rehabilitation Service Assessment Tool (RSAT were developed and implemented. The following steps were followed to develop a checklist for implementation of rehabilitation services: a literature search, drafting, checking and testing the list, and development of the RSAT. Results: The RSAT comprises 8 sections derived from 5 main domains of the most important areas of information (i.e. country profile; health system; disability and rehabilitation; national policies, laws, and responsibilities; and relevant non-governmental stakeholders. Conclusion: The implementation of RSAT in different missions has shown that the principles are working well and that RSAT is feasible and helpful. Further field testing is important and the development of an internationally agreed tool should be promoted.

  17. Basic webliography on health promotion and disease prevention - doi:10.5020/18061230.2009.p217

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Camargo Gonçalves da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To introduce a basic webliography to access highly qualified evidence-based material on health promotion and disease prevention, aiming at the continuing education of health professionals. Methods: By means of Google® browser, applying the descriptors in sequence to progressively refine the search on Internet and key concepts to be learned, all previously defined by the authors themselves, we proceeded a qualitative analyses of the 20 first listed links for each searched issue and the final selection of the most scientifically relevant ones. Results: The 34 selected links are presented in 4 groups: 23 portals, 5 guides and recommendations, 4 scientific journals and 3 blogs that allow free access to health promotion and disease prevention related subjects, such as: concepts; national and international public policies; epidemiology, statistics and health indicators; diseases screening and prophylaxis; counseling for behavior change of health related habits; and interdisciplinary work. Among the selected links 10 (29% are written in English while the others are in Portuguese. Conclusions: The identification of reading materials on health promotion and disease prevention available on Internet, many in Portuguese, allowed us to select relevant scientifically qualified literature and turn it accessible to health professionals, enabling the acquisition of new knowledge or quick update.

  18. Delivering a basic mental health training programme: views and experiences of Mental Health First Aid instructors in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2011-10-01

    Originating in Australia, 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA) is a way of providing support to someone who is experiencing a mental health problem before professional help is obtained. Positive evaluations have shown that it both increases confidence while decreasing stigmatizing attitudes. However, the evidence base surrounding the delivery of basic mental health programmes remains underdeveloped. This descriptive qualitative study explored the views and experiences of 14 MHFA instructors from across Wales through semi-structured interviews, as a means to identify the experience of course delivery from their perspective. Data were collected between January and April 2009. The study found individuals benefited from being an MHFA instructor through increased confidence and self-development. However, instructors encountered logistical difficulties in course delivery and noted that as attendees related to the course material, they wished to discuss their own mental health problems during the course. This created considerable challenges for instructors, who noted both positive and negative impacts on themselves, and on their expectations of the role of becoming MHFA instructors. In conclusion, basic mental health training courses must build a clear infrastructure, ongoing quality assurance processes and reliable support structures to train, support and monitor those delivering them. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  19. Implementation of the principles of primary health care in a rural area of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surona Visagie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The philosophy of primary healthcare forms the basis of South Africa’s health policy and provides guidance for healthcare service delivery in South Africa. Healthcare service provision in South Africa has shown improvement in the past five years. However, it is uncertain as to whether the changes have reached rural areas and if primary healthcare is implemented successfully in these areas. Objectives: The aim of this article is to explore the extent to which the principles of primary healthcare are implemented in a remote, rural setting in South Africa. Method: A descriptive, qualitative design was implemented. Data were collected through interviews and case studies with 36 purposively-sampled participants, then analysed through Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Results: Findings indicated challenges with regard to client-centred care, provision of health promotion and rehabilitation, the way care was organised, the role of the doctor, healthworker attitudes, referral services and the management of complex conditions. Conclusion: The principles of primary healthcare were not implemented successfully. The community was not involved in healthcare management, nor were users involved in their personal health management. The initiation of a community-health forum is recommended. Service providers, users and the community should identify and address the determinants of ill health in the community. Other recommendations include the training of service managers in the logistical management of ensuring a constant supply of drugs, using a Kombi-type vehicle to provide user transport for routine visits to secondary- and tertiary healthcareservices and increasing the doctors’ hours.

  20. Veinte principios básicos para el tratamiento de los problemas de salud en la APS Twenty basic principles for the management of the heatlh problems in PHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz Novás

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Se enfatiza en la importancia del tratamiento de los problemas de salud en la atención primaria, analizándose las variables a considerar. Se exponen 20 principios básicos para ello, y se insiste en el diagnóstico correcto, la relación médico-paciente, la relación riesgo-beneficio, el tratamiento integral de los pacientes, los nuevos medicamentos, los objetivos e individualización del tratamiento, el manejo de los múltiples problemas, la terapéutica en los ancianos, la familia como unidad de atención, el cumplimiento de las indicaciones médicas, los fracasos terapéuticos y los efectos adversos del tratamiento. Se brindan elementos a considerar para una buena prescripción.Emphasis is made on the importance of the treatment of the health problems at the primary health care level and different variables are analysed. Twenty basic principles are exposed to this end and it is insisted on the correct diagnosis, the doctor-patient relation, the risk-benefit relation, the comprehensive treatment to patients, the new drugs, the objectives and individualization of the treatment, the management of the multiple problems, the therapeutics in the elderly, the family as a unit of attention, the fulfillment of the medical indications, the therapeutic failures and the adverse effects of the treatment. Some elements to be taken into account for a right prescription are given.

  1. Measuring and managing progress in the establishment of basic health services: the Afghanistan health sector balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter M; Peters, David H; Niayesh, Haseebullah; Singh, Lakhwinder P; Dwivedi, Vikas; Burnham, Gilbert

    2008-01-01

    The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) of Afghanistan has adopted the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) as a tool to measure and manage performance in delivery of a Basic Package of Health Services. Based on results from the 2004 baseline round, the MOPH identified eight of the 29 indicators on the BSC as priority areas for improvement. Like the 2004 round, the 2005 and 2006 BSCs involved a random selection of more than 600 health facilities, 1700 health workers and 5800 patient-provider interactions. The 2005 and 2006 BSCs demonstrated substantial improvements in all eight of the priority areas compared to 2004 baseline levels, with increases in median provincial scores for presence of active village health councils, availability of essential drugs, functional laboratories, provider knowledge, health worker training, use of clinical guidelines, monitoring of tuberculosis treatment, and provision of delivery care. For three of the priority indicators-drug availability, health worker training and provider knowledge-scores remained unchanged or decreased between 2005 and 2006. This highlights the need to ensure that early gains achieved in establishment of health services in Afghanistan are maintained over time. The use of a coherent and balanced monitoring framework to identify priority areas for improvement and measure performance over time reflects an objectives-based approach to management of health services that is proving to be effective in a difficult environment. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  2. Elderly health and implementation of the Brazilian National Health Policy for Elderly Persons on the performed actions in basic healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCHMINSKI VIEIRA, Roseli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian National Health Policy for Elderly Persons (PNSPI – in Portuguese was formulated by the Ministry of Health through Ordinance No. 2.528/2006 in line with the 1988 Brazilian Constitution. The study investigated whether municipalities from the South region of the State of Santa Catarina had knowledge and applied the PNSPI, on the performed actions in basic healthcare, especially on the Units of Family Healthcare Services based on what the Constitution and the Statute of the Elderly comprise. A deductive method with a qualitative approach and a descriptive research were used. As a result, some difficulties experienced by the research subjects related to two important points of policies and strategies of PNSPI were identified: the lack of a planned policy and of a continuous health education for the elderly; and the lack of a stimulating exercise of social control, whether in the health sector, or in the Municipal Council of Elderly People.

  3. Pharmacy students' use and perceptions of Apple mobile devices incorporated into a basic health science laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jennifer E; Richard, Craig A H

    To describe pharmacy students' use of mobile devices in a basic health science laboratory and to report the students' perceptions on how solving cases with their mobile devices influenced their attitudes, abilities, and view on the use of mobile devices as tools for pharmacists. First-year pharmacy students utilized mobile devices to solve clinical case studies in a basic health sciences laboratory. A pre-survey and two post-surveys were administered to assess the students' comfort, awareness, use, and perceptions on the use of their mobile devices and apps. The pre-survey and first post-survey each had a response rate of 99%, and the second post-survey had a response rate of 100%. In comparing the pre-survey and first post-survey data, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of students that agreed or strongly agreed that they were more comfortable utilizing their mobile device (p = 0.025), they were more aware of apps for pharmacists (p mobile devices, to be more aware of apps that can be useful for pharmacists, and to be more agreeable with mobile device utilization by pharmacists in improving patient care. In addition, the second post-survey also demonstrated that 84% of students responded that using their mobile devices to solve the cases influenced them to either use their mobile device in a clinical setting for a clinical and/or pharmacy-related purpose for the first time or to use it more frequently for this purpose. The use of mobile devices to solve clinical cases in a first-year basic health science laboratory course was perceived as beneficial by students and influenced them to utilize their mobile device even more in a pharmacy practice setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Basic principles of knowledge management and its application to the industrial company in tactical operations of maintenance and operational exploitation: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Cárcel Carrasco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although knowledge and its management is, and has been, studied in depth, particularly since the 90’s decade of the past century, especially for the strategic management, innovation, trade, or business administration, there are still many questions on how it articulates or transfers and the barriers to its management, especially when we talk about internal tactical activities that affect staff that we could call "offices", such as maintenance and industrial assembly or exploitation and conduction of the facilities. Because of the peculiarities normally seen in this kind of activity in the industrial companies, the knowledge of these people is strongly based on their experience (strong tacit component, difficult to measure and articulate, and on many occasions, however, this rupture of information-knowledge, can represent a high cost for the company (often assumed to be something inevitable due to the increase in production and service downtime, loss of efficiency, or tuning time of new staff to these areas.Design/methodology/approach: After a description of the State of the art and the basic principles of knowledge management, a qualitative study in an industrial company has been carried out, within the areas of operation and maintenance, in order to know the barriers and facilitators that such involved personnel finds in order to achieve an adequate transmission and use of that knowledge.Findings and Originality/value: Learn about barriers, facilitators and impact that offers the knowledge management in the areas of industrial maintenance, especially among professionals in offices which operate with a high degree of tacit knowledge and with a heavy dependence on the company on these professionals.Research limitations/implications: Those characteristics of a qualitative study in a particular area and within a geographical area, although it can be extrapolated to other types of companies and regional areas.Practical implications: Learn

  5. A Risk Assessment Matrix for Public Health Principles: The Case for E-Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitta, Daniela; Chowdhury, Azim; Ferro, Giancarlo Antonio; Nalis, Federico Giuseppe; Polosa, Riccardo

    2017-03-31

    Besides nicotine replacement therapies, a realistic alternative for smoking cessation or for smoking substitution may come from electronic cigarettes (ECs), whose popularity has been steadily growing. As for any emerging behaviour associated with exposure to inhalational agents, there is legitimate cause for concern and many health organizations and policy makers have pushed for restrictive policy measures ranging from complete bans to tight regulations of these products. Nonetheless, it is important to reframe these concerns in context of the well-known harm caused by cigarette smoking. In this article, we discuss key public health principles that should be considered when regulating ECs. These include the concept of tobacco harm reduction, importance of relative risk and risk continuum, renormalization of smoking, availability of low-risk product, proportionate taxation, and reassessment of the role of non-tobacco flavours. These public health principles may be systematically scrutinized using a risk assessment matrix that allows: (1) to determine the measure of certainty that a risk will occur; and (2) to estimate the impact of such a risk on public health. Consequently, the ultimate goal of responsible ECs regulation should be that of maximizing the favourable impact of these reduced-risk products whilst minimizing further any potential risks. Consumer perspectives, sound EC research, continuous post-marketing surveillance and reasonable safety and quality product standards should be at the very heart of future regulatory schemes that will address concerns while minimizing unintended consequences of ill-informed regulation.

  6. Perspectives for Developing New Tuberculosis Vaccines Derived from the Pathogenesis of Tuberculosis: I. Basic Principles, II. Preclinical Testing, and III. Clinical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Arthur M; Dey, Bappaditya

    2013-01-25

    Part I. Basic Principles. TB vaccines cannot prevent establishment of the infection. They can only prevent an early pulmonary tubercle from developing into clinical disease. A more effective new vaccine should optimize both cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) better than any existing vaccine. The rabbit is the only laboratory animal in which all aspects of the human disease can be reproduced: namely, the prevention of most primary tubercles, the arrestment of most primary tubercles, the formation of the tubercle's solid caseous center, the liquefaction of this center, the formation of cavities and the bronchial spread of the disease. In liquefied caseum, virulent tubercle bacilli can multiply extracellularly, especially in the liquefied caseum next to the inner wall of a cavity where oxygen is plentiful. The bacilli in liquefied caseum cannot be reached by the increased number of activated macrophages produced by TB vaccines. Therefore, new TB vaccines will have little or no effect on the extracellular bacillary growth within liquefied caseum. TB vaccines can only increase the host's ability to stop the development of new TB lesions that arise from the bronchial spread of tubercle bacilli from the cavity to other parts of the lung. Therefore, effective TB vaccines do not prevent the reactivation of latent TB. Such vaccines only control (or reduce) the number of metastatic lesions that result after the primary TB lesion was reactivated by the liquefaction process. (Note: the large number of tubercle bacilli growing extracellularly in liquefied caseum gives rise to mutations that enable antimicrobial resistance-which is a major reason why TB still exists today). Part II. Preclinical Testing. The counting of grossly visible tubercles in the lungs of rabbits after the inhalation of virulent human-type tubercle bacilli is the most pertinent preclinical method to assess the efficacy of new TB vaccines (because an effective vaccine will

  7. Perspectives for Developing New Tuberculosis Vaccines Derived from the Pathogenesis of Tuberculosis: I. Basic Principles, II. Preclinical Testing, and III. Clinical Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bappaditya Dey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Part I. Basic Principles. TB vaccines cannot prevent establishment of the infection. They can only prevent an early pulmonary tubercle from developing into clinical disease. A more effective new vaccine should optimize both cell-mediated immunity (CMI and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH better than any existing vaccine. The rabbit is the only laboratory animal in which all aspects of the human disease can be reproduced: namely, the prevention of most primary tubercles, the arrestment of most primary tubercles, the formation of the tubercle’s solid caseous center, the liquefaction of this center, the formation of cavities and the bronchial spread of the disease. In liquefied caseum, virulent tubercle bacilli can multiply extracellularly, especially in the liquefied caseum next to the inner wall of a cavity where oxygen is plentiful. The bacilli in liquefied caseum cannot be reached by the increased number of activated macrophages produced by TB vaccines. Therefore, new TB vaccines will have little or no effect on the extracellular bacillary growth within liquefied caseum. TB vaccines can only increase the host’s ability to stop the development of new TB lesions that arise from the bronchial spread of tubercle bacilli from the cavity to other parts of the lung. Therefore, effective TB vaccines do not prevent the reactivation of latent TB. Such vaccines only control (or reduce the number of metastatic lesions that result after the primary TB lesion was reactivated by the liquefaction process. (Note: the large number of tubercle bacilli growing extracellularly in liquefied caseum gives rise to mutations that enable antimicrobial resistance—which is a major reason why TB still exists today. Part II. Preclinical Testing. The counting of grossly visible tubercles in the lungs of rabbits after the inhalation of virulent human-type tubercle bacilli is the most pertinent preclinical method to assess the efficacy of new TB vaccines (because an

  8. Human rights principles in developing and updating policies and laws on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, M

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 stipulates human rights as a cross-cutting principle (WHO, 2013) and foresees global targets to update policies as well as mental health laws in line with international and regional human rights instruments. The international human rights agreements repeatedly refer to health, including mental health. The most pertinent provisions related to mental health are enshrined in the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which sets out human rights in an accessible and inclusive fashion to ensure the equal participation of persons with disabilities. The inconclusive description of disability in the treaty overtly refers to 'mental impairment' as part of an explicitly evolving understanding of disability. This text sketches some of the underlying concepts as they apply to the realm of mental health: non-discrimination of persons with disabilities and measures that should be taken to ensure accessibility in a holistic understanding; removal of social and attitudinal barriers as much as communication and intellectual barriers but also institutional hurdles. The CRPD's paradigm shift away from framing disability mainly through deficits towards a social understanding of disability as the result of interaction and focusing on capacity is the core on which the provision of mental health services at community level to enable participation in society shall be ensured. Questions of capacity, also to make decisions and the possible need for support in so doing, are sketched out.

  9. Phase contrast imaging of the breast. Basic principles and steps towards clinical implementation; Phasenkontrastbildgebung der Brust. Grundlagen und Schritte zur klinischen Implementierbarkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandl, S.; Sztrokay-Gaul, A.; Auweter, S.D.; Hellerhoff, K. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Mammography is the only imaging technique approved for nationwide breast cancer screening. Digital full field mammography has improved mammographic image quality. Nevertheless, mammography has a low positive predictive value and a low sensitivity especially in mammographically dense breasts. One of the major limitations is the inherently low contrast between healthy breast parenchyma and breast cancer. Phase contrast imaging is based on the phase shift that occurs when X-rays encounter a change in refractive index between different materials. The improved soft tissue contrast makes the technology particularly promising for breast diagnostics. The studies presented here suggest that phase contrast imaging provides additional diagnostic information both using phase contrast mammography and phase contrast computed tomography (CT). This paper provides an overview of the basic principles of the phase contrast imaging and describes recent developments towards in vivo and ex vivo phase contrast imaging of the breast. (orig.) [German] Brustkrebs ist weltweit die haeufigste Tumorerkrankung und die haeufigste Krebstodesursache der Frau. Die Mammographie ist die einzige zugelassene bildgebende Methode zur Brustkrebsfrueherkennung im Rahmen flaechendeckender Screeningprogramme. Trotz Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet und der Befundungsperformance durch die Einfuehrung der digitalen Vollfeldmammographie sind der positiv-praediktive Wert und die Sensitivitaet der Mammographie insbesondere bei mammographisch dichtem Druesenkoerper eingeschraenkt. Dies ist u. a. auf die geringen Dichteunterschiede zwischen gesundem Brustdruesengewebe und intramammaeren Malignomen zurueckzufuehren. Die Phasenkontrastbildgebung macht sich die Phasenverschiebung von Roentgenstrahlen zunutze, die an Materialgrenzen mit unterschiedlichen Brechungsindizes entsteht. Die Technik bietet einen potenziell

  10. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  11. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Pakes, Barry; Rouleau, Katherine; MacDonald, Colla J; Arya, Neil; Purkey, Eva; Schultz, Karen; Dhatt, Reena; Wilson, Briana; Hadi, Abdullahel; Pottie, Kevin

    2011-07-22

    Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to develop this framework can be applied

  12. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provided in a non-hospital based health care facility or at a hospital; (ii) Inpatient hospital services, which must include but not be limited to, room and board, general nursing care, meals and special diets... hospital services must include short-term rehabilitation services and physical therapy, the provision of...

