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Sample records for bases chemistry

  1. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  2. Theme-Based Bidisciplinary Chemistry Laboratory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Phyllis A.; Szczerbicki, Sandra K.

    1996-12-01

    A thematic approach to each of the two introductory chemistry laboratory sequences, general and organic chemistry, not only provides an element of cohesion but also stresses the role that chemistry plays as the "central science" and emphasizes the intimate link between chemistry and other science disciplines. Thus, in general chemistry the rubric "Environmental Chemistry" affords connections to the geosciences, whereas experiments on the topic of "Plant Assays" bridge organic chemistry and biology. By establishing links with other science departments, the theme-based laboratory experiments will satisfy the following multidisciplinary criteria: (i) to demonstrate the general applicability of core methodologies to the sciences, (ii) to help students relate concepts to a broader multidisciplinary context, (iii) to foster an attitude of both independence and cooperation that can transcend the teaching laboratory to the research arena, and (iv) to promote greater cooperation and interaction between the science departments. Fundamentally, this approach has the potential to impact the chemistry curriculum significantly by including student decision-making in the experimental process. Furthermore, the incorporation of GC-MS, a powerful tool for separation and identification as well as a state-of-the-art analytical technique, in the modules will enhance the introductory general and organic chemistry laboratory sequences by making them more instrument-intensive and by providing a reliable and reproducible means of obtaining quantitative analyses. Each multifaceted module has been designed to meet the following criteria: (i) a synthetic protocol including full spectral characterization of products, (ii) quantitative and statistical analyses of data, and (iii) construction of a database of results. The database will provide several concrete functions. It will foster the idea that science is a continuous incremental process building on the results of earlier experimentalists

  3. The Intelligent CAI System for Chemistry Based on Automated Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓京; 张景中

    1999-01-01

    A new type of intelligent CAI system for chemistry is developed in this paper based on automated reasoning with chemistry knowledge.The system has shown its ability to solve chemistry problems,to assist students and teachers in studies and instruction with the automated reasoning functions.Its open mode of the knowledge base and its unique style of the interface between the system and human provide more opportunities for the users to acquire living knowledge through active participation.The automated reasoning based on basic chemistry knowledge also opened a new approach to the information storage and management of the ICAI system for sciences.

  4. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  5. Iron-based superconductors via soft chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friederichs, Gina Maya

    2015-06-30

    This thesis provides new soft chemistry approaches to Fe-based superconductors. Mild syntheses were demonstrated to be able to overcome difficulties, occurring in conventional synthesis and to enable the access to new metastable phases. A solvent-based metathesis reaction led to β-FeSe exclusively. Contrary to solid state syntheses, the formation of hexagonal α-FeSe could be avoided under mild conditions. The deintercalation of interstitial Fe (by formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) could be proven by low temperature O{sub 2}-annealing of Fe{sub 1+x}Te{sub 1-y}Se{sub y}. By using redox (de)intercalations K{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2}, metastable Na{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2-y}As{sub 2} and Na{sub 1-x}((Fe{sub 1-y}Co{sub y}){sub 1-z}As){sub 2} could successfully be obtained at room temperature. The mild synthesis conditions led to compounds like FeSe and K{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2} which exhibited different physical properties than found by conventional high temperature methods. In general, the developed (de)intercalation reactions represent a new, universally applicable tool in order to manipulate the structure along with the properties of Fe-based superconductors. The basic structural features of the characteristic FeX{sub 4/4} tetrahedral layers, however, are preserved. Soft chemistry syntheses have been shown to allow the formation of a variety of phases, like Na{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2-y}As{sub 2}, Na{sub 1-x}((Fe{sub 1-y}Co{sub y}){sub 1-z}As){sub 2} and K{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2}. Hence, especially low temperature approaches may enable the realization of complex stacking sequences, potentially leading to the fulfillment of the greatest goal in the research of superconductors - room temperature superconductivity.

  6. Connecting Acids and Bases with Encapsulation... and Chemistry with Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, Brett

    2007-01-01

    The features and the development of various new acids and bases activity sets that combines chemistry with nanotechnology are being described. These sets lead to the generation of many nanotechnology-based pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases.

  7. An Evidence-Based Approach to Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on research into students' understanding, this article argues that the customary approach to introductory chemistry has created difficulties for students. Instead of being based on the notion of "solids, liquids and gases", introductory chemistry should be structured to develop the concept of a substance. The concept of a…

  8. Implementation of Problem-Based Learning in Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Stina; So¨derstro¨m, Hanna; Andersson, Patrik L.; Nording, Malin L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Chemistry covers a range of topics within the discipline of chemistry, from toxicology to legislation, which warrants interdisciplinary study. Consequently, problem-based learning (PBL), a style of student-centered learning which facilitates the integration of multiple subjects, was investigated to determine if it would be a more…

  9. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  10. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Alternative Conceptions about Acids and Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boz, Yezdan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain prospective chemistry teachers' conceptions about acids and bases concepts. Thirty-eight prospective chemistry teachers were the participants. Data were collected by means of an open-ended questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Analysis of data indicated that most prospective teachers did not have…

  11. A Thematic Review of Studies into the Effectiveness of Context-Based Chemistry Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultay, Neslihan; Calik, Muammer

    2012-01-01

    Context-based chemistry education aims at making connections between real life and the scientific content of chemistry courses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate context-based chemistry studies. In looking for the context-based chemistry studies, the authors entered the keywords "context-based", "contextual learning" and "chemistry…

  12. Integrating UNESCO ICT-Based Instructional Materials in Chemistry Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLIE P. NACARIO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effectiveness of the lessons in Chemistry integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional material on the achievement of Chemistry students at Central Bicol State University of Agriculture. It aimed to identify lessons that may be developed integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials, determine the effect of the developed lessons using the material on: conceptual understanding; science process skills; and attitude towards chemistry and gather insights from the experiences of the students and teacher. The study used the single group pretest and posttest experimental design. Descriptive, quantitative and qualitative techniques were also utilized. Quantitative data were taken from the pretest-posttest results on the Test on Conceptual Understanding, Science Process Skills and Chemistry Attitudinaire. Qualitative data were drawn from the experts’ assessment of the developed lessons and research instruments, and the insights of students and teacher. The developed lessons integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials were Atomic Model and Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, Chemical Bonding, and Balancing Chemical Equation. These lessons increased the conceptual understanding of the students by topic and skill from very low mastery to average mastery level. The students have slightly improved along the different science process skills. After teaching the lessons, the students’ attitude also improved. The students became more motivated and interested in Chemistry and the lessons were student centered and entailed teacher’s competence and flexibility in computer use.

  13. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  14. Applications of Azide-Based Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry in Glycobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  15. Applications of azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry in glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu; Zhang, Yan

    2013-06-19

    Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  16. Click Chemistry in Peptide-Based Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Chaiken

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is an efficient and chemoselective synthetic method for coupling molecular fragments under mild reaction conditions. Since the advent in 2001 of methods to improve stereochemical conservation, the click chemistry approach has been broadly used to construct diverse chemotypes in both chemical and biological fields. In this review, we discuss the application of click chemistry in peptide-based drug design. We highlight how triazoles formed by click reactions have been used for mimicking peptide and disulfide bonds, building secondary structural components of peptides, linking functional groups together, and bioconjugation. The progress made in this field opens the way for synthetic approaches to convert peptides with promising functional leads into structure-minimized and more stable forms.

  17. Click chemistry in peptide-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyuan; Aneja, Rachna; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-08-16

    Click chemistry is an efficient and chemoselective synthetic method for coupling molecular fragments under mild reaction conditions. Since the advent in 2001 of methods to improve stereochemical conservation, the click chemistry approach has been broadly used to construct diverse chemotypes in both chemical and biological fields. In this review, we discuss the application of click chemistry in peptide-based drug design. We highlight how triazoles formed by click reactions have been used for mimicking peptide and disulfide bonds, building secondary structural components of peptides, linking functional groups together, and bioconjugation. The progress made in this field opens the way for synthetic approaches to convert peptides with promising functional leads into structure-minimized and more stable forms.

  18. Web-based Cooperative Learning in College Chemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With the coming of information era, information process depend on internet and multi-media technology in education becomes the new approach of present teaching model reform. Web-based cooperative learning is becoming a popular learning approach with the rapid development of web technology. The paper aims to how to carry out the teaching strategy of web-based cooperative learning and applied in the foundation chemistry teaching.It was shown that with the support of modern web-based teaching environment, students' cooperative learning capacity and overall competence can be better improved and the problems of interaction in large foundation chemistry classes can be solved. Web-based cooperative learning can improve learning performance of students, what's more Web-based cooperative learning provides students with cooperative skills, communication skills, creativity, critical thinking skills and skills in information technology application.

  19. [Computational chemistry in structure-based drug design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ran; Li, Wei; Sun, Han-Zi; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Niu

    2013-07-01

    Today, the understanding of the sequence and structure of biologically relevant targets is growing rapidly and researchers from many disciplines, physics and computational science in particular, are making significant contributions to modern biology and drug discovery. However, it remains challenging to rationally design small molecular ligands with desired biological characteristics based on the structural information of the drug targets, which demands more accurate calculation of ligand binding free-energy. With the rapid advances in computer power and extensive efforts in algorithm development, physics-based computational chemistry approaches have played more important roles in structure-based drug design. Here we reviewed the newly developed computational chemistry methods in structure-based drug design as well as the elegant applications, including binding-site druggability assessment, large scale virtual screening of chemical database, and lead compound optimization. Importantly, here we address the current bottlenecks and propose practical solutions.

  20. Effectiveness of Case-Based Learning Instruction on Pre-Service Teachers' Chemistry Motivation and Attitudes toward Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Aylin; Geban, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    Background: The development of primary pre-service teachers' chemistry motivation and attitudes toward chemistry were examined in order to develop their science literacy using case-based learning. Students' ideas were emphasized, real-life situations were discussed, and students could share their ideas and knowledge with peers; as a result,…

  1. How Do Undergraduate Students Conceptualize Acid-Base Chemistry? Measurement of a Concept Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, William L.; Todd, Amber N.; Clark, Travis B.

    2016-01-01

    We developed and validated a new instrument, called "Measuring Concept progressions in Acid-Base chemistry" (MCAB) and used it to better understand the progression of undergraduate students' understandings about acid-base chemistry. Items were developed based on an existing learning progression for acid-base chemistry. We used the Rasch…

  2. Structure-based classification and ontology in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastings Janna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent years have seen an explosion in the availability of data in the chemistry domain. With this information explosion, however, retrieving relevant results from the available information, and organising those results, become even harder problems. Computational processing is essential to filter and organise the available resources so as to better facilitate the work of scientists. Ontologies encode expert domain knowledge in a hierarchically organised machine-processable format. One such ontology for the chemical domain is ChEBI. ChEBI provides a classification of chemicals based on their structural features and a role or activity-based classification. An example of a structure-based class is 'pentacyclic compound' (compounds containing five-ring structures, while an example of a role-based class is 'analgesic', since many different chemicals can act as analgesics without sharing structural features. Structure-based classification in chemistry exploits elegant regularities and symmetries in the underlying chemical domain. As yet, there has been neither a systematic analysis of the types of structural classification in use in chemistry nor a comparison to the capabilities of available technologies. Results We analyze the different categories of structural classes in chemistry, presenting a list of patterns for features found in class definitions. We compare these patterns of class definition to tools which allow for automation of hierarchy construction within cheminformatics and within logic-based ontology technology, going into detail in the latter case with respect to the expressive capabilities of the Web Ontology Language and recent extensions for modelling structured objects. Finally we discuss the relationships and interactions between cheminformatics approaches and logic-based approaches. Conclusion Systems that perform intelligent reasoning tasks on chemistry data require a diverse set of underlying computational

  3. Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2015-12-28

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil "electrical sensitivity." Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems. © ASCE.

  4. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  5. Canonical Pedagogical Content Knowledge by Cores for Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry at High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Clara; Cañada, Florentina; Garritz, Andoni; Mellado, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The topic of acid-base chemistry is one of the oldest in general chemistry courses and it has been almost continuously in academic discussion. The central purpose of documenting the knowledge and beliefs of a group of ten Mexican teachers with experience in teaching acid-base chemistry in high school was to know how they design, prepare and…

  6. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  7. Crystal chemistry and structural design of iron-based superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Hao; Sun Yun-Lei; Xu Zhu-An; Cao Guang-Han

    2013-01-01

    The second class of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs),iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides,necessarily contain Fe2X2 (“X” refers to a pnictogen or a chalcogen element) layers,just like the first class of HTSCs which possess the essential CuO2 sheets.So far,dozens of iron-based HTSCs,classified into nine groups,have been discovered.In this article,the crystal-chemistry aspects of the known iron-based superconductors are reviewed and summarized by employing “hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB)” concept.Based on these understandings,we propose an alternative route to exploring new iron-based superconductors via rational structural design.

  8. Component-based integration of chemistry and optimization software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Joseph P; Benson, Steven J; Alexeev, Yuri; Sarich, Jason; Janssen, Curtis L; McInnes, Lois Curfman; Krishnan, Manojkumar; Nieplocha, Jarek; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Fahlstrom, Carl; Windus, Theresa L

    2004-11-15

    Typical scientific software designs make rigid assumptions regarding programming language and data structures, frustrating software interoperability and scientific collaboration. Component-based software engineering is an emerging approach to managing the increasing complexity of scientific software. Component technology facilitates code interoperability and reuse. Through the adoption of methodology and tools developed by the Common Component Architecture Forum, we have developed a component architecture for molecular structure optimization. Using the NWChem and Massively Parallel Quantum Chemistry packages, we have produced chemistry components that provide capacity for energy and energy derivative evaluation. We have constructed geometry optimization applications by integrating the Toolkit for Advanced Optimization, Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation, and Global Arrays packages, which provide optimization and linear algebra capabilities. We present a brief overview of the component development process and a description of abstract interfaces for chemical optimizations. The components conforming to these abstract interfaces allow the construction of applications using different chemistry and mathematics packages interchangeably. Initial numerical results for the component software demonstrate good performance, and highlight potential research enabled by this platform.

  9. Project-based learning in the secondary chemistry classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Elizabeth L.

    This study investigated the use of project-based learning (PBL) in a high school chemistry classroom. PBL encourages the use of projects, which promote continual learning, rather than a summative project at the end of a unit after the learning has already been done. Along with implementing PBL, the study also incorporated many of the strategies included in the broader strategy known as Assessment for Learning (AfL), which stresses developing assessments that are part of the learning process rather than simply a measurement of the amount of learning that has occurred upon completion of a unit. The hypothesis of this research was that PBL would increase student comprehension and motivation as measured through pre and post-test data and a student survey. The new project-based unit required students to research and present the properties and structures of elements and how we use them. The expectation was that this approach would engage students with the material, the computer modeling would allow for more concrete visualization of structures and the project-based format would allow students to become more invested in their own learning. This study provided evidence to support the hypothesis that the implementation of project-based learning, supported by formative assessment and other assessment for learning strategies, will improve student comprehension and motivation in the secondary chemistry classroom.

  10. A Thematic Review of Studies into the Effectiveness of Context-Based Chemistry Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ültay, Neslihan; Çalık, Muammer

    2012-12-01

    Context-based chemistry education aims at making connections between real life and the scientific content of chemistry courses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate context-based chemistry studies. In looking for the context-based chemistry studies, the authors entered the keywords `context-based', `contextual learning' and `chemistry education' in well-known databases (i.e. Academic Search Complete, Education Research Complete, ERIC, Springer LINK Contemporary). Further, in case the computer search by key words may have missed a rather substantial part of the important literature in the area, the authors also conducted a hand search of the related journals. To present a detailed thematic review of context-based chemistry studies, a matrix was used to summarize the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methodologies, general knowledge claims, and implications for teaching and learning, implications for curriculum development and suggestions for future research. The general knowledge claims investigated in this paper were: (a) positive effects of the context-based chemistry studies; (b) caveats, both are examined in terms of students' attitudes and students' understanding/cognition. Implications were investigated for practice in context- based chemistry studies, for future research in context- based chemistry studies, and for curriculum developers in context- based chemistry studies. Teachers of context-based courses claimed that the application of the context-based learning approach in chemistry education improved students' motivation and interest in the subject. This seems to have generated an increase in the number of the students who wish to continue chemistry education at higher levels. However, despite the fact that the majority of the studies have reported advantages of context-based chemistry studies, some of them have also referred to pitfalls, i.e. dominant

  11. A Collaborative, Wiki-Based Organic Chemistry Project Incorporating Free Chemistry Software on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, postsecondary instructors have recognized the potential of wikis to transform the way students learn in a collaborative environment. However, few instructors have embraced in-depth student use of chemistry software for the creation of interactive chemistry content on the Web. Using currently available software, students are able…

  12. Development and Assessment of a Chemistry-Based Computer Video Game as a Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, Kermin Joel

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry-based computer video game is a multidisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and computer graphics and technology fields developed to explore the use of video games as a possible learning tool. This innovative approach aims to integrate elements of commercial video game and authentic chemistry context environments into a learning…

  13. Lubrication Chemistry Viewed from DFT-Based Concepts and Electronic Structural Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Yuansheng; Yang He; Li Shenghua

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: Fundamental molecular issues in lubrication chemistry were reviewed under categories of solution chemistry, contact chemistry and tribochemistry. By introducing the Density Functional Theory(DFT)-derived chemical reactivity parameters (chemical potential, electronegativity, hardness, softness and Fukui function) and related electronic structural principles (electronegativity equalization principle, hard-soft acid-base principle, and maximum hardness principle), their relevancy to lu...

  14. Model for acid-base chemistry in nanoparticle growth (MABNAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Juuti, T.; Barsanti, K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Kieloaho, A.-J.; Makkonen, U.; Petäjä, T.; Ruuskanen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.

    2013-12-01

    Climatic effects of newly-formed atmospheric secondary aerosol particles are to a large extent determined by their condensational growth rates. However, all the vapours condensing on atmospheric nanoparticles and growing them to climatically relevant sizes are not identified yet and the effects of particle phase processes on particle growth rates are poorly known. Besides sulfuric acid, organic compounds are known to contribute significantly to atmospheric nanoparticle growth. In this study a particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) was developed to study the effect of salt formation on nanoparticle growth, which has been proposed as a potential mechanism lowering the equilibrium vapour pressures of organic compounds through dissociation in the particle phase and thus preventing their evaporation. MABNAG is a model for monodisperse aqueous particles and it couples dynamics of condensation to particle phase chemistry. Non-zero equilibrium vapour pressures, with both size and composition dependence, are considered for condensation. The model was applied for atmospherically relevant systems with sulfuric acid, one organic acid, ammonia, one amine and water in the gas phase allowed to condense on 3-20 nm particles. The effect of dissociation of the organic acid was found to be small under ambient conditions typical for a boreal forest site, but considerable for base-rich environments (gas phase concentrations of about 1010 cm-3 for the sum of the bases). The contribution of the bases to particle mass decreased as particle size increased, except at very high gas phase concentrations of the bases. The relative importance of amine versus ammonia did not change significantly as a function of particle size. While our results give a reasonable first estimate on the maximum contribution of salt formation to nanoparticle growth, further studies on, e.g. the thermodynamic properties of the atmospheric organics, concentrations of low

  15. Model for acid-base chemistry in nanoparticle growth (MABNAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yli-Juuti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Climatic effects of newly-formed atmospheric secondary aerosol particles are to a large extent determined by their condensational growth rates. However, all the vapors condensing on atmospheric nanoparticles and growing them to climatically relevant sizes are not identified yet and the effects of particle phase processes on particle growth rates are poorly known. Besides sulfuric acid, organic compounds are known to contribute significantly to atmospheric nanoparticle growth. In this study a particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth was developed to study the effect of salt formation on nanoparticle growth, which has been proposed as a potential mechanism lowering the equilibrium vapor pressures of organic compounds through dissociation in the particle phase and thus preventing their evaporation. MABNAG is a model for monodisperse aqueous particles and it couples dynamics of condensation to particle phase chemistry. Non-zero equilibrium vapor pressures, with both size and composition dependence, are considered for condensation. The model was applied for atmospherically relevant systems with sulfuric acid, one organic acid, ammonia, one amine and water in the gas phase allowed to condense on 3–20 nm particles. The effect of dissociation of the organic acid was found to be small under ambient conditions typical for a boreal forest site, but considerable for base-rich environments (gas phase concentrations of about 1010 cm−3 for the sum of the bases. The contribution of the bases to particle mass decreased as particle size increased, except at very high gas phase concentrations of the bases. The relative importance of amine versus ammonia did not change significantly as a function of particle size. While our results give a reasonable first estimate on the maximum contribution of salt formation to nanoparticle growth, further studies on, e.g. the thermodynamic properties of the atmospheric organics

  16. Membrane-based microextraction techniques in analytical chemistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasek, Eduardo; Merib, Josias

    2015-06-23

    The use of membrane-based sample preparation techniques in analytical chemistry has gained growing attention from the scientific community since the development of miniaturized sample preparation procedures in the 1990s. The use of membranes makes the microextraction procedures more stable, allowing the determination of analytes in complex and "dirty" samples. This review describes some characteristics of classical membrane-based microextraction techniques (membrane-protected solid-phase microextraction, hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction and hollow-fiber renewal liquid membrane) as well as some alternative configurations (thin film and electromembrane extraction) used successfully for the determination of different analytes in a large variety of matrices, some critical points regarding each technique are highlighted.

  17. Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

    2011-07-21

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

  18. Hydrogen production via thermochemical cycles based on sulfur chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, M.A.; Conger, W.L.; Carty, R.H.; Funk, J.E.; Cox, K.E.

    1976-01-01

    A class of closed thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production based on sulfur chemistry is presented. This class is described by the following set of chemical reactions: M + H/sub 2/O reversible MO + H/sub 2/ (low temperature); MO + 0.5S reversible M + 0.5SO/sub 2/ (high temperature); M'O + 1.5SO/sub 2/ reversible M'SO/sub 4/ + 0.5S (low temperature); and M'SO/sub 4/ reversible M'O + SO/sub 2/ + 0.5O/sub 2/ (high temperature). Experimental investigation of some of the reactions is presented. Thermodynamic analysis indicates efficiencies of the range of 40 to 50 percent and sometimes higher. Not all of the reactions in the proposed cycles have been verified in the literature or through experimentation.

  19. [Recent advancement of photonic-crystal-based analytical chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Guo, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jinyi; Chen, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Photonic crystals are a type of novel materials with ordered structure, nanopores/channels and optical band gap. They have hence important applications in physics, chemistry, biological science and engineering fields. This review summarizes the recent advancement of photonic crystals in analytical chemistry applications, with focus on sensing and separating fields happening in the nearest 5 years.

  20. Ceria-based solid catalysts for organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, Laurence; Duprez, Daniel

    2010-06-21

    Ceria has been the subject of thorough investigations, mainly because of its use as an active component of catalytic converters for the treatment of exhaust gases. However, ceria-based catalysts have also been developed for different applications in organic chemistry. The redox and acid-base properties of ceria, either alone or in the presence of transition metals, are important parameters that allow to activate complex organic molecules and to selectively orient their transformation. Pure ceria is used in several organic reactions, such as the dehydration of alcohols, the alkylation of aromatic compounds, ketone formation, and aldolization, and in redox reactions. Ceria-supported metal catalysts allow the hydrogenation of many unsaturated compounds. They can also be used for coupling or ring-opening reactions. Cerium atoms can be added as dopants to catalytic system or impregnated onto zeolites and mesoporous catalyst materials to improve their performances. This Review demonstrates that the exceptional surface (and sometimes bulk) properties of ceria make cerium-based catalysts very effective for a broad range of organic reactions.

  1. A New Project-Based Lab for Undergraduate Environmental and Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Gianpiero

    2006-01-01

    A new project-based lab was developed for third year undergraduate chemistry students based on real world applications. The experience suggests that the total analytical procedure (TAP) project offers a stimulating alternative for delivering science skills and developing a greater interest for analytical chemistry and environmental sciences and…

  2. Towards a framework for a professional development programme: empowering teachers for context-based chemistry education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.; Bulte, A.M.W.; de Jong, O.; Pilot, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a framework for professional development programmes that empowers chemistry teachers to teach and design context-based chemistry curricula. Firstly, teachers involvement, their concerns and their professional development in several context-based curriculum innovat

  3. Lubrication Chemistry Viewed from DFT-Based Concepts and Electronic Structural Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yuansheng

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Fundamental molecular issues in lubrication chemistry were reviewed under categories of solution chemistry, contact chemistry and tribochemistry. By introducing the Density Functional Theory(DFT-derived chemical reactivity parameters (chemical potential, electronegativity, hardness, softness and Fukui function and related electronic structural principles (electronegativity equalization principle, hard-soft acid-base principle, and maximum hardness principle, their relevancy to lubrication chemistry was explored. It was suggested that DFT, theoretical, conceptual and computational, represents a useful enabling tool to understand lubrication chemistry issues prior to experimentation and the approach may form a key step in the rational design of lubrication chemistry via computational methods. It can also be optimistically anticipated that these considerations will gestate unique DFT-based strategies to understand sophisticated tribology themes, such as origin of friction, essence of wear, adhesion in MEMS/NEMS, chemical mechanical polishing in wafer manufacturing, stress corrosion, chemical control of friction and wear, and construction of designer tribochemical systems.

  4. A National Science Standards-Based Study of Web-Based Inquiry in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Louise; Bodzin, Alec M.; Cates, Ward Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    Inquiry-based teaching and learning and technology integration are integral parts of the National Science Education Standards ad AAAA Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy. It is found that there are very few chemistry WBIs in the public domain, and the WBIs found are with a limited scope and content coverage and so the need for extensive…

  5. Computational Chemistry Data Management Platform Based on the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Dobosh, Paul A; Chalk, Stuart; Sopek, Mirek; Ostlund, Neil S

    2017-01-12

    This paper presents a formal data publishing platform for computational chemistry using semantic web technologies. This platform encapsulates computational chemistry data from a variety of packages in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file called CSX (Common Standard for eXchange). On the basis of a Gainesville Core (GC) ontology for computational chemistry, a CSX XML file is converted into the JavaScript Object Notation for Linked Data (JSON-LD) format using an XML Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) file. Ultimately the JSON-LD file is converted to subject-predicate-object triples in a Turtle (TTL) file and published on the web portal. By leveraging semantic web technologies, we are able to place computational chemistry data onto web portals as a component of a Giant Global Graph (GGG) such that computer agents, as well as individual chemists, can access the data.

  6. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Tas, E.; M. Peleg; D. U. Pedersen; Matveev, V; A. Pour Biazar; Luria, M.

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. Th...

  7. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    A. Pour Biazar; Matveev, V; D. U. Pedersen; M. Peleg; Tas, E.; Luria, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the ...

  8. Small-molecule azomethines: organic photovoltaics via Schiff base condensation chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus,M. L.; Bouwer, R. K. M.; Lafont, U.; Athanasopoulos, S.; Greenham, N. C.; Dingemans, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated small-molecule azomethines for photovoltaic applications were prepared via Schiff base condensation chemistry. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices exhibit efficiencies of 1.2% with MoOx as the hole-transporting layer. The versatility and simplicity of the chemistry is illustrated by prepari

  9. A Tiny Adventure: The Introduction of Problem Based Learning in an Undergraduate Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan P.; Woodward, Jonathan R.; Symons, Sarah L.; Davies, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Year 1 of the chemistry degree at the University of Leicester has been significantly changed by the integration of a problem based learning (PBL) component into the introductory inorganic/physical chemistry module, "Chemical Principles". Small groups of 5-6 students were given a series of problems with real world scenarios and were then…

  10. Stimulating Students' Intrinsic Motivation for Learning Chemistry through the Use of Context-Based Learning Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaino, Katrin; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmae, Miia

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a research project in which five chemistry teachers, working in cooperation with university researchers, implemented a new teaching approach using context-based modules specially designed to stimulate the intrinsic motivation of students. The intention was to induce change in chemistry teachers' teaching approach from more…

  11. Effects of Computer Based Learning on Students' Attitudes and Achievements towards Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Husamettin; Durmaz, Asli; Tuysuz, Cengiz; Feyzioglu, Burak

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of computer-based learning and traditional method on students' attitudes and achievement towards analytical chemistry. Students from Chemistry Education Department at Dokuz Eylul University (D.E.U) were selected randomly and divided into three groups; two experimental (Eg-1 and Eg-2) and a control…

  12. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  13. Experienced Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of nine experienced chemistry teachers. The teachers took part in a teacher training course on students' difficulties and the use of models in teaching acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and redox reactions. Two years after the course, the teachers were interviewed about their PCK of (1)…

  14. Life-Cycle Analysis and Inquiry-Based Learning in Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, Marianne; Aksela, Maija

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this design research is to improve the quality of environmental literacy and sustainability education in chemistry teaching through combining a socio-scientific issue, life-cycle analysis (LCA), with inquiry-based learning (IBL). This first phase of the cyclic design research involved 20 inservice trained chemistry teachers from…

  15. Comparative Analysis of Click Chemistry Mediated Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Cell Lysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinliang Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Activity-based protein profiling uses chemical probes that covalently attach to active enzyme targets. Probes with conventional tags have disadvantages, such as limited cell permeability or steric hindrance around the reactive group. A tandem labeling strategy with click chemistry is now widely used to study enzyme targets in situ and in vivo. Herein, the probes are reacted in live cells, whereas the ensuing detection by click chemistry takes place in cell lysates. We here make a comparison of the efficiency of the activity-based tandem labeling strategy by using Cu(I-catalyzed and strain-promoted click chemistry, different ligands and different lysis conditions.

  16. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  17. The EPA Comptox Chemistry Dashboard: A Web-Based Data Integration Hub for Toxicology Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  18. Integration of Environmental Analytical Chemistry with Environmental Law: The Development of a Problem-Based Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancilla, Devon A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an undergraduate level problem-based analytical chemistry laboratory course integrated with an environmental law course. Aims to develop an understanding among students on the use of environmental indicators for environmental evaluation. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  19. Developing computational model-based diagnostics to analyse clinical chemistry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Bochove, K. van; Ommen, B. van; Freidig, A.P.; Someren, E.P. van; Greef, J. van der; Graaf, A.A. de

    2010-01-01

    This article provides methodological and technical considerations to researchers starting to develop computational model-based diagnostics using clinical chemistry data.These models are of increasing importance, since novel metabolomics and proteomics measuring technologies are able to produce large

  20. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing Content, Learning Activities, and Interpersonal Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms,…

  1. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  2. The exceptionally rich coordination chemistry generated by Schiff-base ligands derived from o-vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruh, Marius

    2015-10-14

    Ortho-vanillin became very popular in coordination chemistry because of its Schiff bases, which generate a rich variety of complexes, ranging from oligonuclear species to coordination polymers. Some of these organic molecules are particularly useful in metallosupramolecular chemistry for assembling homo- and heterometallic helicates. The Schiff bases obtained using aminoalcohols open the door to the synthesis of homo- and heterometallic clusters with various nuclearities and surprising topologies of the metal centers. Several relevant structural types are reviewed. The heterobinuclear 3d-3d' and 3d-4f complexes are valuable building-blocks for the synthesis of heterotrimetallic systems. Beyond the richness of this chemistry, the complexes obtained from o-vanillin-based Schiff ligands show interesting properties: magnetism, luminescence, chirality, catalysis, cytotoxicity, and ferroelectricity. This paper reviews recent data that illustrate a very fertile and dynamic research field in coordination chemistry and materials science.

  3. Green Chemistry Based Benign Routes for Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry has been an eye catching area of interest since the past few years. With the problem of energy crisis looming high and its constraint being particularly vulnerable on the developing economies, the need for giving alternative traditional chemistry a serious consideration as well as adequate room for development has received significant boost through the coveted efforts of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary scientific fields. Nanoscience has been the right field in this dimension as it opens up the door to multiple opportunities through enabling a number of chemical, biochemical, and biophysical transformations in a significantly easier and reliable manner. The use of nanoparticles has made the fields of catalysis, synthesis, and enzyme immobilizations as well as molecular interactions a lot much easier, rapid and easily controllable. This review article sheds light on the popular alternative synthesis routes being employed for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the pivotal being from microbes, plants, and chemical routes via sonication, microwaving, and many others.

  4. Double electrochemical covalent coupling method based on click chemistry and diazonium chemistry for the fabrication of sensitive amperometric immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Honglan; Li, Min; Zhang, Rui; Dong, Manman; Ling, Chen

    2013-08-20

    A double electrochemical covalent coupling method based on click chemistry and diazonium chemistry for the fabrication of sensitive amperometric immunosensor was developed. As a proof-of-concept, a designed alkyne functionalized human IgG was used as a capture antibody and a HRP-labeled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used as signal antibody for the determination of the anti-human IgG using the sandwich model. The immunosensor was fabricated by electrochemically grafting a phenylazide on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode, and then, by coupling the alkyne functionalized human IgG with the phenylazide group through an electro-click chemistry in the presence of Cu(II). The amperometric measurement for the determination of the anti-human IgG was performed after the fabricated immunosensor was incubated with the target anti-human IgG and then with the HRP-labeled anti-goat IgG at -0.25V in 0.10M PBS (pH 7.0) containing 0.1mM hydroquinone and 2.0mM H2O2. The results showed that the increased current was linear with the logarithm of the concentration of the anti-human IgG in the range from 1.0×10(-10)g mL(-1) to 1.0×10(-8)g mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3×10(-11)g mL(-1). Furthermore, the feasibility of the double electrochemical covalent coupling method proposed in this work for fabricating the amperometric immunosensor array was explored. This work demonstrates that the double electrochemical covalent coupling method is a promising approach for the fabrication of the immunosensor and immunosensor array.

  5. Chemistry Teachers' Perceived Benefits and Challenges of Inquiry-Based Instruction in Inclusive Chemistry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, F.; Banda, A.; Chabalengula, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inquiry-based instruction in inclusive science teaching have mainly focused on elementary and middle school levels. Little is known about inquiry-based instruction in high school inclusive science classes. Yet, such classes have become the norm in high schools, fulfilling the instructional needs of students with mild disabilities. This…

  6. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  7. Computer-based, Jeopardy™-like game in general chemistry for engineering majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, S. S.; Saffre, F.; Kadadha, M.; Gater, D. L.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design of Jeopardy™-like computer game for enhancement of learning of general chemistry for engineering majors. While we examine several parameters of student achievement and attitude, our primary concern is addressing the motivation of students, which tends to be low in a traditionally run chemistry lectures. The effect of the game-playing is tested by comparing paper-based game quiz, which constitutes a control group, and computer-based game quiz, constituting a treatment group. Computer-based game quizzes are Java™-based applications that students run once a week in the second part of the last lecture of the week. Overall effectiveness of the semester-long program is measured through pretest-postest conceptual testing of general chemistry. The objective of this research is to determine to what extent this ``gamification'' of the course delivery and course evaluation processes may be beneficial to the undergraduates' learning of science in general, and chemistry in particular. We present data addressing gender-specific difference in performance, as well as background (pre-college) level of general science and chemistry preparation. We outline the plan how to extend such approach to general physics courses and to modern science driven electives, and we offer live, in-lectures examples of our computer gaming experience. We acknowledge support from Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi

  8. A Web-Based Chemistry Course as a Means To Foster Freshmen Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Barak, Miri; Adir, Noam

    2003-09-01

    Chemistry courses in higher education have traditionally been composed of lectures, problem solving sessions, and laboratories. This study describes a Web-based chemistry course and the learning outcomes of freshmen that used it. Chemistry faculty and teaching assistants were interviewed regarding their views about Web-based teaching and learning. Students who took part in a Web-based general chemistry course were divided into two groups based on their preference of participating in a Computerized Molecular Modeling (CMM) project. The experimental group students carried out an individualized project using CMM software to represent a complex molecule in three model types, compute its molecular weight, and construct hybridization and electrical charge distribution for each of the carbon atoms in the molecule. Pre- and post-tests along with final examination grades served for assessing the students' achievements. The 95 experimental students achieved significantly higher grades than their 120 control-group peers in both the post-test and the final examination. The experimental students were able to switch from 1-D to 2- and 3-D molecular representations, argue for selecting an appropriate substance for a particular purpose, and transfer between the four levels of understanding in chemistry better than their control counterparts.

  9. Teachers Implementing Context-Based Teaching Materials: A Framework for Case-Analysis in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Martin A. J.; Taconis, Ruurd; Jochems, Wim M. G.; Pilot, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We present a framework for analysing the interplay between context-based teaching material and teachers, and for evaluating the adequacy of the resulting implementation of context-based pedagogy in chemistry classroom practice. The development of the framework is described, including an account of its theoretical foundations. The framework needs…

  10. Strategies for a professional development programme: empowering teachers for context-based chemistry education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.; Bulte, A.M.W.; de Jong, O.; Pilot, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the design of professional development programmes in teacher-based and context-based chemistry curriculum innovations. Firstly, the goals of these programmes are discussed and related to the concept of empowerment. Next, in a selection of empirical studies, fou

  11. Thai Grade 11 Students' Alternative Conceptions for Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artdej, Romklao; Ratanaroutai, Thasaneeya; Coll, Richard Kevin; Thongpanchang, Tienthong

    2010-01-01

    This study involved the development of a two-tier diagnostic instrument to assess Thai high school students' understanding of acid-base chemistry. The acid-base diagnostic test (ABDT) comprising 18 items was administered to 55 Grade 11 students in a science and mathematics programme during the second semester of the 2008 academic year. Analysis of…

  12. Examining the Mismatch between Pupil and Teacher Knowledge in Acid-Base Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel

    2003-01-01

    Reports a mismatch between teacher and pupil knowledge of acid-base chemistry as a result of controversial episodes from three science lessons. Suggests that the teacher's knowledge is guided by textbook information while the pupil's knowledge is based on direct experimental experience. Proposes that classroom activities should support the…

  13. Student Perceptions of Group-Based Competitive Exercises in the Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin C.; Mody, Tina; Breen, Maureen P.

    2008-01-01

    A non-traditional teaching method that can operate as a vehicle for engaging students is group-based competitive exercises. These exercises combine cooperative learning with a competitive environment and may be employed to promote subject- and problem-based learning. Survey responses of college-level organic chemistry and biochemistry students…

  14. Carbohydrate-based bioactive compounds for medicinal chemistry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, L; Peri, F

    2011-01-01

    In this article we review our work over the years on carbohydrates and carbohydrate mimetics and their applications in medicinal chemistry. In the first part of the review innovative synthetic methods, such as the chemoselective glycosylation method originally developed by our group and its applications to the synthesis of neoglycoconjugates (neoglycopeptides, oligosaccharide mimetics, neoglycolipids, etc…) will be presented. The high density of functional groups (hydroxyls) on the monosaccharides and the structural role of sugars forming the core of complex glycans in scaffolding and orienting the external sugar units for the interaction with receptors, inspired us and others to use sugars as scaffolds for the construction of pharmacologically active compounds. In the second part of this review, we will present some examples of bioactive and pharmacologically active compounds obtained by decorating monosaccharide scaffolds with pharmacophore groups. Sugar-derived protein ligands were also used as chemical probes to study the interaction of their target with other proteins in the cell. In this context, sugar mimetics and sugar-derived compounds have been employed as tools for exploring biology according to the "chemical genetic" approach.

  15. Developing and Implementing a Reorganized Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Based on the Foundational Chemistry Topics of Structure, Reactivity, and Quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Fazal, M. A.; Jones, T. Nicholas; McIntee, Edward J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2014-01-01

    The recent revision of undergraduate curricular guidelines from the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training (ACS-CPT) has generated interest in examining new ways of organizing course sequences both for chemistry majors and for nonmajors. A radical reconstruction of the foundation-level chemistry curriculum is presented in…

  16. Recent applications of carbon-based nanomaterials in analytical chemistry: critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scida, Karen; Stege, Patricia W; Haby, Gabrielle; Messina, Germán A; García, Carlos D

    2011-04-08

    The objective of this review is to provide a broad overview of the advantages and limitations of carbon-based nanomaterials with respect to analytical chemistry. Aiming to illustrate the impact of nanomaterials on the development of novel analytical applications, developments reported in the 2005-2010 period have been included and divided into sample preparation, separation, and detection. Within each section, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and composite materials will be addressed specifically. Although only briefly discussed, included is a section highlighting nanomaterials with interesting catalytic properties that can be used in the design of future devices for analytical chemistry.

  17. Transitioning from Expository Laboratory Experiments to Course-Based Undergraduate Research in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Ricciardo, Rebecca; Weaver, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    General chemistry courses predominantly use expository experiments that shape student expectations of what a laboratory activity entails. Shifting within a semester to course-based undergraduate research activities that include greater decision-making, collaborative work, and "messy" real-world data necessitates a change in student…

  18. A Game-Based Approach to an Entire Physical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubenfeld, Thorsten; Zenker, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    We designed, implemented, and evaluated a game-based learning approach to increase student motivation and achievement for an undergraduate physical chemistry course. By focusing only on the most important game aspects, the implementation was realized with a production ratio of 1:8 (study load in hours divided by production effort in hours).…

  19. Addition of a Project-Based Component to a Conventional Expository Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Gorezi, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    Students should enjoy their laboratory classes and for this purpose a project-based activity is added to a conventional physical chemistry laboratory. Students were given project work instead of conventional experiment and then they had to make progress in the project according to instructions and then carry out experiments related to the project.

  20. Incorporating Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences into Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Melissa A.; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    A continuous effort within an undergraduate university setting is to improve students' learning outcomes and thus improve students' attitudes about a particular field of study. This is undoubtedly relevant within a chemistry laboratory. This paper reports the results of an effort to introduce a problem-based learning strategy into the analytical…

  1. Inquiry-Based Course in Physics and Chemistry for Preservice K-8 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loverude, Michael E.; Gonzalez, Barbara L.; Nanes, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat…

  2. Evaluating a Professional Development Framework to Empower Chemistry Teachers to Design Context-Based Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.J.; Bulte, A.M.W.; de Jong, O.; Pilot, A.

    2012-01-01

    Even experienced chemistry teachers require professional development when they are encouraged to become actively engaged in the design of new context-based education. This study briefly describes the development of a framework consisting of goals, learning phases, strategies and instructional functi

  3. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  4. Acid-Base Learning Outcomes for Students in an Introductory Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanovich, Carlee; Gandhi, Aneri; Flynn, Alison B.

    2015-01-01

    An outcome-based approach to teaching and learning focuses on what the student demonstrably knows and can do after instruction, rather than on what the instructor teaches. This outcome-focused approach can then guide the alignment of teaching strategies, learning activities, and assessment. In organic chemistry, mastery of organic acid-base…

  5. Formalizing the First Day in an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using a Studio-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Christina G.; Cody, Jeremy; Smith, Darren; Swartzenberg, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    A novel studio-based lab module that incorporates student-centered activities was designed and implemented to introduce second-year undergraduate students to the first-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The "First Day" studio module incorporates learning objectives for the course, lab safety, and keeping a professional lab notebook.

  6. Application of ICT-based Learning Resources for University Inorganic Chemistry Course Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana M. Derkach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies expediency and efficiency of various ICT-based learning resources use in university inorganic chemistry course training, detects difference of attitudes toward electronic resources between students and faculty members, which create the background for their efficiency loss

  7. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  8. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  9. Conceptual Understanding of Acids and Bases Concepts and Motivation to Learn Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin-Dindar, Ayla; Geban, Omer

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 5E learning cycle model oriented instruction (LCMI) on 11th-grade students' conceptual understanding of acids and bases concepts and student motivation to learn chemistry. The study, which lasted for 7 weeks, involved two groups: An experimental group (LCMI) and a control group (the…

  10. A Learning-Cycle-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Program for Students in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, William J.