  13. Modeling the principles of community-based participatory research in a community health assessment conducted by a health foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Jaynes; Gail Bray, Patricia; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Reisz, Ilana; Peranteau, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss strategies used and lessons learned by a health foundation during development of a community health assessment model incorporating community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches. The assessment model comprises three models incorporating increasing amounts of CPBR principles. Model A combines local-area analysis of quantitative data, qualitative information (key informants, focus groups), and asset mapping. Model B, a community-based participatory model, emphasizes participatory rural appraisal approaches and quantitative assessment using rapid epidemiological assessment. Model C, a modified version of Model B, is financially more sustainable for our needs than Model B. The authors (a) describe origins of these models and illustrate practical applications and (b) explore the lessons learned in their transition from a traditional, nonparticipatory, quantitative approach to participatory approaches to community-health assessment. It is hoped that this article will contribute to the growing body of knowledge of practical aspects of incorporating CBPR approaches into community health assessments.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  15. [Health and social inequality in Europe: changes of the basic conditions for municipal health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, E U

    1998-11-01

    Good health is not distributed equally, neither in life conditions--including the individual ability to act--nor according to the supply grid. These interrelations, shown in several empirical investigations, assume more importance in view of the groving tendency to social polarisation in the countries of Europe, different in fact in the single countries, but clear in respect of tendency: social exclusion does not only mean to have less financial resources but also social disadvantages in other realms of living, especially in health. Migration, not only from East to West, but also inside and between the countries of the European Union and inside of Eastern Europe too, is only an especially dear expression that social problems have their origin in international problems and casualities, but become visible in local and regional structures and thus in the responsibility of the municipalities. Globalisation, Europe etc., terms mostly connected with positive connotations, have not only a positive side, but also another one, namely, the re-regionalisation of social problems especially in the municipalities. Normally the municipalities have to counterbalance and to regulate the negative consequences of these European--and moreover international--changes of the structures, although their financial means are declining. The municipal health service is integrated in this contradictory constellation. To prevent irrational social and/or political developments, the reasons and possible strategies of reform policy will have to be discussed carefully.

  16. [Fundamental principles of social work--(also) a contribution to public health ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lob-Hüdepohl, A

    2009-05-01

    Social work and public health are different but mutually connected. Both are professions with their own ethical foundations. Despite all differences, they have the same goal: to protect and to enhance the well-being of people. This is, in part, why the fundamental ethical principles of social work are salient for developing public health ethics. As a human rights profession, social work respects the personal autonomy of clients, supports solidarity-based relationships in families, groups or communities, and attempts to uphold social justice in society. Social workers need to adopt special professional attitudes: sensibility for the vulnerabilities of clients, care and attentiveness for their resources and strengths, assistance instead of paternalistic care and advocacy in decision making for clients' well-being when clients are not able to decide for themselves. These fundamental ethical principles are the basis for discussion of special topics of social work ethics as public health ethics, for example, in justifying intervention in individual lifestyles by public services without the participation or consent of the affected persons.

  17. Improving health, safety and energy efficiency in New Zealand through measuring and applying basic housing standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Keall, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Baker, Michael G

    2013-08-02

    Substandard housing is a problem in New Zealand. Historically there has been little recognition of the important aspects of housing quality that affect people's health and safety. In this viewpoint article we outline the importance of assessing these factors as an essential step to improving the health and safety of New Zealanders and household energy efficiency. A practical risk assessment tool adapted to New Zealand conditions, the Healthy Housing Index (HHI), measures the physical characteristics of houses that affect the health and safety of the occupants. This instrument is also the only tool that has been validated against health and safety outcomes and reported in the international peer-reviewed literature. The HHI provides a framework on which a housing warrant of fitness (WOF) can be based. The HHI inspection takes about one hour to conduct and is performed by a trained building inspector. To maximise the effectiveness of this housing quality assessment we envisage the output having two parts. The first would be a pass/fail WOF assessment showing whether or not the house meets basic health, safety and energy efficiency standards. The second component would rate each main assessment area (health, safety and energy efficiency), potentially on a five-point scale. This WOF system would establish a good minimum standard for rental accommodation as well encouraging improved housing performance over time. In this article we argue that the HHI is an important, validated, housing assessment tool that will improve housing quality, leading to better health of the occupants, reduced home injuries, and greater energy efficiency. If required, this tool could be extended to also cover resilience to natural hazards, broader aspects of sustainability, and the suitability of the dwelling for occupants with particular needs.

  18. Principles of project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of project management as practiced by NASA management personnel are presented. These principles are given as ground rules and guidelines to be used in the performance of research, development, construction or operational assignments.

  19. Teaching seven principles for public health ethics: towards a curriculum for a short course on ethics in public health programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Duncan, Peter; Sherlaw, William; Brall, Caroline; Czabanowska, Katarzyna

    2014-10-07

    Teaching ethics in public health programmes is not routine everywhere - at least not in most schools of public health in the European region. Yet empirical evidence shows that schools of public health are more and more interested in the integration of ethics in their curricula, since public health professionals often have to face difficult ethical decisions. The authors have developed and practiced an approach to how ethics can be taught even in crowded curricula, requiring five to eight hours of teaching and learning contact time. In this way, if programme curricula do not allow more time for ethics, students of public health can at least be sensitised to ethics and ethical argumentation. This approach - focusing on the application of seven mid-level principles to cases (non-maleficence, beneficence, health maximisation, efficiency, respect for autonomy, justice, proportionality) - is presented in this paper. Easy to use 'tools' applying ethics to public health are presented. The crowded nature of the public health curriculum, and the nature of students participating in it, required us to devise and develop a short course, and to use techniques that were likely to provide a relatively efficient introduction to the processes, content and methods involved in the field of ethics.

  20. Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Basic Life Support Among Health Students at a Saudi Women's University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A

    2017-02-01

    Awareness of basic life support (BLS) is paramount to ensure the provision of essential life-saving medical care in emergency situations. This study aimed to measure knowledge of BLS and attitudes towards BLS training among female health students at a women's university in Saudi Arabia. This prospective cross-sectional study took place between January and April 2016 at five health colleges of the Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All 2,955 students attending the health colleges were invited to participate in the study. Participants were subsequently asked to complete a validated English-language questionnaire which included 21 items assessing knowledge of BLS and six items gauging attitudes to BLS. A total of 1,349 students completed the questionnaire (response rate: 45.7%). The mean overall knowledge score was very low (32.7 ± 13.9) and 87.9% of the participants had very poor knowledge scores. A total of 32.5% of the participants had never received any BLS training. Students who had previously received BLS training had significantly higher knowledge scores ( P supported mandatory BLS training. Overall knowledge about BLS among the students was very poor; however, attitudes towards BLS training were positive. These findings call for an improvement in BLS education among Saudi female health students so as to ensure appropriate responses in cardiac arrest or other emergency situations.

  1. [Psychology and basic attention: experiences of trainees in Family Health Strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Valdemar Donizeti; Cury, Vera Engler

    2009-10-01

    This study shows a qualitative research based on a humanist theory in relation to the experiences of trainees from the psychology course of PUC-Campinas, that are participating in family health teams in the areas of Health/Clinic and basic attention in public health. The participants were six trainees in the last year of the course and located in two Health-School Centers in the Northwest region of Campinas. The methodology used was an ethnographic view. The processes of data composition were produced in two different moments: a) by weekly register on the trainee's personal diary during five months; b) semi-directed individual interviews at the end of the term. These data were analyzed according to a phenomenological reading. It was found evolutive stages in the process of the trainee formation. Initially, the experience was lived with surprise and strangeness, resulting in contradictory feelings of innapropriation to their inexperience to work in teams. On the other hand, because they were well received by the group, there was a personal transformation considered to be very enriching, symbolized as a single felling of belonging, motivating efforts to a creative and integrating clinic practice.

  2. Allocation of basic health units based on the multicriteria approach: a proposition for a mediumsized city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ferreira de Negreiros

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Basic Health Units (UBSs are responsible for the treatment of diseases in their initial phase. It is possible to observe that there is an investment by the Brazilian government into this kind of strategy in health policies. These kinds of actions aim to reduce the number of patients being sent to hospitals, because the low and medium priority problems can be treated at a UBS. The UBSs are related to the Family Health Program (PSF with the objective of serving the poorest population. The government must allocate these units efficiently, to improve the services and serve more people. However, this kind of decision is made by the empirical knowledge of municipal managers. This paper proposes a model to rationalize this decision process using the multiple criteria decision aid approach to allocate these units in a city in the west region of Rio Grande do Norte State, in Brazil. We can conclude that the model developed prioritizes the neighborhoods with the greatest need for healthcare, using the value system of the city’s health department.

  3. A practical guide to applying lean tools and management principles to health care improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ross W; Canacari, Elena G

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing organizations have used Lean management principles for years to help eliminate waste, streamline processes, and cut costs. This pragmatic approach to structured problem solving can be applied to health care process improvement projects. Health care leaders can use a step-by-step approach to document processes and then identify problems and opportunities for improvement using a value stream process map. Leaders can help a team identify problems and root causes and consider additional problems associated with methods, materials, manpower, machinery, and the environment by using a cause-and-effect diagram. The team then can organize the problems identified into logical groups and prioritize the groups by impact and difficulty. Leaders must manage action items carefully to instill a sense of accountability in those tasked to complete the work. Finally, the team leaders must ensure that a plan is in place to hold the gains. Copyright © 2012 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Logic and Mentality as the Basics of Wittgenstein's Picture Theory of Language and Extracting Educational Principles and Methods According to This Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshi, Kamal Nosrati; Nasrabadi, Hassanali Bakhtiyar

    2016-01-01

    The present paper attempts to recognize principles and methods of education based on Wittgenstein's picture theory of language. This qualitative research utilized inferential analytical approach to review the related literature and extracted a set of principles and methods from his theory on picture language. Findings revealed that Wittgenstein…

  5. Designing the Health-related Internet of Things: Ethical Principles and Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Mittelstadt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The conjunction of wireless computing, ubiquitous Internet access, and the miniaturisation of sensors have opened the door for technological applications that can monitor health and well-being outside of formal healthcare systems. The health-related Internet of Things (H-IoT increasingly plays a key role in health management by providing real-time tele-monitoring of patients, testing of treatments, actuation of medical devices, and fitness and well-being monitoring. Given its numerous applications and proposed benefits, adoption by medical and social care institutions and consumers may be rapid. However, a host of ethical concerns are also raised that must be addressed. The inherent sensitivity of health-related data being generated and latent risks of Internet-enabled devices pose serious challenges. Users, already in a vulnerable position as patients, face a seemingly impossible task to retain control over their data due to the scale, scope and complexity of systems that create, aggregate, and analyse personal health data. In response, the H-IoT must be designed to be technologically robust and scientifically reliable, while also remaining ethically responsible, trustworthy, and respectful of user rights and interests. To assist developers of the H-IoT, this paper describes nine principles and nine guidelines for ethical design of H-IoT devices and data protocols.

  6. A calculus of unnecessary echoes: application of management principles to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, J D; McCullough, G

    2002-01-01

    We studied the clinical utility of echocardiography in children and applied principles of business management to draw conclusions that are applicable to health care in general. A significant number (13% in this series) of expensive medical diagnostic tests could be avoided without harm to patients. Cost reduction in medicine is possible in many situations without compromising quality of care. Care pathways (i.e., practice guidelines or clinical algorithms) provide one useful modality. However, for the safety of patients, all cost reduction methods must start with practicing physicians (or involve them at conceptualization) and an escape clause must be available to the treating physician for the atypical patient. The analytic approach used--concurrent assessment of percentage cost, charge, and payor--is applicable to all components of the health care value chain. The use of "percentage of charges" as an indicator of collection effectiveness is unrealistic and should be changed to "percentage potential reimbursement" because health care is effectively a fixed-reimbursement industry rather than a system subject to standard microeconomic (supply and demand) forces. The current reimbursement structure provides conflicting incentives both to health care institutions and to providers, creating an insurmountable barrier to any effective incentive system. Colloquy between practicing physicians and experts in operations management will stimulate cost reduction and can optimize the delivery of health care.

  7. Increasing both the public health potential of basic research and the scientist satisfaction. An international survey of bio-scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Carmen; Boggio, Andrea; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hemenway, David; Scita, Giorgio; Ballabeni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basic scientific research generates knowledge that has intrinsic value which is independent of future applications. Basic research may also lead to practical benefits, such as a new drug or diagnostic method. Building on our previous study of basic biomedical and biological researchers at Harvard, we present findings from a new survey of similar scientists from three countries. The goal of this study was to design policies to enhance both the public health potential and the work satisfaction and test scientists' attitudes towards these factors. The present survey asked about the scientists' motivations, goals and perspectives along with their attitudes concerning  policies designed to increase both the practical (i.e. public health) benefits of basic research as well as their own personal satisfaction. Close to 900 basic investigators responded to the survey; results corroborate the main findings from the previous survey of Harvard scientists. In addition, we find that most bioscientists disfavor present policies that require a discussion of the public health potential of their proposals in grants but generally favor softer policies aimed at increasing the quality of work and the potential practical benefits of basic research. In particular, bioscientists are generally supportive of those policies entailing the organization of more meetings between scientists and the general public, the organization of more academic discussion about the role of scientists in the society, and the implementation of a "basic bibliography" for each new approved drug.

  8. Work-related violence, lifestyle, and health among special education teachers working in Finnish basic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimäki, Mika; Pentti, Jaana; Salmi, Venla; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna

    2012-07-01

    Studies have reported higher levels of absenteeism due to illness among special education teachers compared to other teachers, but it is not known which factors might contribute to this difference. We examined whether health, health behaviors, and exposure to violence at work differed between special education and general education teachers in Finnish basic education. Survey data from 5760 general and special education teachers were analyzed with multilevel logistic models adjusted for individual- and school-level confounding factors. No difference was found between the health behaviors of general and special education teachers. The differences in physical and mental health between the two groups were also relatively small. With regard to work-related violence, however, male special education teachers were 3 times more likely to be exposed to mental abuse, and 5 times more likely to be exposed to physical violence when compared to their male colleagues in general education. Although female special educators were also at an increased risk of mental abuse and physical violence compared to their female general teacher colleagues, their odds ratios for such an encounter were smaller (2- and 3-fold, respectively) than those of male special education teachers. The school-level variance of physical violence toward teachers was large, which indicates that while most schools have little physical violence toward teachers, schools do exist in which teachers' exposure to violence is common. These findings suggest that special education teachers may benefit from training for handling violent situations and interventions to prevent violence at schools. © 2012, American School Health Association.

  9. Scoping literature review on the basic health benefit package and its determinant criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Ramin; Bastani, Peivand; Kabir, Mohammad Javad; Kavosi, Zahra; Sobhani, Ghasem

    2018-03-02

    There are various criteria and methods to develop Basic Health Benefit Package (BHBP) in world health systems. The present study aimed to extract criteria used in health systems in different countries around the world using scoping review method. A systematic search was carried out in Cochrane Library, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Web of Science, ProQuest, World Bank, World Health Organization, and Google databases between January and April 2016. Papers and reports were gathered according to selected keywords and were examined by two authors. Finally, the criteria were extracted from the selected papers. The primary search included 8876 papers. After studying the articles' titles, abstracts, and full texts, 9 articles and 14 reports were selected for final analysis. After the final analysis, 19 criteria were extracted. Due to diversity of criteria in terms of number and nature, they were divided into three categories. The categories included intervention-related criteria, disease-related criteria, and community-related criteria. The largest number of criteria belonged to the first category. Indeed, the most widely applied criteria included cost-effectiveness (20), effectiveness (19), budget impact (12), equity (12), and burden of disease (10). According to the results, different criteria were identified in terms of number and nature in developing BHBP in world health systems. It seems that certain criteria, such as cost-effectiveness, effectiveness, budget impact, burden of disease, equity, and necessity, that were most widely utilized in countries under study could be for designing BHBP with regard to social, cultural, and economic considerations.

  10. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. Aim  To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. Study design  The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty‐two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user‐led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Results  Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high‐quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. Conclusions  The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. PMID:21645185

  11. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2013-03-01

    Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty-two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user-led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high-quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Using mobile clinics to deliver HIV testing and other basic health services in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, T G; Deutsch, K; Schell, E; Bvumbwe, A; Hart, K B; Laviwa, J; Rankin, S H

    2011-01-01

    The majority of Malawians are impoverished and primarily dependant on subsistence farming, with 85% of the population living in a rural area. The country is highly affected by HIV and under-resourced rural health centers struggle to meet the government's goal of expanding HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment, and other basic services. This report describes the work of two four-wheel drive mobile clinics launched in 2008 to fill an identified service gap in the remote areas of Mulanje District, Malawi. The program was developed by an international non-governmental organization, Global AIDS Interfaith Alliance (GAIA), and the Mulanje District Health Office, with funding from the Elizabeth Taylor HIV/AIDS Foundation. The clinics provide: (1) rapid HIV testing and treatment referral; (2) diagnosis and treatment of malaria; (3) sputum collection for TB screening; (4) diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted and opportunistic infections; and (5) pre-natal care. The clinic vehicles provide medical supplies and personnel (a clinical officer, nurse, and nurse aide) to set up clinics in community buildings such as churches or schools. In such a project, the implementation process and schedule can be affected by medication, supply chain and infrastructural issues, as well as governmental and non-governmental requirements. Timelines should be sufficiently flexible to accommodate unexpected delays. Once established, service scheduling should be flexible and responsive; for instance, malaria treatment rather than HIV testing was most urgently needed in the season when these services were launched. Assessing the impact of healthcare delivery in Malawi is challenging. Although mobile clinic and the government Health Management Information System (HMIS) data were matched, inconsistent variables and gaps in data made direct comparisons difficult. Data collection was compromised by the competing demand of high patient volume; however, rather than reducing the burden on

  13. Lack of basic and luxury goods and health-related dysfunction in older persons; Findings from the longitudinal SMILE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempen Gertrudis IJM

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More so than the traditional socioeconomic indicators, such as education and income, wealth reflects the accumulation of resources and makes socioeconomic ranking manifest and explicitly visible to the outside world. While the lack of basic goods, such as a refrigerator, may affect health directly, via biological pathways, the lack of luxury goods, such as an LCD television, may affect health indirectly through psychosocial mechanisms. We set out to examine, firstly, the relevance of both basic and luxury goods in explaining health-related dysfunction in older persons, and, secondly, the extent to which these associations are independent of traditional socioeconomic indicators. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal data from 2067 men and women aged 55 years and older who participated in the Study on Medical Information and Lifestyles Eindhoven (SMILE were gathered. Logistic regression analyses were used to study the relation between a lack of basic and luxury goods and health-related function, assessed with two sub-domains of the SF-36. Results The lack of basic goods was closely related to incident physical (OR = 2.32 and mental (OR = 2.12 dysfunction, even when the traditional measures of socioeconomic status, i.e. education or income, were taken into account. Cross-sectional analyses, in which basic and luxury goods were compared, showed that the lack of basic goods was strongly associated with mental dysfunction. Lack of luxury goods was, however, not related to dysfunction. Conclusion Even in a relatively wealthy country like the Netherlands, the lack of certain basic goods is not uncommon. More importantly, lack of basic goods, as an indicator of wealth, was strongly related to health-related dysfunction also when traditional measures of socioeconomic status were taken into account. In contrast, no effects of luxury goods on physical or mental dysfunction were found. Future longitudinal research is necessary to

  14. Lack of basic and luxury goods and health-related dysfunction in older persons; findings from the longitudinal SMILE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groffen, Daniëlle A I; Bosma, Hans; van den Akker, Marjan; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; van Eijk, Jacques T M

    2008-07-17

    More so than the traditional socioeconomic indicators, such as education and income, wealth reflects the accumulation of resources and makes socioeconomic ranking manifest and explicitly visible to the outside world. While the lack of basic goods, such as a refrigerator, may affect health directly, via biological pathways, the lack of luxury goods, such as an LCD television, may affect health indirectly through psychosocial mechanisms. We set out to examine, firstly, the relevance of both basic and luxury goods in explaining health-related dysfunction in older persons, and, secondly, the extent to which these associations are independent of traditional socioeconomic indicators. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data from 2067 men and women aged 55 years and older who participated in the Study on Medical Information and Lifestyles Eindhoven (SMILE) were gathered. Logistic regression analyses were used to study the relation between a lack of basic and luxury goods and health-related function, assessed with two sub-domains of the SF-36. The lack of basic goods was closely related to incident physical (OR = 2.32) and mental (OR = 2.12) dysfunction, even when the traditional measures of socioeconomic status, i.e. education or income, were taken into account. Cross-sectional analyses, in which basic and luxury goods were compared, showed that the lack of basic goods was strongly associated with mental dysfunction. Lack of luxury goods was, however, not related to dysfunction. Even in a relatively wealthy country like the Netherlands, the lack of certain basic goods is not uncommon. More importantly, lack of basic goods, as an indicator of wealth, was strongly related to health-related dysfunction also when traditional measures of socioeconomic status were taken into account. In contrast, no effects of luxury goods on physical or mental dysfunction were found. Future longitudinal research is necessary to clarify the precise mechanisms underlying these effects.