    1982-01-01

    The laboratory of an organic chemistry course for dietetics students is based on the learning cycle approach (exploration, invention-concept introduction, and concept application). The laboratory program is divided into four sections: lab techniques, compound types, reaction types, and reaction characteristics. (SK)

  11. Enquiry-Based Learning: Experiences of First Year Chemistry Students Learning Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Rowley, Natalie M.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the experiences of first year chemistry students of an Enquiry-Based Learning (EBL) approach to learning spectroscopy. An investigation of how students' perceived confidences changed as a result of their experience of using EBL in the spectroscopy course was carried out. Changes in the students' perceived confidence, both in their…

  12. Structurally Based Therapeutic Evaluation: A Therapeutic and Practical Approach to Teaching Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explains structurally based therapeutic evaluation of drugs, which uses seven therapeutic criteria in translating chemical and structural knowledge into therapeutic decision making in pharmaceutical care. In a Creighton University (Nebraska) medicinal chemistry course, students apply the approach to solve patient-related therapeutic problems in…

  13. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  14. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: A Discovery-Based Activity for the General Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgsmiller, Karen L.; O'Connell, Dylan J.; Klauenberg, Kathryn M.; Wilson, Peter M.; Stromberg, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery-based method is described for incorporating the concepts of IR and Raman spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum. Students use three sets of springs to model the properties of single, double, and triple covalent bonds. Then, Gaussian 03W molecular modeling software is used to illustrate the relationship between bond…

  15. Use of chemistry software to teach and assess model-based reaction and equation knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pyatt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the challenges students face when learning chemical reactions in a first-year chemistry course and the effectiveness of a curriculum and software implementation that was used to teach and assess student understanding of chemical reactions and equations. This study took place over a two year period in a public suburban high-school, in southwestern USA. Two advanced placement (AP chemistry classes participated, referred to here as study group A (year 1, N = 14; and study group B (year 2, N = 21. The curriculum for a first-year chemistry course (group A was revised to include instruction on reaction-types. The second year of the study involved the creation and implementation of a software solution which promoted mastery learning of reaction-types. Students in both groups benefited from the reaction-type curriculum and achieved proficiency in chemical reactions and equations.  The findings suggest there was an added learning benefit to using the reaction-type software solution. This study also found that reaction knowledge was a moderate to strong predictor of chemistry achievement. Based on regression analysis, reaction knowledge significantly predicted chemistry achievement for both groups.

  16. Improving Pharmacy Students' Understanding and Long-term Retention of Acid-Base Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Victoria F.

    2007-01-01

    Despite repeated exposure to the principles underlying the behavior of organic acids and bases in aqueous solution, some pharmacy students remain confused about the topic of acid-base chemistry. Since a majority of organic drug molecules have acid-base character, the ability to predict their reactivity and the extent to which they will ionize in a given medium is paramount to students' understanding of essentially all aspects of drug action in vivo and in vitro. This manuscript presents a med...

  17. Speed limits for acid-base chemistry in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donten, Mateusz L; Vandevondele, Joost; Hamm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reactions, including acid-base recombination, are commonly considered to occur 'nearly instantaneously'. However, their actual time scales may stretch far into the microsecond range, as acid-base reactions are diffusion controlled and the concentrations are low near neutral pH. The interplay of competing bases in the pH relaxation is illustrated using a model acid-base system consisting of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (oNBA) as a proton cage and acetate ions and hydroxyl ions as bases. The kinetically controlled behavior leads to highly counterintuitive states, i.e. acetate ions are transiently protonated for hundreds of nanoseconds despite the presence of a much stronger base OH-.

  18. Isocyanide based multi component reactions in combinatorial chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although usually regarded as a recent development, the combinatorial approach to the synthesis of libraries of new drug candidates was first described as early as 1961 using the isocyanide-based one-pot multicomponent Ugi reaction. Isocyanide-based multi component reactions (MCR's) markedly differ f

  19. How do video-based demonstration assessment tasks affect problem-solving process, test anxiety, chemistry anxiety and achievement in general chemistry students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Rosalind Stephanie

    2001-12-01

    Because paper-and-pencil testing provides limited knowledge about what students know about chemical phenomena, we have developed video-based demonstrations to broaden measurement of student learning. For example, students might be shown a video demonstrating equilibrium shifts. Two methods for viewing equilibrium shifts are changing the concentration of the reactants and changing the temperature of the system. The students are required to combine the data collected from the video and their knowledge of chemistry to determine which way the equilibrium shifts. Video-based demonstrations are important techniques for measuring student learning because they require students to apply conceptual knowledge learned in class to a specific chemical problem. This study explores how video-based demonstration assessment tasks affect problem-solving processes, test anxiety, chemistry anxiety and achievement in general chemistry students. Several instruments were used to determine students' knowledge about chemistry, students' test and chemistry anxiety before and after treatment. Think-aloud interviews were conducted to determine students' problem-solving processes after treatment. The treatment group was compared to a control group and a group watching video demonstrations. After treatment students' anxiety increased and achievement decreased. There were also no significant differences found in students' problem-solving processes following treatment. These negative findings may be attributed to several factors that will be explored in this study.

  20. Computational chemistry for graphene-based energy applications: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Zak E.; Walsh, Tiffany R.

    2015-04-01

    Research in graphene-based energy materials is a rapidly growing area. Many graphene-based energy applications involve interfacial processes. To enable advances in the design of these energy materials, such that their operation, economy, efficiency and durability is at least comparable with fossil-fuel based alternatives, connections between the molecular-scale structure and function of these interfaces are needed. While it is experimentally challenging to resolve this interfacial structure, molecular simulation and computational chemistry can help bridge these gaps. In this Review, we summarise recent progress in the application of computational chemistry to graphene-based materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics and supercapacitors. We also outline both the bright prospects and emerging challenges these techniques face for application to graphene-based energy materials in future.

  1. Computational chemistry for graphene-based energy applications: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Zak E; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2015-04-28

    Research in graphene-based energy materials is a rapidly growing area. Many graphene-based energy applications involve interfacial processes. To enable advances in the design of these energy materials, such that their operation, economy, efficiency and durability is at least comparable with fossil-fuel based alternatives, connections between the molecular-scale structure and function of these interfaces are needed. While it is experimentally challenging to resolve this interfacial structure, molecular simulation and computational chemistry can help bridge these gaps. In this Review, we summarise recent progress in the application of computational chemistry to graphene-based materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics and supercapacitors. We also outline both the bright prospects and emerging challenges these techniques face for application to graphene-based energy materials in future.

  2. Chemistry and applications of organotin(IV) complexes of Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Mala; Saini, Pramendra K

    2011-07-21

    Schiff bases are the most widely used versatile ligands, able to coordinate many elements and to stabilize them in various oxidation states. Recently, this class of compounds has been employed as models for biological systems, and in control of stereochemistry in six-coordinate transition metal complexes. Recently, the chemistry of organotin(IV) complexes of Schiff bases has also stemmed from their antitumour, antimicrobial, antinematicidal, anti-insecticidal and anti-inflammatory activities. Furthermore, organotin(IV) complexes of Schiff bases present a wide variety of interesting structural possibilities. Both aliphatic and aromatic Schiff bases in their neutral and deprotonated forms have been used to yield adducts and chelates with variable stoichiometry and different modes of coordination. This critical review (>155 references) focuses upon the chemistry and biological applications of organotin(IV) complexes of Schiff bases reported in the past 15 years. Thermal behavior of these complexes is also discussed.

  3. A Study on Advanced Lithium-Based Battery Cell Chemistries to Enhance Lunar Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Bennett, William R.

    2010-01-01

    NASAs Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project conducted an advanced lithium-based battery chemistry feasibility study to determine the best advanced chemistry to develop for the Altair Lunar Lander and the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) advanced Lunar surface spacesuit. These customers require safe, reliable batteries with extremely high specific energy as compared to state-of-the-art. The specific energy goals for the development project are 220 watt-hours per kilogram (Wh/kg) delivered at the battery-level at 0 degrees Celsius ( C) at a C/10 discharge rate. Continuous discharge rates between C/5 and C/2, operation between 0 and 30 C and 200 cycles are targeted. Electrode materials that were considered include layered metal oxides, spinel oxides, and olivine-type cathode materials, and lithium metal, lithium alloy, and silicon-based composite anode materials. Advanced cell chemistry options were evaluated with respect to multiple quantitative and qualitative attributes while considering their projected performance at the end of the available development timeframe. Following a rigorous ranking process, a chemistry that combines a lithiated nickel manganese cobalt oxide Li(LiNMC)O2 cathode with a silicon-based composite anode was selected as the technology that can potentially offer the best combination of safety, specific energy, energy density, and likelihood of success.

  4. Highly sensitive methods for electroanalytical chemistry based on nanotubule membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Martin, C R

    1999-09-01

    Two new methods of electroanalysis are described. These methods are based on membranes containing monodisperse Au nanotubules with inside diameters approaching molecular dimensions. In one method, the analyte species is detected by measuring the change in trans-membrane current when the analyte is added to the nanotubule-based cell. The second method entails the use of a concentration cell based on the nanotubule membrane. In this case, the change in membrane potential is used to detect the analyte. Detection limits as low as 10(-11) M have been achieved. Hence, these methods compete with even the most sensitive of modern analytical methodologies. In addition, excellent molecular-sized-based selectivity is observed.

  5. Schiff Bases: A Short Survey on an Evergreen Chemistry Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Panunzio; Stefano Biondi; Wenling Qin; Sha Long

    2013-01-01

    The review reports a short biography of the Italian naturalized chemist Hugo Schiff and an outline on the synthesis and use of his most popular discovery: the imines, very well known and popular as Schiff Bases. Recent developments on their “metallo-imines” variants have been described. The applications of Schiff bases in organic synthesis as partner in Staudinger and hetero Diels-Alder reactions, as “privileged” ligands in the organometallic complexes and as biological active Schiff intermed...

  6. Mannich bases in medicinal chemistry and drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Gheorghe

    2015-01-07

    The biological activity of Mannich bases, a structurally heterogeneous class of chemical compounds that are generated from various substrates through the introduction of an aminomethyl function by means of the Mannich reaction, is surveyed, with emphasis on the relationship between structure and biological activity. The review covers extensively the literature reports that have disclosed Mannich bases as anticancer and cytotoxic agents, or compounds with potential antibacterial and antifungal activity in the last decade. The most relevant studies on the activity of Mannich bases as antimycobacterial agents, antimalarials, or antiviral candidates have been included as well. The review contains also a thorough coverage of anticonvulsant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant activities of Mannich bases. In addition, several minor biological activities of Mannich bases, such as their ability to regulate blood pressure or inhibit platelet aggregation, their antiparasitic and anti-ulcer effects, as well as their use as agents for the treatment of mental disorders have been presented. The review gives in the end a brief overview of the potential of Mannich bases as inhibitors of various enzymes or ligands for several receptors.

  7. Schiff bases: a short survey on an evergreen chemistry tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenling; Long, Sha; Panunzio, Mauro; Biondi, Stefano

    2013-10-08

    The review reports a short biography of the Italian naturalized chemist Hugo Schiff and an outline on the synthesis and use of his most popular discovery: the imines, very well known and popular as Schiff Bases. Recent developments on their "metallo-imines" variants have been described. The applications of Schiff bases in organic synthesis as partner in Staudinger and hetero Diels-Alder reactions, as "privileged" ligands in the organometallic complexes and as biological active Schiff intermediates/targets have been reported as well.

  8. Schiff Bases: A Short Survey on an Evergreen Chemistry Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Panunzio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review reports a short biography of the Italian naturalized chemist Hugo Schiff and an outline on the synthesis and use of his most popular discovery: the imines, very well known and popular as Schiff Bases. Recent developments on their “metallo-imines” variants have been described. The applications of Schiff bases in organic synthesis as partner in Staudinger and hetero Diels-Alder reactions, as “privileged” ligands in the organometallic complexes and as biological active Schiff intermediates/targets have been reported as well.

  9. [Practical chemistry education provided by team-based learning (TBL) and peer evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Konishi, Motomi; Nishida, Takahiro; Kushihata, Taro; Sone, Tomomichi; Kurio, Wasako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    2014-01-01

    Learning chemistry is cumulative: basic knowledge and chemical calculation skills are required to gain understanding of higher content. However, we often suffer from students' lack of learning skills to acquire these concepts. One of the reasons is the lack of adequate training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry, and one of the reasons for this lack is the lack of adequate evaluation of training procedures and content. Team-based learning (TBL) is a strong method for providing training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry and reaffirms the knowledge and skills of students of various levels. In our faculty, TBL exercises are provided for first-year students concurrently with lectures in physical chemistry and analytical chemistry. In this study, we researched the adoption of a peer evaluation process for this participatory learning model. Questionnaires taken after TBL exercises in the previous year showed a positive response to TBL. Further, a questionnaire taken after TBL exercises in the spring semester of the current year also yielded a positive response not only to TBL but also to peer evaluation. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the improvement of students' grades in chemistry classes and the feeling the percentage (20%) of peer evaluation in overall evaluation low (logistic regression analysis, p=0.022). On the basis of the findings, we argue that TBL provides a generic, practical learning environment including an effective focus on learning strategy and evaluation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and studies on the educational effects of TBL and peer evaluation.

  10. DEVELOPING CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS AND CREATIVE ATTITUDE THROUGH PROBLEM BASED GREEN VISION CHEMISTRY ENVIRONMENT LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nuswowati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to build creative thinking skills and creative attitude of students through a model of problem-based lectures Environmental Chemistry (PBL Green Chemistry visionary. Mixed methods research design experimental models embedded with pretest-posttest control group were used in this study, and the differences between assumed initial end-tests as the effects of the treatment. Creative thinking skills measured by the essay tests, non test while the creative attitude is measured from the completed questionnaires consisting of positive and negative statements of markers creative attitude. Data measurement N-gain of creative thinking skills for the control and experimental group were 0.40 and 0.71, while the creative attitude were 0.08 and 0.34. Improved tests of creative thinking skills or creative attitudes were analyzed by t-test. Implementation of research findings indicate environmental chemistry lecture- problems based Green Chemistry vision can improve thinking skills and of creative student.

  11. Coordination chemistry of N-heterocyclic nitrenium-based ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Kozuch, Sebastian; Saha, Prasenjit; Mauda, Assaf; Nisnevich, Gennady; Botoshansky, Mark; Shimon, Linda J W; Gandelman, Mark

    2015-05-04

    Comprehensive studies on the coordination properties of tridentate nitrenium-based ligands are presented. N-heterocyclic nitrenium ions demonstrate general and versatile binding abilities to various transition metals, as exemplified by the synthesis and characterization of Rh(I) , Rh(III) , Mo(0) , Ru(0) , Ru(II) , Pd(II) , Pt(II) , Pt(IV) , and Ag(I) complexes based on these unusual ligands. Formation of nitrenium-metal bonds is unambiguously confirmed both in solution by selective (15) N-labeling experiments and in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. The generality of N-heterocyclic nitrenium as a ligand is also validated by a systematic DFT study of its affinity towards all second-row transition and post-transition metals (Y-Cd) in terms of the corresponding bond-dissociation energies.

  12. Patent Retrieval in Chemistry based on Semantically Tagged Named Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    their corresponding synonyms. An ex- ample query for TS-15 is: (" Betaine " OR "Glycine betaine " OR "Glycocol betaine " OR "Glycylbetaine" OR ...) AND...task in an automatic way based on noun- phrase detection incorporating the OpenNLP chun- 3 Informative Term Synonyms Source Betaine Glycine betaine ...Glycocol betaine , Glycylbetaine etc. ATC Peripheral Artery Disease Peripheral Artery Disorder, Peripheral Arterial Disease etc. MeSH Diels-Alder reaction

  13. Teaching “Chemistry in Our Lives” Unit in the 9th Grade Chemistry Course through Context-Based ARCS Instructional Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya KUTU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the usability of Context-based ARCS Instructional Model on secondary school chemistry teaching. For this purpose the effects of learning through Context-based ARCS Instructional Model on the retention of knowledge, students’ motivation and attitude towards chemistry have been investigated. An instrumental case study has been utilized as the research method to teach the unit “Chemistry in Our Lives” in the 9th grade high school chemistry curriculum through Context-based ARCS Instructional Model. The sample of the study is composed of totally 60 ninth grade students from two different classes in a high school in Erzurum. The sample has been selected by convenience sampling method. Data have been collected through “Attitude Towards Chemistry Scale [ATCS]”; “Instructional Materials Motivation Survey [IMMS]”, “Constructivist Learning Environment Survey [CLES]”, “Achievement Test [AT]” have been developed by the researchers and semi-structured interviews. The data for IMMS, CLES and AT have been analyzed through descriptive statistics and results were presented as mean, standard deviation and charts. ATCS test has been analyzed by dependent sample t-test to see whether there is a significant difference between pre and post-tests scores. Semi-structured interviews have been subjected to content analysis and the results are presented as descriptively. The results show that the method used has increased the retention of learning and students’ motivation but has not had a statistically significant impact on students’ attitudes towards chemistry. In addition, it has been seen that students perceive classroom milieu as a constructivist learning environment.

  14. Pyrazine-based organometallic complex: synthesis, characterization, and supramolecular chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sourav; Chakraborty, Sourav; Das, Atanu; Rajamohanan, P R; Das, Neeladri

    2015-03-16

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a new pyrazine-based ditopic platinum(II) organometallic complex are reported. The molecular structure of the organoplatinum pyrazine dipod was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The potential utility of this organometallic ditopic acceptor as a building block in the construction of neutral metallasupramolecular macrocycles containing the pyrazine motif was explored. Pyrazine motifs containing supramolecules were characterized by multinuclear NMR (including (1)H DOSY), mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. The geometry of each supramolecular framework was optimized by employing the PM6 semiempirical molecular orbital method to predict its shape and size. The ability of the pyrazine-based organoplatinum complex to act as a host for nitroaromatic guest (2,4-dinitrotoluene and PA) molecules was explored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The binding stoichiometry and thermodynamic parameters of these host-guest complexation reactions were evaluated using ITC. Theoretical calculations were performed to obtain insight into the binding pattern between the organometallic host and nitroaromatic guests. The preferable binding propensity of the binding sites of complex 1 for both nitroaromatics (PA and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) determined by molecular simulation studies corroborates well with the experimental results as obtained by ITC experiments.

  15. Promoting Student Development of Models and Scientific Inquiry Skills in Acid-Base Chemistry: An Important Skill Development in Preparation for AP Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale-Hanes, Cara

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two groups of 11th grade chemistry students (n = 210) performed a sequence of hands-on and virtual laboratories that were progressively more inquiry-based. One-half of the students did the laboratory sequence with the addition of a teacher-led discussion connecting student data to student-generated visual representations of…

  16. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating fluid transitions between concepts and context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-05-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing conceptual understanding. This interpretive study explored the learning transactions in one 11th grade context-based chemistry classroom where the context was the local creek. The dialectic of agency/structure was used as a lens to examine how the practices in classroom interactions afforded students the agency for learning. The results suggest that first, fluid transitions were evident in the student-student interactions involving successful students; and second, fluid transitions linking concepts to context were evident in the students' successful reports. The study reveals that the structures of writing and collaborating in groups enabled students' agential and fluent movement between the field of the real-world creek and the field of the formal chemistry classroom. Furthermore, characteristics of academically successful students in context-based chemistry are highlighted. Research, teaching, and future directions for context-based science teaching are discussed.

  17. Development and Preliminary Impacts of the Implementation of an Authentic Research-Based Experiment in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; Cottone, Katelyn E.; Heethuis, Mitchell T.; Mueller, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating research-based lab activities into general chemistry at a large university can be challenging, considering the high enrollments and costs typically associated with the courses. Performing sweeping curricular overhauls of the general chemistry laboratory can be difficult, and in some cases discouraged, as many would rather maintain…

  18. Students' perceptions of teaching in context-based and traditional chemistry classrooms : Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M W; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's t

  19. Textbook Questions in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Curricula Analysed from a Content Perspective and a Learning Activities Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    In this study, questions in context-based and traditional chemistry textbooks were analysed from two perspectives that are at the heart of chemistry curricula reforms: a content perspective and a learning activities perspective. To analyse these textbook questions, we developed an instrument for each perspective. In total, 971 textbook questions…

  20. How are the Concepts and Theories of Acid-Base Reactions Presented? Chemistry in Textbooks and as Presented by Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio-Mas, Carlos; Calatayud, Maria Luisa; Guisasola, Jenaro; Furio-Gomez, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the views of science and scientific activity that can be found in chemistry textbooks and heard from teachers when acid-base reactions are introduced to grade 12 and university chemistry students. First, the main macroscopic and microscopic conceptual models are developed. Second, we attempt to show how the existence of…

  1. The Efficacy of Problem-Based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking…

  2. An investigation into the effectiveness of problem-based learning in a physical chemistry laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Açıkyıldız, Metin; Doğar, Çetin; Sözbilir, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students’ attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group pre-test post-test. Four experiments, covering the topics adsorption, viscosity, surface tension and conductivity were performed using a PBL approach in the fall semester of the 2003/04 academic year at Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty of Atatürk University. Each experiment was done over a three week period. A total of 40 students, 18 male and 22 female, participated in the study. Students took the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Concept Test (PCLCT), Attitudes towards Chemistry Laboratory (ATCL) questionnaire and Science Process Skills Test (SPST) as pre and post-tests. In addition, the effectiveness of the PBL approach was also determined through four different scales; Scales Specific to Students’ Views of PBL. A statistically significant difference between the students’ academic achievement and scientific process skills at p

  3. Adsorption of atrazine on hemp stem-based activated carbons with different surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lupul, Iwona; Yperman, Jan; Carleer, Robert; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Surface-modified hemp stem-based activated carbons (HACs) were prepared and used for the adsorption of atrazine from aqueous solution, and their adsorption performance was examined. A series of HACs were prepared by potassium hydroxide activation of hemp stems, followed by subsequent modification by thermal annealing, oxidation with nitric acid and amination. The resultant HACs differed in surface chemistry, while possessing similar porous structure. The surface group characteristics were exa...