  15. The Principles of Designing Hospital Hotel with the Approach of Health Tourism in Kish Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anosh Sheikh Kazemha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical tourism is known as one of the fastest growing sectors of the world tourism industry. Today, medical tourism has been highly considered by tourists to take advantage of the health benefits and physical and psychological effects of specific areas. Medical tourism as one of the tourism dimensions helps the economy of the country. Given the lucrative nature of the industry, many developing and even developed countries, focus their attention on the industry sector and plan for it. Hospital hotel is a combination of a hotel as a resort and a hospital as a place of healing and rejuvenation that in addition to the course of treatment provides accommodations after treatment as well. Hence, the present study examined the background of this type of application and its advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility in Kish Island to investigate the growth factors and potential of health tourism and ways to overcome obstacles to attract medical tourism. The findings show that the Island faces challenges in basic and health infrastructure, government’s efficient support, having a program for the development of medical tourism, having centers providing the health service with the international credit and promotion and integrated marketing. Proper planning, cheap prices of tourism services, medical education, creating websites of medical tourism and health tourism policy council are also the strategies mentioned in this study.

  16. Integrating the Carbon and Water Footprints’ Costs in the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC Full Water Cost Recovery Concept: Basic Principles Towards Their Reliable Calculation and Socially Just Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasia Papadopoulou; Stavroula Tsitsifli; Vasilis Kanakoudis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles for the integration of the water and carbon footprints cost into the resource and environmental costs respectively, taking the suggestions set by the Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000/60/EC one step forward. WFD states that full water cost recovery (FWCR) should be based on the estimation of the three sub-costs related: direct; environmental; and resource cost. It also strongly suggests the EU Member States develop and apply effective water pricing ...

  17. Researcher-decision-maker partnerships in health services research: Practical challenges, guiding principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In health services research, there is a growing view that partnerships between researchers and decision-makers (i.e., collaborative research teams) will enhance the effective translation and use of research results into policy and practice. For this reason, there is an increasing expectation by health research funding agencies that health system managers, policy-makers, practitioners and clinicians will be members of funded research teams. While this view has merit to improve the uptake of research findings, the practical challenges of building and sustaining collaborative research teams with members from both inside and outside the research setting requires consideration. A small body of literature has discussed issues that may arise when conducting research in one’s own setting; however, there is a lack of clear guidance to deal with practical challenges that may arise in research teams that include team members who have links with the organization/community being studied (i.e., are “insiders”). Discussion In this article, we discuss a researcher-decision-maker partnership that investigated practice in primary care networks in Alberta. Specifically, we report on processes to guide the role clarification of insider team members where research activities may pose potential risk to participants or the team members (e.g., access to raw data). Summary These guiding principles could provide a useful discussion point for researchers and decision-makers engaged in health services research. PMID:22928979

  18. Researcher-decision-maker partnerships in health services research: Practical challenges, guiding principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmeyer Anne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In health services research, there is a growing view that partnerships between researchers and decision-makers (i.e., collaborative research teams will enhance the effective translation and use of research results into policy and practice. For this reason, there is an increasing expectation by health research funding agencies that health system managers, policy-makers, practitioners and clinicians will be members of funded research teams. While this view has merit to improve the uptake of research findings, the practical challenges of building and sustaining collaborative research teams with members from both inside and outside the research setting requires consideration. A small body of literature has discussed issues that may arise when conducting research in one’s own setting; however, there is a lack of clear guidance to deal with practical challenges that may arise in research teams that include team members who have links with the organization/community being studied (i.e., are “insiders”. Discussion In this article, we discuss a researcher-decision-maker partnership that investigated practice in primary care networks in Alberta. Specifically, we report on processes to guide the role clarification of insider team members where research activities may pose potential risk to participants or the team members (e.g., access to raw data. Summary These guiding principles could provide a useful discussion point for researchers and decision-makers engaged in health services research.

  19. Patch-based models and algorithms for image processing: a review of the basic principles and methods, and their application in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Davood; Ward, Rabab K

    2016-10-01

    Image models are central to all image processing tasks. The great advancements in digital image processing would not have been made possible without powerful models which, themselves, have evolved over time. In the past decade, "patch-based" models have emerged as one of the most effective models for natural images. Patch-based methods have outperformed other competing methods in many image processing tasks. These developments have come at a time when greater availability of powerful computational resources and growing concerns over the health risks of the ionizing radiation encourage research on image processing algorithms for computed tomography (CT). The goal of this paper is to explain the principles of patch-based methods and to review some of their recent applications in CT. We first review the central concepts in patch-based image processing and explain some of the state-of-the-art algorithms, with a focus on aspects that are more relevant to CT. Then, we review some of the recent application of patch-based methods in CT. Patch-based methods have already transformed the field of image processing, leading to state-of-the-art results in many applications. More recently, several studies have proposed patch-based algorithms for various image processing tasks in CT, from denoising and restoration to iterative reconstruction. Although these studies have reported good results, the true potential of patch-based methods for CT has not been yet appreciated. Patch-based methods can play a central role in image reconstruction and processing for CT. They have the potential to lead to substantial improvements in the current state of the art.

  20. Analysis of Diabetes Mellitus Determinants in Indonesia: A Study from the Indonesian Basic Health Research 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Haerawati; Hasyim, Hamzah; Utama, Feranita

    2017-10-01

    diabetes mellitus is a silent-killer. Its prevalence and impact on health expenses increase from year to year. This study aims to investigate the characteristics and the risk factors that affect  diabetes mellitus in Indonesia. this is a cross sectional study. Data were obtained from the Basic Health Research (RISKESDAS) in 2013. The samples were individuals aged ≥15 years, whose fasting blood glucose and 2 hours blood glucose after the imposition have been measured. 38.052 individuals were selected for this study. The variables of age, sex, marital status, level of education, employment status, living area, regional status, hypertension, obesity, smoking habit, and dyslipidemia are analyzed as risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Bivariate analysis was using chi-square test with significance level of pdiabetes mellitus in 2013. Factors affecting diabetes mellitus were age>55 years (OR=5.10; 95%CI 4.42 to 5.89; pdiabetes mellitus in 2013. Age, gender, living area, employment status, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are the contributing factors to diabetes mellitus.

  1. Leveraging lean principles in creating a comprehensive quality program: The UCLA health readmission reduction initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar-Manesh, Nasim; Lonowski, Sarah; Namavar, Aram A

    2017-12-01

    UCLA Health embarked to transform care by integrating lean methodology in a key clinical project, Readmission Reduction Initiative (RRI). The first step focused on assembling a leadership team to articulate system-wide priorities for quality improvement. The lean principle of creating a culture of change and accountability was established by: 1) engaging stakeholders, 2) managing the process with performance accountability, and, 3) delivering patient-centered care. The RRI utilized three major lean principles: 1) A3, 2) root cause analyses, 3) value stream mapping. Baseline readmission rate at UCLA from 9/2010-12/2011 illustrated a mean of 12.1%. After the start of the RRI program, for the period of 1/2012-6/2013, the readmission rate decreased to 11.3% (pservice- and location-based interventions into strategies with broader approach. As elucidated, a systematic clinical approach grounded in lean methodologies is a viable solution to this complex problem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High risk pregnancy referrals adequacy in the Basic Health Services of Sobral, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Juvenal Linhares

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the appropriateness of referrals of high-risk pregnancies in the basic healthcare network of Sobral, in Ceará, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive quantitative study. The medical files of 173 pregnant patients referred to the high-risk outpatient clinic of Centro de Especialidades Médicas of Sobral, during the period from July 2006 to April 2007, were analyzed. Variables analyzed were correctness of the referrals, professionals who made them, causes and origins of the referrals, and age bracket of the patients referred. The referrals were divided into “appropriate” and “inappropriate”, according to the classification of risk established by the technical manual of the Ministry of Health. Rresults: Of the 173 cases, 102 (59% were considered appropriate/correct, and 71 (41% referrals were considered inappropriate/incorrect. The referrals were divided according to the professional class of the referring individuals: physicians or nurses. Of the 173 referrals, 49 (28.3% were made by physicians, and 124 (71.7% by nurses. Of the 49 patients referred by physicians, 39 (79.6% were considered correct. Of the 124 referrals made by nurses, 63 (50.8% were considered incorrect, revealing a significant difference between the groups (p < 0.00001. The most common causes of referrals of pregnant patients were hypertensive syndromes (23.6%, physiological modifications of pregnancy (22.6%, prolonged pregnancy (15.1%, and diabetes (12.3%. Cconclusions: There was a low rate of appropriate/correct referrals. There is a need for training in the basic healthcare network for quality prenatal care, with special emphasis on referring nurses.

  3. Pharmacist contributions for basic care from the perspective of professionals of familial health care teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gecioni Loch-Neckel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the social representations of professionals included in the team of Family Health Strategy (physicians, nurses and dentists respecting the action possibilities and contributions of the pharmacist for the basic care, and based on social psychology and, particularly, on the theory of social representations. The epistemological basis of the research is qualitative, and the data were collected by means of individual semi-structured interviews, which were submitted to analysis of categorical thematic content. Apparently, the majority of professionals already inserted in the team know and recognize the importance of professional pharmacists in the basic care, as well as their potential contribution to this topic. The representations were constructed according to the following parameters: a the study object and the intervention area, b the individual practice of every professional and c his/her action in specific cases. The quality of the professional or personal experience concerning the action of these professionals has contributed for the knowledge about the possibilities of pharmacists' intervention in basic care.Este estudo teve por objetivo investigar as representações sociais dos profissionais incluídos na equipe de Estratégia em Saúde da Família (médico, enfermeiro e odontólogo, sobre as possibilidades de atuação e as contribuições do farmacêutico na atenção básica, tendo por fundamento a psicologia social e, particularmente, a teoria das representações sociais. A base epistemológica da pesquisa é qualitativa, sendo os dados coletados por meio de entrevistas individuais semi-estruturadas e analisados por meio de análise de conteúdo categorial temático. Constatou-se que a maioria dos profissionais já inseridos na equipe conhece e reconhece a importância do profissional farmacêutico na atenção básica e as suas possibilidades de contribuição. As representações foram construídas a

  4. Less noise, more hacking: how to deploy principles from MIT's hacking medicine to accelerate health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasse, Jacqueline W; Carroll, Ryan; Ippolito, Andrea; Yost, Allison; Santorino, Data; Chu, Zen; Olson, Kristian R

    2014-07-01

    Medical technology offers enormous potential for scalable medicine--to improve the quality and access in health care while simultaneously reducing cost. However, current medical device innovation within companies often only offers incremental advances on existing products, or originates from engineers with limited knowledge of the clinical complexities. We describe how the Hacking Medicine Initiative, based at Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed an innovative "healthcare hackathon" approach, bringing diverse teams together to rapidly validate clinical needs and develop solutions. Hackathons are based on three core principles; emphasis on a problem-based approach, cross-pollination of disciplines, and "pivoting" on or rapidly iterating on ideas. Hackathons also offer enormous potential for innovation in global health by focusing on local needs and resources as well as addressing feasibility and cultural contextualization. Although relatively new, the success of this approach is clear, as evidenced by the development of successful startup companies, pioneering product design, and the incorporation of creative people from outside traditional life science backgrounds who are working with clinicians and other scientists to create transformative innovation in health care.

  5. Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions (JITAIs) in Mobile Health: Key Components and Design Principles for Ongoing Health Behavior Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Smith, Shawna N; Spring, Bonnie J; Collins, Linda M; Witkiewitz, Katie; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A

    2016-09-23

    The just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) is an intervention design aiming to provide the right type/amount of support, at the right time, by adapting to an individual's changing internal and contextual state. The availability of increasingly powerful mobile and sensing technologies underpins the use of JITAIs to support health behavior, as in such a setting an individual's state can change rapidly, unexpectedly, and in his/her natural environment. Despite the increasing use and appeal of JITAIs, a major gap exists between the growing technological capabilities for delivering JITAIs and research on the development and evaluation of these interventions. Many JITAIs have been developed with minimal use of empirical evidence, theory, or accepted treatment guidelines. Here, we take an essential first step towards bridging this gap. Building on health behavior theories and the extant literature on JITAIs, we clarify the scientific motivation for JITAIs, define their fundamental components, and highlight design principles related to these components. Examples of JITAIs from various domains of health behavior research are used for illustration. As we enter a new era of technological capacity for delivering JITAIs, it is critical that researchers develop sophisticated and nuanced health behavior theories capable of guiding the construction of such interventions. Particular attention has to be given to better understanding the implications of providing timely and ecologically sound support for intervention adherence and retention.

  6. To what extent can PBL principles be applied in blended learning: Lessons learned from health master programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N; Krumeich, J S M; Verstegen, D M L

    2017-02-01

    Maastricht University has been actively exploring blended learning approaches to PBL in Health Master Programs. Key principles of PBL are, learning should be constructive, self-directed, collaborative, and contextual. The purpose is to explore whether these principles are applicable in blended learning. The programs, Master of Health Services Innovation (case 1), Master Programme in Global Health (case 2), and the Master of Health Professions Education (case 3), used a Virtual Learning Environment for exchanging material and were independently analyzed. Quantitative data were collected for cases 1 and 2. Simple descriptive analyses such as frequencies were performed. Qualitative data for cases 1 and 3 were collected via (focus group) interviews. All PBL principles could be recognized in case 1. Case 2 seemed to be more project-based. In case 3, collaboration between students was not possible because of a difference in time-zones. Important educational aspects: agreement on rules for (online) sessions; visual contact (student-student and student-teacher), and frequent feedback. PBL in a blended learning format is perceived to be an effective strategy. The four principles of PBL can be unified in PBL with a blended learning format, although the extent to which each principle can be implemented can differ.

  7. Clinton outlines principles guiding health care reform plan as detractors weigh in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-24

    A summary is provided of President Clinton's address on health insurance before the August meeting of the National Governor's Association (NGA). Enactment would probably occur in 1994. Health care reform is expected to be difficult, and White House aides working on this issue have moved appropriately into the White House "war room". The President identified the basic components of the plan as 1) universal coverage, 2) simplification of administration and expenses, and 3) coast containment, but he declined to provide details of the plan. The speech was well received, and action was urged by governors to respect state discretion and allow for state efforts in health care reform before national enactment of a flexible framework. Employer mandates received considerable attention. Governor Pete Wilson of California was concerned about the effect on small businesses and suggested that the program be voluntary. Opponents of the plan are already preparing a multimillion lobbying effort. President Clinton has received a letter endorsed by 41 Republican congressmen which stated their strong opposition to employer mandates. Republicans in both the House and Senate are preparing their own plans. House Minority Leader Robert Michel of Illinois is planning to introduce, in the fall, a proposal, without universal coverage. A Senate proposal by John Chafee of Rhode Island would provide universal coverage. Health care advisor Ira Magaziner had leaked that the plan would include coverage of abortion- related services, and a conscience clause for those morally or religiously opposed to providing abortion-related care. States would be allowed to set conditions on abortions, such as the parental request restrictions or waiting periods. Support for abortion related services came from 33 women congressional representatives on behalf of the bipartisan Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues. Comprehensive reproductive health care was also requested as a necessary provision in the plan.

  8. PRINCIPLES OF HYDROGEOMORPHOLOGY AS A BASIC PRECONDITION FOR SOLUTION OF TERRITORIAL STRUCTURE OF UNITARY SYSTEM OF AGRICULTURAL, FOREST AND WATER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K KUDRNA

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the presented work, the laws of hydrogeomorfhology have been defi ned on the principle of symmetry and invariance, which are to be respected at solution of territorial structure of Unitary System of Agricultural, Forest and Water Management (USAFWM. The principle of the solution is a dominant position of the geomorphologic formation Gh of a given sea-level altitude in the analyzed part of territory, which determines control and regulation of all components of water balance. The newly formed territory unit, delimited around the geomorphologic formation by water streams, was called a hydrogeomorphologic region of the third order (HGR-3.

  9. Alternatives in Environmental Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ahraf, Amer; Hanson, Donald

    1975-01-01

    The role environmental health should play in management of the environment is examined. Four major environmental health administration models presently available and possible alternatives are presented. A basic set of environmental health principles is included. (BT)

  10. The Caux Round Table principles for business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, L L

    1996-02-01

    In 1994, the Caux Round Table in Switzerland developed what is believed to be the first international code of business ethics. Business leaders from Japan, Europe and the United States collaborated to create a set of principles rooted in two basic ideals: kyosei and human dignity. Because of its importance and its applicability to the conduct of today's health care businesses, this entire column is devoted to reprinting these "Principles for Business."

  11. Professional self-assessment of future health basics teachers as professionally important quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Radchenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to theoretically substantiate and experimentally test professional self-assessment of future health basics teachers as professionally important quality. Material: 152 students participated in experiment. Results: assessment of images “I am real”, “I am student” and I am future professional” is rather high in most of students. The strength of these three images was assessed also approximately equally. But portion of average marks in indicator of image strength is much higher than in indicator of mark. Activity of three images differs a little and has significant quantity of average and high marks. Analysis of three main images’ wholeness witnesses that students’ self assessment is rather holistic. With it image “I am future professional” is formed on the base of image “I am student”. Dynamic of images’ self assessment witnesses that increasing of assessment and respect to image “I am future professional” depend on year of studying. Besides, assessment of strength and activity of this image also increases. Conclusions: in the process of studying students are oriented on professional formation as well as on formation of professionally important qualities, revelation of potential for self realization in the future. It was found that responsible attitude to professional functioning, future relations with children depend on self-assessment of formation.

  12. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  13. Integrated and Contextual Basic Science Instruction in Preclinical Education: Problem-Based Learning Experience Enriched with Brain/Mind Learning Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülpinar, Mehmet Ali; Isoglu-Alkaç, Ümmühan; Yegen, Berrak Çaglayan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, integrated and contextual learning models such as problem-based learning (PBL) and brain/mind learning (BML) have become prominent. The present study aimed to develop and evaluate a PBL program enriched with BML principles. In this study, participants were 295 first-year medical students. The study used both quantitative and qualitative…

  14. Limiting Rights and Freedoms in the Context of Ebola and Other Public Health Emergencies: How the Principle of Reciprocity Can Enrich the Application of the Siracusa Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego S; Smith, Maxwell J

    2015-06-11

    One of the key components of CESCR General Comment No. 14: The Right to the Highest Attainable Standard of Health (GC 14) is the recognition that human rights are necessarily interdependent and that the social determinants of health are important to the promotion of health itself; as stated in paragraph 3 "…other [human] rights and freedoms [e.g., food, housing] address integral components of the right to health." GC 14, paragraph 16 maintains that a right to health also includes the right to control the spread of infectious diseases via a variety of control measures, some of which are restrictive. The use of restrictive measures during infectious disease outbreaks, including measures like quarantine, isolation, and travel prohibitions, restrict or limit basic human rights prescribed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, such as freedom of movement (Article 13) and the right to peaceful assembly (Article 20), for the sake of protecting and promoting the health of individuals and communities. Copyright 2015 Silva and Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  15. Profile of Knowledge Management, Basic Sanitation and Attitudes towards Clean and Health Community in Kupang City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmah; Ardi, Muhammad; Yahya, Mohamad; Upa, Muhamad D. Pua; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2017-01-01

    The objective of research is to describe the knowledge and attitude of basic sanitation management community in Kupang City. This type of research is a survey research using quantitative approach. Data were collected by using the instrument in the form of test knowledge of basic sanitation management and attitude questionnaire. The data was then…

  16. [The federal politics of basic sanitation and the initiatives of participation, mobilization, social control, health and environmental education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisés, Márcia; Kligerman, Débora Cynamon; Cohen, Simone Cynamon; Monteiro, Sandra Conceição Ferreira

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to accomplish a critical analysis of two governmental important programs in health and environmental education - Health Education and Social Mobilization Program (PESMS) and Environmental Education and Sanitation Social Mobilization Program (PEAMSS), aiming at stimulate participative educational actions and social mobilization in sanitation projects. The methodology was based on reading and analysis of documents and observation in Workshops, Meetings, Seminars, Conventions, Congresses and Interviews. The authors describe the process of Program creation - PESMS and PEAMSS. They promoted a reflection and thought about Participation, Mobilization, Social Control, Health Education and Environmental Education. They also made considerations about the difficulties, facilities, advances and challenges in the implantation and implementation of PESMS and PEAMSS in the fundament for the realization of the public services of basic sanitation. They conclude that the creation of conditions by means of initiatives of Participation, Mobilization, Social Control, Health Education and Environmental Education become necessary for the development of Federal Policies of Basic Sanitation.

  17. 76 FR 56767 - Request for Information Regarding State Flexibility To Establish a Basic Health Program Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... shall also take into consideration the experience of other States with respect to participation in an... that its Basic Health Program meets: (1) Eligibility verification standards for participation in the... discretion by following the above mentioned instructions. A. General Provisions 1. What are some of the major...

  18. Multimedia Design Principles in the Psychomotor Domain: The Effect of Multimedia and Spatial Contiguity on Students' Learning of Basic Life Support with Task Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Mols, Liesbet; Elen, Jan; Behets, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This study adds to the literature by introducing multimedia research in the psychomotor area. In this study, 87 freshman students in pedagogy used task cards to learn Basic Life Support (BLS), a psychomotor skill consisting of nine lifesaving actions to be performed in a specific order. Task cards are printed materials and are often implemented…

  19. Ultra-processed food consumption in children from a Basic Health Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrenberger, Karen; Friedrich, Roberta Roggia; Schiffner, Mariana Dihl; Schuch, Ilaine; Wagner, Mário Bernardes

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of ultra-processed food (UPF) on the dietary consumption of children treated at a Basic Health Unit and the associated factors. Cross-sectional study carried out with a convenience sample of 204 children, aged 2-10 years old, in Southern Brazil. Children's food intake was assessed using a 24-h recall questionnaire. Food items were classified as minimally processed, processed for culinary use, and ultra-processed. A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to collect socio-demographic and anthropometric variables. Overweight in children was classified using a Z score >2 for children younger than 5 and Z score >+1 for those aged between 5 and 10 years, using the body mass index for age. Overweight frequency was 34% (95% CI: 28-41%). Mean energy consumption was 1672.3 kcal/day, with 47% (95% CI: 45-49%) coming from ultra-processed food. In the multiple linear regression model, maternal education (r=0.23; p=0.001) and child age (r=0.40; p<0.001) were factors associated with a greater percentage of UPF in the diet (r=0.42; p<0.001). Additionally, a statistically significant trend for higher UPF consumption was observed when data were stratified by child age and maternal educational level (p<0.001). The contribution of UPF is significant in children's diets and age appears to be an important factor for the consumption of such products. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Basic Principles of Health Economics Applied - How to Assess if Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation is Worth the Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, Matthias; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    This article attempts to present some highlights from the rich economic literature pertaining to interventional cardiology and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). There are currently more questions than answers, not surprisingly given the pace of technological change in interventional cardiology. For clinicians who work in a strictly regulated environment and have limited control over their use of medical technologies, this article will hopefully shed some light on the motives for policy decisions. For clinicians who make decisions on the resources used to treat their patients, it aims to provide the means of looking for evidence that will allow for informed decisions from both clinical and economic perspectives.

  1. The Principle of Non-Discrimination : An Empty Promise for the Preventive Health Care of Asylum Seekers and Undocumented Migrants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flegar, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    The principle of non-discrimination in Article 2 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) holds that its rights are equally applicable to ‘everyone’. Nevertheless, evidence from the national context suggests that access to health care for asylum seekers and

  2. Why not private health insurance? 2. Actuarial principles meet provider dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deber, R; Gildiner, A; Baranek, P

    1999-09-07

    What do insurers and employers feel about proposals to expand Canadian health care financing through private insurance, in either a parallel stream or a supplementary tier? The authors conducted 10 semistructured, open-ended interviews in the autumn and early winter of 1996 with representatives of the insurance industry and benefits managers working with large employers; respondents were identified using a snowball sampling technique. The respondents felt that proposals for parallel private plans within a competitive market are incompatible with insurance principles, as long as a well-functioning and relatively comprehensive public system continues to exist; the maintenance of a strong public system was both socially and economically desirable. With the exception of serving the niche market for the private management of return-to-work strategies, respondents showed little interest in providing parallel coverage. They were receptive to a larger role for supplementary insurance but cautioned that they are not willing to cover all delisted services. As business executives they stated that they are willing to insure only services and clients that will be profitable.

  3. Application of PACE Principles for Population Health Management of Frail Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Reich, Shelley; Casiano, Alex

    2015-10-01

    To determine which practices would have the most impact on reducing hospital and emergency department admissions and nursing home placement among older adults with multiple comorbid conditions, a literature search and survey were conducted to identify and prioritize comprehensive care principles as practiced in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). PACE medical directors and members of the PACE interdisciplinary team (IDT) were surveyed to gain their insights on the most impactful practices, which were identified as: End-of-Life Management, Caregiver Support, Management of Red Flags, Medication Management, Participant and Caregiver Health Care System Literacy, and Care Coordination. In addition, this research evaluated measures that could be used to assess an organization's level of success with regard to each of the 6 PACE practices identified. The results reported in this article, found through a survey with PACE medical directors and IDT members concerning effective interventions, can be viewed as strategies to improve care for older adults, enabling them to maintain their independence in the community, avoid the expense of facility-based care, and enhance their quality of life.

  4. [Evaluating the efficiency of basic public health service project in Beijing rural areas based on data envelopment analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-lin; Pan, Xi-long

    2013-04-18

    To measure the efficiency changes of basic public health service in Beijing rural areas and to provide some suggestions for the basic public health service project throughout China. In the study, stratified random samples from 32 township health centers (THCs) were measured by data envelopment analysis (DEA) model with the panel data from 2007 to 2009. (1) The average total efficiency score of samples was 0.972. The TE non-efficient THCs were with excess in all input indicators and insufficient outputs in technology management, health promotion and chronic disease management. (2) The total factor productivity (TFP) from 2007 to 2008 increased 8.8%, which was attributed to technology change. The TFP decreased by 6.6% from 2008 to 2009, but the technical efficiency increased by 3.3%. There is room for improvemrnt in the basic public health service project in Beijing rural areas. Scale efficiency should be improved and the common development of technical efficiency and technology progress promoted in order to increase the project outputs.

  5. A comparative analysis of moral principles and behavioral norms in eight ethical codes relevant to health sciences librarianship, medical informatics, and the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Gary D; Winkelstein, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Based on the authors' shared interest in the interprofessional challenges surrounding health information management, this study explores the degree to which librarians, informatics professionals, and core health professionals in medicine, nursing, and public health share common ethical behavior norms grounded in moral principles. Using the "Principlism" framework from a widely cited textbook of biomedical ethics, the authors analyze the statements in the ethical codes for associations of librarians (Medical Library Association [MLA], American Library Association, and Special Libraries Association), informatics professionals (American Medical Informatics Association [AMIA] and American Health Information Management Association), and core health professionals (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association). This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements. These eight ethical codes share a large number of common behavioral norms based most frequently on the principle of Beneficence, then on Autonomy and Justice, but rarely on Non-Maleficence. The MLA and AMIA codes share the largest number of common behavioral norms, and these two associations also share many norms with the other six associations. The shared core of behavioral norms among these professions, all grounded in core moral principles, point to many opportunities for building effective interprofessional communication and collaboration regarding the development, management, and use of health information resources and technologies.

  6. Technology adds new principles to persuasive psychology : Evidence from health education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; IJsselsteijn, W; DeKort, Y; Midden, C; Eggen, B; VandenHoven, E

    2006-01-01

    Computer-technology has led to the use of new principles of persuasion. These new principles constitute the unique working mechanisms of persuasion by means of computer. In the present study, three tailored messages that each contained one potential working mechanism - personalization, adaptation or

  7. [Political implementation of prevention: the discussion about the ten principles of German concerted action in the health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsbach, R

    2010-04-01

    The "ten principles", developed by the Federal Ministry of Labour in 1985, mark an important turning point in the government's efforts to reform the health-care system. Citizens' self-reliance became a central objective. The implementation of the idea of prevention--postulated in the principles as well--was generally welcomed, but accentuated in different ways by the various stakeholders. An extension of specific measures, for example in occupational medicine, was rejected by liberal business circles. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  8. Basic physics for all

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B N

    2012-01-01

    This is a simple, concise book for both student and non-physics students, presenting basic facts in straightforward form and conveying fundamental principles and theories of physics. This book will be helpful as a supplement to class teaching and to aid those who have difficulty in mastering concepts and principles.

  9. Follow-up of Impaired Glucose Tolerance Basic Health Survey 2007 in Jakarta in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentia Mihardja

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKLatar Belakang:Toleransi Glukosa Terganggu (TGT atau Pre Diabetes merupakan keadaan yang belum termasuk kategori diabetes tetapi glukosa darah lebih tinggi dari normal. TGT merupakan faktor risiko terjadinya diabetes mellitus (DM, penyakit jantung koroner, stroke. Metode: Dilakukan penelitian follow up responden TGT Riskesdas 2007 pada tahun 2009 untuk mengetahui status hiperglikemianya apakah telah menjadi DM, tetap TGT atau Normal. Hasil:Didapatkan setelah 2 tahun 7,2% telah menjadi DM, 47,8% tetap TGT, 4,3% berubah menjadi gangguan glukosa puasa dan 40,7% menjadi normal toleransi glukosa. Kebiasaan perilaku, keadaan biologis seperti indeks massa tubuh, obesitas sentral, dislipidemia tidak berbeda signifikan antara tahun 2009 dibandingkan 2007. Dari analisis didapatkan pada kelompok TGT yang menjadi DM lingkar pinggang meningkat tapi tidak signifikan dan Homa IR (resistensi insulin lebih tinggi (p < 0,05 dibandingkan kelompok lainnya. Saran:Disarankan agar pembuat program melakukan intervensi pada kelompok TGT agar tidak menjadi DM dan mencegah timbulnya komplikasi penyakit degeneratif.Kata kunci: Toleransi Glukosa Terganggu, obesitas sentral, DKI JakartaABSTRACTBackground: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT or pre diabetes is not categorized as diabetes yet but blood glucose level is more than normal. IGT is the risk factor for diabetes mellitus, coronary disease and stroke. Methods: In 2009, a cross-sectional study was conducted in DKI Jakarta to follow up 78 subjects identified as IGT in Basic Health Survey (Riskesdas 2007. It aimed to assess the hyperglycemia status of the IGT subjects, whether developing into diabetes mellitus or becoming normal glucose tolerance or just remained IGT. Results: We found over two years for IGT subjects, 7.2% progressed to diabetes mellitus, 47.8% remained impaired glucose tolerance, 4.3% changed to impaired fasting glucose and 40.7% reverted to normal glucose tolerance. Life style and biological factors

  10. A shared statement of ethical principles for those who shape and give health care: a working draft from the Tavistock group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R; Hiatt, H; Berwick, D

    1999-01-19

    Health care delivery in many countries has expanded over the past 150 years from a largely social service delivered by individual practitioners to an intricate network of services provided by teams of professionals. The problems of increasing resource consumption, financial constraints, complexity, and poor system design that have emerged as consequences of these changes have exacerbated many of the ethical tensions inherent in health care and have created new ones. Many groups of professionals that give and affect health care have established separate codes of ethics for their own disciplines, but no shared code exists that might bring all stakeholders in health care into a more consistent moral framework. A multidisciplinary group therefore recently met at Tavistock Square in London in an effort to prepare such a shared code. The result was not a code but a more basic and generic statement of ethical principles. The intent and hope is that it will offer clear guidance for tough calls in real world settings. It is presented here not as a finished work, but as a draft to elicit comment, critique, suggestions for revision, and, especially, ideas for implementation.

  11. Basic Electronics I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, L. Paul

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of twenty-nine units of instruction in five major content areas: Orientation, Basic Principles of Electricity/Electronics, Fundamentals of Direct Current, Fundamentals of Alternating Current, and Applying for a Job. Each instructional unit includes some or all of…

  12. Zymography Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Kurz, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Zymography, the detection, identification, and even quantification of enzyme activity fractionated by gel electrophoresis, has received increasing attention in the last years, as revealed by the number of articles published. A number of enzymes are routinely detected by zymography, especially with clinical interest. This introductory chapter reviews the major principles behind zymography. New advances of this method are basically focused towards two-dimensional zymography and transfer zymography as will be explained in the rest of the chapters. Some general considerations when performing the experiments are outlined as well as the major troubleshooting and safety issues necessary for correct development of the electrophoresis.

  13. The World Health Organization's Basic Radiological System (WHO-BRS). How to provide a better service with less cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Crespo, G.; Hanson, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes the application of the World Health Organization - Basic Radiological System (WHO-BRS) in Latin America in particular in Colombia. Various aspects of the radiological system are discussed including the X-ray equipment, radiation safety, training, manuals for operating and maintenance of the equipments, supply of spare parts, etc. The difficulties encountered in applying medical radiography in Latin America are pointed out. 6 refs

  14. Basic versus Supplementary Health Insurance : The Role of Cost Effectiveness and Prevalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2014-01-01

    In a model where patients face budget constraints that make some treatments unaffordable, we ask which treatments should be covered by universal basic insurance and which by private voluntary insurance. We argue that both cost effectiveness and prevalence are important if the government wants to

  15. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following article by Leet et al advocates training rural PHC staff in basic emergency surgery in those areas of South Sudan where there is no access to secondary or tertiary level facilities (i.e. surgical task-shifting). Based on their experience, the authors describe and recommend the type of on-the-job training that they ...

  16. Basic Needs, Stress and the Effects of Tailored Health Communication in Vulnerable Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Erika R.; Kreuter, Matthew W.; Boyum, Sonia; Thompson, Tess

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether unmet basic needs (food, housing, personal and neighborhood safety, money for necessities) and perceived stress affect recall of and response to a tailored print intervention one month later. Participants (N = 372) were adults who had called 2-1-1 Missouri between June 2010 and June 2012. A series of path analyses using…

  17. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Ehiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Methods: PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014 with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Results: Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania, Central America (Belize, and Asia (Myanmar were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Conclusion: Although

  18. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiri, John E.; Gunn, Jayleen K.L.; Center, Katherine E.; Li, Ying; Rouhani, Mae; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs) and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Methods PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014) with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Results Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only) conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania), Central America (Belize), and Asia (Myanmar) were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Conclusion Although available evidence

  19. [Illness in adolescence: the health-illness profile of clients of basic health units in the city of São Paolo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M A; Egry, E Y; Gejer, D

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to verify the health-illness profile of adolescent users of a Basic Health Unit in the city of Sõ Paulo (SP-Brazil). Empirical data were gathered through the retrospective analysis of individual reports, during the period of time in which a specific program for adolescents was developed, January 1988 to December 1991. The identified profile leads to a reflection concerning adolescents' life conditions and the correlated health-illness process expressions, enabling the conclusion that the biological paradigm must be surpassed so that other dimensions of the adolescents' existence that interfere in their health-illness process can be expressed.

  20. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  1. [The Unified National Health System and the third sector: Characterization of non-hospital facilities providing basic health care services in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabrava, Claudia Marques; Andrade, Eli Iôla Gurgel; Janones, Fúlvio Alves; Alves, Thiago Andrade; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2007-01-01

    In Brazil, nonprofit or charitable organizations are the oldest and most traditional and institutionalized form of relationship between the third sector and the state. Despite the historical importance of charitable hospital care, little research has been done on the participation of the nonprofit sector in basic health care in the country. This article identifies and describes non-hospital nonprofit facilities providing systematically organized basic health care in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 2004. The research focused on the facilities registered with the National Council on Social Work, using computer-assisted telephone and semi-structured interviews. Identification and description of these organizations showed that the charitable segment of the third sector conducts organized and systematic basic health care services but is not recognized by the Unified National Health System as a potential partner, even though it receives referrals from basic government services. The study showed spatial and temporal overlapping of government and third-sector services in the same target population.

  2. Vaccinology: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrow, John

    2012-01-01

    ... principles to implementation. This is an authoritative textbook that details a comprehensive and systematic approach to the science of vaccinology focusing on not only basic science, but the many stages required to commercialize...

  3. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Low

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. Methods: A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations’ (EHOs and community-based organizations’ (CBHOs service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Findings: Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Conclusion: Despite the chronic conflict in

  4. 5. The Basic Principles of The Working Process From Nature and the Role of Composition in Creating Landscape in Terms of Plein-Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savițkaia-Baraghin Iarîna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Principles of possession of the landscape painting, applied by masters of the past, as well as theoretical elaborations of scientists in the field of chromatics, psychology and pedagogy of arts, become important components in improving training methods of artists in plein-air in contemporary conditions. The skills and knowledge gained in the process of pleinair studies form professional skills and improve the properties of painting and composition within the workshop. This studying outlines the stringency of training and development methods of creative individuality, especially in plein-air, where the principal teacher is the nature. The plein-air enriches color perception of the real world, located in the air, and mutual relationship of landscape with architecture and space determines knowledge of the issues of proportionality and subordination in compositions, educates sense of proportion and artistic taste. Improving visual mastery into the natural environment contributes to the formation to painters of the necessity to create outside the workshop, which is a necessary condition for the development of individuality and professional skills of the painter.

  5. Chemical Mixtures Health Risk Assessment: Overview of Exposure Assessment, Whole Mixtures Assessments; Basic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    This problems-based, half-day, introductory workshop focuses on methods to assess health risks posed by exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment. Chemical mixtures health risk assessment methods continue to be developed and evolve to address concerns over health risks f...

  6. Ontology of Public Health in University Curriculum: Exploring Basic Elements of an Interdisciplinary Field of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul

    2017-01-01

    Public health has constituted itself as a distinct academic discipline. The present paper attempts to understand ontology of this discipline. A study has recently been carried out which concerns, first, conceptualization of ontology of public health, secondly, nature of public health, and thirdly, curriculum development. Ontology is a…

  7. Microwave system engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Raff, Samuel J

    1977-01-01

    Microwave System Engineering Principles focuses on the calculus, differential equations, and transforms of microwave systems. This book discusses the basic nature and principles that can be derived from thermal noise; statistical concepts and binomial distribution; incoherent signal processing; basic properties of antennas; and beam widths and useful approximations. The fundamentals of propagation; LaPlace's Equation and Transmission Line (TEM) waves; interfaces between homogeneous media; modulation, bandwidth, and noise; and communications satellites are also deliberated in this text. This bo

  8. Predicting performance in contracting of basic health care to NGOs: experience from large-scale contracting in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Anna; Awasthi, Maya Kant; Ali, Jabir; Shukla, Neena; Forsberg, Birger C

    2011-07-01

    Escalating costs and increasing pressure to improve health services have driven a trend toward contracting with the private sector to provide traditionally state-run services. Such contracting is seen as an opportunity to combine theorized advantages of contracting with the efficiency of the private sector. There is still a limited understanding of the preconditions for successful use of contracting and the resources needed for their appropriate use and sustainability. This study assesses the large-scale contracting of 294 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for delivery of basic health services in Uttar Pradesh, a state with almost 170 million in India. Due to high rates of discontinuation or non-renewal of contracts based on poor performance in the project, a better method for selecting partners was requested. Data on characteristics of the NGOs (intake data) and performance/outcome monitoring indicators were combined to identify correlations. The results showed that NGOs selected were generally small but well-established, had implemented at least two large projects, and had more non-health experience than health experience. Bivariate regressions of outcome score on each input variable showed that training experience, proposal quality and having 'health' contained in the objectives of the organization were statistically significant predictors of good performance. Factors relating to financial capacity, staff qualification, previous experience with health or non-health projects, and age of establishment were not. A combined training plus proposal score was highly predictive of outcome score (β = 1.37, P NGOs (β = 0.073, P = 0.539). The study provides valuable information from large-scale contracting. Conclusions on criteria for selecting NGOs for providing basic health care could guide other governments choosing to contract for such services.