  4. Fluorescent detection of copper(II) based on DNA-templated click chemistry and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lifen; Shen, Qinpeng; Zhao, Peng; Xiang, Bingbing; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-12-15

    A novel DNA-templated click chemistry strategy for homogenous fluorescent detection of Cu(2+) has been developed based on click ligation-dependent DNA structure switch and the selective quenching ability of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet. The clickable duplex probe consists of two DNA strands with alkyne and azide group, respectively, and Cu(+)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction can chemically ligate these two strands. Toehold sequence displacement was consequently exploited to achieve DNA structure transformation bearing fluorescent tag FAM. Cu(2+)-induced chemical ligation caused the probe transfer to hybrid structure with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) tail, while only duplex structure was obtained without Cu(2+). This structural difference can be probed by GO-based fluorescence detection due to the preferential binding of GO to ssDNA. Under the optimum conditions, this sensor can sensitively and specifically detect Cu(2+) with a low detection limit of 58 nM and a linear range of 0.1-10 μM. This new strategy is highly sensitive and selective for Cu(2+) detection because of the great specificity of click chemistry and super-quenching ability of GO. Moreover, with the aid of high efficient DNA templated synthesis, the detection process requires only about half an hour which is much quicker than previous click-chemistry-based Cu(2+) sensors.

  5. Hydration of pure and base-Containing sulfuric acid clusters studied by computational chemistry methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschel, Henning; Ortega, Ismael K.; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    The formation of hydrates of small molecular sulfuric acid clusters and cluster containing both sulfuric acid and base (ammonia or dimethylamine) has been studied by means of computational chemistry. Using a combined ab initio/density functional approach, formation energies of clusters with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, and up to two base molecules, have been calculated. Consequences for the hydration level of the corresponding clusters have been modelled. While the majority of pure sulfuric acid cluster are comparatively strongly hydrated, base containing cluster were found to be less hydrophilic. Dimethylamine is particularly effective in lowering the hydrophilicity of the cluster. Implications of the hydration profiles on atmospheric processes are discussed.

  6. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Furthermore, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area, and for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has a great potential to affect the RBS activity in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  7. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pour Biazar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Further, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations, and for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has the potential to greatly affect the RBS activity in areas under anthropogenic influence, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  8. Stability of genetic-based defensive chemistry across life stages in a Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Humphreys, Jonathan R; Potts, Brad M

    2007-10-01

    Defensive chemistry is a key plant fitness trait, and the investigation of the expression of plant secondary metabolites across life stages is important in understanding the lifetime evolutionary selection pressures on a plant. The expression of genetic-based differences in foliar defensive chemistry, known to influence mammalian herbivore preferences, was studied across two contrasting life phases of the heteroblastic tree, Eucalyptus globulus. With plants from different subraces of E. globulus growing in a field trial, we compared the levels of seven chemical constituents in adult and juvenile foliage from related coppiced plants. Defensive chemistry was generally higher in more vulnerable coppice foliage than adult foliage. Significant, genetic-based differences among subraces were detected for two key defensive chemicals, a sideroxylonal and a macrocarpal, and these differences were stable across life phases. In contrast, significant differences among subraces in adult leaf condensed tannins were not evident in the coppice because of the absence of this group of tannins in this foliage. These findings lend support to hypotheses that suggest condensed tannins may have evolved for reasons other than mammalian herbivore defense.

  9. Graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials: the promising materials for bright future of electroanalytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-mei; Wu, Geng-huang; Jiang, Ya-qi; Wang, Yi-ru; Chen, Xi

    2011-11-21

    Similar to its popular older cousins of fullerene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the latest form of nanocarbon, graphene, is inspiring intensive research efforts in its own right. As an atomically thin layer of sp(2)-hybridized carbon, graphene possesses spectacular electronic, optical, magnetic, thermal and mechanical properties, which make it an exciting material in a variety of important applications. In this review, we present the current advances in the field of graphene electroanalytical chemistry, including the modern methods of graphene production, and graphene functionalization. Electrochemical (bio) sensing developments using graphene and graphene-based materials are summarized in more detail, and we also speculate on their future and discuss potential progress for their applications in electroanalytical chemistry.

  10. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  11. Extending Halogen-based Medicinal Chemistry to Proteins: IODO-INSULIN AS A CASE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Krystel; Pandyarajan, Vijay; Phillips, Nelson B; Smith, Brian J; Menting, John G; Whittaker, Jonathan; Lawrence, Michael C; Meuwly, Markus; Weiss, Michael A

    2016-12-30

    Insulin, a protein critical for metabolic homeostasis, provides a classical model for protein design with application to human health. Recent efforts to improve its pharmaceutical formulation demonstrated that iodination of a conserved tyrosine (Tyr(B26)) enhances key properties of a rapid-acting clinical analog. Moreover, the broad utility of halogens in medicinal chemistry has motivated the use of hybrid quantum- and molecular-mechanical methods to study proteins. Here, we (i) undertook quantitative atomistic simulations of 3-[iodo-Tyr(B26)]insulin to predict its structural features, and (ii) tested these predictions by X-ray crystallography. Using an electrostatic model of the modified aromatic ring based on quantum chemistry, the calculations suggested that the analog, as a dimer and hexamer, exhibits subtle differences in aromatic-aromatic interactions at the dimer interface. Aromatic rings (Tyr(B16), Phe(B24), Phe(B25), 3-I-Tyr(B26), and their symmetry-related mates) at this interface adjust to enable packing of the hydrophobic iodine atoms within the core of each monomer. Strikingly, these features were observed in the crystal structure of a 3-[iodo-Tyr(B26)]insulin analog (determined as an R6 zinc hexamer). Given that residues B24-B30 detach from the core on receptor binding, the environment of 3-I-Tyr(B26) in a receptor complex must differ from that in the free hormone. Based on the recent structure of a "micro-receptor" complex, we predict that 3-I-Tyr(B26) engages the receptor via directional halogen bonding and halogen-directed hydrogen bonding as follows: favorable electrostatic interactions exploiting, respectively, the halogen's electron-deficient σ-hole and electronegative equatorial band. Inspired by quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics, such "halogen engineering" promises to extend principles of medicinal chemistry to proteins.

  12. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  13. The Effect of Multimedia Based Learning in Chemistry Teaching and Learning on Students’ Self-Regulated Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Erfan Priyambodo; Sulistyani Sulistyani

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the uses of Multimedia Based Learning (MBL) in classroom instruction increased widely. Overall, this implementation aims to improve students’ motivation and also their learning outcomes. This study was answering the effect of MBL toward students’ Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) in chemistry teaching and learning. The experiment was conducted in class XI of senior high school in Yogyakarta. Researchers create some computer based media for chemistry materials and continued with e...

  14. Graphene-based materials: fabrication and application for adsorption in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Bo; Lu, Qipeng; Qu, Qishu

    2014-10-03

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms densely packed into a honeycomb crystal lattice with unique electronic, chemical, and mechanical properties, is the 2D allotrope of carbon. Owing to the remarkable properties, graphene and graphene-based materials are likely to find potential applications as a sorbent in analytical chemistry. The current review focuses predominantly on the recent development of graphene-based materials and demonstrates their enhanced performance in adsorption of organic compounds, metal ions, and solid phase extraction as well as in separation science since mostly 2012.

  15. Teaching Green and Sustainable Chemistry: A Revised One-Semester Course Based on Inspirations and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteel-Parrish, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    An elective course, "Toward the Greening of Our Minds": Green and Sustainable Chemistry, has been offered at Washington College since 2005. This new course without laboratory is designed for chemistry and biology majors and minors who have previously taken two semesters of general chemistry and organic chemistry. Due to the popularity of…

  16. Scope and Limitations of Fmoc Chemistry SPPS-Based Approaches to the Total Synthesis of Insulin Lispro via Ester Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Rege, Nischay; Weiss, Michael A; Eitel, Simon H; Meier, Thomas; Schoenleber, Ralph O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2017-01-31

    We have systematically explored three approaches based on 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) for the total chemical synthesis of the key depsipeptide intermediate for the efficient total chemical synthesis of insulin. The approaches used were: stepwise Fmoc chemistry SPPS; the "hybrid method", in which maximally protected peptide segments made by Fmoc chemistry SPPS are condensed in solution; and, native chemical ligation using peptide-thioester segments generated by Fmoc chemistry SPPS. A key building block in all three approaches was a Glu[O-β-(Thr)] ester-linked dipeptide equipped with a set of orthogonal protecting groups compatible with Fmoc chemistry SPPS. The most effective method for the preparation of the 51 residue ester-linked polypeptide chain of ester insulin was the use of unprotected peptide-thioester segments, prepared from peptide-hydrazides synthesized by Fmoc chemistry SPPS, and condensed by native chemical ligation. High-resolution X-ray crystallography confirmed the disulfide pairings and three-dimensional structure of synthetic insulin lispro prepared from ester insulin lispro by this route. Further optimization of these pilot studies could yield an efficient total chemical synthesis of insulin lispro (Humalog) based on peptide synthesis by Fmoc chemistry SPPS.

  17. A comprehensive review in current developments of benzothiazole-based molecules in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keri, Rangappa S; Patil, Mahadeo R; Patil, Siddappa A; Budagumpi, Srinivasa

    2015-01-07

    Benzothiazole (BTA) and its derivatives are the most important heterocyclic compounds, which are common and integral feature of a variety of natural products and pharmaceutical agents. BTA shows a variety of pharmacological properties, and its analogs offer a high degree of structural diversity that has proven useful for the search of new therapeutic agents. The broad spectrum of pharmacological activity in individual BTA derivative indicates that, this series of compounds is of an undoubted interest. The related research and developments in BTA-based medicinal chemistry have become a rapidly developing and increasingly active topic. Particularly, numerous BTA-based compounds as clinical drugs have been extensively used in practice to treat various types of diseases with high therapeutic potency. This work systematically gives a comprehensive review in current developments of BTA-based compounds in the whole range of medicinal chemistry as anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, analgesic, anti-HIV, antioxidant, anticonvulsant, antitubercular, antidiabetic, antileishmanial, antihistaminic, antimalarial and other medicinal agents. It is believed that, this review article is helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic BTA-based drugs, as well as more effective diagnostic agents and pathologic probes.

  18. Comprehensive review in current developments of imidazole-based medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Peng, Xin-Mei; Damu, Guri L V; Geng, Rong-Xia; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2014-03-01

    Imidazole ring is an important five-membered aromatic heterocycle widely present in natural products and synthetic molecules. The unique structural feature of imidazole ring with desirable electron-rich characteristic is beneficial for imidazole derivatives to readily bind with a variety of enzymes and receptors in biological systems through diverse weak interactions, thereby exhibiting broad bioactivities. The related research and developments of imidazole-based medicinal chemistry have become a rapidly developing and increasingly active topic. Particularly, numerous imidazole-based compounds as clinical drugs have been extensively used in the clinic to treat various types of diseases with high therapeutic potency, which have shown the enormous development value. This work systematically gives a comprehensive review in current developments of imidazole-based compounds in the whole range of medicinal chemistry as anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, antitubercular, anti-inflammatory, antineuropathic, antihypertensive, antihistaminic, antiparasitic, antiobesity, antiviral, and other medicinal agents, together with their potential applications in diagnostics and pathology. It is hoped that this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic imidazole-based medicinal drugs, as well as more effective diagnostic agents and pathologic probes.

  19. Applications of monolithic solid-phase extraction in chromatography-based clinical chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2013-04-01

    Complex matrices, for example urine, serum, plasma, and whole blood, which are common in clinical chemistry testing, contain many non-analyte compounds that can interfere with either detection or in-source ionization in chromatography-based assays. To overcome this problem, analytes are extracted by protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), and liquid-liquid extraction. With correct chemistry and well controlled material SPE may furnish clean specimens with consistent performance. Traditionally, SPE has been performed with particle-based adsorbents, but monolithic SPE is attracting increasing interest of clinical laboratories. Monoliths, solid pieces of stationary phase, have bimodal structures consisting of macropores, which enable passage of solvent, and mesopores, in which analytes are separated. This structure results in low back-pressure with separation capabilities similar to those of particle-based adsorbents. Monoliths also enable increased sample throughput, reduced solvent use, varied support formats, and/or automation. However, many of these monoliths are not commercially available. In this review, application of monoliths to purification of samples from humans before chromatography-based assays will be critically reviewed.

  20. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Glotzer, Sharon [University of Michigan; McCurdy, Bill [University of California Davis; Roberto, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of

  1. Chemistry of stannylene-based Lewis pairs: dynamic tin coordination switching between donor and acceptor character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kilian M; Freitag, Sarah; Schubert, Hartmut; Gerke, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Wesemann, Lars

    2015-03-16

    The coordination chemistry of cyclic stannylene-based intramolecular Lewis pairs is presented. The P→Sn adducts were treated with [Ni(COD)2] and [Pd(PCy3)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, PCy3 = tricyclohexylphosphine). In the isolated coordination compounds the stannylene moiety acts either as an acceptor or a donor ligand. Examples of a dynamic switch between these two coordination modes of the P-Sn ligand are illustrated and the structures in the solid state together with heteronuclear NMR spectroscopic findings are discussed. In the case of a Ni(0) complex, (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy of the uncoordinated and coordinated phosphastannirane ligand is presented.

  2. Nonlinear theory of combustion stability in liquid rocket engine based on chemistry dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉辉; 王振国; 周进

    2002-01-01

    Detailed models of combustion instability based on chemistry dynamics are developed. The results show that large activation energy goes against the combustion stability. The heat transfer coefficient between the wall and the combust gas is an important bifurcation parameter for the combustion instability. The acoustics modes of the chamber are in competition and cooperation with each other for limited vibration energy. Thermodynamics criterion of combustion stability can be deduced from the nonlinear thermodynamics. Correlations of the theoretical results and historical experiments indicate that chemical kinetics play a critical role in the combustion instability.

  3. Manufacturing of Peptide Microarrays Based on Catalyst-Free Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim, Denis; Pfeifer, Marc E

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization of peptides to a solid surface is frequently an important first step before they can be probed with a variety of biological samples in a heterogeneous assay format for research and clinical diagnostic purposes. Peptides can be derivatized in many ways to subsequently covalently attach them to an activated solid surface such as epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Here, we describe a clean, efficient, and reproducible fabrication process based on catalyst-free click chemistry compatible with the construction of low- to high-density peptide microarrays.

  4. Synthetics, mineral oils, and bio-based lubricants chemistry and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnick, Leslie R

    2005-01-01

    As the field of tribology has evolved, the lubrication industry is also progressing at an extraordinary rate. Updating the author's bestselling publication, Synthetic Lubricants and High-Performance Functional Fluids, this book features the contributions of over 60 specialists, ten new chapters, and a new title to reflect the evolving nature of the field: Synthetics, Mineral Oils, and Bio-Based Lubricants: Chemistry and Technology. The book contains chapters on all major lubricant fluids used in a wide range of applications. For each type of lubricant, the authors discuss the historical develo

  5. Discovery and Development of Natural Product-derived Chemotherapeutic Agents Based on a Medicinal Chemistry Approach⊥†

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal plants have long been an excellent source of pharmaceutical agents. Accordingly, the long term objectives of the author's research program are to discover and design new chemotherapeutic agents based on plant-derived compound leads by using a medicinal chemistry approach, which is a combination of chemistry and biology. Different examples of promising bioactive natural products and their synthetic analogs, including sesquiterpene lactones, quassinoids, naphthoquinones, phenylquinolo...

  6. Impact of STS (Context-Based Type of Teaching) in Comparison with a Textbook Approach on Attitudes and Achievement in Community College Chemistry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gita

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of a context-based teaching approach (STS) versus a more traditional textbook approach on the attitudes and achievement of community college chemistry students. In studying attitudes toward chemistry within this study, I used a 30-item Likert scale in order to study the importance of chemistry in…

  7. Teaching biochemistry to medical students in Singapore--from organic chemistry to problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, H E

    2005-07-01

    The medical faculty in the National University of Singapore started in 1905 but the Chair in Biochemistry was only established in 1927. For many years the biochemistry course consisted of the teaching of the organic chemistry of substances of physiological importance, nutrition, metabolism and hormones. In 1961, clinical biochemistry was introduced and in the 1980s, genetics and molecular biology were included. By then, most of the organic chemistry content had been removed as greater emphasis was placed on clinical correlation. Laboratory classes consisted of mock glucose tolerance tests and the measurement of various enzymes. By the 1990s, students were no longer interested in such practical classes, so a bold decision was made around 1995 to remove laboratory classes from the curriculum. Unfortunately, this meant that the medical students who might have been interested in laboratory work could no longer do such work. However, the new curriculum in 1999 gave the department an opportunity to offer a laboratory course as an elective for interested students. This new curriculum adopted an integrated approach with Genetics being taught as part of Paediatrics, and a new module (Structural and Cell Biology) comprising aspects of cell biology and biochemistry was introduced. This module is currently taught by staff from Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry. Some biochemistry content is now incorporated into the clinical problem scenarios of problem-based learning such as jaundice, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa, etc. So the evolution of teaching biochemistry to medical students in Singapore has paralleled worldwide trends and moved from the didactic teaching of organic chemistry of biomolecules to problem-based learning using clinical cases.

  8. Pre-Nursing Students Perceptions of Traditional and Inquiry Based Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jessica

    This paper describes a process that attempted to meet the needs of undergraduate students in a pre-nursing chemistry class. The laboratory was taught in traditional verification style and students were surveyed to assess their perceptions of the educational goals of the laboratory. A literature review resulted in an inquiry based method and analysis of the needs of nurses resulted in more application based activities. This new inquiry format was implemented the next semester, the students were surveyed at the end of the semester and results were compared to the previous method. Student and instructor response to the change in format was positive. Students in the traditional format placed goals concerning technique above critical thinking and felt the lab was easy to understand and carry out. Students in the inquiry based lab felt they learned more critical thinking skills and enjoyed the independence of designing experiments and answering their own questions.

  9. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  10. Wastewater treatment using hybrid treatment schemes based on cavitation and Fenton chemistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagal, Manisha V; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes such as cavitation and Fenton chemistry have shown considerable promise for wastewater treatment applications due to the ease of operation and simple reactor design. In this review, hybrid methods based on cavitation coupled with Fenton process for the treatment of wastewater have been discussed. The basics of individual processes (Acoustic cavitation, Hydrodynamic cavitation, Fenton chemistry) have been discussed initially highlighting the need for combined processes. The different types of reactors used for the combined processes have been discussed with some recommendations for large scale operation. The effects of important operating parameters such as solution temperature, initial pH, initial pollutant concentration and Fenton's reagent dosage have been discussed with guidelines for selection of optimum parameters. The optimization of power density is necessary for ultrasonic processes (US) and combined processes (US/Fenton) whereas the inlet pressure needs to be optimized in the case of Hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) based processes. An overview of different pollutants degraded under optimized conditions using HC/Fenton and US/Fenton process with comparison with individual processes have been presented. It has been observed that the main mechanism for the synergy of the combined process depends on the generation of additional hydroxyl radicals and its proper utilization for the degradation of the pollutant, which is strongly dependent on the loading of hydrogen peroxide. Overall, efficient wastewater treatment with high degree of energy efficiency can be achieved using combined process operating under optimized conditions, as compared to the individual process.

  11. Discovery and development of natural product-derived chemotherapeutic agents based on a medicinal chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-03-26

    Medicinal plants have long been an excellent source of pharmaceutical agents. Accordingly, the long-term objectives of the author's research program are to discover and design new chemotherapeutic agents based on plant-derived compound leads by using a medicinal chemistry approach, which is a combination of chemistry and biology. Different examples of promising bioactive natural products and their synthetic analogues, including sesquiterpene lactones, quassinoids, naphthoquinones, phenylquinolones, dithiophenediones, neo-tanshinlactone, tylophorine, suksdorfin, DCK, and DCP, will be presented with respect to their discovery and preclinical development as potential clinical trial candidates. Research approaches include bioactivity- or mechanism of action-directed isolation and characterization of active compounds, rational drug design-based modification and analogue synthesis, and structure-activity relationship and mechanism of action studies. Current clinical trial agents discovered by the Natural Products Research Laboratories, University of North Carolina, include bevirimat (dimethyl succinyl betulinic acid), which is now in phase IIb trials for treating AIDS. Bevirimat is also the first in a new class of HIV drug candidates called "maturation inhibitors". In addition, an etoposide analogue, GL-331, progressed to anticancer phase II clinical trials, and the curcumin analogue JC-9 is in phase II clinical trials for treating acne and in development for trials against prostate cancer. The discovery and development of these clinical trial candidates will also be discussed.

  12. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  13. The Importance of Computer Based Active Learning for Basic Chemistry in Vocational High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe GÜNTER

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry is a very comprehensive discipline that researches atoms; molecules; the structure of matter in the form of element or compound; combinations, and physical and chemical properties of matter; macroscopic and microscopic transformations of matters; the energy and entropy released or absorbed in the course of these transformations; the structures and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and minerals in the body. This discipline includes numerous reactions at the macroscopic, microscopic and particulate levels, abstract concepts, three-dimensional structure of molecules, mathematics, and graphics. It is important for students to be trained as scientists to internalize -with meaningful learning - chemistry having much abstract concepts. Especially for students in associate degree programs in Vocational High Schools, taking this integrated course will provide them to be more creative in their future professional work; to cope with and overcome analytical problems; to be self-learners; to fill the gaps concerning chemical analysis originated from secondary education; and to gain critical thinking and self-evaluation skills regarding chemical problems. In the age of developing science and technology, “Computer-Based Active Learning Method” emerged with the introduction of multi-media into education and training. In this context, students will learn difficult and complex mathematical operations and graphics interpretations more meaningfully with computer-based simulations and analogies.