  9. MPH Education for the 21st Century: Motivation, Rationale, and Key Principles for the New Columbia Public Health Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Linda P.; Begg, Melissa D.; Bayer, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Public health is at a watershed moment. The world’s health needs are changing, and complex problems require interdisciplinary approaches and systems-based solutions. Our longer lives and changing environments necessitate life-course and structural approaches to prevention. This argues strongly for public health graduate education that adequately prepares trainees to tackle emerging challenges and to lead now and in the future. Nearly a century of scholarship and scientific advances may offer a blueprint for training the next generation of public health leaders. We articulate a case for change; discuss some of the foundational principles that should guide public health education; and discuss what such a change might look like building on prior scholarship, on the examples set by other disciplines, and on our own experience. PMID:24228646

  10. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The quality of health care services offered to people suffering from chronic diseases often fails to meet standards in Denmark or internationally. The population consisting of people with chronic diseases is large and accounts for about 70% of total health care expenses. Given that resources...... are limited, it is necessary to identify efficient methods to improve the quality of care. Comparing health care systems is a well-known method for identifying new knowledge regarding, for instance, organisational methods and principles. Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated health care delivery system...... which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved....

  11. Comparing the effects of China's three basic health insurance schemes on the equity of health-related quality of life: using the method of coarsened exact matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Zhou, Zhongliang; Si, Yafei; Wei, Xiaolin; Xu, Yongjian; Fan, Xiaojing; Chen, Gang

    2018-03-07

    China has three basic health insurance schemes: Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI), Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) and New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS). This study aimed to compare the equity of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of residents under any two of the schemes. Using data from the 5th National Health Services Survey of Shaanxi Province, China, coarsened exact matching method was employed to control confounding factors. We included a matched sample of 6802 respondents between UEBMI and URBMI, 34,169 respondents between UEBMI and NRCMS, and 36,928 respondents between URBMI and NRCMS. HRQoL was measured by EQ-5D-3L based on the Chinese-specific value set. Concentration index was adopted to assess health inequality and was decomposed into its contributing factors to explain health inequality. After matching, the horizontal inequity indexes were 0.0036 and 0.0045 in UEBMI and URBMI, 0.0035 and 0.0058 in UEBMI and NRCMS, and 0.0053 and 0.0052 in URBMI and NRCMS respectively, which were mainly explained by age, educational and economic statuses. The findings demonstrated the pro-rich health inequity was much higher for the rural scheme than that for the urban ones. This study highlights the need to consolidate all three schemes by administrating uniformly, merging funds pooling and benefit packages. Based on the contributing factors, strategies aim to facilitate health conditions of the elderly, narrow economic gap, and reduce educational inequity, are essential. This study will provide evidence-based strategies on consolidating the fragmented health schemes towards reducing health inequity in both China and other developing countries.

  12. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Health system reforms are the most strategic issue that has been seriously considered in healthcare systems in order to reduce costs and increase efficiency and effectiveness. The costs of health system finance in our country, lack of universal coverage in health insurance, and related issues necessitate reforms in our health system financing. The aim of this research was to prepare a structure of framework for social health insurance in Iran and conducting a comp...

  13. related Factors of complete basic Immunization on children and Vaccine Management at Primary Health care and Health Post in X Subdistrict Depok city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Afriani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available background:Immunization is an effective primary prevention against infectious diseases on children. The purpose of this study was to determine the related factors to the completeness of basic immunization on children and vaccine management at primary health care and posyandu in X Subdistric, Depok City. Methods:The study used a cross-sectional design with a sample of 140 mothers of children aged at least 11 months, and qualitatif study about vaccines management. Mother and child data collection using questionnaires and child health card (Kartu Menuju Sehat in December 2012–May 2013. Vaccine management data was collected at 2 primary health care and 2 posyandu with interview and observation. Data analysis was performed with Chi-square test. result:The largest percentage of mothers who have children under the age of at least 11 months of age <30 years, at least graduated from junior high school education, no work, have a low knowledge about immunization. Vaccine management in clinics and neighborhood health center for storage after use of vaccines in posyandu not be returned to the community health center, recording and reporting is not done on the book of the records so that the possibility of scattered or lost, and the person in charge of managing the vaccine instead of pharmacy personnel. Residual use of the vaccine in posyandu not directly returned to the health center. Recording the use of vaccines in posyandu not carried on the books, so it is probable scattered or lost. Manager vaccine at primary health care should a technical pharmacy in accordance with Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009 conclusion: Completeness of basic immunization of children under one years old (82,9%, incomplete biggest measles immunization (15,0%. Factors parental characteristics (age, education, occupation, knowledge and the availability of the vaccine were not significantly associated with children complete basic immunization. recommendation: Improving health

  14. The basic principles for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides (The most important indirect methods used in the Protection and Safety Dept. for internal occupational exposure monitoring)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Sakhita, K.

    2009-05-01

    This study shows the basic principles for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides in order to calculate the committed effective dose of each radionuclide separately. We also discussed when the routine monitoring of workers becomes useful and when the workplace monitoring is better than workers monitoring. In addition, this study contains the details of four indirect methods as they are validated in the protection and safety department, and their names are: Determination the concentration of total uranium by using fluorimetry technique, Determination the activity of two uranium isotopes 238 and 234, The activity of Polonium 210, and the activity of Radium 226 by using alpha spectrometry for urine samples collected from workers occupationally exposed to this isotope. (author)

  15. Applying Human Factors Principles to Mitigate Usability Issues Related to Embedded Assumptions in Health Information Technology Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael C; Lowry, Svetlana Z; Patterson, Emily S

    2014-12-18

    There is growing recognition that design flaws in health information technology (HIT) lead to increased cognitive work, impact workflows, and produce other undesirable user experiences that contribute to usability issues and, in some cases, patient harm. These usability issues may in turn contribute to HIT utilization disparities and patient safety concerns, particularly among "non-typical" HIT users and their health care providers. Health care disparities are associated with poor health outcomes, premature death, and increased health care costs. HIT has the potential to reduce these disparate outcomes. In the computer science field, it has long been recognized that embedded cultural assumptions can reduce the usability, usefulness, and safety of HIT systems for populations whose characteristics differ from "stereotypical" users. Among these non-typical users, inappropriate embedded design assumptions may contribute to health care disparities. It is unclear how to address potentially inappropriate embedded HIT design assumptions once detected. The objective of this paper is to explain HIT universal design principles derived from the human factors engineering literature that can help to overcome potential usability and/or patient safety issues that are associated with unrecognized, embedded assumptions about cultural groups when designing HIT systems. Existing best practices, guidance, and standards in software usability and accessibility were subjected to a 5-step expert review process to identify and summarize those best practices, guidance, and standards that could help identify and/or address embedded design assumptions in HIT that could negatively impact patient safety, particularly for non-majority HIT user populations. An iterative consensus-based process was then used to derive evidence-based design principles from the data to address potentially inappropriate embedded cultural assumptions. Design principles that may help identify and address embedded HIT

  16. Survey on basic knowledge about exposure and potential environmental and health risks for selected nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sonja Hagen; Hansen, Erik; Christensen, Trine Boe

    Based on a literature review this report provides a general description as well as an environmental and health profile of 7 nanomaterials. The examined nanomaterials are selected because of expected high use or specific environmental and health properties. Fullerenes, iron, silver, nanoclay...... and titanium-, cerium-, and silicondioxides were studied in the project. Based on current uses, it is concluded that current applications of nano-iron and nanoclay can not cause unexpected “nano-associated” health or environmental problems. Although no specific risk associated with current uses of any of the 7...

  17. Relationship of Environmental Conditions to Filariasis Cases in Community (An Advanced Analysis of Basic Health Research 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis (elephantiasis disease in Indonesia is still a health problems, there are still areas with the patient chronic and acute. A total of 1553 villages in 647 health centers scattered in 231 districts in 26 provinces as the location of the endemic, with a number of chronic cases of 6233 people. Elimination program disease elephantiasis has been undertaken by the government, but until today there are still many areas with the number of microfilariae (Mf rate is still high (> 1%. One of the government's efforts in this regard Litbangkes RI in collecting basic data, including data filariasis is with the activities of the Basic Health Research (Riskesdas conducted simultaneously across Indonesia. Based on the results of data collection Riskesdas then further analysis is to look at the environmental conditions and demographic status associated with the incidence of filariasis. Based on the results of analysis show that there were a statistically significant relationship between the type of waste water reservoirs; types of sewage systems and types of livestock kept, the classification of villages with the incidence of filariasis.

  18. Social Physique Anxiety, Mental Health, and Exercise: Analyzing the Role of Basic Psychological Needs and Psychological Inflexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Ibáñez, Manuel; Sicilia, Álvaro; Burgueño, Rafael

    2017-02-22

    This study aimed to determine the usefulness of integrating basic psychological needs theory (BPNT) and relational frames theory (RFT) in order to explain the effects of social physique anxiety (SPA) - in the context of exercise - on exercisers' mental health. A total of 296 recreational cyclists and triathletes (100% males) aged 18 to 60 years old (M age = 35.65, SD = 9.49) completed a multi-section questionnaire assessing the target variables. Two models of structural equations with multiple mediators were tested using 5000 bootstrap samples. While the BPNT-based model explained 20% of variance in satisfaction with life (SWL) and 25% of variance in mental health (MH), the model that also incorporated RFT explained 43% of variance in both of those variables. Results showed that SPA negatively impacted exercisers' mental health via two different mechanisms: a) through a decrease in perceived satisfaction of basic psychological needs (β = -.05, p = .045 for SWL; β = -.07, p = .002 for MH); b) through an increase in psychological inflexibility, generated directly by SPA (β = -.24, p exercise.

  19. Why stories matter. Applying principles of narrative medicine to health care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Eric K

    2013-01-01

    Narrative medicine seeks to improve clinical effectiveness through narrative training in reading and writing. Stories give meaning to experience and encourage communication between doctors and patients by honoring the basic human need to recognize and be recognized. Learning how to receive and tell stories, practiced through close reading, group discussion, and written response, may also facilitate ethical reflection and inquiry.

  20. Taking the Concept of Citizenship in Mental Health across Countries. Reflections on Transferring Principles and Practice to Different Sociocultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco José; Rowe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Transferring principles and practices to different sociocultural and professional contexts in the field of mental health can be very complex. Previous research on public health policy points to difficulties in different areas such as the understanding the new concepts, their applicability in different health systems, and suitable approaches to its effective implementation. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the process of transferring the concept of Citizenship, from its United States origins in mental health outreach work with persons who are homeless to Catalonia, Spain. We define Citizenship as promoting the rights, responsibilities, roles, resources and relationships of persons with mental illnesses, along with a sense of belonging that is validated by other citizens. The process of this transition involves embedding Citizenship in the mental health “first-person” (internationally known as Consumer/Survivor/Peer) movement in Catalonia. The paper includes a discussion of the concept of transference, including a case example of the adoption of the concept of mental health recovery in different countries. Following this, we describe the United States Citizenship model and key elements of its development. We then turn to Spain and the evolution of its mental health system, and then to Catalonia for a brief case history of transference of the principles and practices of Citizenship to that region. The “take home message” of this work is that concepts being brought from one sociocultural and national context to another, must focus on contextualization in the ‘adoptee’s’ practices, including the balance between personal involvement and professional rigor, the involvement of key actors, and ongoing evaluation of actions taken. PMID:28680412

  1. Taking the Concept of Citizenship in Mental Health across Countries. Reflections on Transferring Principles and Practice to Different Sociocultural Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco José; Rowe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Transferring principles and practices to different sociocultural and professional contexts in the field of mental health can be very complex. Previous research on public health policy points to difficulties in different areas such as the understanding the new concepts, their applicability in different health systems, and suitable approaches to its effective implementation. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the process of transferring the concept of Citizenship, from its United States origins in mental health outreach work with persons who are homeless to Catalonia, Spain. We define Citizenship as promoting the rights, responsibilities, roles, resources and relationships of persons with mental illnesses, along with a sense of belonging that is validated by other citizens. The process of this transition involves embedding Citizenship in the mental health "first-person" (internationally known as Consumer/Survivor/Peer) movement in Catalonia. The paper includes a discussion of the concept of transference, including a case example of the adoption of the concept of mental health recovery in different countries. Following this, we describe the United States Citizenship model and key elements of its development. We then turn to Spain and the evolution of its mental health system, and then to Catalonia for a brief case history of transference of the principles and practices of Citizenship to that region. The "take home message" of this work is that concepts being brought from one sociocultural and national context to another, must focus on contextualization in the 'adoptee's' practices, including the balance between personal involvement and professional rigor, the involvement of key actors, and ongoing evaluation of actions taken.

  2. Taking the Concept of Citizenship in Mental Health across Countries. Reflections on Transferring Principles and Practice to Different Sociocultural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Eiroa-Orosa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Transferring principles and practices to different sociocultural and professional contexts in the field of mental health can be very complex. Previous research on public health policy points to difficulties in different areas such as the understanding the new concepts, their applicability in different health systems, and suitable approaches to its effective implementation. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the process of transferring the concept of Citizenship, from its United States origins in mental health outreach work with persons who are homeless to Catalonia, Spain. We define Citizenship as promoting the rights, responsibilities, roles, resources and relationships of persons with mental illnesses, along with a sense of belonging that is validated by other citizens. The process of this transition involves embedding Citizenship in the mental health “first-person” (internationally known as Consumer/Survivor/Peer movement in Catalonia. The paper includes a discussion of the concept of transference, including a case example of the adoption of the concept of mental health recovery in different countries. Following this, we describe the United States Citizenship model and key elements of its development. We then turn to Spain and the evolution of its mental health system, and then to Catalonia for a brief case history of transference of the principles and practices of Citizenship to that region. The “take home message” of this work is that concepts being brought from one sociocultural and national context to another, must focus on contextualization in the ‘adoptee’s’ practices, including the balance between personal involvement and professional rigor, the involvement of key actors, and ongoing evaluation of actions taken.

  3. Knowledge and use of medicinal plants for users of two basic health units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Florêncio Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at verifying the knowledge and use of medicinal plants among users of two Family Health Units. This was a quantitative survey carried out between June and August 2010 at Sinop, Mato Grosso, Brazil. We used a structured interview guide, attended by 302 people of both sexes, which indicated that 77 plants are used for the treatment of several diseases, only 7.67% did not use medicinal plants. However, we described the 10 most reported plants, the part used for each form and its preparation. Only 0.9% of the population interviewed acquired information about such plants with health professionals. It is necessary to invest in initiatives that promote greater integration of the use of medicinal plants within the programs developed at Family Health Units, as well as a greater training of these professionals, by incorporating content that include herbal medicine in undergraduate courses.

  4. Fundamentos de los estudios de costo de la enfermedad: valoración actual del costo del glaucoma Basic principles of study of disease costs: current assessment of glaucoma cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Fernández García

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: los estudios del costo de la enfermedad consisten en una estimación cuantificada y valorada en unidades monetarias de un conjunto de efectos de una enfermedad, un grupo de enfermedades o de un factor de riesgo, sobre los recursos, y sobre otras variables que tienen un efecto presumible sobre el bienestar de los individuos y la sociedad. OBJETIVOS: explicar los fundamentos generales de los estudios de costo de la enfermedad, y describir el estado actual de un caso particular, del glaucoma. MÉTODOS: se aplicó el modelo Big 6 desarrollado por Mike Eisenberg y Bob Berkoeitz, como método sistemático de solución de problemas de información, apoyada en el pensamiento crítico, para realizar la búsqueda de bibliografía. RESULTADOS: los estudios del costo de la enfermedad se consideran un estudio parcial, o bien un tipo de ejercicio de preevaluación que puede servir de punto de partida de estudios de evaluación propiamente dichos. Los estudios sobre las implicaciones socioeconómicas del glaucoma, refieren que los costos de la atención al paciente aumentan a medida que empeora esta enfermedad, y que la efectividad en el tratamiento al paciente y el retraso en la progresión de la enfermedad, pueden reducir significativamente la carga económica del glaucoma. CONCLUSIONES: los estudios de costo de la enfermedad pueden demostrar que las enfermedades requieren una mayor asignación de recursos para la prevención y para el tratamiento, y ayudarán a influir en las decisiones sobre las prioridades de investigación y monitorear el impacto de iniciativas de políticas en la salud visual.INTRODUCTION: studies of disease costs are an quantified valuation and assessed in monetary units of a series of disease effects, a group of diseases or of a risk factor on the resources and on other variables with a likely effect on the subject and society wellbeing. OBJECTIVES: to explain the general the basic principles of studies of disease cost

  5. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    are limited, it is necessary to identify efficient methods to improve the quality of care. Comparing health care systems is a well-known method for identifying new knowledge regarding, for instance, organisational methods and principles. Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated health care delivery system...... in the U.S., is recognized as providing high-quality chronic care; to some extent, this is due to KP's implementation of the chronic care model (CCM). This model recommends a range of evidence-based management practices that support the implementation of evidence-based medicine. However, it is not clear...... which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved....

  6. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Health system reforms are the most strategic issue that has been seriously considered in healthcare systems in order to reduce costs and increase efficiency and effectiveness. The costs of health system finance in our country, lack of universal coverage in health insurance, and related issues necessitate reforms in our health system financing. The aim of this research was to prepare a structure of framework for social health insurance in Iran and conducting a comparative study in selected countries with social health insurance. This comparative descriptive study was conducted in three phases. The first phase of the study examined the structure of health social insurance in four countries - Germany, South Korea, Egypt, and Australia. The second phase was to develop an initial model, which was designed to determine the shared and distinguishing points of the investigated structures, for health insurance in Iran. The third phase was to validate the final research model. The developed model by the Delphi method was given to 20 professionals in financing of the health system, health economics and management of healthcare services. Their comments were collected in two stages and its validity was confirmed. The study of the structure of health insurance in the selected countries shows that health social insurance in different countries have different structures. Based on the findings of the present study, the current situation of the health system, and the conducted surveys, the following framework is suitable for the health social insurance system in Iran. The Health Social Insurance Organization has a unique service by having five funds of governmental employees, companies and NGOs, self-insured, villagers, and others, which serves as a nongovernmental organization under the supervision of public law and by decision- and policy-making of the Health Insurance Supreme Council. Membership in this organization is based on the nationality or residence, which the insured by

  7. Cosmological principles. II. Physical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, E.R.

    1974-01-01

    The discussion of cosmological principle covers the uniformity principle of the laws of physics, the gravitation and cognizability principles, and the Dirac creation, chaos, and bootstrap principles. (U.S.)

  8. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... If so, what type of training is best? Should there be a recognized curriculum and accreditation? What further information would you like the authors to provide? Is your organisation training non-medical health staff in surgery (or other medical procedures)? If so, what are the results? Write to the editor at: ...

  9. The Tarsal Bone Test: A Basic Test of Health Sciences Students' Knowledge of Lower Limb Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Castillo-López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present study was to design an easy-to-use tool, the tarsal bone test (TBT, to provide a snapshot of podiatry students’ basic anatomical knowledge of the bones of the lower limb. Methods. The study included 254 podiatry students from three different universities, 145 of them were first-year students and 109 were in their fourth and final years. The TBT was administered without prior notice to the participants and was to be completed in 5 minutes. Results. The results show that 97.2% of the subjects (n=247 correctly labelled all tarsal bones, while the other 2.8% (n=7 incorrectly labelled at least one bone, that was either the cuboid (7 times or the navicular (6 times. Although only one fourth-year student inaccurately identified one bone, no significant differences in the distribution of the correct and incorrect responses were found between first and fourth-year students. Conclusions. The TBT seems to be a straightforward and easy-to-apply instrument, and provides an objective view of the level of knowledge acquired at different stages of podiatry studies.