  14. The successful merger of theoretical thermochemistry with fragment-based methods in quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Quantum chemistry and electronic structure theory have proven to be essential tools to the experimental chemist, in terms of both a priori predictions that pave the way for designing new experiments and rationalizing experimental observations a posteriori. Translating the well-established success of electronic structure theory in obtaining the structures and energies of small chemical systems to increasingly larger molecules is an exciting and ongoing central theme of research in quantum chemistry. However, the prohibitive computational scaling of highly accurate ab initio electronic structure methods poses a fundamental challenge to this research endeavor. This scenario necessitates an indirect fragment-based approach wherein a large molecule is divided into small fragments and is subsequently reassembled to compute its energy accurately. In our quest to further reduce the computational expense associated with the fragment-based methods and overall enhance the applicability of electronic structure methods to large molecules, we realized that the broad ideas involved in a different area, theoretical thermochemistry, are transferable to the area of fragment-based methods. This Account focuses on the effective merger of these two disparate frontiers in quantum chemistry and how new concepts inspired by theoretical thermochemistry significantly reduce the total number of electronic structure calculations needed to be performed as part of a fragment-based method without any appreciable loss of accuracy. Throughout, the generalized connectivity based hierarchy (CBH), which we developed to solve a long-standing problem in theoretical thermochemistry, serves as the linchpin in this merger. The accuracy of our method is based on two strong foundations: (a) the apt utilization of systematic and sophisticated error-canceling schemes via CBH that result in an optimal cutting scheme at any given level of fragmentation and (b) the use of a less expensive second

  15. Towards "Bildung"-Oriented Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education, based on a reflective and critical discourse of chemistry. It is contrasted with the dominant type of chemistry education, based on the mainstream discourse of chemistry. "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education includes not only content knowledge in chemistry, but also…

  16. The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry: A Peer-Reviewed, Web-Based, Education Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, W.; Gallant, A.; Joiner, C.

    2004-01-01

    The recent developments in nuclear chemistry education are presented and an attempt is made to collect supplemental materials relating to the study and practice of nuclear chemistry. The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry functions as an authoritative Web site with supplemental material for teaching nuclear and radiochemistry.

  17. Research on Application to College Study in Organic Chemistry Teaching based on Computer Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to give more accurate response to some basic chemical problems, it relates to the theoretical analysis and calculation so the computer chemistry has been developed rapidly. The computational chemistry software has its unique properties and it can achieve human-computer interaction showing vividness and intuitivenes setc. the effect is signifcant, which concrete teaching case analysis and in chemistry teaching by making good use of computer chemistry software so as to improve the actual effect of classroom teaching enrich the teaching contents in class animate the classroom atmosphere and enhance students enthusiasm of learning chemistry.

  18. Eutrophication of Lake Wingra: A Chemistry-Based Environmental Science Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Ann C.; Cizmas, Leslie; Bereman, Robert

    1999-07-01

    The paper describes the development and field test of a curriculum module for introductory chemistry by an interinstitutional, interdisciplinary team representing the disciplines of chemistry, biology, political science, environmental management and computer visualization. The module was designed to show that a serious and common worldwide environmental problem, the eutrophication of freshwater lakes, is directly related to the chemical reactions of phosphates. The module, which includes a student manual, an instructor's manual, and a computer visualization component, is based on a case study of Lake Wingra in Madison, Wisconsin. The module was field tested at two sites, after which 80% of students gave it a high overall rating. Attitude questionnaires administered before and after the unit was taught showed that students increased their interest in environmental problems, increased their understanding of the complexity of the problems, and had a higher level of personal commitment to address environmental problems. With changes in emphasis the module is suitable for use in other courses, including economics, biological science, and environmental science.

  19. Peptide tag/probe pairs based on the coordination chemistry for protein labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchinomiya, Shohei; Ojida, Akio; Hamachi, Itaru

    2014-02-17

    Protein-labeling methods serve as essential tools for analyzing functions of proteins of interest under complicated biological conditions such as in live cells. These labeling methods are useful not only to fluorescently visualize proteins of interest in biological systems but also to conduct protein and cell analyses by harnessing the unique functions of molecular probes. Among the various labeling methods available, an appropriate binding pair consisting of a short peptide and a de novo designed small molecular probe has attracted attention because of its wide utility and versatility. Interestingly, most peptide tag/probe pairs exploit metal-ligand coordination interactions as the main binding force responsible for their association. Herein, we provide an overview of the recent progress of these coordination-chemistry-based protein-labeling methods and their applications for fluorescence imaging and functional analysis of cellular proteins, while highlighting our originally developed labeling methods. These successful examples clearly exemplify the utility and versatility of metal coordination chemistry in protein functional analysis.

  20. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J.; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  1. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  2. Tetrazine-based chemistry for nitrite determination in a paper microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gomez, Inmaculada; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Álvarez-Bermejo, José Antonio; Ariza-Avidad, Maria; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-11-01

    We present a new chemistry to determine nitrites implemented in a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (µPAD). The device is fabricated in cellulose paper with a sample reception area and three replicate detection areas with recognition chemistry immobilized by adsorption. The method involves the use of nitrite in an acid medium reaction to generate nitrous acid, which produces the oxidation of s-dihydrotetrazine: 1,2-dihydro-3,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DHBPTz), which change the detection zone from colorless to pink. We used a digital camera and smartphone for the quantitative analysis of nitrite with the color coordinate S of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter. Parameters such as concentration and volume of s-dihydrotetrazine, pH, sample volume and reaction time were studied. The detection limit for this method is 1.30µM nitrite. To estimate the selectivity of the method an interference study of common ions in water samples was performed. The procedure was applied to natural water and compared with reference procedures.

  3. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Glotzer, Sharon [University of Michigan; McCurdy, Bill [University of California Davis; Roberto, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of

  4. On the Prevalence of Alternative Conceptions on Acid-Base Chemistry among Secondary Students: Insights from Cognitive and Confidence Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Kai Yee; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of alternative conceptions (ACs) on acid--base chemistry harbored by grade 9 students in Singapore. The ACs were obtained by the development and validation of a 4-tier diagnostic instrument. It is among the very few studies in the science education literature that have focused on examining results based also on…

  5. Medicinal Chemistry Projects Requiring Imaginative Structure-Based Drug Design Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Pottel, Joshua; Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Liu, Zhaomin; Tomberg, Anna; Corbeil, Christopher R

    2016-09-20

    Computational methods for docking small molecules to proteins are prominent in drug discovery. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of documented examples-and several pertinent cases within our research program. Fifteen years ago, our first docking-guided drug design project yielded nanomolar metalloproteinase inhibitors and illustrated the potential of structure-based drug design. Subsequent applications of docking programs to the design of integrin antagonists, BACE-1 inhibitors, and aminoglycosides binding to bacterial RNA demonstrated that available docking programs needed significant improvement. At that time, docking programs primarily considered flexible ligands and rigid proteins. We demonstrated that accounting for protein flexibility, employing displaceable water molecules, and using ligand-based pharmacophores improved the docking accuracy of existing methods-enabling the design of bioactive molecules. The success prompted the development of our own program, Fitted, implementing all of these aspects. The primary motivation has always been to respond to the needs of drug design studies; the majority of the concepts behind the evolution of Fitted are rooted in medicinal chemistry projects and collaborations. Several examples follow: (1) Searching for HDAC inhibitors led us to develop methods considering drug-zinc coordination and its effect on the pKa of surrounding residues. (2) Targeting covalent prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibitors prompted an update to Fitted to identify reactive groups and form bonds with a given residue (e.g., a catalytic residue) when the geometry allows it. Fitted-the first fully automated covalent docking program-was successfully applied to the discovery of four new classes of covalent POP inhibitors. As a result, efficient stereoselective syntheses of a few screening hits were prioritized rather than synthesizing large chemical libraries-yielding nanomolar inhibitors. (3) In order to study the metabolism of POP inhibitors by

  6. Determination of Carbonate Rock Chemistry Using Laboratory-Based Hyperspectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrullah Zaini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced laboratory-based imaging hyperspectral sensors, such as SisuCHEMA, has created an opportunity to extract compositional information of mineral mixtures from spectral images. Determining proportions of minerals on rock surfaces based on spectral signature is a challenging approach due to naturally-occurring minerals that exist in the form of intimate mixtures, and grain size variations. This study demonstrates the application of SisuCHEMA hyperspectral data to determine mineral components in hand specimens of carbonate rocks. Here, we applied wavelength position, spectral angle mapper (SAM and linear spectral unmixing (LSU approaches to estimate the chemical composition and the relative abundance of carbonate minerals on the rock surfaces. The accuracy of these classification methods and correlation between mineral chemistry and mineral spectral characteristics in determining mineral constituents of rocks are also analyzed. Results showed that chemical composition (Ca-Mg ratio of carbonate minerals at a pixel (e.g., sub-grain level can be extracted from the image pixel spectra using these spectral analysis methods. The results also indicated that the spatial distribution and the proportions of calcite-dolomite mixtures on the rock surfaces vary between the spectral methods. For the image shortwave infrared (SWIR spectra, the wavelength position approach was found to be sensitive to all compositional variations of carbonate mineral mixtures when compared to the SAM and LSU approaches. The correlation between geochemical elements and spectroscopic parameters also revealed the presence of these carbonate mixtures with various chemical compositions in the rock samples. This study concludes that the wavelength position approach is a stable and reproducible technique for estimating carbonate mineral chemistry on the rock surfaces using laboratory-based hyperspectral data.

  7. Inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Loverude

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat unusual for its interdisciplinary focus. We describe the course structure in detail, providing examples of course materials and assessment strategies. Finally, we provide research data illustrating both the need for the course and the effectiveness of the course in developing student understanding of selected topics. Student responses to various questions reflect a lack of understanding of many relatively simple physical science concepts, and a level of performance that is usually lower than that in comparable courses serving a general education audience. Additional data suggest that course activities improve student understanding of selected topics, often dramatically.

  8. Comprehensive Review in Current Developments of Benzimidazole-Based Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keri, Rangappa S; Hiremathad, Asha; Budagumpi, Srinivasa; Nagaraja, Bhari Mallanna

    2015-07-01

    The properties of benzimidazole and its derivatives have been studied over more than one hundred years. Benzimidazole derivatives are useful intermediates/subunits for the development of molecules of pharmaceutical or biological interest. Substituted benzimidazole derivatives have found applications in diverse therapeutic areas such as antiulcer, anticancer agents, and anthelmintic species to name just a few. This work systematically gives a comprehensive review in current developments of benzimidazole-based compounds in the whole range of medicinal chemistry as anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, analgesic agents, anti-HIV, antioxidant, anticonvulsant, antitubercular, antidiabetic, antileishmanial, antihistaminic, antimalarial agents, and other medicinal agents. This review will further be helpful for the researcher on the basis of substitution pattern around the nucleus with an aim to help medicinal chemists for developing an SAR on benzimidazole drugs/compounds.

  9. Teaching Effectiveness of Integrating Task-based Approach into Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry Course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianjiao; WEI; Yiru; WANG; Sen; HUANG

    2013-01-01

    From the perspective of students,the effectiveness of task-based approach in In-organic and Analytical Chemistry course were summarized.The strength and weak points of TBA were analyzed,and the specific suggestions for obtaining better effect were put forward.The result showed a satisfactory achievement and unexpected result in showing the effectiveness of this teaching model.Not only could this TBA enhance student’s overall knowledge of discipline but also cultivate students’ multi-dimensional competence:competence in searching literatures, communication and management,autonomous,co-operative and reflective learning,and competence in analyzing and problem-solving,as well as improving their language expression ability,and skills in using multi-media and internet technology into their academic course learning and research.The implication of this research on the classroom teaching practice will shed light on the future teaching reform of other courses in China.

  10. Silver/polysaccharide-based nanofibrous materials synthesized from green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, M A; Garza-Navarro, M A; Moreno-Cortez, I E; Lucio-Porto, R; González-González, V A

    2016-01-20

    In this contribution a novel green chemistry approach for the synthesis of nanofibrous materials based on blends of carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC)-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) composite and polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) is proposed. These nanofibrous materials were obtained from the electrospinning of blends of aqueous solutions of CMC-AgNPs composite and PVA, which were prepared at different CMC/PVA weight ratios in order to electrospin nanofibers applying a constant tension of 15kV. The synthesized materials were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy; as well as Fourier-transform infrared, ultraviolet and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Experimental evidence suggests that the diameter of the nanofibers is thinner than any other reported in the literature regarding the electrospinning of CMC. This feature is related to the interactions of AgNPs with carboxyl functional groups of the CMC, which diminish those between the later and acetyl groups of PVA.

  11. The Effect of Multimedia Based Learning in Chemistry Teaching and Learning on Students’ Self-Regulated Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfan Priyambodo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the uses of Multimedia Based Learning (MBL in classroom instruction increased widely. Overall, this implementation aims to improve students’ motivation and also their learning outcomes. This study was answering the effect of MBL toward students’ Self-Regulated Learning (SRL in chemistry teaching and learning. The experiment was conducted in class XI of senior high school in Yogyakarta. Researchers create some computer based media for chemistry materials and continued with expert judgement of the media. Students’ data SRL were measured using validated questionnaire. The questionnaire consists of three components, i.e. metacognitive, motivation and behavior. The results showed that there was significant differences in SRL of students before and after participating in chemistry teaching and learning which applying MBL.

  12. Guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction: Investigation of critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, and implementing student roles in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanya

    Recent initiatives in the laboratory curriculum have encouraged an inquiry-based approach to learning and teaching in the laboratory. It has been argued that laboratory instruction should not just be hands-on, but it should portray the essence of inquiry through the process of experiential learning and reflective engagement in collaboration with peers and in facilitation by the instructor. A student-centered active learning approach may be an effective way to enhance student understanding of concepts in the laboratory. The dissertation research work explores the impact of laboratory instruction and its relevance for college-level chemistry. Each chapter is different from the preceding chapter in terms of the purpose of the study and the research questions asked. However, the overarching idea is to address the importance of guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction in chemistry and its relevance in helping students to make connections with the chemistry content and in imparting skills to students. Such skills include problem solving, collaborative group work and critical thinking. The first research study (Chapter 2) concerns the impact of first year co-requisite general chemistry laboratory instruction on the problem-solving skills of students. The second research study (Chapter 3) examines the impact of implementing student roles also known as Student-Led Instructor Facilitated Guided-Inquiry based Laboratories, SLIFGIL) by modifying the Science Writing Heuristic approach of laboratory instruction. In the third research study (Chapter 4), critical thinking skills of first semester general chemistry laboratory students were compared to advanced (third or fourth year) chemistry laboratory students based on the analysis of their laboratory reports.

  13. Experience and the arts: An examination of an arts-based chemistry class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Patricia Ann

    Many high school students are either intimidated or unmotivated when faced with science courses taught with a traditional teaching methodology. The focus of this study was the integration of the arts, specifically the Creative Arts Laboratory (CAL) approach, into the teaching methodology and assessment of a high school chemistry class, with particular interest in what occurs from the point of view of the students and the teacher throughout the integration. Using a case study design, research questions were developed that looked at the effects of arts-integration on the students and teacher in a high school chemistry class; what strategies of arts integration were viewed positively and negatively by the students and teacher; and what role the arts may play in the formation of a new approach to the high school science curriculum. The levels of student engagement and participation were changed and thusly viewed positively by both students and teacher. Specifically, group work that allowed students to choose various arts elements to depict chemistry concepts was considered most favorably. The role of the teacher shifted from a teacher-centered design to a more student-centered environment. Classroom activities that garnered the most student engagement included peer-to-peer review through the critique process and the reinforcement of vocabulary definitions through movement activities. Negative student reviews of the integration were noted when time constraints prevented them from completing their projects to their own standards of satisfaction. However, within this study, the arts allowed many students of varying learning abilities to potentially grasp and understand scientific concepts in new and individual ways, which reinforces an inquiry-based scientific method. Further research is necessary to determine how to prepare teachers to use varying teaching methodologies including the CAL method. Moreover, high school science curricula need to be reviewed to potentially

  14. Sol-Gel Application for Consolidating Stone: An Example of Project-Based Learning in a Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Santos, Desiree´ M.; Montes, Antonio; Sa´nchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Navas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A Project Based Learning (PBL) methodology was used in the practical laboratories of the Advanced Physical Chemistry department. The project type proposed simulates "real research" focusing on sol-gel synthesis and the application of the obtained sol as a stone consolidant. Students were divided into small groups (2 to 3 students) to…

  15. Synthesis and ligand-based reduction chemistry of boron difluoride complexes with redox-active formazanate ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, M. -C.; Otten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Mono(formazanate) boron difluoride complexes (LBF2), which show remarkably facile and reversible ligand-based redox-chemistry, were synthesized by transmetallation of bis(formazanate) zinc complexes with boron trifluoride. The one-electron reduction product [LBF2](-)[Cp2Co](+) and a key intermediate

  16. Bringing Research into a First Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory with the Multistep Synthesis of Carbohydrate-Based HIV Inhibitor Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a…

  17. Fenton chemistry-based detemplation of an industrially relevant microcrystalline beta zeolite. Optimization and scaling-up studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz-Iniesta, Maria Jesus; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    A mild template removal of microcrystalline beta zeolite, based on Fenton chemistry, was optimized. Fenton detemplation was studied in terms of applicability conditions window, reaction rate and scale up. TGA and CHN elemental analysis were used to evaluate the detemplation effectiveness, while 'CP,

  18. STREAMWATER ACID-BASED CHEMISTRY AND CRITICAL LOADS OF ATMOSPHERIC SULFUR DEPOSITION IN SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK, VIRGINIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A modeling study was conducted to evaluate the acid-base chemistry of streams within Shenandoah National Park, Virginia and to project future responses to sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) atmospheric emissions controls. Many of the major stream systems in the Park have acid neutraliz...

  19. Web-Based Undergraduate Chemistry Problem-Solving: The Interplay of Task Performance, Domain Knowledge and Web-Searching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hsiao-Ching; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Li, Ta-Wei; Wang, Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Tien; Lee, Pei-Zon; Chou, Wen-Chi; Chuang, Ming-Hua

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of Web-based Chemistry Problem-Solving, with the attributes of Web-searching and problem-solving scaffolds, on undergraduate students' problem-solving task performance. In addition, the nature and extent of Web-searching strategies students used and its correlation with task performance and domain knowledge also…

  20. Changing the First-Year Chemistry Laboratory Manual to Implement a Problem-Based Approach that Improves Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredo, Thamara

    2013-01-01

    For students who are not science majors, problem-based (PB) laboratories for first-year chemistry provide a more comprehensive experience than conventional expository ones. Implementing PB labs is reasonably easy, as the lab experiments may not need to change; what changes is the way the lab manual is set up and how the actual session is carried…

  1. An Inquiry-Based Chemistry Laboratory Promoting Student Discovery of Gas Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2007-01-01

    Gas laws are taught in most undergraduate general chemistry courses and even in some high school chemistry courses. This article describes the author's experience of using the laboratory to allow students to "discover" gas laws instead of the conventional approach of using the lecture to teach this concept. Students collected data using Vernier…

  2. Students’ experienced coherence between chemistry and biology in context-based secondary science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.J.; Prins, Gjalt; Goedhart, M.J.; Boersma, Kerst

    2014-01-01

    In current biology and chemistry secondary school practice, coherence between the subjects chemistry and biology is underexposed or even ignored. This is incongruent with the current scientific practice, in which the emphasis is shifting towards inter- and multidisciplinarity. These problems have be

  3. Web-Based Job Submission Interface for the GAMESS Computational Chemistry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, M. J.; Weber, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    A Web site is described that facilitates use of the free computational chemistry software: General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS). Its goal is to provide an opportunity for undergraduate students to perform computational chemistry experiments without the need to purchase expensive software.

  4. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  5. Fluorometric method for inorganic pyrophosphatase activity detection and inhibitor screening based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kefeng; Chen, Zhonghui; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Ou; Wu, Xiaoping; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2015-01-06

    A fluorometric method for pyrophosphatase (PPase) activity detection was developed based on click chemistry. Cu(II) can coordinate with pyrophosphate (PPi), the addition of pyrophosphatase (PPase) into the above system can destroy the coordinate compound because PPase catalyzes the hydrolysis of PPi into inorganic phosphate and produces free Cu(II), and free Cu(II) can be reduced by sodium ascorbate (SA) to form Cu(I), which in turn initiates the ligating reaction between nonfluorescent 3-azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes to produce a highly fluorescent triazole complex, based on which, a simple and sensitive turn on fluorometric method for PPase can be developed. The fluorescence intensity of the system has a linear relationship with the logarithm of the PPase concentration in the range of 0.5 and 10 mU with a detection limit down to 0.2 mU (S/N = 3). This method is cost-effective and convenient without any labels or complicated operations. The proposed system was applied to screen the potential PPase inhibitor with high efficiency. The proposed method can be applied to diagnosis of PPase-related diseases.

  6. Recent developments in computer vision-based analytical chemistry: A tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán-Vallvey, Luis Fermín; López-Ruiz, Nuria; Martínez-Olmos, Antonio; Erenas, Miguel M; Palma, Alberto J

    2015-10-29

    Chemical analysis based on colour changes recorded with imaging devices is gaining increasing interest. This is due to its several significant advantages, such as simplicity of use, and the fact that it is easily combinable with portable and widely distributed imaging devices, resulting in friendly analytical procedures in many areas that demand out-of-lab applications for in situ and real-time monitoring. This tutorial review covers computer vision-based analytical (CVAC) procedures and systems from 2005 to 2015, a period of time when 87.5% of the papers on this topic were published. The background regarding colour spaces and recent analytical system architectures of interest in analytical chemistry is presented in the form of a tutorial. Moreover, issues regarding images, such as the influence of illuminants, and the most relevant techniques for processing and analysing digital images are addressed. Some of the most relevant applications are then detailed, highlighting their main characteristics. Finally, our opinion about future perspectives is discussed.

  7. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  8. Vygotskian-based grouping: Utilizing the zone of proximal development in a chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggle, Justin David

    A large portion of any science major's curriculum utilizes laboratories. Many of these laboratories now incorporate cooperative learning as a result of studies attesting to its beneficial effects. However, little attention has been given to the composition of those groups, specifically at post-secondary education institutes. We have therefore investigated the effectiveness of a grouping technique based on the theories of L. S. Vygotsky and his construct of the zone of proximal development (ZPD) in the context of an undergraduate general chemistry laboratory course at The University of Texas at Austin. All students were responsible for the completion of a short, 11 question, pre-quiz. Depending on their respective classes, students were grouped either according to the ZPD-scheme, based on pre-quiz scores, or randomly, regardless of pre-quiz score. Achievement of the students in each of the two groups was compared in order to determine grouping effectiveness. This study was carried out for 3 semesters (spring 2003, spring 2004, and fall 2004) under two different instructors. Overall, results indicate that grouping according to the ZPD-scheme revealed higher student achievement versus random grouping. Moreover, students scoring low and average on pre-quizzes benefited far more from this grouping method than higher scoring students. The protocol for implementing this grouping scheme is straightforward and is discussed in detail.