  10. Risk communication basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, P.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information.

  11. Risk communication basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrado, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  13. The effects of China's urban basic medical insurance schemes on the equity of health service utilisation: evidence from Shaanxi Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongliang; Zhu, Liang; Zhou, Zhiying; Li, Zhengya; Gao, Jianmin; Chen, Gang

    2014-03-09

    In order to alleviate the problem of "Kan Bing Nan, Kan Bing Gui" (medical treatment is difficult to access and expensive) and improve the equity of health service utilisation for urban residents in China, the Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance scheme (UEBMI) and Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance scheme (URBMI) were established in 1999 and 2007, respectively. This study aims to analyse the effects of UEBMI and URBMI on the equity of outpatient and inpatient utilisation in Shaanxi Province, China. Using the data from the fourth National Health Services Survey in Shaanxi Province, the method of Propensity Score Matching was employed to generate comparable samples between the insured and uninsured residents, through a one-to-one match algorithm. Next, based on the matched data, the method of decomposition of the concentration index was employed to compare the horizontal inequity indexes of health service utilisation between the UEBMI/URBMI insured and the matched uninsured residents. For the UEBMI insured and matched uninsured residents, the horizontal inequity indexes of outpatient visits are 0.1256 and -0.0511 respectively, and the horizontal inequity indexes of inpatient visits are 0.1222 and 0.2746 respectively. Meanwhile, the horizontal inequity indexes of outpatient visits are -0.1593 and 0.0967 for the URBMI insured and matched uninsured residents, and the horizontal inequity indexes of inpatient visits are 0.1931 and 0.3199 respectively. The implementation of UEBMI increased the pro-rich inequity of outpatient utilisation (rich people utilise outpatient facilities more than the poor people) and the implementation of URBMI increased the pro-poor inequity of outpatient utilisation. Both of these two health insurance schemes reduced the pro-rich inequity of inpatient utilisation.

  14. Some views of health professionals and basic health care unit users concerning nutritional education - DOI: 10.3395/reciis.v1i2.86en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa Françoise da Silva Aquino

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional education is a participatory process of knowledge acquisition concerning a healthy diet. The implementation of nutritional education in the public health care system is put into question based on a survey carried out with health professionals, and with users of one Basic Health Care Unit (UBS. The execution of nutritional education requires health professional specific knowledge in order to approach alimentary problems. The nutritionist is not duly involved in the public health care. Based on quantitative and qualitative methodologies, eight UBS health professionals were interviewed in order to verify their professional and personal experiences concerning nutritional education. There were 306 users interviewed, which is a representative sample of the population which is assisted by the UBS, in order to analyze the influence of such activity in their health. The interview results show that the professionals have some difficulty in approaching information concerning alimentation and that they believe there is some room for a nutritionist's participation in a multi-disciplinary team. Around 97% of the users believe that nutrition interferes in their life quality and 19.28% of them believe that nutrition problems are related to education. Nutritional education, as a structured program, does not exist. The mobilization of nutritionists in the exercise of their function and in meeting demands of health professionals and health care users is necessary.

  15. Application of HACCP principles to control visitor health threats on dairy farms open to the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barten, M; Noordhuizen, J P M; Lipman, L J A

    2008-10-01

    An increasing number of Dutch dairy farmers have diversified their activities, often opening their farm up to visitors (tourist accommodation, farm shop, contact with livestock, etc). It is essential to prevent these visitors from having accidents or becoming ill, which could result in financial claims and might harm the reputation of the agricultural sector. This article describes how the hazard analysis critical control points concept and principles (HACCP) can be applied to these activities and integrated with on-farm operational herd health and production management programmes.

  16. The extent to which the public health 'war on obesity' reflects the ethical values and principles of critical health promotion: a multimedia critical discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lily; Taylor, Jane; Barnes, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The discipline of health promotion is responsible for implementing strategies within weight-related public health initiatives (WR-PHI). It is imperative that such initiatives be subjected to critical analysis through a health promotion ethics lens to help ensure ethical health promotion practice. Multimedia critical discourse analysis was used to examine the claims, values, assumptions, power relationships and ideologies within Australian WR-PHI. The Health Promotion Values and Principles Continuum was used as a heuristic to evaluate the extent to which the WR-PHI reflected the ethical values of critical health promotion: active participation of people in the initiative; respect for personal autonomy; beneficence; non-maleficence; and strong evidential and theoretical basis for practice. Ten initiatives were analysed. There was some discourse about the need for participation of people in the WR-PHI, but people were routinely labelled as 'target groups' requiring 'intervention'. Strong evidence of a coercive and paternalistic discourse about choice was identified, with minimal attention to respect for personal autonomy. There was significant emphasis on the beneficiaries of the WR-PHI but minimal attention to the health benefits, and nothing about the potential for harm. Discourse about the evidence of need was objectivist, and there was no discussion about the theoretical foundations of the WR-PHI. The WR-PHI were not reflective of the ethical values and principles of critical health promotion. So what? Health promotion researchers and practitioners engaged in WR-PHI should critically reflect on the extent to which they are consistent with the ethical aspects of critical health promotion practice.

  17. Social roles, basic need satisfaction, and psychological health: the central role of competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Amelia E; Kocum, Lucie; Schlegel, Rebecca J; Molix, Lisa; Bettencourt, B Ann

    2012-02-01

    The authors propose that competence need fulfillment within valued role domains (i.e., spouse, parent, worker) will account, in part, for associations between autonomy and relatedness need fulfillment and psychological health. Testing these assertions in cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys of women in two independent community samples, the findings are the first to formally examine whether the satisfaction of competence needs within social roles accounts for associations between other types of need satisfaction and affective outcomes as well as depressive symptomology. Evidence supporting the hypothesis was stronger when examining individuals' affective health as compared to their depressive symptoms. Implications of the findings are discussed with regard to need fulfillment within social roles.

  18. Value-Based Pricing and Reimbursement in Personalised Healthcare: Introduction to the Basic Health Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Garrison, Louis P.; Towse, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    ‘Value-based’ outcomes, pricing, and reimbursement are widely discussed as health sector reforms these days. In this paper, we discuss their meaning and relationship in the context of personalized healthcare, defined as receipt of care conditional on the results of a biomarker-based diagnostic test. We address the question: “What kinds of pricing and reimbursement models should be applied in personalized healthcare?” The simple answer is that competing innovators and technology adopters shoul...

  19. Multimedia Bootcamp: a health sciences library provides basic training to promote faculty technology integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Ellen C

    2006-04-25

    Recent research has shown a backlash against the enthusiastic promotion of technological solutions as replacements for traditional educational content delivery. Many institutions, including the University of Virginia, have committed staff and resources to supporting state-of-the-art, showpiece educational technology projects. However, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has taken the approach of helping Health Sciences faculty be more comfortable using technology in incremental ways for instruction and research presentations. In July 2004, to raise awareness of self-service multimedia resources for instructional and professional development needs, the Library conducted a "Multimedia Bootcamp" for nine Health Sciences faculty and fellows. Case study. Program stewardship by a single Library faculty member contributed to the delivery of an integrated learning experience. The amount of time required to attend the sessions and complete homework was the maximum fellows had to devote to such pursuits. The benefit of introducing technology unfamiliar to most fellows allowed program instructors to start everyone at the same baseline while not appearing to pass judgment on the technology literacy skills of faculty. The combination of wrapping the program in the trappings of a fellowship and selecting fellows who could commit to a majority of scheduled sessions yielded strong commitment from participants as evidenced by high attendance and a 100% rate of assignment completion. Response rates to follow-up evaluation requests, as well as continued use of Media Studio resources and Library expertise for projects begun or conceived during Bootcamp, bode well for the long-term success of this program. An incremental approach to integrating technology with current practices in instruction and presentation provided a supportive yet energizing environment for Health Sciences faculty. Keys to this program were its faculty focus, traditional hands-on instruction, unrestricted

  20. Basics of programming exercises using health and fitness technology in physical education pupils of secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Verkhovska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to present a framework for programming model classes using athletic health technologies at physical training lessons to pupils of general education schools. Material : the information base on research constitute official documents of the governing bodies of the European Union for the development of sports education. Also - the curricula and training programs for teachers of physical training, training programs on physical training of general educational institutions, research papers, reference and encyclopaedias, periodicals, national and foreign publications. The study involved 178 teachers of physical culture. Results : The general education schools were given the right choice of the existing options of training and education. Also - the construction of new ones. Therefore, the logical focus is physical education teachers to use technology in improving physical fitness physical training lessons, changing the concept of sports orientation of physical training on wellness. This concept aims at developing various curricula, development and testing of new technologies and more. Conclusions : Programming exercises using athletic health technologies do not change the logic of the training and educational process. They cancel stringent regulatory and authoritarian school programs, form the subject of a positive motivation to contribute to improving and training effect, adjust the health status of all participants.

  1. Curing hearing loss: Patient expectations, health care practitioners, and basic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms of mild hearing loss, the only viable option for patients suffering from profound hearing loss is the cochlear implant. Despite their successes, hearing aids and cochlear implants are not perfect. Particularly frequency discrimination and performance in noisy environments and general efficacy of the devises vary among individual patients. The advent of regenerative medicine, the publicity of stem cells and gene therapy, and recent scientific achievements in inner ear cell regeneration have generated an emerging spirit of optimism among scientists, health care practitioners, and patients. In this review, we place the different points of view of these three groups in perspective with the goal of providing an assessment of patient expectations, health care reality, and potential future treatment options for hearing disorders. (1) Readers will be encouraged to put themselves in the position of a hearing impaired patient or family member of a hearing impaired person. (2) Readers will be able to explain why diagnosis of the underlying pathology of hearing loss is difficult. (3) Readers will be able to list the main directions of current research aimed to cure hearing loss. (4) Readers will be able to understand the different viewpoints of patients and their relatives, health care providers, and scientists with respect to finding novel treatments for hearing loss. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Statement of the American Psychological Association in response to the "joint principles: integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norman B; Belar, Cynthia D; Cubic, Barbara A; Garrison, Ellen G; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2014-06-01

    Comments on the article "Joint principles: Integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home" (see record 2014-24217-011), presented by the Working Party Group on Integrated Behavioral Healthcare. The American Psychological Association (APA) shares concerns about the lack of reference to behavioral health care in the original 2007 Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home for which this new document is intended to supplement but not replace. The decision to support the supplemental Joint Principles was not an easy one for APA, as there is one area of significant concern. That concern is related to the use of the term "physician-directed medical practice"

  3. [Evaluation of the capacity for governance of a State Health Department in monitoring and evaluation of basic health care provision--lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Juliana; de Carvalho, Eduardo Maia Freese; Pereira, Gladys Fernanda Coelho; de Mello, Fernanda Maria Bezerra

    2011-01-01

    The decentralization of the SUS requires state health departments to assume new powers as the monitoring and evaluation of Basic Care. This article aims to evaluate the "capacity for governance" of a State Health Northeastern Brazilian Department in monitoring and evaluation of Basic Care. From the technical cooperation held via component III of Proesf, key health care managers were interviewed, strategical documents were analyzed, and participatory observation of activities was carried out at a training centre, with a "contend analysis" procedure. Among the results, are: absence of "government project", problems of physical infrastructure, human resources and material, with low professional qualification in the use of information systems, monitoring and evaluation, and strategic planning, promoting and fragile bureaucratic work use of epidemiological data. In 2006, the Department used federal resources to strengthen the monitoring and evaluation of primary care by expanding its physical infrastructure, acquiring equipment and training for staff, without investing its own resource. To conclude, the Health Department has experienced difficulties in adjusting to decentralization, with the introduction of new working procedures into the institution.

  4. A cost and technical efficiency analysis of two alternative models for implementing the basic package of health services in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaakman, Aaron Philip; Salehi, Ahmad Shah; Boitard, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Since 2003, the Afghan Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and international partners have directed a contracting-out model through which non-governmental organisations (NGOs) deliver the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) in 31 of the 34 Afghan provinces. The MoPH also managed health service delivery in three provinces under an alternative initiative entitled Strengthening Mechanisms (SM). In 2011, under the authority of the MoPH and Delegation of the European Union to Afghanistan, EPOS Health Management conducted a cost and technical efficiency study of the contracting-out and SM mechanisms in six provinces to examine economic trade-offs in the provision of the BPHS. The study provides analyses of all resource inputs and primary outputs of the BPHS in the six provinces during 2008 and 2009. The authors examined technical efficiency using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) at the BPHS facility level. Cost analysis results indicate that the weighted average cost per BPHS outpatient visit totalled $3.41 in the SM provinces and $5.39 in the NGO-led provinces in 2009. Furthermore, the data envelopment analyses (DEAs) indicate that facilities in the three NGO-led provinces scored 0.168 points higher on the DEA scale (0-1) than SM facilities. The authors conclude that an approximate 60% increase in costs yielded a 16.8% increase in technical efficiency in the delivery of the BPHS during 2009 in the six provinces.

  5. Fermat and the Minimum Principle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arguably, least action and minimum principles were offered or applied much earlier. This (or these) principle(s) is/are among the fundamental, basic, unifying or organizing ones used to describe a variety of natural phenomena. It considers the amount of energy expended in performing a given action to be the least required ...

  6. Teaching evidence-based practice principles to prepare health professions students for an interprofessional learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nell Aronoff

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Online EBP learning modules were effective in developing EBP knowledge and skills for health professions students. Using the same modules ensured that students from different health professions at different stages of their professional programs had consistent knowledge and enabled each student to fully engage in an interprofessional evidence-based activity. Student feedback indicated the modules were valued and beneficial.

  7. Basic biochemical, hematological and hormonal parameters for monitoring the health and nutritional status in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz Urdampilleta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporting competitions are becoming more demanding in terms of intensity of effort, and this means controlling all aspects that affect athletic performance. Food, hydration and supplementation, before, during and after training or competition directly affect health, body composition, performance and recovery of the athlete. The assessment of nutritional status is required for proper advising of the athlete, through blood tests to control the process of adaptation to training. The aim of this paper is to provide practical tools for dietitiansnutritionists to control the health and nutritional status of athletes, as well as monitoring their adaptation to workloads and competition periods. Performing analytical tests to control of protein metabolism, lipid profile, ions, blood tests and iron metabolism, in addition to review some hormonal parameters, may be of interest in order to observe the potential existence of overtraining states. The correct understanding and interpretation of laboratory tests (under sports doctor’s supervision will be most important and useful for dietitiansnutritionists, performing dietary and nutritional advice to athletes, because it will determine the status of the athlete and propose different individual feeding strategies depending on the training phase and response.

  8. Exposure to Non-Ionizing Radiation and Public Health: Basic Concepts and Safety Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda-Maeso, A.; Vargas-Marcos, F.; Trillo-Ruiz, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The potential health effects of exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in public and residential environments are a source of increasing concern for both the public and authorities on environmental health. This work briefly summarizes the theoretical and experimental bases supporting the safety levels proposed by international committees. It also reviews the recent scientific literature on bioeffects on non-ionizing radiation that may prove potentially relevant to the validation or modification of present exposure limits. Because of their social interest, special consideration will be given to power frequency fields (50-60 Hz) and to the radio communication signals of mobile phones. We will also describe how interpretations of scientific evidence from sources other than international committees have generated some controversy and provided basis for more restrictive limits, such as those adopted in Europe by Switzerland and Italy. In addition, this work identifies some gaps in the present scientific knowledge of bioelectromagnetics. Such gaps are largely responsible for the existing controversy and differences in risk perception. This is why more research aimed at broadening and deepening our understanding of biological responses to non-ionizing radiation is urgently needed. (author)

  9. Optimal body weight for health and longevity: bridging basic, clinical, and population research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Luigi; Hu, Frank B

    2014-06-01

    Excess body weight and adiposity cause insulin resistance, inflammation, and numerous other alterations in metabolic and hormonal factors that promote atherosclerosis, tumorigenesis, neurodegeneration, and aging. Studies in both animals and humans have demonstrated a beneficial role of dietary restriction and leanness in promoting health and longevity. Epidemiological studies have found strong direct associations between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risks of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and several types of cancer, beginning from BMI of 20-21 kg m(-2). Although a recent meta-analysis suggests that overweight individuals have significantly lower overall mortality than normal-weight individuals, these data are likely to be an artifact produced by serious methodological problems, especially confounding by smoking, reverse causation due to existing chronic disease, and nonspecific loss of lean mass and function in the frail elderly. From a clinical and public health point of view, maintaining a healthy weight through diet and physical activity should remain the cornerstone in the prevention of chronic diseases and the promotion of healthy aging. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. International survey of methods used in health technology assessment (HTA: does practice meet the principles proposed for good research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephens JM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer M Stephens,1 Bonnie Handke,2 Jalpa A Doshi3 On behalf of the HTA Principles Working Group, part of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR HTA Special Interest Group (SIG1Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Medtronic Neuromodulation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Center for Evidence-Based Practice and Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAObjective: To describe research methods used internationally in health technology assessment (HTA and health-care reimbursement policies; compare the survey findings on research methods and processes to published HTA principles; and discuss important issues/trends reported by HTA bodies related to current research methods and applications of the HTA process.Methods: Representatives from HTA bodies worldwide were recruited to complete an online survey consisting of 47 items within four topics: (1 organizational information and process, (2 primary HTA methodologies and importance of attributes, (3 HTA application and dissemination, and (4 quality of HTA, including key issues. Results were presented as a comparison of current HTA practices and research methods to published HTA principles.Results: The survey was completed by 30 respondents representing 16 countries in five major regions, Australia (n = 3, Canada (n = 2, Europe (n = 17, Latin America (n = 2, and the United States (n = 6. The most common methodologies used were systematic review, meta-analysis, and economic modeling. The most common attributes evaluated were effectiveness (more commonly than efficacy, cost-effectiveness, safety, and quality of life. The attributes assessed, relative importance of the attributes, and conformance with HTA principles varied by region/country. Key issues and trends facing HTA bodies included standardizing methods for economic evaluations and grading of evidence, lack of evidence

  11. MIGRAINE: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Esin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern recommendations for the migraine attack treatment and it's prophylaxis are analyzed in this review. Established, that acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac potassium, ibuprofen, naproxen, paracetamol, metamizol and their combination with caffeine are drugs of the first choice for migraine attack treatment. Metoclopramide and domperidone are used to reduce nausea and vomiting. Also triptans are high effective drugs for migraine attack treatment. Metoprolol, propranolol, flunarizine, valproic acid can be used for migraine prophylaxis. Drugs of the second choice are: amitriptyline, venlafaxine, naproxen and bisoprolol.

  12. X-ray Spectrometry: Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, R.M.; Teixeira, G.J.; Cardoso, R.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2017-01-01

    The application of X rays requires a study of its spectrum. Intrinsic difficulties of the own method and of all the instrumentation necessary for the accomplishment of this practice were related. The objective was to demonstrate the use of a commercial spectrometer using at room temperature and compare it with spectra theoretically obtained by simulation. As an initial result was that both instrumentation is compatible to be used in an X-ray beam, with and without scattering material and its theoretical data were obtained. (author)

  13. Laser light scattering basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, this text introduces the interdisciplinary area of laser light scattering, focusing chiefly on theoretical concepts of quasielastic laser scattering.

  14. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One such nonlinear process, namely, the third order nonlinear spectroscopy has become a popular tool to study molecular structure. Thus, the spectroscopy based on the third order optical nonlinearity called stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is a tool to extract the structural and dynamical information about a molecular ...

  15. Basic Principles and Concepts for Achieving Quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Emanuel R; Fisher, Matthew J; Goethert, Wolfhart; Marino, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    ...) developed in the early 1980s for the Department of Defense (DoD) by Baker and colleagues. The original quality concepts of the SQF are extended beyond software to include products, services, and processes...

  16. Laser Treatment of Tattoos: Basic Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Tattooing has become very popular worldwide during the past decades, and millions of people have one or many tattoos at different anatomical sites. The color of tattoos is mainly black, followed by red, green, blue, and other colors. A part of the tattooed people regret tattooing or have permanent problems with tattoos and therefore seek for tattoo removal. Tattoos consist of solid pigment particles in the skin. Thus, tattoo removal requires fragmentation of these permanently incorporated particles. The gold standard of tattoo removal is laser therapy. Short light pulses at high intensities are applied to the tattooed skin surface. The laser light penetrates the skin and is selectively absorbed in the pigment particles. The absorbed laser light leads to heat-up and fragmentation of the particles. Due to the complex chemistry of the various tattoo pigments, the efficacy of this fragmentation process is frequently unpredictable. Due to the short and intense pulses, nonlinear effects of light and thermal properties of tattoo particles may play a role, and the assumptions of selective photothermolysis may not reflect the real process of tattoo particle fragmentation as a whole. In case fragmentation occurs, the concentration of pigment particles in the skin decreases, yielding a fading of the tattoo color in the skin. Laser therapy is most effective in black tattoos and less effective for colored tattoos. The rate of side effects is low due to the selectivity of the treatment. Laser light may change the chemistry of the tattoo pigments and hence provoke toxic decomposition products. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (k1 − k2) z − (ω1 − ω2)t. )] } ... . (11). The terms within {···} correspond to different signals generated due to the second order nonlinearity. The first two terms in equation 11 correspond to DC field gene- ration, also known as optical rectification. The third and fourth terms correspond to second harmonic generation,.

  18. Basic principles for chronic peritoneal dialysis prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto J. Barone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available La diálisis peritoneal, como tratamiento sustitutivo de la función renal, se basa en la instilación dentro de la cavidad peritoneal de soluciones de diálisis con el objeto de aprovechar algunas de las propiedades del peritoneo como membrana biológica, con el fin de eliminar las sustancias de desecho generadas diariamente por nuestro organismo y contribuir entre otros con el control del balance hidrosalino alterado en la insuficiencia renal.

  19. Software Defined Radio: Basic Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raúl Machado-Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author makes a review of the SDR (Software Defined Radio technology, including hardware schemes and application fields. A low performance device is presented and several tests are executed with it using free software. With the acquired experience, SDR employment opportunities are identified for low-cost solutions that can solve significant problems. In addition, a list of the most important frameworks related to the technology developed in the last years is offered, recommending the use of three of them.

  20. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PUPIL’S DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Mujčin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available “Physical education is consciousness activity, constant from childhood to adult- hood, to which the aim is to assure full physical development, to strengthen the power of resistance against illness, to ameliorate energy and all other characteristics of ac- tivity and character.” (Hebert / Le sport contre l’éducation physique“, Pons 1925.. Physycal education is important factor of overall education. It becomes equal and equally valuable process, which features special tools and tasks. However, besides everything else success of physical education of children and youth depends on methods, content, tools, sources and school organization of teaching. The science has universal deve- lopment of the personality as the main goal. Following that every education which’s results The science puts overall development of personality as goal of education. Follo- wing that, every education that opposes to that goal is wrong and narrow. This means that physical education as composing and indivisible part of general education is permanent, planned and systematic process of impact on human, especially at the period of youth when different kinds of tools, especially by physical education develop and build a person capable for work, and when forming his personality in sense of ethics Yet, besides all other a success of physical education of children and youth depend on methods, content, tools, sources and school organization of teaching. For an achie- vement of expected results it is not enough that teacher knows only meanings, aims and connectivity of his work in function of school as educational institution, but also to know to organize and perform teaching by modern scientific achievement, specially pedagogy, psychology and physiology.

  1. The woollen system- development and basic principles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, JP

    1984-03-01

    Full Text Available is normally received at the miU in a press packed hale with a density of approximately 250 kg/m3. The latest trend is to compact the bales to a density3 of up to 570 kg/m3 or higher. It is therefore essential that the bales he opened and that machines... or box and this skip, containing a unit mixture of the blend, is then emptied into a special hopper feed, levelling out the intermittent feed of the skip, which levels out the flow for feeding the opening machid6. The modem trend is to place a series...

  2. Digital design basic concepts and principles

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Mohammad A

    2007-01-01

    DATA TYPE AND REPRESENTATIONS Positional Number Systems Number System Conversion Negative Numbers Binary Arithmetic Unconventional Number System Binary Codes Error Detecting and Correcting Codes CAD System BOOLEAN ALGEBRA Logic Operations Logic Functions from Truth Tables Boolean Algebra MINIMIZATION OF LOGIC FUNCTIONS Karnaugh Map Incompletely Specified Functions in K-Map K-Maps for Product-of-sum Form of Functions Map-entered Variables Hazards Single-output Q-M Tabular Reduction Multiple-output Q-M Tabular reduction                               LOGIC FUNCTION IMPLEMENTATION Introduction Functionally Complete Operation Sets NAND-only and NOR-only Implementations Function Implementation Using XOR and XNOR Logic Circuit Implementation Using Gate Arrays Logic Function Implementation Using Multiplexers Logic Function Implementation Using Demultiplexers andecoders Logic Function Implementation Using ROM Logic Function Implementation Using PLD Logic Func...

  3. Development of a Positive Youth Development Program: Promoting the Mental Health of Stressful Adolescents Using Principles of Problem Solving Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the proposal for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a positive youth development program that attempts to promote the mental health of stressful Chinese adolescents using principles of Problem Solving Therapy (PST. There are two general aims of PST: to help clients identify life difficulties and resolve them, as well as to teach them skills on how to deal with future problems. The proposed project will utilize the principles of PST as the guiding framework to run two mental health promotion courses for adolescents who are experiencing disturbing stressful responses and students who want to improve their stress management style. Both objective and subjective outcome evaluation strategies will be carried out to assess the effectiveness of the intervention to promote the psychological well-being in adolescents who are experiencing stress. A related sample proposal is described that can give social workers some insight on how to prepare a proposal for developing the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs.

  4. [Perception of knowledge in palliative care housing for the elderly workers in a basic health zone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Holgado, J; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, J; Torijano-Casalengua, M L

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the level of knowledge in palliative care that health and non health housing for the elderly workers refer, to study the differences between professional categories and to detect their interest in receiving palliative care training. Cross-sectional study conducted among physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, nursing assistant and occupational therapists applying a questionnaire assisting terminal patients with 22 items grouped into four sections: generalities palliative care, physical care, psycho-emotional and spiritual. Each question is answered using a four point scale in much-regulate-little-nothing. 86.8% of respondents know quite what they mean or regular palliative care. 3.8% consider themselves sufficiently trained in palliative care. We found significant differences in non-pharmacological management of dyspnea and insomnia where concerns have less knowledge worker. Medicine and nursing reported having more knowledge in the recognition of a tumor ulcer. There is a very high interest in receiving palliative care training and these are considered very useful. Required impact on the acquisition of knowledge in the medical staff not optional as to non-pharmacological management of major symptoms It also emphasizes the need to approach not to question the patient's pain by physicians. The test to detect cognitive impairment are not well known for nursing assistants. The spiritual realm is the acceptable level of knowledge on the part of all professional categories surveyed. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Towards open collaborative health informatics - The Role of free/libre open source principles. Contribution of the IMIA Open Source Health Informatics Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karopka, T; Schmuhl, H; Marcelo, A; Molin, J Dal; Wright, G

    2011-01-01

    : To analyze the contribution of Free/Libre Open Source Software in health care (FLOSS-HC) and to give perspectives for future developments. The paper summarizes FLOSS-related trends in health care as anticipated by members of the IMIA Open Source Working Group. Data were obtained through literature review and personal experience and observations of the authors in the last two decades. A status quo is given by a frequency analysis of the database of Medfloss.org, one of the world's largest platforms dedicated to FLOSS-HC. The authors discuss current problems in the field of health care and finally give a prospective roadmap, a projection of the potential influences of FLOSS in health care. FLOSS-HC already exists for more than 2 decades. Several projects have shown that FLOSS may produce highly competitive alternatives to proprietary solutions that are at least equivalent in usability and have a better total cost of ownership ratio. The Medfloss.org database currently lists 221 projects of diverse application types. FLOSS principles hold a great potential for addressing several of the most critical problems in health care IT. The authors argue that an ecosystem perspective is relevant and that FLOSS principles are best suited to create health IT systems that are able to evolve over time as medical knowledge, technologies, insights, workflows etc. continuously change. All these factors that inherently influence the development of health IT systems are changing at an ever growing pace. Traditional models of software engineering are not able to follow these changes and provide up-to-date systems for an acceptable cost/value ratio. To allow FLOSS to positively influence Health IT in the future a "FLOSS-friendly" environment has to be provided. Policy makers should resolve uncertainties in the legal framework that disfavor FLOSS. Certification procedures should be specified in a way that they do not raise additional barriers for FLOSS.

  6. Highly Sensitive and Selective Uranium Detection in Natural Water Systems Using a Luminescent Mesoporous Metal-Organic Framework Equipped with Abundant Lewis Basic Sites: A Combined Batch, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and First Principles Simulation Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Dai, Xing; Bai, Zhuanling; Wang, Yanlong; Yang, Zaixing; Zhang, Linjuan; Xu, Lin; Chen, Lanhua; Li, Yuxiang; Gui, Daxiang; Diwu, Juan; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhou, Ruhong; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2017-04-04

    Uranium is not only a strategic resource for the nuclear industry but also a global contaminant with high toxicity. Although several strategies have been established for detecting uranyl ions in water, searching for new uranium sensor material with great sensitivity, selectivity, and stability remains a challenge. We introduce here a hydrolytically stable mesoporous terbium(III)-based MOF material compound 1, whose channels are as large as 27 Å × 23 Å and are equipped with abundant exposed Lewis basic sites, the luminescence intensity of which can be efficiently and selectively quenched by uranyl ions. The detection limit in deionized water reaches 0.9 μg/L, far below the maximum contamination standard of 30 μg/L in drinking water defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, making compound 1 currently the only MOF material that can achieve this goal. More importantly, this material exhibits great capability in detecting uranyl ions in natural water systems such as lake water and seawater with pH being adjusted to 4, where huge excesses of competing ions are present. The uranyl detection limits in Dushu Lake water and in seawater were calculated to be 14.0 and 3.5 μg/L, respectively. This great detection capability originates from the selective binding of uranyl ions onto the Lewis basic sites of the MOF material, as demonstrated by synchrotron radiation extended X-ray adsorption fine structure, X-ray adsorption near edge structure, and first principles calculations, further leading to an effective energy transfer between the uranyl ions and the MOF skeleton.

  7. Redefining leadership education in graduate public health programs: prioritization, focus, and guiding principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Jennifer A; Oxendine, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    Public health program graduates need leadership skills to be effective in the complex, changing public health environment. We propose a new paradigm for schools of public health in which technical and leadership skills have equal priority as core competencies for graduate students. Leadership education should focus on the foundational skills necessary to effect change independent of formal authority, with activities offered at varying levels of intensity to engage different students. Leadership development initiatives should be practice based, process focused, interdisciplinary, diversity based, adaptive, experimental, innovative, and empowering, and they should encourage authenticity. Leadership training in graduate programs will help lay the groundwork for public health professionals to have an immediate impact in the workforce and to prioritize continuous leadership development throughout their careers.

  8. Redefining Leadership Education in Graduate Public Health Programs: Prioritization, Focus, and Guiding Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxendine, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Public health program graduates need leadership skills to be effective in the complex, changing public health environment. We propose a new paradigm for schools of public health in which technical and leadership skills have equal priority as core competencies for graduate students. Leadership education should focus on the foundational skills necessary to effect change independent of formal authority, with activities offered at varying levels of intensity to engage different students. Leadership development initiatives should be practice based, process focused, interdisciplinary, diversity based, adaptive, experimental, innovative, and empowering, and they should encourage authenticity. Leadership training in graduate programs will help lay the groundwork for public health professionals to have an immediate impact in the workforce and to prioritize continuous leadership development throughout their careers. PMID:25706021

  9. Principles and practical procedures for acute psychological first aid training for personnel without mental health experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, George S; Flynn, Brian W

    2006-01-01

    Most authorities agree that mass disasters leave in their wake a need for some form of acute mental health services. However, a review of current literature on crisis intervention and disaster mental health reveals differing points of view on the methods that should be employed (Raphael, 1986; NIMH, 2002). Nevertheless, there appears to be virtual universal endorsement, by relevant authorities, of the value of acute "psychological first aid" (American Psychiatric Association, 1954; USDHHS, 2004; Raphael, 1986; NIMH, 2002; Institute of Medicine, 2003; WHO, 2003; DoD/VAPTSD, 2004; Ritchie, et al., 2004; Friedman, Hamblin, Foa, & Charney, 2004). Psychological first aid (PFA), as an acute mental health intervention, seems uniquely applicable to public health settings, the workplace, the military, mass disaster venues, and even the demands of more well circumscribed critical incidents, e.g., dealing with the psychological aftermath of accidents, robberies, suicide, homicide, or community violence. In this document, we shall introduce the notion of psychological first aid (PFA) as one aspect of a psychological continuum of care, offer a rudimentary definition of PFA, and provide the reader with a practicalframework for its implementation utilizing the individual psychological first aid (iPFA)format. The goal of this paper is to better prepare public health, public safety, and other disaster response personnel who do not possess formal clinical mental health degrees or specialized training to provide iPFA services to primary and secondary disaster victims.

  10. Better access to mental health care and the failure of the Medicare principle of universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Graham N; Enticott, Joanne C; Inder, Brett; Russell, Grant M; Gurr, Roger

    2015-03-02

    To examine whether adult use of mental health services subsidised by Medicare varies by measures of socioeconomic and geographic disadvantage in Australia. A secondary analysis of national Medicare data from 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2011 for all mental health services subsidised by Better Access to Mental Health Care (Better Access) and Medicare - providers included general practitioners, psychiatrists, clinical psychologists and mental health allied health practitioners. Service use rates followed by measurement of inequity using the concentration curve and concentration index. Increasing remoteness was consistently associated with lower service activity; eg, per 1000 population, the annual rate of use of GP items was 79 in major cities and 25 and 8 in remote and very remote areas, respectively. Apart from GP usage, higher socioeconomic disadvantage in areas was typically associated with lower usage; eg, per 1000 population per year, clinical psychologist consultations were 68, 40 and 23 in the highest, middle and lowest advantaged quintiles, respectively; and non-Better Access psychiatry items were 117, 55 and 45 in the highest, middle and lowest advantaged quintiles, respectively. Our results highlight important socioeconomic and geographical disparities associated with the use of Better Access and related Medicare services. This can inform Australia's policymakers about these priority gaps and help to stimulate targeted strategies both nationally and regionally that work towards the universal and equitable delivery of mental health care for all Australians.

  11. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  12. Value-Based Pricing and Reimbursement in Personalised Healthcare: Introduction to the Basic Health Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis P. Garrison

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ‘Value-based’ outcomes, pricing, and reimbursement are widely discussed as health sector reforms these days. In this paper, we discuss their meaning and relationship in the context of personalized healthcare, defined as receipt of care conditional on the results of a biomarker-based diagnostic test. We address the question: “What kinds of pricing and reimbursement models should be applied in personalized healthcare?” The simple answer is that competing innovators and technology adopters should have incentives that promote long-term dynamic efficiency. We argue that—to meet this social objective of optimal innovation in personalized healthcare—payers, as agents of their plan participants, should aim to send clear signals to their suppliers about what they value. We begin by revisiting the concept of value from an economic perspective, and argue that a broader concept of value is needed in the context of personalized healthcare. We discuss the market for personalized healthcare and the interplay between price and reimbursement. We close by emphasizing the potential barrier posed by inflexible or cost-based reimbursement systems, especially for biomarker-based predictive tests, and how these personalized technologies have global public goods characteristics that require global value-based differential pricing to achieve dynamic efficiency in terms of the optimal rate of innovation and adoption.

  13. Value-Based Pricing and Reimbursement in Personalised Healthcare: Introduction to the Basic Health Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Louis P; Towse, Adrian

    2017-09-04

    'Value-based' outcomes, pricing, and reimbursement are widely discussed as health sector reforms these days. In this paper, we discuss their meaning and relationship in the context of personalized healthcare, defined as receipt of care conditional on the results of a biomarker-based diagnostic test. We address the question: "What kinds of pricing and reimbursement models should be applied in personalized healthcare?" The simple answer is that competing innovators and technology adopters should have incentives that promote long-term dynamic efficiency. We argue that-to meet this social objective of optimal innovation in personalized healthcare-payers, as agents of their plan participants, should aim to send clear signals to their suppliers about what they value. We begin by revisiting the concept of value from an economic perspective, and argue that a broader concept of value is needed in the context of personalized healthcare. We discuss the market for personalized healthcare and the interplay between price and reimbursement. We close by emphasizing the potential barrier posed by inflexible or cost-based reimbursement systems, especially for biomarker-based predictive tests, and how these personalized technologies have global public goods characteristics that require global value-based differential pricing to achieve dynamic efficiency in terms of the optimal rate of innovation and adoption.

  14. Detection of irradiation history for health foods. Calcium salt of organic acid and its basic ingredient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Seiko; Yunoki, Shunji; Ohyabu, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium carbonate and calcium salt of organic acid are well-known food additives used for the improvement of the shelf life and eating quality of health food. Calcium carbonate is a precursor in the synthesis of calcium salts of organic acid. Certain calcium carbonates made of natural limestone mined from very old stratum have silicate minerals exposed to a low level of natural radiation over a long period of time and food additives derived from calcium carbonates contained of such silicate minerals are possible to classify as irradiated foods by PSL and TL analysis in spite of non-irradiation. The study of calcium carbonates and calcium salts of organic acid obtained from different producers were allow to provided appropriate decisions by using the information of both the TL response (Glow1 peak temperature and TL ratio) and PSL ratio. ESR measurements of radicals in such food additives caused by gamma- irradiation were effective tool for correctly determining for irradiation history of those because the measurements were not affected by silicate minerals contained in those. (author)

  15. The National Programme for Improvement of Access and Quality of Basic Health Care and the work process organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Auxiliadora Almeida LOPES

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study analises the National Programme for Improvement of Access and Quality of the Basic Health Care focusing on the reorganization of work processes: self-evaluation, continuous education, institutional support and monitoring. Based on document analysis, direct observations and interviews with workers in the Federal District. The results point to lack of training of team members for the adherence to the programme; parcial/distorted view about its proposal; weakenesses in the monitoring; incipient self-evaluations processes; lack of institutional support; inadequate permanent education; unsatisfactory working conditions; and deficits in the support diagnosys network. It should be considered that changes in work processes require time to be implemented and that improvement in the quality of services goes beyound prescriptions and fullfilment of standards and norms.