  9. A proposal for teaching undergraduate chemistry students carbohydrate biochemistry by problem-based learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Angela C M; Rocha, Joao B T

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental activities (8-12 hours) were related to the questions: (i) what does the Benedict's Reagent detect? and (ii) What is determined by glucose oxidase (GOD)? We also ask the students to compare the results with those obtained with the Lugol reagent, which detects starch. Usually, students inferred that the Benedict reagent detects reducing sugars, while GOD could be used to detect glucose. However, in GOD assay, an open question was left, because the results could be due to contamination of the sugars (particularly galactose) with glucose. Though not stressed, GOD does not oxidize the carbohydrates tested and all the positive results are due to contamination. The activities presented here can be easily done in the high school, because they are simple and non-expensive. Furthermore, in the case of Benedict reaction, it is possible to follow the reduction of Cu (II) "macroscopically" by following the formation of the brick-orange precipitate. The concrete observation of a chemical reaction can motivate and facilitate students understanding about chemistry of life.

  10. Structure based medicinal chemistry-driven strategy to design substituted dihydropyrimidines as potential antileishmanial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Umer; Sultana, Riffat; Shaheen, Nargis; Hassan, Syed Fahad; Yaqoob, Farhana; Ahmad, Muhammad Jawad; Iftikhar, Fatima; Sultana, Nighat; Asghar, Saba; Yasinzai, Masoom; Ansari, Farzana Latif; Qureshi, Naveeda Akhter

    2016-06-10

    In an attempt to explore novel and more potent antileishmanial compounds to diversify the current inhibitors, we pursued a medicinal chemistry-driven strategy to synthesize novel scaffolds with common pharmacophoric features of dihydropyrimidine and chalcone as current investigational antileishmanial compounds. Based on the reported X-ray structure of Pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) from Leishmania major, we have designed a number of dihydropyrimidine-based derivatives to make specific interactions in PTR1 active site. Our lead compound 8i has shown potent in vitro antileishmanial activity against promastigotes of L. Major and Leishmania donovani with IC50 value of 0.47 μg/ml and 1.5 μg/ml respectively. The excellent in vitro activity conclusively revealed that our lead compound is efficient enough to eradicate both visceral and topical leishmaniasis. In addition, docking analysis and in silico ADMET predictions were also carried out. Predicted molecular properties supported our experimental analysis that these compounds have potential to eradicate both visceral and topical leishmaniasis.

  11. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  12. Recent insights on the medicinal chemistry of metal-based compounds: hints for the successful drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, M Z; de S Pontes, F J; Coelho, L C D; Moreira, D R M; Pereira, V R A; Leite, A C L

    2010-01-01

    Although more complex than usually described, the anticancer action mechanism of cisplatin is based on binding to DNA. Following this line of reasoning, most the metal-based compounds discovered soon after cisplatin were designed to acting as DNA-binding agents and their pharmacological properties were thought to be correlated with this mechanism. Apart from the DNA structure, a significant number of proteins and biochemical pathways have been described as drug targets for metal-based compounds. This paper is therefore aimed at discussing the most recent findings on the medicinal chemistry of metal-based drugs. It starts illustrating the design concept behind the bioinorganic chemistry of anticancer complexes. Anticancer metallic compounds that inhibit the protein kinases are concisely discussed as a case study. The accuracy and limitations of molecular docking programs currently available to predict the binding mode of metallic complexes in molecular targets are further discussed. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of different in vitro screenings are briefly commented.

  13. A green chemistry-based classification model for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The assessment of implementation of green chemistry principles in the synthesis of nanomaterials is a complex decision-making problem that necessitates integration of several evaluation criteria. Multiple Criteria Decision Aiding (MCDA) provides support for such a challenge. One ...

  14. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  15. Microprocessor-based near real-time bedside blood chemistry monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D K; Jordan, W S

    1992-01-01

    A microprocessor-based instrument which integrates the function of a volumetric infusion pump with a blood chemistry analyzer has been developed. Presently, the instrument is capable of measuring Na+, K+, Ca++ and pH within approximately 40 sec at a frequency of up to every 2 min. The system is set up as an intravenous (IV) infusion pump with the addition of an array of disposable sensors placed at the distal end of the IV set. An isotonic IV solution is used to keep the site patent while also serving as a calibrant for the sensors. The instrument first calibrates the sensors, then withdraws approximately 0.6 ml of blood to come in contact with the sensors. Within approximately 15 sec, it displays the results, flushes the blood back into the patient and resumes normal infusion. There is no blood loss to the patient and no need to handle blood. The system was first validated with known aqueous controls and then used on-line in a variety of animal studies where dynamic fluctuation of electrolytes and pH occurred. Excellent correlation was found with off-line samples tested on conventional STAT analyzers. Some preliminary patient data is also presented.

  16. Fabrication of amperometric xanthine biosensors based on direct chemistry of xanthine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Yansheng; Shen Chunping [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Di Junwei, E-mail: djw@suda.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Tu Yifeng [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2009-08-31

    The construction of amperometric xanthine biosensor by immobilization of xanthine oxidase (XOD) on the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface was investigated. The direct chemistry of XOD was accomplished and the formal potential was about - 0.465 V (vs SCE). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant was evaluated to be 2.0 {+-} 0.3 s{sup -1}. The xanthine biosensor based on XOD entrapped in silica sol-gel (SG) thin film on CNTs-modified GC electrode surface was also investigated. The XOD still maintains its activity to xanthine. The amperometric response to xanthine showed a linear relation in the range from 0.2 {mu}M to 10 {mu}M and a detection limit of 0.1 {mu}M (S/N = 3). The enzyme electrode retained 95% of its initial activity after 90 days of storage. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity, rapid response and good long-term stability.

  17. Cell Proliferation Method: Click Chemistry Based on BrdU Coupling for Multiplex Antibody Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Paolo; Gasparri, Fabio; Pulici, Maurizio; Moll, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Determination of incorporation of the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into DNA is a widely used method to analyze the cell cycle. However, DNA denaturation is required for BrdU detection with the consequence that most protein epitopes are destroyed and their immunocytochemical detection for multiplex analysis is not possible. A novel assay is presented for identifying cells in active S-phase that does not require the DNA denaturation step but nevertheless detects BrdU. For this purpose, cells were pulsed for a short time by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) which is incorporated into DNA. The nucleotide-exposed ethynyl residue was then derivatized by a copper-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction ("click chemistry" coupling) using a BrdU azide probe. The resulting DNA-bound bromouracil moieties were then detected by commercial anti-BrdU monoclonal antibodies without the need for a denaturation step. This method has been tested using several cell lines and is more sensitive than traditional BrdU and allows multicolor and multiplex analysis in flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry.

  18. Hybrid magnetic materials based on layered double hydroxides: from the chemistry towards the applications

    OpenAIRE

    ABELLÁN SÁEZ, GONZALO

    2014-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are the leitmotiv of this dissertation. Contradicting the assertion that “any past was better”, LDHs have been continuously revisited from the middle of the twentieth century, and represent an excellent example of the never-ending beauty of Chemistry. New synthetic perspectives are giving a new impetus to LDH chemistry, which among hybrid materials, are finding their heyday. This is resulting in novel materials and also paving the way for new fundamental and p...

  19. Manganese(III) Schiff base complexes: chemistry relevant to the copolymerization of epoxides and carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Frantz, Eric B

    2007-07-23

    Schiff base complexes of the form (acacen)Mn(III)X (acacen = N,N'-bis(acetylacetone)-1,2-ethylenediimine), where X = OAc, Cl, or N(3), have been evaluated for their ability to couple CO(2) and cyclohexene oxide in the presence of a variety of cocatalysts to provide cyclic or polycarbonates. These complexes proved to be ineffective at catalyzing this process; however, valuable information related to the coordination chemistry of these manganese Schiff bases was elucidated. Of importance, mechanistic findings as revealed by comprehensive studies involving structurally related (salen)CrX and (salen)CoX complexes strongly support the requirement of six-coordinate metal species for the effective copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides. In the case of these Mn(III) complexes, it was determined that in chloroform or toluene solution a five-coordinate species was greatly favored over a six-coordinate species even in the presence of 20 equiv or more of various Lewis bases. Significantly epoxide monomers such as propylene oxide and cyclohexene oxide displayed no tendency to bind to these (acacen)MnX derivatives, even when used as solvents. Only in the case of excessive quantities of heterocyclic amines such as pyridine, DMAP, and DBU was spectral evidence of a six-coordinate Mn derivative observed in solution. X-ray crystal structures are provided for many of the complexes involved in this study, including the one-dimensional polymeric structures of [(acacen)MnOAc x 2H(2)O](n), [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)), and a rare mixed bridging species [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)/mu(1,1)-N(3)). In addition, a structure was obtained in which the unit cell contains both a (acacen)MnN(3)(DMAP) and a (acacen)MnN(3) species.

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LECTURE MODEL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION MANAGEMENT BASED ON LESSON STUDY TO IMPROVE CHEMISTRY TEACHER CANDIDATES’ PROFESIONALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Sumarti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to produce a lecture model of chemical education management based on lesson study as an effort to improve chemistry teacher candidates’ professionalism. This study used a model of ADDIE (Analysis-Design-Implement-Develop-Evaluate. Based on the results of the reflection, lecturer and team can arrange the post-presentation activities (discussing material theoretically with a variety of management practices in the field. Activities will be carried out by presenting a real problem in the field to find the solution, thus the students’ curiosity about management implementation will be fulfilled. Lecture Model of Chemical Education Management Based on Lesson Study can improve the chemistry teacher candidates’ professionalism, primarily in preparing, presenting and being responsible of their work by learning from their learning experience.

  1. Domain-Specific Expertise of Chemistry Teachers on Context-Based Education about Macro-Micro Thinking in Structure-Property Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolfing, Ria; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Pilot, Albert; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine and describe the new domain-specific expertise of experienced chemistry teachers in teaching an innovative context-based unit about macro-micro thinking in structure-property relations. The construct of "teachers' domain-specific expertise" was used to analyse the new repertoire chemistry teachers need to acquire to…

  2. Teaching the Societal Dimension of Chemistry Using a Socio-Critical and Problem-Oriented Lesson Plan Based on Bioethanol Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, Timo; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a chemistry lesson plan based on the use of ethanol as an alternative and renewable energy source. The lessons were developed by participatory action research and follow a socio-critical and problem-oriented approach to chemistry teaching. This approach specifically focuses on the handling of scientific and technological…

  3. Surface chemistry of InP ridge structures etched in Cl{sub 2}-based plasma analyzed with angular XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchoule, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.bouchoule@lpn.cnrs.fr; Cambril, Edmond; Guilet, Stephane [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructure (LPN)—UPR20, CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Chanson, Romain; Pageau, Arnaud; Rhallabi, Ahmed; Cardinaud, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.cardinaud@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 44322 Nantes (France)

    2015-09-15

    Two x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy configurations are proposed to analyze the surface chemistry of micron-scale InP ridge structures etched in chlorine-based inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Either a classical or a grazing configuration allows to retrieve information about the surface chemistry of the bottom surface and sidewalls of the etched features. The procedure is used to study the stoichiometry of the etched surface as a function of ridge aspect ratio for Cl{sub 2}/Ar and Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma chemistries. The results show that the bottom surface and the etched sidewalls are P-rich, and indicate that the P-enrichment mechanism is rather chemically driven. Results also evidence that adding H{sub 2} to Cl{sub 2} does not necessarily leads to a more balanced surface stoichiometry. This is in contrast with recent experimental results obtained with the HBr ICP chemistry for which fairly stoichiometric surfaces have been obtained.

  4. Maternal and fetal Acid-base chemistry: a major determinant of perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omo-Aghoja, L

    2014-01-01

    Very small changes in pH may significantly affect the function of various fetal organ systems, such as the central nervous system, and the cardiovascular system with associated fetal distress and poor Apgar score. Review of existing data on maternal-fetal acid-base balance in pregnancy highlight the factors that are associated with derangements of the acid-base status and the impact of the derangements on fetal outcome. Extensive search of electronic databases and manual search of journals for relevant literature on maternal and fetal acid chemistry, clinical studies and case studies were undertaken. There is a substantial reduction in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in pregnancy. Adequate buffering prevents significant changes in maternal arterial pH. Normal fetal metabolism results in the production of acids which are buffered to maintain extracellular pH within a critical range. Fetal hypoxia can occur when maternal oxygenation is compromised, maternal perfusion of the placenta is reduced, or delivery of oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus is impeded. When adequate fetal oxygenation does not occur, metabolisms proceed along with an anaerobic pathway with production of organic acids, such as lactic acid. Accumulation of lactic acid can deplete the buffer system and result in metabolic acidosis with associated low fetal pH, fetal distress and poor Apgar score. There is a significant reduction in pCO2 in pregnancy. This change, however, does not result in a corresponding significant reduction in maternal arterial pH, because of adequate buffering. Very small changes in pH may cause significant derangement in fetal function and outcome.

  5. Transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes through silica based porous media: influences of aquatic chemistry, surface chemistry, and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Bitter, Julie L; Smith, Billy A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ball, William P

    2013-12-17

    This paper provides results from studies of the transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNTs) of varying surface oxygen concentrations under a range of aquatic conditions and through uniform silica glass bead media. In the presence of Na(+), the required ionic strength (IS) for maximum particle attachment efficiency (i.e., the critical deposition concentration, or CDC) increased as the surface oxygen concentration of the O-MWCNTs or pH increased, following qualitative tenets of theories based on electrostatic interactions. In the presence of Ca(2+), CDC values were lower than those with Na(+) present, but were no longer sensitive to surface oxygen content, suggesting that Ca(2+) impacts the interactions between O-MWCNTs and glass beads by mechanisms other than electrostatic alone. The presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) decreased the attachment efficiency of O-MWCNTs in the presence of either Na(+) or Ca(2+), but with more pronounced effects when Na(+) was present. Nevertheless, low concentrations of SRNOM (organic carbon) were sufficient to mobilize all O-MWCNTs studied at CaCl2 concentrations as high as 10 mM. Overall, this study reveals that NOM content, pH, and cation type show more importance than surface chemistry in affecting O-MWCNTs deposition during transport through silica-based porous media.

  6. Take-Home Challenges: Extending Discovery-Based Activities beyond the General Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, P. K.; Sarquis, A. M.

    1996-04-01

    In an effort to more effectively integrate the experimental nature of chemistry into our students' experiences, we are developing and implementing discovery-based activities into both the laboratory and lecture components of general chemistry. Below we describe and provide an example of a "take-home challenge" intended to supplement the lecture component of the course. These take-home challenges involve the student in chemistry exploration outside of class and extend the context of content and experimentation into a nontraditional laboratory environment. Over 25 take-home challenges have been developed to date. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of the take-home challenges shows that students reporting themselves as receiving a B or C grade in the course find the challenges very useful in helping them gain a conceptual understanding of the phenomena addressed. Students earning an A grade report little or no impact on their learning. Prepared as one-page handouts, each take-home challenge begins with a scene-setting introduction followed by pertinent background information, a list of materials to be collected, and any appropriate safety precautions. The exploration component of the activity integrates leading questions with the procedural instructions to help guide the students through the discovery process and challenge them to stretch their understanding of the chemistry. After completing a take-home challenge activity, students submit written reports containing responses to the questions posed, observations of data collected, and their responses to the challenge. The accompanying sample take-home challenge activity is provided as a novel adaptation of the belch phenomenon that challenges students to experiment in order to explain the factors that account for the observed behavior. Persons interested in field testing the take-home challenges with their classes should contact the authors. Belch Bottle Challenge: What factors are responsible for the behavior of a

  7. Controlling Nonspecific Protein Adsorption in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System by Controlling Interfacial Chemistry Using Fluorous-Phase Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, L. Spencer; Song, Helen; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2005-01-01

    Control of surface chemistry and protein adsorption is important for using microfluidic devices for biochemical analysis and high-throughput screening assays. This paper describes the control of protein adsorption at the liquid-liquid interface in a plug-based microfluidic system. The microfluidic system uses multiphase flows of immiscible fluorous and aqueous fluids to form plugs, which are aqueous droplets that are completely surrounded by fluorocarbon oil and do not come into direct contac...

  8. Medicinal chemistry based approaches and nanotechnology-based systems to improve CNS drug targeting and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieghe, Patrick; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by various barriers, which regulate nervous tissue homeostasis and control the selective and specific uptake, efflux, and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Among these barriers is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a physical and physiological barrier that filters very efficiently and selectively the entry of compounds from the blood to the brain and protects nervous tissue from harmful substances and infectious agents present in the bloodstream. The BBB also prevents the entry of potential drugs. As a result, various drug targeting and delivery strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport of drugs from the blood to the brain. Following a general introduction, we briefly overview in this review article the fundamental physiological properties of the BBB. Then, we describe current strategies to bypass the BBB (i.e., invasive methods, alternative approaches, and temporary opening) and to cross it (i.e., noninvasive approaches). This section is followed by a chapter addressing the chemical and technological solutions developed to cross the BBB. A special emphasis is given to prodrug-targeting approaches and targeted nanotechnology-based systems, two promising strategies for BBB targeting and delivery of drugs to the brain.

  9. Preparation of novel chiral stationary phase based on click chemistry for ligand exchange chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Mei Fu; Hong Yu Shi; Guang Sheng Qian; Zhang Wan Li

    2009-01-01

    Click chemistry was applied to immobilize L-proline derivative onto azide-modified silica gel to give a novel chiral stationary phase (denoted as click-CSP) for ligand exchange chromatography. The developed protocol combines the benefits of operational simplicity, exceptionally mild conditions and high surface loadings. The enantioselectivity α of some DE-amino acids on the click-CSP were found to be in the range from 1.13 to 3.46. The chromatographic resolutions of some DL-amino acids and the stability study firmly illustrate the potential of click chemistry for preparation chiral stationary phase for ligand exchange chromatography.

  10. Coinage metal coordination chemistry of stable primary, secondary and tertiary ferrocenylethyl-based phosphines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizpoor Fard, M; Rabiee Kenaree, A; Boyle, P D; Ragogna, P J; Gilroy, J B; Corrigan, J F

    2016-02-21

    Ferrocene-based phosphines constitute an important auxiliary ligand in inorganic chemistry. Utilizing the (ferrocenylethyl)phosphines (FcCH2CH2)3-nHnP (Fc = ferrocenyl; n = 2, 1; n = 1, 2; n = 0, 3) the synthesis of a series of coordination complexes [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPCuCl]4 (n = 2, 1-CuCl; n = 0, 3-CuCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPCuCl] (2-CuCl), {[(FcCH2CH2)H2P]2AgCl}2 (1-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPAgCl] (2-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PAgCl]4 (3-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PM(OAc)]4 (M = Cu, 3-CuOAc M = Ag, 3-AgOAc), [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPAuCl] (n = 1, 2-AuCl; n = 0, 3-AuCl), via the reaction between the free phosphine and MX (M = Cu, Ag and Au; X = Cl, OAc), is described. The reaction between the respective phosphine with a suspension of metal-chloride or -acetate in a 1 : 1 ratio in THF at ambient temperature affords coordinated phosphine-coinage metal complexes. Varying structural motifs are observed in the solid state, as determined via single crystal X-ray analysis of 1-CuCl, 3-CuCl, 1-AgCl, 3-AgCl, 3-CuOAc, 3-AgOAc, 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl. Complexes 1-CuCl and 3-CuCl are tetrameric Cu(i) cubane-like structures with a Cu4Cl4 core, whereas silver complexes with primary and tertiary phosphine reveal two different structural types. The structure of 1-AgCl, unlike the rest, displays the coordination of two phosphines to each silver atom and shows a quadrangle defined by two Ag and two Cl atoms. In contrast, 3-AgCl is distorted from a cubane structure via elongation of one of the ClAg distances. 3-CuOAc and 3-AgOAc are isostructural with step-like cores, while complexes 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl reveal a linear geometry of a phosphine gold(i) chloride devoid of any aurophilic interactions. All of the complexes were characterized in solution by multinuclear (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P NMR spectroscopic techniques; the redox chemistry of the series of complexes was examined using cyclic voltammetry. This class of complexes has been found to exhibit one reversible Fe(ii)/Fe(iii) oxidation couple, suggesting the

  11. PERANGKAT PEMBELAJARAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING BERORIENTASI GREEN CHEMISTRY MATERI HIDROLISIS GARAM UNTUK MENGEMBANGKAN SOFT SKILL KONSERVASI SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rosita

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan perangkat pembelajaran problem based learning berorientasi green chemistry pada materi hidrolisis garam untuk mengembangkan soft skill konservasi siswa SMA. Metode penelitian ini adalah research and development (R&D. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan LKS yang dikembangkan sangat layak untuk digunakan dalam pembelajaran kimia. Perangkat pembelajaran dapat meningkatkan pemahaman konsep siswa materi hidrolisis garam dengan N-gain sebesar 0,63 (sedang. Peningkatan soft skill konservasi siswa yang berkriteria tinggi sebanyak 35,48 % sedangkan yang berkriteria sedang 64,52 %. This research has aim to developt teaching and learning instrument application on problem based learning which oriented on green chemistry on salt hydrolisys for developing conservation soft skill for student. The method of this research is research and development (R&D. The results showed a very worthy worksheets developed for use in teaching chemistry. Teaching instrument can improve the understanding of student concept of salt hydrolysis matery can get N-gain 0,63 (medium. The improving soft skill of student conservation has high criteria 35,48%. For medium has 64,52%.

  12. Incorporating Students' Self-Designed, Research-Based Analytical Chemistry Projects into the Instrumentation Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruomei

    2015-01-01

    In a typical chemistry instrumentation laboratory, students learn analytical techniques through a well-developed procedure. Such an approach, however, does not engage students in a creative endeavor. To foster the intrinsic motivation of students' desire to learn, improve their confidence in self-directed learning activities and enhance their…

  13. Juicing the Juice: A Laboratory-Based Case Study for an Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Peter M.; Dinan, Frank J.; St. Phillips, Michael; Larson, Renee; Pines, Harvey A.; Larkin, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    A young, inexperienced Food and Drug Administration (FDA) chemist is asked to distinguish between authentic fresh orange juice and suspected reconstituted orange juice falsely labeled as fresh. In an advanced instrumental analytical chemistry application of this case, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy is used to distinguish between the…

  14. Evaluation of computer-based learning material for food chemistry education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, J.; Gruppen, H.; Hartog, R.J.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Digital exercises were designed and developed for food chemistry education. During the design process, design requirements were described for such exercises. The exercises were evaluated in three case studies, firstly to determine whether the exercises satisfy the design requirements with respect to

  15. Inquiry-Based Arson Investigation for General Chemistry Using GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Marta K.; Bukowski, Michael R.; Menachery, Mary D.; Zatorsky, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a two-week guided-inquiry laboratory in which first-semester general chemistry students investigate a suspected arson using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and paper chromatography. In the process of evaluating evidence from the crime scene, students develop and test hypotheses and learn the fundamentals of chromatography,…

  16. Benefits of a Game-Based Review Module in Chemistry Courses for Nonmajors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfield, Thomas W.; Kramer, Eugene F.

    2014-01-01

    Review sessions provide an opportunity for students to reflect on the material they have learned. Game shows can grab the students' interest and make them invested in the outcomes of their learning. A module developed around game show review was studied in chemistry courses for nonmajors to determine whether benefits could be found in…

  17. Using Web-Based Video as an Assessment Tool for Student Performance in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredricks, Susan; Dudkin, Elizabeth; Kistler, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the potential for using video responses to specific questions as part of the assessment process in an organic chemistry class. These exercises have been used with a postbaccalaureate cohort of 40 students, learning in an online environment, over a period of four years. A second cohort of 25 second-year students taking the…

  18. "JCE" Classroom Activity #110: Artistic Anthocyanins and Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Jenna; Dounin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Art and science are sometimes viewed as opposing subjects, but are united in many ways. With an increased awareness of the benefits of interdisciplinary studies in education, it is desirable to show students how different subjects impact one another. Visual arts are greatly connected to chemistry in several ways. Pigments are usually synthetically…

  19. A Solvent-Free Base Liberation of a Tertiary Aminoalkyl Halide by Flow Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Jønch; Skovby, Tommy; Mealy, Michael J.;

    2016-01-01

    has been fulfilled by the simple use of a saturated NaOH solution, followed by isolation of the liquid phases by gravimetric separation. The flow setup has an E factor reduction of nearly 50%, and a distillation step has been avoided. The method exemplifies how flow chemistry can be exploited...

  20. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  1. Colour Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  2. Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  3. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  4. Biophysical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  5. Heterocyclic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Hemming, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds is presented\\ud 2010 offered highlights in pericyclic chemistry, particularly 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition chemistry, asymmetric synthesis, gold catalysis, organocatalysis, hydroamination, C–H activation and multicomponent reactions.

  6. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  7. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  8. Strong Relationships in Acid-Base Chemistry – Modeling Protons Based on Predictable Concentrations of Strong Ions, Total Weak Acid Concentrations, and pCO2

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acid-base regulation is often reduced to pigeonholing clinical states into categories of disorders based on arterial blood sampling. An earlier ambition to quantitatively explain disorders by measuring production and elimination of acid has not become standard clinical practice. Seeking back to classical physical chemistry we propose that in any compartment, the requirement of electroneutrality leads to a strong relationship between charged moieties. This relationship is derived...

  9. Factors related to the economic sustainability of two-year chemistry-based technology training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Bridgid A.

    Two-year chemistry-based technology training (CBTT) programs in the U.S. are important in the preparation of the professional technical workforce. The purpose of this study was to identify, examine, and analyze factors related to the economic sustainability of CBTT programs. A review of literature identified four clustered categories of 31 sub-factors related to program sustainability. Three research questions relating to program sustainability were: (1) What is the relative importance of the identified factors?, (2) What differences exist between the opinions of administrators and faculty?, and (3) What are the interrelationships among the factors? In order to answer these questions, survey data gathered from CBTT programs throughout the United States were analyzed statistically. Conclusions included the following: (1) Rank order of the importance to sustainability of the clustered categories was: (1) Partnerships, (2) Employer and Student Educational Goals, (3) Faculty and Their Resources, and (4) Community Perceptions and Marketing Strategies. (2) Significant correlations between ratings of sustainability and the sub-factors included: degree of partnering, college responsiveness, administration involvement in partnerships, experiential learning opportunities, employer input in curriculum development, use of skill standards, number of program graduates, student job placement, professional development opportunities, administrator support, presence of a champion, flexible scheduling, program visibility, perception of chemical technicians, marketing plans, and promotion to secondary students. (3) Faculty and administrators differed significantly on only two sub-factor ratings: employer assisted curriculum development, and faculty workloads. (4) Significant differences in ratings by small program faculty and administrators and large program faculty and administrators were indicated, with most between small program faculty and large program administrators. The study

  10. Comparing Chemistry and Census-based Estimates of Net Ecosystem Calcification on a Rim Reef in Bermuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis A Courtney

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef net ecosystem calcification (NEC has decreased for many Caribbean reefs over recent decades primarily due to a combination of declining coral cover and changing benthic community composition. Chemistry-based approaches to calculate NEC utilize the drawdown of seawater total alkalinity (TA combined with residence time to calculate an instantaneous measurement of NEC. Census-based approaches combine annual growth rates with benthic cover and reef structural complexity to estimate NEC occurring over annual timescales. Here, NEC was calculated for Hog Reef in Bermuda using both chemistry and census-based NEC techniques to compare the mass-balance generated by the two methods and identify the dominant biocalcifiers at Hog Reef. Our findings indicate close agreement between the annual 2011 census-based NEC 2.35±1.01 kg CaCO3•m-2•y-1 and the chemistry-based NEC 2.23±1.02 kg CaCO3•m-2•y-1 at Hog Reef. An additional record of Hog Reef TA data calculated from an autonomous CO2 mooring measuring pCO2 and modeled pHtotal every 3-hours highlights the dynamic temporal variability in coral reef NEC. This ability for chemistry-based NEC techniques to capture higher frequency variability in coral reef NEC allows the mechanisms driving NEC variability to be explored and tested. Just four coral species, Diploria labyrinthiformis, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Millepora alcicornis, and Orbicella franksi, were identified by the census-based NEC as contributing to 94±19% of the total calcium carbonate production at Hog Reef suggesting these species should be highlighted for conservation to preserve current calcium carbonate production rates at Hog Reef. As coral cover continues to decline globally, the agreement between these NEC estimates suggest that either method, but ideally both methods, may serve as a useful tool for coral reef managers and conservation scientists to monitor the maintenance of coral reef structure and ecosystem services.

  11. The Efficacy of Problem-based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, AL

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking ability of students in both the treatment and control groups were evaluated before and at the end of the implementation of the programme, using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. In addition, changes in students' self-regulated learning skills using the Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) and their self-evaluation proficiency were evaluated. Analysis of covariance showed that the creative thinking ability of the treatment group had improved statistically significantly after the PBL course (p self-regulated learning strategies more frequently than students in the comparison group. According to the results of the self-evaluation, students became more positive and confident in problem-solving and group work as the semester progressed. Overall, PBL was shown to be an effective pedagogical instructional strategy for enhancing chemistry students' creative thinking ability, self-regulated learning skills and self-evaluation.

  12. Forensic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  13. Impact of STS (Context-Based Type of Teaching) in Comparison With a Textbook Approach on Attitudes and Achievement in Community College Chemistry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gita

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of a context-based teaching approach (STS) versus a more traditional textbook approach on the attitudes and achievement of community college chemistry students. In studying attitudes toward chemistry within this study, I used a 30-item Likert scale in order to study the importance of chemistry in students' lives, the importance of chemistry, the difficulty of chemistry, interest in chemistry, and the usefulness of chemistry for their future career. Though the STS approach students had higher attitude post scores, there was no significant difference between the STS and textbook students' attitude post scores. It was noted that females had higher postattitude scores in the STS group, while males had higher postattitude scores in the textbook group. With regard to postachievement, I noted that males had higher scores in both groups. A correlation existed between postattitude and postachievement in the STS classroom. In summary, while an association between attitude and achievement was found in the STS classroom, teaching approach or sex was not found to influence attitudes, while sex was also not found to influence achievement. These results, overall, suggest that attitudes are not expected to change on the basis of either teaching approach or gender, and that techniques other than changing the teaching approach would need to be used in order to improve the attitudes of students. Qualitative analysis of an online discussion activity on Energy revealed that STS students were able to apply aspects of chemistry in decision making related to socioscientific issues. Additional analysis of interview and written responses provided insight regarding attitudes toward chemistry, with respect to topics of applicability of chemistry to life, difficulties with chemistry, teaching approach for chemistry, and the intent for enrolling in additional chemistry courses. In addition, the surveys of female students brought out

  14. The Importance of Computer Based Active Learning for Basic Chemistry in Vocational High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğçe GÜNTER; Ebru OFLUOĞLU DEMİR; AKYOL GÜNER, TÜRKAN

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry is a very comprehensive discipline that researches atoms; molecules; the structure of matter in the form of element or compound; combinations, and physical and chemical properties of matter; macroscopic and microscopic transformations of matters; the energy and entropy released or absorbed in the course of these transformations; the structures and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and minerals in the body. This discipline includes numerous reactions at ...

  15. Investigating the Chemical Pathways to PAH- and PANH-Based Aerosols in Titan's Atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella Marion; Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, Claire Louise; Salama, Farid

    2011-01-01

    A complex organic chemistry between Titan's two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. These aerosols are at the origin of the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. In situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini have revealed the presence of large amounts of neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan. In particular, benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3), which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, have been detected, suggesting that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan s aerosols. Moreover, results from numerical models as well as laboratory simulations of Titan s atmospheric chemistry are also suggesting chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN ...) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols.

  16. Focus on the nanomaterial-based biosensor papers in Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry of the year 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xia; MA LiNa; WANG ZhenXin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their unique physical and chemical properties,nanomaterials have been widely used to develop biosensing systems for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.The journal Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry published 35 papers on nanomaterial-based biosensors in 2010,including 5 reviews [1-5] and 29 research articles [6-34].These biosensing systems were fabricated by a broad range of nanomaterials (e.g.,carbon nanotube,gold nanoparticle,magnetic nanoparticle,silica nanoparticle,quantum dot,and so forth,Figure 1),some of them have high quality and get great achievements.

  17. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C Pickard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field.

  18. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Frank C; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field.

  19. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, J.P., E-mail: allain@purdue.ed [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Rokusek, D.L.; Harilal, S.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Nieto-Perez, M. [CICATA-IPN, Cerro Blanco 141 Cimatario, Queretaro, QRO 76090 (Mexico); Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Heim, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  20. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  1. Organic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-15

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  2. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  3. Chemistry Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Chemistry technology experts at NCATS engage in a variety of innovative translational research activities, including:Design of bioactive small molecules.Development...

  4. Application of fundamental aquatic chemistry to the safety case and the role of thermodynamic reference data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Gaona, Xavier; Fellhauer, David; Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2015-07-01

    All national and international programs developing a Nuclear Waste Disposal Safety Case have recognized the essential requirement of assessing aqueous (radionuclide) chemistry and establishing reliable thermodynamic databases. Long-term disposal of nuclear waste in deep underground repositories is the safest option to separate highly hazardous radionuclides from the environment. In order to predict the long-term performance of a repository for different evolution scenarios, the potentially relevant specific (geo)chemical systems are analyzed. This requires a detailed understanding of solubility, speciation and thermodynamics for all relevant components including radionuclides, and the availability of reliable thermodynamic data and databases as fundamental input for integral geochemical model calculations and hence PA. Radionuclide solubility and speciation strongly depend on chemical conditions (pH, E{sub h}, matrix electrolyte system and ionic strength) with additional factors like the presence of complexing ligands or temperature further impacting solution chemistry. As the fundamental chemical key processes are known and convincingly described by general laws of nature (→ solution thermodynamics), the long-term behavior of a repository system can be analyzed over geological timescales using geochemical tools. A key application of fundamental aquatic chemistry in the Safety Case is the determination of solubility limits (radionuclide source terms). Based upon fundamental chemical information (on solid phases, complexation reactions, activity coefficients, etc.), the maximum amount of radionuclides potentially dissolved in a given volume of solution and transported away from the repository, are quantified. A detailed understanding of radionuclide chemistry is also crucial for neighboring fields. For example, advanced mechanistic understanding and modeling of sorption processes at the solid liquid interphase, waste dissolution processes, secondary phase and

  5. 基于SCIE的有关"Click chemistry"研究论文分析%Study of the Papers of Click Chemistry based on SCIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙吴琼

    2016-01-01

    依据Web of Science平台下的SCIE数据库中2001-2014年间有关"Click chemistry"的论文数据和文献计量方法,从发表年份、国家、机构、期刊和研究方向等进行聚类分析,研究"Click chemistry"自首次提出后的研究发展情况.结果表明,美国发表相关论文的数量和质量均位居世界第一.中国的发文量排名第二,但是论文质量和世界先进水平仍有一定差距.

  6. SPECTRa-T: machine-based data extraction and semantic searching of chemistry e-theses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Jim; Harvey, Matt J; Morgan, Peter B; Murray-Rust, Peter; Rzepa, Henry S; Stewart, Diana C; Tonge, Alan P; Townsend, Joe A

    2010-02-22

    The SPECTRa-T project has developed text-mining tools to extract named chemical entities (NCEs), such as chemical names and terms, and chemical objects (COs), e.g., experimental spectral assignments and physical chemistry properties, from electronic theses (e-theses). Although NCEs were readily identified within the two major document formats studied, only the use of structured documents enabled identification of chemical objects and their association with the relevant chemical entity (e.g., systematic chemical name). A corpus of theses was analyzed and it is shown that a high degree of semantic information can be extracted from structured documents. This integrated information has been deposited in a persistent Resource Description Framework (RDF) triple-store that allows users to conduct semantic searches. The strength and weaknesses of several document formats are reviewed.

  7. Neural Network Based on Quantum Chemistry for Predicting Melting Point of Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan A. Lazzús

    2009-01-01

    The melting points of organic compounds were estimated using a combined method that includes a backpropagation neural network and quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) parameters in quantum chemistry. Eleven descriptors that reflect the intermolec-ular forces and molecular symmetry were used as input variables. QSPR parameters were calculated using molecular modeling and PM3 semi-empirical molecular orbital theories. A total of 260 compounds were used to train the network, which was developed using MatLab. Then, the melting points of 73 other compounds were predicted and results were compared to experimental data from the literature. The study shows that the chosen artificial neural network and the quantitative structure property relationships method present an excellent alternative for the estimation of the melting point of an organic compound, with average absolute deviation of 5%.

  8. Interface fracture and chemistry of a tungsten-based metallization on borophosphosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, B.; Heinz, W.; Matoy, K.; Roth, R.; Batke, J. M.; Schöberl, T.; Scheu, C.; Dehm, G.

    2015-06-01

    In microelectronic devices, the interface between barrier metal and dielectric is of particular interest for a reliable electronic functionality. However, it is frequently observed that this interface is prone to failure. In this work, the strength of interfaces between an as-deposited borophosphosilicate dielectric glass (BPSG) layer and a W(Ti) metallization with and without Ti interlayer was the centre of interest. Four-point-bending tests were used for the mechanical characterization combined with a topological and chemical analysis of the fracture surfaces. In addition, the interface chemistry was studied locally prior to the testing to search for a possible Ti enrichment at the interface. The fracture results will be discussed taking the chemical and topological information into account.

  9. Synthesis and carbonization chemistry of a phosphorous-nitrogen based intumescent flame retardant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Haiyun, E-mail: mahaiyun@gmail.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, HeBei University, Baoding, Hebei Province 071002 (China); Fang, Zhengping [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, Zhejiang University, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Graphical abstract: The carbonization chemistry and mechanism of a novel synthesized intumescent flame retardant. The final chars showed a complex P-O-Ph and aromatic/graphitic structure containing architecture. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IFR synthesized is polymeric and has high molecular weight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IFR has a higher thermal stability than most of the commercial IFRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final chars of IFR showed a complex P-O-Ph and aromatic/graphitic structure. - Abstract: In this work, a polymeric phosphorous-nitrogen containing intumescent flame retardant, named poly(diaminodiphenyl methane spirocyclic pentaerythritol bisphosphonate) (PDSPB), was synthesized. The carbonization chemistry was investigated. FTIR and {sup 1}H NMR were used to confirm the chemical structure of PDSPB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in situ FTIR and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to investigate and monitor the chemical structural changes during thermal degradation. PDSPB demonstrated a three-step degradation behavior. PDSPB oligomers continuously polymerized and generated a higher macromolecular weight during the first step (200-250 Degree-Sign C). The phosphate ester bonds were broken down and phosphoric acid was released which dehydrated the carbon source to form chars during the second step (280-320 Degree-Sign C). The residues will be further degraded and form final chars during the final weight loss step (400-450 Degree-Sign C). The final chars showed a complex P-O-Ph and aromatic/graphitic structure containing architecture.

  10. Structural and defect chemistry guidelines for Sr(V,Nb)O3-based SOFC anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, J; Yaremchenko, A A; Fagg, D P; Frade, J R

    2015-04-28

    Structural and defect chemistry guidelines were used for Nb-substituted SrVO3-δ materials, designed to meet SOFC anode requirements, with emphasis on redox tolerance, thermochemical compatibility with other SOFC materials, electrical conductivity and adjustable changes in oxygen stoichiometry for their prospective impact on electrocatalytic performance. SrV1-xNbxO3-δ (x = 0-0.30) ceramics were prepared by solid-state synthesis and sintered at 1773 K in a reducing atmosphere. XRD and SEM/EDS showed that under these conditions a single-phase cubic perovskite structure appears up to x ≈ 0.25. Electrical conductivity is metallic-like and nearly p(O2)-independent. Although substitution by niobium decreases the conductivity, which still exceeds 100 S cm(-1) for x ≤ 0.20 at temperatures below 1273 K, it also expands the stability domain of the cubic perovskite phase and suppresses partly high thermochemical expansion characteristic of parent SrVO3-δ. The upper p(O2) limit of phase stability was found to shift from ∼2 × 10(-15) atm for the undoped material to ∼2 × 10(-12) atm for x = 0.30, whereas the average thermal expansion coefficient at 773-1223 K decreased from 22.7 × 10(-6) to 13.3 × 10(-6) K(-1). SrV1-xNbxO3-δ perovskites undergo oxidative decomposition in air, which causes dimensional and microstructural changes. However, sluggish kinetics of oxidation under inert gas conditions results in nearly reversible behavior in relatively short-term redox cycles between reducing and inert atmospheres. Subtle structural changes and a close correlation with point defect chemistry clarify these sluggish changes and provide guidelines to retain the metastability.

  11. Interactions between groundwater and surface water in a Virginia coastal plain watershed. 2. Acid-base chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, A. K.; Eshleman, K.N.; Pollard, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    At the Reedy Creek watershed sulphate concentrations were higher and alkalinity lower in the groundwater in the hillslope than in the stream. Sulphate concentrations and alkalinity observed in groundwater in the wetland were usually between those of the hillslope and stream. These data suggest that the wetland is a sink for sulphate and acidity; sulphate reduction may be an important mechanism for generating alkalinity in the wetland. The DOC concentrations were higher in the stream and wetland groundwater than in hillslope groundwater. No consistent spatial patterns in sulphate concentrations were observed in surface water chemistry under base flow conditions. Stream discharge was found to be positively correlated with base flow sulphate concentrations and inversely correlated with alkalinity. A sulphate mass balance indicated that approximately 30% of the estimated 24.9 kg SO42-/ha yr wet atmospheric input was exported from the watershed as sulphate in stream runoff in the water year 1990. -from Authors

  12. 1,3,5-Triazine-based analogues of purine: from isosteres to privileged scaffolds in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Felicia Phei Lin; Dolzhenko, Anton V

    2014-10-06

    Purines can be considered as the most ubiquitous and functional N-heterocyclic compounds in nature. Structural modifications of natural purines, particularly using isosteric ring systems, have been in the focus of many drug discovery programs. Fusion of 1,3,5-triazine ring with pyrrole, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole or 1,2,4-triazole results in seven bicyclic heterocyclic systems isosteric to purine. Application of the isosterism concept for the development of new compounds with therapeutic potential in areas involving purinergic regulation or purine metabolism led to significant advances in medicinal chemistry of the azolo[1,3,5]triazines. These 1,3,5-triazine-based purine-like scaffolds significantly increase level of molecular diversity and allow covering chemical space in the important areas of medicinal chemistry. Some of these azolo[1,3,5]triazine systems have become privileged scaffolds in the development of inhibitors of various kinases, phosphodiesterase, xanthine oxidase, and thymidine phosphorylase, antagonists of adenosine and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors, anticancer and antiviral agents.

  13. Impact of surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  14. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 4: Equilibria in Acid-Base Systems. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Frank A., Jr.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this acid-base equilibria unit includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, a discussion of equilibrium constants, and 20 problem sets.…

  15. A Reconstruction of Development of the Periodic Table Based on History and Philosophy of Science and Its Implications for General Chemistry Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Angmary; Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (a) elaboration of a history and philosophy of science (HPS) framework based on a reconstruction of the development of the periodic table; (b) formulation of seven criteria based on the framework; and (c) evaluation of 57 freshman college-level general chemistry textbooks with respect to the presentation of the…

  16. A Competency-Based Clinical Chemistry Course for the Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technician Graduate in a Medical Technology Baccalaureate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccelli, Pamela

    Presented is a project that developed a competency-based clinical chemistry course for associate degree medical laboratory technicians (MLT) in a medical technology (MT) baccalaureate program. Content of the course was based upon competencies expected of medical technologists at career-entry as defined in the statements adopted in 1976 by the…

  17. A Comparative Study of the Effects of a Concept Mapping Enhanced Laboratory Experience on Turkish High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The research reported here consists of the introduction of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities combined with concept mapping. The purpose of this intervention was to enhance student understanding of acid-base chemistry for tenth grade students' from two classes in a Turkish high school. An additional aim was to enhance…

  18. Design and development of microcontroller-based clinical chemistry analyser for measurement of various blood biochemistry parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, S R; Gupta, R C; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K K; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments.