  16. An Evaluation of the Quality of the Desinfection Process in Inanimated Surfaces of Basic Health Units by Biomarkers Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bandeira Fucci

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection Related Health Care – IRHC may occur by exogenous transmission through the contamination of contaminated surfaces. This study aimed at verifying the quality of the process of disinfecting inanimate surfaces of Basic Health Units – BHU in a northeastern city in São Paulo state, through the presence of biomarkers, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. We evaluated 7 UBS in random times and days, covering the following areas: dressing-room doorknob, drinking fountains and faucets, office desk, reception counter. Sterile swabs were rubbed on a 20 cm2 surface and transported to the laboratory in Stuart medium to the Clinical Analyses Didactic Laboratory of UNIFEV. The samples were cultured on Blood agar and MacConkey agar at 35 ± 1oC for 24 hours in aerobic and microaerophilic jar, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was identified by the production of hemolysin, catalase and coagulase. Escherichia coli was identified using the biochemical tests: TSI, citrate, urease, indole, lysine, ornithine and arginine. Of the 105 samples analyzed, 6.66% of the samples were positive for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to 2.85%. The Areas which showed the presence of biomarkers were: the reception booth, booth pharmacy, handles of the dressing room, dressing room faucet and drinking fountain. These results corroborate other studies that show that inanimate surfaces are important sources of contamination in the healthcare environment, contributing to crosscontamination and, consequently, to the increase of infection to the patient who is subjected to procedures in this environment. Within this context, government, by means of public health policies, is responsible for the training of health professionals, contributing to the promotion and prevention of public health

  17. Integrating the SE and HCI models in the human factors engineering cycle for re-engineering Computerized Physician Order Entry systems for medications: basic principles illustrated by a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernonville, Stéphanie; Kolski, Christophe; Leroy, Nicolas; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine

    2010-04-01

    The integration of Human Factors is still insufficient in the design and implementation phases of complex interactive systems such as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) systems. One of the problems is that human factors specialists have difficulties to communicate their data and to have them properly understood by the computer scientists in the design and implementation phases. This paper presents a solution to this problem based on the creation of common documentation supports using Software Engineering (SE) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) methods. The integration of SE and HCI methods and models is an interesting means for modelling an organization's activities, with software applications being part of these activities. Integrating these SE and HCI methods and models allows case studies to be seen from the technical, organizational and ergonomic perspectives, and also makes it easier to compare current and future work situations. The exploitation of these techniques allows the creation of common work supports that can be easily understandable by computer scientists and relevant for re-engineering or design. In this paper, the basic principles behind such communication supports are described and illustrated by a real case study. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Less power outages thanks to shunt circuit breakers - Basic principle and experience gained in medium voltage networks with isolated neutral; Reduction des interruptions de fourniture grace au disjoncteur shunt. Principe et experimentation dans les reseaux moyenne tension a neutre isole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raemy, E. de; Dutoit, J.

    2009-07-01

    The article presents the basic principle of the operation of shunt circuit breakers and reports on two years experience with such devices in the medium voltage (20 kV) distribution networks with isolated neutral of the 'Groupe E' electric utility in Western Switzerland. Shunt circuit breakers are devices that absorb the current of a phase for a few seconds in case this phase conductor encounters an insulation failure to the ground. In this way, electric arcs may be interrupted before they cause short circuits and, consequently, power outages. This is particularly useful in cable distribution networks. The article reports on the sophisticated criteria used to identify the default phase, since a simple criterion based on the voltage difference to the ground may be misleading. The experiments made in the networks under operation are reported in detail. They included all possible types of insulation failures that may occur in the practice. The statistics of the real failures encountered in the following two years of operation and the experience gained are also discussed. The authors conclude that shunt circuit breakers effectively avoid most power outages. The 'Groupe E' utility decided to immediately install such devices in its networks.

  19. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves: Basic principles and procedures for routine clinical and research application. An updated report from an I.F.C.N. Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R; Cohen, L G; Daskalakis, Z; Di Iorio, R; Di Lazzaro, V; Ferreri, F; Fitzgerald, P B; George, M S; Hallett, M; Lefaucheur, J P; Langguth, B; Matsumoto, H; Miniussi, C; Nitsche, M A; Pascual-Leone, A; Paulus, W; Rossi, S; Rothwell, J C; Siebner, H R; Ugawa, Y; Walsh, V; Ziemann, U

    2015-06-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation, especially for TMS. Recent guidelines can be found in the literature covering specific aspects of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as safety (Rossi et al., 2009), methodology (Groppa et al., 2012) and therapeutic applications (Lefaucheur et al., 2014). This up-dated review covers theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating the Carbon and Water Footprints’ Costs in the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC Full Water Cost Recovery Concept: Basic Principles Towards Their Reliable Calculation and Socially Just Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Papadopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the basic principles for the integration of the water and carbon footprints cost into the resource and environmental costs respectively, taking the suggestions set by the Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC one step forward. WFD states that full water cost recovery (FWCR should be based on the estimation of the three sub-costs related: direct; environmental; and resource cost. It also strongly suggests the EU Member States develop and apply effective water pricing policies to achieve FWCR. These policies must be socially just to avoid any social injustice phenomena. This is a very delicate task to handle, especially within the fragile economic conditions that the EU is facing today. Water losses play a crucial role for the FWC estimation. Water losses should not be neglected since they are one of the major “water uses” in any water supply network. A methodology is suggested to reduce water losses and the related Non Revenue Water (NRW index. An Expert Decision Support System is proposed to assess the FWC incorporating the Water and Carbon Footprint costs.

  1. Revamping occupational safety and health training: Integrating andragogical principles for the adult learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Albert

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite attempts to improve safety performance, the construction industry continues to account for a disproportionate rate of injuries. A large proportion of these injuries occur because workers are unable to recognize and respond to hazards in dynamic and unpredictable environments. Unrecognized hazards expose workers to unanticipated risks and can lead to catastrophic accidents. In order to enhance hazard recognition skills, employers often put new and experienced workers through formal hazard recognition training programs. Unfortunately, current training programs primarily rely on instructor-centric pedagogical approaches, which are insensitive to the adult learning process. In order to ensure effective adult learning, training programs must integrate learner-centric andragogical principles to improve engagement and retention in adult trainees. This paper aims to discuss training program elements that can potentially accelerate the adult learning process while improving safety knowledge retention. To this end, the researchers reviewed relevant literature on the cognitive processes of adult learning, essential components of effectual training programs and developed a reliable framework for the training and transfer of safety knowledge. A case example of successfully using the framework is also presented. The results of the study will provide safety trainers and construction professionals with valuable information on developing effective hazard recognition and receptor training programs, with the goal of improving construction safety performance.

  2. First principles of Hamiltonian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Foster, Kevin; Úbeda, Francisco

    2014-05-19

    We introduce the field of Hamiltonian medicine, which centres on the roles of genetic relatedness in human health and disease. Hamiltonian medicine represents the application of basic social-evolution theory, for interactions involving kinship, to core issues in medicine such as pathogens, cancer, optimal growth and mental illness. It encompasses three domains, which involve conflict and cooperation between: (i) microbes or cancer cells, within humans, (ii) genes expressed in humans, (iii) human individuals. A set of six core principles, based on these domains and their interfaces, serves to conceptually organize the field, and contextualize illustrative examples. The primary usefulness of Hamiltonian medicine is that, like Darwinian medicine more generally, it provides novel insights into what data will be productive to collect, to address important clinical and public health problems. Our synthesis of this nascent field is intended predominantly for evolutionary and behavioural biologists who aspire to address questions directly relevant to human health and disease.

  3. The Judicialization of Health in Brazil: Guiding Principles, Organization as the Law 8.080/90, Possibilities and Limites of Jurisdiction in Actions of Free Medicine Provision

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Christina Zenkner; Natal dos Reis Carvalho Junior

    2016-01-01

    The theme of this paper deals with the increasing movement of judicialization of the right to health, characterized by the excess of judicial demands aiming at the obtaining of health treatments and medicines. A study was made on the right to health, its principles and health organization in Brazil in light of Law 8.080 / 90. It analyzed parameters for rationalization of the judicialization in the supply of medicines. He noted the need to adapt procedures and criteria, both administrative and...

  4. An inquiry into the principles of needs-based allocation of health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hope, Tony; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave; Hasman, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of need is often proposed as providing an additional or alternative criterion to cost-effectiveness in making allocation decisions in health care. If it is to be of practical value it must be sufficiently precisely characterized to be useful to decision makers. This will require both ...

  5. [Comprehensiveness and healthcare technologies: a narrative on conceptual contributions to the construction of the comprehensiveness principle in the Brazilian Unified National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Artur Olhovetchi; Ayres, José Ricardo de Carvalho Mesquita

    2016-08-08

    Comprehensiveness is the most challenging principle for building health reform in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). This study aims to identify critical moments in the conceptual debate on comprehensiveness and its contributions to reflection on healthcare technologies in the SUS. The essay addresses some conceptual constructs that approach comprehensiveness as an underlying principle in health programs and actions at various levels and in various dimensions of the healthcare organization - from intersubjective interactions to the organization of regional networks. The study was based on a non-systematic literature review on comprehensiveness and related themes in the Brazilian public health field in the last five decades. The study proposed a chronology/typology spanning the 1960s to the 2010s, divided into four significant periods or categories. The narrative is not intended to be exhaustive, but to build a comprehensive reference base capable of contributing to analyses, assessments, and debates on healthcare organization in the SUS according to the comprehensiveness principle.

  6. WNA's Policy Document : sustaining global best practices in uranium, mining and processing, principles for managing radiation, health and safety, waste and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.; Waste Management and Decommissioning Working Group-WM and DW

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide community of uranium mining and processing recognizes that managing radiation, health and safety, waste and the environment is paramount. Such responsible management applies at all stages of planning and activities. Today we are acting to ensure that all parties directly involved in uranium mining and processing strive to achieve the highest levels of excellence in these fields. We are doing so by sustaining a strong safety culture based on a commitment to common, internationally shared principles. This paper sets out principles for the management of radiation, health and safety, waste and the environment applicable to sites throughout the world. In national and regional settings where nuclear fuel cycle activities are well developed, these principles already serve as the underpinning for 'Codes of Practice' that govern uranium mining and processing. In any given setting, a Code of Practice is needed to guide practical implementation of these principles according to the regional, national or site-specific context. These principles are published in the belief that they hold special relevance for emerging uranium producing countries that do not yet have fully developed regulations for the control of radiation, health and safety, waste and the environment associated with uranium mining and processing. The principles are equally relevant for operators, contractors, and regulators newly engaged in uranium mining and processing. Once national regulations are fully developed, they can be expected to embody these principles. Each principle affirmed here will not apply to the same extent for each party. Ultimately, the precise allocation of responsibilities must be set at the national and local levels. This document holds the status of a policy and ethical declaration by the full WNA membership, which the global nuclear industry. The principles affirmed here are supported by key relevant international organizations, including the IAEA and the global mining

  7. Trial-based economic evaluations in occupational health: principles, methods, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Johanna M; van Wier, Marieke F; Tompa, Emile; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Bosmans, Judith E

    2014-06-01

    To allocate available resources as efficiently as possible, decision makers need information on the relative economic merits of occupational health and safety (OHS) interventions. Economic evaluations can provide this information by comparing the costs and consequences of alternatives. Nevertheless, only a few of the studies that consider the effectiveness of OHS interventions take the extra step of considering their resource implications. Moreover, the methodological quality of those that do is generally poor. Therefore, this study aims to help occupational health researchers conduct high-quality trial-based economic evaluations by discussing the theory and methodology that underlie them, and by providing recommendations for good practice regarding their design, analysis, and reporting. This study also helps consumers of this literature with understanding and critically appraising trial-based economic evaluations of OHS interventions.

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  10. Formative Assessment Using Social Marketing Principles to Identify Health and Nutrition Perspectives of Native American Women Living within the Chickasaw Nation Boundaries in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephany; Hunter, Toma; Briley, Chiquita; Miracle, Sarah; Hermann, Janice; Van Delinder, Jean; Standridge, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify health product and promotion channels for development of a Chickasaw Nation Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Education Program (SNAP-Ed) social marketing program. Methods: The study was qualitative and used social marketing principles to assess Native American women's views of health and nutrition. Focus groups (n = 8) and…

  11. Energy efficiency as a unifying principle for human, environmental, and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Luigi; Atella, Vincenzo; Kammen, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    A strong analogy exists between over/under consumption of energy at the level of the human body and of the industrial metabolism of humanity. Both forms of energy consumption have profound implications for human, environmental, and global health. Globally, excessive fossil-fuel consumption, and individually, excessive food energy consumption are both responsible for a series of interrelated detrimental effects, including global warming, extreme weather conditions, damage to ecosystems, loss of biodiversity, widespread pollution, obesity, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and other lethal chronic diseases. In contrast, data show that the efficient use of energy—in the form of food as well as fossil fuels and other resources—is vital for promoting human, environmental, and planetary health and sustainable economic development. While it is not new to highlight how efficient use of energy and food can address some of the key problems our world is facing, little research and no unifying framework exists to harmonize these concepts of sustainable system management across diverse scientific fields into a single theoretical body. Insights beyond reductionist views of efficiency are needed to encourage integrated changes in the use of the world’s natural resources, with the aim of achieving a wiser use of energy, better farming systems, and healthier dietary habits. This perspective highlights a range of scientific-based opportunities for cost-effective pro-growth and pro-health policies while using less energy and natural resources. PMID:24555053

  12. Energy efficiency as a unifying principle for human, environmental, and global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Luigi; Atella, Vincenzo; Kammen, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    A strong analogy exists between over/under consumption of energy at the level of the human body and of the industrial metabolism of humanity. Both forms of energy consumption have profound implications for human, environmental, and global health. Globally, excessive fossil-fuel consumption, and individually, excessive food energy consumption are both responsible for a series of interrelated detrimental effects, including global warming, extreme weather conditions, damage to ecosystems, loss of biodiversity, widespread pollution, obesity, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and other lethal chronic diseases. In contrast, data show that the efficient use of energy-in the form of food as well as fossil fuels and other resources-is vital for promoting human, environmental, and planetary health and sustainable economic development. While it is not new to highlight how efficient use of energy and food can address some of the key problems our world is facing, little research and no unifying framework exists to harmonize these concepts of sustainable system management across diverse scientific fields into a single theoretical body. Insights beyond reductionist views of efficiency are needed to encourage integrated changes in the use of the world's natural resources, with the aim of achieving a wiser use of energy, better farming systems, and healthier dietary habits. This perspective highlights a range of scientific-based opportunities for cost-effective pro-growth and pro-health policies while using less energy and natural resources.

  13. Comparison of Cervicovaginal Cytopathological Samples Collected in Basic Health Units and in Private Clinics in the Midwest of Santa Catarina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallazem, Bárbara; Dambrós, Bibiana Paula; Gamba, Conrado de Oliveira; Perazzoli, Marcelo; Kirschnick, Alexandre

    2018-02-01

     To compare the quality of cervicovaginal samples obtained from basic health units (BHUs) of the Unified Health System (SUS) and those obtained from private clinics to screen precursor lesions of cervical cancer.  It was an intervention study whose investigated variables were: adequacy of the samples; presence of epithelia in the samples, and cytopathological results. A total of 940 forms containing the analysis of the biological samples were examined: 470 forms of women attended at BHUs of the SUS and 470 forms of women examined in private clinics in January and February of 2016.  All the unsatisfactory samples were collected at BHUs and corresponded to 4% of the total in this sector ( p  private clinics ( p  private system and SUS, respectively. Less serious lesions corresponded to 0.89% of the samples from the SUS and 2.56% of the tests from the private sector; more serious lesions were not represented in the samples obtained from BHUs, whereas the percentage was 1.49% in private institutions.  Unsatisfactory cervical samples were observed only in exams performed at the SUS. There is a need for guidance and training of professionals who perform this procedure to achieve higher reliability in the results and more safety for women who undergo this preventive test. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  14. The role of welfare state principles and generosity in social policy programmes for public health: an international comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Olle; Yngwe, Monica Aberg; Stjärne, Maria Kölegård; Elstad, Jon Ivar; Ferrarini, Tommy; Kangas, Olli; Norström, Thor; Palme, Joakim; Fritzell, Johan

    2008-11-08

    Many important social determinants of health are also the focus for social policies. Welfare states contribute to the resources available for their citizens through cash transfer programmes and subsidised services. Although all rich nations have welfare programmes, there are clear cross-national differences with respect to their design and generosity. These differences are evident in national variations in poverty rates, especially among children and elderly people. We investigated to what extent variations in family and pension policies are linked to infant mortality and old-age excess mortality. Infant mortality rates and old-age excess mortality rates were analysed in relation to social policy characteristics and generosity. We did pooled cross-sectional time-series analyses of 18 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries during the period 1970-2000 for family policies and 1950-2000 for pension policies. Increased generosity in family policies that support dual-earner families is linked with lower infant mortality rates, whereas the generosity in family policies that support more traditional families with gainfully employed men and homemaking women is not. An increase by one percentage point in dual-earner support lowers infant mortality by 0.04 deaths per 1000 births. Generosity in basic security type of pensions is linked to lower old-age excess mortality, whereas the generosity of earnings-related income security pensions is not. An increase by one percentage point in basic security pensions is associated with a decrease in the old age excess mortality by 0.02 for men as well as for women. The ways in which social policies are designed, as well as their generosity, are important for health because of the increase in resources that social policies entail. Hence, social policies are of major importance for how we can tackle the social determinants of health.

  15. Basic metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Names SMAC7; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-7; SMA7; Metabolic panel 7; CHEM-7 References ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. [Bioethics of principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Soba Díez del Corral, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    Bioethics emerges about the tecnological problems of acting in human life. Emerges also the problem of the moral limits determination, because they seem exterior of this practice. The Bioethics of Principles, take his rationality of the teleological thinking, and the autonomism. These divergence manifest the epistemological fragility and the great difficulty of hmoralñ thinking. This is evident in the determination of autonomy's principle, it has not the ethical content of Kant's propose. We need a new ethic rationality with a new refelxion of new Principles whose emerges of the basic ethic experiences.

  17. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The quality of health care services offered to people suffering from chronic diseases often fails to meet standards in Denmark or internationally. The population consisting of people with chronic diseases is large and accounts for about 70% of total health care expenses. Given that resources are limited, it is necessary to identify efficient methods to improve the quality of care. Comparing health care systems is a well-known method for identifying new knowledge regarding, for instance, organisational methods and principles. Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated health care delivery system in the U.S., is recognized as providing high-quality chronic care; to some extent, this is due to KP's implementation of the chronic care model (CCM). This model recommends a range of evidence-based management practices that support the implementation of evidence-based medicine. However, it is not clear which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved. The aim of this dissertation is to describe the effect of determinants, such as organisational structures and management practices including two selected incentives, on the quality of care in chronic diseases. The dissertation is based on four studies with the following purposes: 1) macro- or healthcare system-level identification of organisational structures and principles that affect the quality of health care services, based on a comparison of KP and the Danish health care system; 2) meso- or organisation-level identification of management practices with positive effects on screening rates for hemoglobin A1c and lipid profile in diabetes; 3) evaluation of the effect of the CCM on quality of health care services and continuity of care in a Danish setting; 4) micro- or practice-level evaluation of the

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to content Home Health & Education Health & Education Home Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental ... illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health & Education Health & Education Home Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical ... NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical ...

  20. Imbedding HACCP principles in dairy herd health and production management: case report on calf rearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boersema JSC

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Driven by consumer demands, European legislation has suggested the use of HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point as the quality risk management programme for the whole dairy chain. Until now, an exception has been made for primary producers, but as regulations evolve, on-farm HACCP-like programmes should be ready to assure food safety as well as animal health and animal welfare. In our field experiment, the HACCP-concept was used to combine both optimal farm management and formalisation of quality assurance in an on-farm situation in the Netherlands. The process of young stock rearing was chosen, since its importance for the future of the farm is often underestimated. Hazards and their associated risk factors can be controlled within the farm-specific standards and tolerances, as targets can be controlled by corrective measures and by implementation of farm-specific worksheets. The veterinarian is pivotal for the facility-based HACCP team, since he/she has knowledge about on-farm risk assessment and relations between clinical pathology, feed and farm management. The HACCP concept in combination with veterinary herd health and production management programmes offers a promising approach to optimise on-farm production processes (i.e., young stock rearing in addition to a structural approach for quality risk management on dairy farms.