  19. Examination on Expert Chemistry Teachers’ Secondary School Chemistry Textbook Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan NAKİBOĞLU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine how chemistry textbooks used by expert chemistry teachers are used during teaching process in secondary education, and to find how prospective chemistry teachers evaluate the situation mentioned. Thus, a project concerned with how expert chemistry teachers use them in their classes was carried out. Based on the research context, an interview that was used to interview with expert chemistry teachers by prospective chemistry teachers was prepared by the author. Next, prospective chemistry teachers were asked to evaluate how expert chemistry teachers used textbooks. The sample group of the study consisted of 21 expert high school chemistry teachers working at schools in Balıkesir and 21 prospective chemistry teachers studying at Education Faculty of Balıkesir University during 2007-2008 academic years. The findings of the study revealed that expert chemistry teachers did not use textbooks during their teaching process while they used them as the sources of problems and exercises at the end of units. Furthermore, it was found that University Entrance Exam (OSS had an effect on how to use the textbooks by teachers.

  20. Wet deposition at the base of Mt Everest: Seasonal evolution of the chemistry and isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Delconte, Carlo A.; Sacchi, Elisa; Wilson, Alana M.; Williams, Mark W.; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Putero, Davide

    2016-12-01

    The chemistry of wet deposition was investigated during 2012-2014 at the Pyramid International Laboratory in the Upper Khumbu Valley, Nepal, at 5050 m a.s.l., within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. The main hydro-chemical species and stable isotopes of the water molecule were determined for monsoon rain (July-September) and snow samples (October-June). To evaluate the synoptic-scale variability of air masses reaching the measurement site, 5 day back-trajectories were computed for the sampling period. Ion concentrations in precipitation during the monsoon were low suggesting that they represent global regional background concentrations. The associations between ions suggested that the principal sources of chemical species were marine aerosols, rock and soil dust, and fossil fuel combustion. Most chemical species exhibited a pattern during the monsoon, with maxima at the beginning and at the end of the season, partially correlated with the precipitation amount. Snow samples exhibited significantly higher concentrations of chemical species, compared to the monsoon rainfall observations. Particularly during 2013, elevated concentrations of NO3-, SO42- and NH4+ were measured in the first winter snow event, and in May at the end of the pre-monsoon season. The analysis of large-scale circulation and wind regimes as well as atmospheric composition observations in the region indicates the transport of polluted air masses from the Himalayan foothills and Indian sub-continent up to the Himalaya region. During the summer monsoon onset period, the greater values of pollutants can be attributed to air-mass transport from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) of the Indo-Gangetic plains. Isotopic data confirm that during the monsoon period, precipitation occurred from water vapor that originated from the Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal; by contrast during the non-monsoon period, an isotopic signature of more continental origin appeared, indicating that the higher

  1. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  2. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, B Scott; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2014-07-01

    A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org). The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  3. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Scott Perrin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org. The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  4. Organic-rich hybrid O/I systems based on isocyanate chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuney, S. [INSA, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. des Materiaux Macromoleculaires]|[BSN, Givors (France); Gerard, J.F.; Pascault, J.P.Vigier, G. [INSA, Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-12-31

    The isocyanate chemistry has been used to prepare, without adding any solvent, organic-rich hybrid O/I systems, {alpha}-{omega} hydroxy-terminated prepolymers (soft segments, denoted SS) can be end-capped with {gamma}-isocyanato propyl triethoxy silane ({gamma}-IPS), or previously reacted with a diisocyanate (DI) and then end-capped with {gamma}-amino propyl triethoxy silane ({gamma}-APS), or with {gamma}-amino propyl methyl diethoxy silane ({gamma}-APMDES). With this second pathway, a double distribution of molecules is present. The aim of this work is to investigate the morphologies and structural properties of different organic-rich hybrid organic/inorganic materials. Two types of {alpha}-{Omega} hydroxy prepolymers have been used: hydrogenated polybutadiene, HPBD, and polycaprolactone, PCL. The inorganic phase is obtained through the hydrolysis and condensation of the silane groups under acidic conditions and with [H{sub 2}O]/Si = 3. The nanometric silica-rich particles in the final morphologies, after a post-cure at 150 C, were also studied by means of SAXS measurements. Viscoelastic measurements show one or two main relaxation peaks depending on the phase separation process during reaction and the polarity of the initial SS. However for full crosslinked SS/{gamma}-IPS hybrid networks, the relaxed modulus does not depend on SS nature and it is well described by the affine network theory.

  5. Efavirenz a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of first-generation: Approaches based on its medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Mônica M; Costa, Carolina C P; Bezerra, Talitha C; da Silva, Fernando de C; Boechat, Núbia

    2016-01-27

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that affects individuals on all continents. In 1987, the antiretroviral therapy began increasing survival rates and improving the quality of life for patients. Efavirenz (EFV) is a drug widely used in the treatment of HIV-AIDS since 1998. Belonging to a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), it directly blocks the action of the enzyme and consequently the multiplication of the virus. Although EFV has provided excellent results in reducing viral load, cases of resistance associated with adverse effects have led to the search to find new analogs of this drug. Although many researchers are involved in this quest, curiously there is still no clinical substitute for EFV. To develop a second-generation version of EFV, it is essential understand the structure-activity relationships of the derivative compounds. Thus, the aims of the present review are to compare EFV and its derivatives using medicinal chemistry and to describe the main synthetic routes.

  6. A portable chemical sensor for histidine based on the strategy of click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Kefeng; Zhou, Ping; Zheng, Ou; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2014-01-15

    A novel portable chemical sensor is developed in combination of the personal glucose meters (PGM) with click chemistry for sensitive and selective determination of histidine. Invertase-labeled alkynyl-DNA can be modified onto the surfaces of Streptavidin Magnespheres Paramagnetic Particles (PMPs) through copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction and formed invertase-functionalized PMPs, which can be separated easily. The presence of invertase can convert sucrose to glucose and can be monitored by the PGM easily. The presence of histidine can inhibit the CuAAC, so the read-out signal of PGM decreased. The difference in signals from the PGM before and after addition of histidine has a good linear correlation with the logarithm of the histidine concentrations in the range of 0.01~100 μM with a detection limit of 3.4 nM, which is lower than those of many other chemical sensors. Moreover, the assay of histidine in milk samples is demonstrated with satisfactory results.

  7. Stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling for Peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Hanzhi; Lee, Kim-Chung; Liu, Hongxia; Zhao, Yufen; Cai, Zongwei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-12-04

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling (SIPL) strategy for peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry. The labeling reaction could be performed easily and completed within 40 min in a one-pot reaction without additional cleanup procedures. It was found that N-phosphorylation labeling reagents were activated in situ to form labeling intermediates with high reactivity targeting on N-terminus and ε-amino groups of lysine under mild reaction conditions. The introduction of N-terminal-labeled phosphoryl group not only improved the ionization efficiency of peptides and increased the protein sequence coverage for peptide mass fingerprints but also greatly enhanced the intensities of b ions, suppressed the internal fragments, and reduced the complexity of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragmentation patterns of peptides. By using nano liquid chromatography chip/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nano LC-chip/TOF MS) for the protein quantification, the obtained results showed excellent correlation of the measured ratios to theoretical ratios with relative errors ranging from 0.5% to 6.7% and relative standard deviation of less than 10.6%, indicating that the developed method was reproducible and precise. The isotope effect was negligible because of the deuterium atoms were placed adjacent to the neutral phosphoryl group with high electrophilicity and moderately small size. Moreover, the SIPL approach used inexpensive reagents and was amenable to samples from various sources, including cell culture, biological fluids, and tissues. The method development based on organic phosphorus chemistry offered a new approach for quantitative proteomics by using novel stable isotope labeling reagents.

  8. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  9. Nuclear Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  10. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  11. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  12. Preparation and application of a novel electrochemical sensing material based on surface chemistry of polyhydroquinone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China); Wang, Yingkai [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu, Chengguo, E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China); Huang, Jianlin; Chen, Huaixia; Wang, Shengfu [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Shengshui, E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China)

    2014-07-01

    A new analogue of polydopamine (PDA), i.e., polyhydroquinone (PH{sub 2}Q), was polymerized and its surface chemistry was studied by different ways of characterization. PH{sub 2}Q was produced by the self-polymerization of H{sub 2}Q mediated by dissolved oxygen, and the self-polymerization process was strongly dependent on the type and the pH value of the buffer solutions. PH{sub 2}Q can not only achieve surface hydrophilization of different substrates like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, graphite strip, C{sub 12}SH/Au and wax slice, but also possess several unique properties like reversible adsorption, good solubility and low cost. These properties made PH{sub 2}Q an ideal polymeric modifier for the noncovalent functionalization of some nanomaterials. By simply grinding with PH{sub 2}Q, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can be readily dispersed in water with high solubility and good stability. The resulting MWNT–PH{sub 2}Q composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance, which was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). - Highlights: • Polyhydroquinone (PH{sub 2}Q) was produced by the self-polymerization of hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) mediated by dissolved oxygen. • PH{sub 2}Q can achieve surface hydrophilization of a variety of substrates. • PH{sub 2}Q is an ideal polymeric modifier for the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). • The MWNT–PH{sub 2}Q composite can be employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA)

  13. Student Development of Information Literacy Skills during Problem-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Ginger V.; Li, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning methods support student learning of content as well as scientific skills. In the course of problem-based learning, students seek outside information related to the problem, and therefore, information literacy skills are practiced when problem-based learning is used. This work describes a mixed-methods approach to investigate…

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  15. Creating and Teaching a Web-Based, University-Level Introductory Chemistry Course that Incorporates Laboratory Exercises and Active Learning Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    An introductory, nonscience-majors chemistry course was converted to a Web-based course. The differences in student populations, teaching strategies, laboratory methods, and learning outcomes are described. Practical information is also given on the use of software and other online technology to implement course conversion. (Contains 2 tables.)

  16. Domain-specific expertise of chemistry teachers on context-based education about macro-micro thinking in structure-property relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, R.; Bulte, A.M.W.; Pilot, A.; Vermunt, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine and describe the new domain-specific expertise of experienced chemistry teachers in teaching an innovative context-based unit about macro– micro thinking in structure–property relations. The construct of ‘teachers’ domain-specific expertise’ was used to analyse the new r

  17. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  18. Evaluating cis-2,6-dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) as a base component in lithium-mediated zincation chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David R; Garden, Jennifer A; Kennedy, Alan R; Leenhouts, Sarah M; Mulvey, Robert E; O'Keefe, Philip; O'Hara, Charles T; Steven, Alan

    2013-09-27

    Most recent advances in metallation chemistry have centred on the bulky secondary amide 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide (TMP) within mixed metal, often ate, compositions. However, the precursor amine TMP(H) is rather expensive so a cheaper substitute would be welcome. Thus this study was aimed towards developing cheaper non-TMP based mixed-metal bases and, as cis-2,6-dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) was chosen as the alternative amide, developing cis-DMP zincate chemistry which has received meagre attention compared to that of its methyl-rich counterpart TMP. A new lithium diethylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] (TMEDA=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) has been synthesised by co-complexation of Li(cis-DMP), Et2Zn and TMEDA, and characterised by NMR (including DOSY) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, which revealed a dinuclear contact ion pair arrangement. By using N,N-diisopropylbenzamide as a test aromatic substrate, the deprotonative reactivity of [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] has been probed and contrasted with that of the known but previously uninvestigated di-tert-butylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)tBu2]. The former was found to be the superior base (for example, producing the ortho-deuteriated product in respective yields of 78% and 48% following D2O quenching of zincated benzamide intermediates). An 88% yield of 2-iodo-N,N-diisopropylbenzamide was obtained on reaction of two equivalents of the diethylzincate with the benzamide followed by iodination. Comparisons are also drawn using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazide (HMDS), diisopropylamide and TMP as the amide component in the lithium amide, Et2Zn and TMEDA system. Under certain conditions, the cis-DMP base system was found to give improved results in comparison to HMDS and diisopropylamide (DA), and comparable results to a TMP system. Two novel complexes isolated from reactions of the di-tert-butylzincate and crystallographically characterised, namely the pre-metallation complex [{(iPr)2N

  19. Pedagogy-Based-Technology and Chemistry Students' Performance in Higher Institutions: A Case of Debre Berhan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Tesfaye; Ochonogor, Chukunoye E.; Engida, Temechegn

    2011-01-01

    Many students have difficulty in learning abstract and complex lessons of chemistry. This study investigated how students develop their understandings of abstract and complex lessons in chemistry with the aid of visualizing tools: animation, simulation and video that allow them to build clear concepts. Animation, simulation and video enable…

  20. An Experiential Research-Focused Approach: Implementation in a Nonlaboratory-Based Graduate-Level Analytical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Chee-Seng

    2007-01-01

    A project is described which incorporates nonlaboratory research skills in a graduate level course on analytical chemistry. This project will help students to grasp the basic principles and concepts of modern analytical techniques and also help them develop relevant research skills in analytical chemistry.

  1. The Role of Green Chemistry Activities in Fostering Secondary School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts and Argumentation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Roth, Wolff Michael; Sinniah, Devananthini

    2016-01-01

    In a world where environmental degradation is taking on alarming levels, understanding, and acting to minimize, the individual environmental impact is an important goal for many science educators. In this study, a green chemistry curriculum--combining chemistry experiments with everyday, environmentally friendly substances with a student-centered…

  2. Bringing research into a first semester organic chemistry laboratory with the multistep synthesis of carbohydrate-based HIV inhibitor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a synthetic scheme of four reactions was developed for and implemented in the first semester organic lab. Students carried out the synthetic reactions during the last 6 of 10 total labs in the course, generating carbohydrate-based dimeric target molecules modeled after published dimers with application in HIV therapy. The project was designed to provide a research experience through use of literature procedures for reactions performed, exploration of variation in linker length in the target structure, and synthesis of compounds not previously reported in the scientific literature. Project assessment revealed strong student support, indicating enhanced engagement and interest in the course as a direct result of the use of scientific literature and the applications of the synthesized carbohydrate-based molecules. Regardless of discussed challenges in designing a research project for the first semester lab course, the finding from data analysis that a project implemented in the first semester lab had significantly greater student impact than a second semester project should provide motivation for development of additional research projects for a first semester organic course.

  3. Green Chemistry Approach for Efficient Synthesis of Schiff Bases of Isatin Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jnyanaranjan Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted organic synthesis, a green chemistry approach, is nowadays widely used in the drug synthesis. Microwave-assisted synthesis improves both throughput and turnaround time for medicinal chemists by offering the benefits of drastically reduced reaction times, increased yields, and pure products. Schiff bases are the important class of organic compounds due to their flexibility, and structural diversities due to the presence of azomethine group which is helpful for elucidating the mechanism of transformation and rasemination reaction in biological system. This novel compound could also act as valuable ligands for the development of new chemical entities. In the present work, some Schiff bases of Isatin derivatives was synthesized using microwave heating method. Schiff base of Isatin were synthesized by condensation of the keto group of Isatin with different aromatic primary amines. They were characterized by means of spectral data and subsequently subjected to the in vitro antibacterial activities against gram positive and gram negative strains of microbes. It was observed that the compound with electron withdrawing substituents exhibited good antibacterial activities against almost all the micro organisms.

  4. Crossing Levels and Representations: The Connected Chemistry (CC1) Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sharona T.; Wilensky, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Connected Chemistry (named CC1 to denote Connected Chemistry Chapter 1) is a computer-based environment for learning the topics of gas laws and kinetic molecular theory in chemistry. It views chemistry from an "emergent" perspective, how macroscopic phenomena result from the interaction of many submicroscopic particles. Connected Chemistry employs…

  5. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating Fluid Transitions between Concepts and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing…

  6. Towards Bildung-Oriented Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-07-01

    This paper concerns Bildung-oriented chemistry education, based on a reflective and critical discourse of chemistry. It is contrasted with the dominant type of chemistry education, based on the mainstream discourse of chemistry. Bildung-oriented chemistry education includes not only content knowledge in chemistry, but also knowledge about chemistry, both about the nature of chemistry and about its role in society. In 2004 Mahaffy suggested a tetrahedron model based on Johnstone's chemical triangle. The latter represents the formal aspects of chemistry teaching (macro, submicro, and symbolic) and the top of the tetrahedron represents a human element. In the present paper the following subdivision of the top is suggested (starting from the bottom): (1) applied chemistry, (2) socio-cultural context, and (3) critical-philosophic approach. The professional identity of the Bildung-oriented chemistry teacher differs from that of the chemist and is informed by research fields such as Philosophy of Chemistry, Science and Technology Studies, and Environmental Education. He/she takes a socio-critical approach to chemistry, emphasising both the benefits and risks of chemistry and its applications.

  7. A Bioanalytical Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Students: Biosensors Based on Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niagi, John; Warner, John; Andreesco, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the development of new biosensors based on metal nanoparticles because of its high surface area and large binding ability. The adopted procedure is extremely simple and versatile and can be used in various applications of electrochemistry.

  8. Green chemistry approach to the synthesis of potentially bioactive aminobenzylated Mannich bases through active hydrogen compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. VASOYA

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and high yield method for the synthesis of aminobenzylated Mannich bases is described. The synthesis occurs in aqueous medium at 0 ºC. The compounds show moderate antitubercular and antimicrobial activities.

  9. Acid-Base Chemistry of White Wine: Analytical Characterisation and Chemical Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Prenesti; Silvia Berto; Simona Toso; Pier Giuseppe Daniele

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of car...

  10. A Quantum Chemistry Concept Inventory for Physical Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Luxford, Cynthia J.; Windus, Theresa L.; Holme, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A 14-item, multiple-choice diagnostic assessment tool, the quantum chemistry concept inventory or QCCI, is presented. Items were developed based on published student misconceptions and content coverage and then piloted and used in advanced physical chemistry undergraduate courses. In addition to the instrument itself, data from both a pretest,…

  11. Strong Relationships in Acid-Base Chemistry - Modeling Protons Based on Predictable Concentrations of Strong Ions, Total Weak Acid Concentrations, and pCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Troels; Kellum, John A

    2016-01-01

    confirmed the relationship between charged species we then examine some of the classical and recent literature concerning the importance of charge balance. We conclude that focusing on the charges which are predictable such as strong ions and total concentrations of weak acids leads to new insights......Understanding acid-base regulation is often reduced to pigeonholing clinical states into categories of disorders based on arterial blood sampling. An earlier ambition to quantitatively explain disorders by measuring production and elimination of acid has not become standard clinical practice....... Seeking back to classical physical chemistry we propose that in any compartment, the requirement of electroneutrality leads to a strong relationship between charged moieties. This relationship is derived in the form of a general equation stating charge balance, making it possible to calculate [H+] and p...

  12. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  13. Effective Use of Storage/Retrieval-Based Chemistry Acceleration in CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuhui; Haworth, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    In situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) S.B. Pope Combust. Theory Modell. 1:41-63, 1997 has proven to be an efficient strategy for incorporating multiple-step chemical kinetics into CFD-based combustion modeling. Most ISAT applications reported in the literature have been for probability density function (PDF)-based simulations of statistically stationary flames, and have been limited to relatively small chemical mechanisms (fewer than 20 independent composition variables). Effective use of ISAT requires judicious specification of several control parameters, including error tolerances and scale factors. Here an ISAT- based algorithm I. Veljkovic, P. Plassmann and D. Haworth, in Computational Science and Its Applications ICCSA 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS 2667), Part I, pp. 643-653, Springer Verlag, 2003 is applied to statistically stationary (nonpremixed jet flames) and nonstationary (direct-injection IC engines) combustion systems, using chemical mechanisms that range from fewer than 20 to more than 100 chemical species, with PDF-based and non-PDF-based modeling approaches. Modifications to the original ISAT algorithm are proposed to enhance its effectiveness in nonstationary systems and for larger chemical mechanisms, and recommendations for control-parameter specification are offered for different situations.

  14. African American Advanced Placement chemistry students and their developing study habits: A phenomenologically-based interpretive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Natalie D.

    The academic achievement gap between African American and White students has gained much attention in recent years. Much has been written about the causes of and reasons for this problem ranging from the vestigial effects of slavery to poor parenting. Much less has been written or understood about its solution. While it is impossible for educators to change the pasts of their African American students, it is possible to effect change for the few minutes in which they are in direct contact with them each day. If African American science students are taught effective study skills and habits, then perhaps they might have the tools to close the achievement gap themselves. The participants in this phenomenologically based interpretive study were five African American Advanced Placement Chemistry students from an inner-city high school. Three in-depth interviews were conducted with each of the participants during the beginning, middle and end of a semester. The purpose of the interviews was to locate the students in terms of their thought processes, experiences and perceived barriers concerning the nature and practice of effective study and retention of chemistry content. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. The texts were then analyzed for common themes. Five common themes emerged from the interviews. These were: (1) Homework vs. Study: a distinction between homework---which students knew how to approach; and study---which they did not. (2) Student Effort: their changing perception of adequate and effective study practices while in a rigorous course. (3) Teacher Rigor: they perceived high expectations and challenging work as a sign of respect from their teachers. (4) Parental Involvement: students' admission that they desired more input from parents regarding their academic performance. (5) Racial Considerations: their need to disprove negative stereotypes and their personal observations regarding racial differences in studying. A discussion of the themes and

  15. Colorimetric Detection of Creatinine Based on Plasmonic Nanoparticles via Synergistic Coordination Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianjun; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Chen, Shi; Sum, Tze Chien; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-09-02

    A simple and portable colorimetric assay for creatinine detection is fabricated based on the synergistic coordination of creatinine and uric acid with Hg(2+) on the surface of gold nanoparticles, which exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity. Point-of-care clinical creatinine monitoring can be supported for monitoring renal function and diagnosing corresponding renal diseases at home.

  16. SYNTHESIS OF PROTEINS BY NATIVE CHEMICAL LIGATION USING FMOC-BASED CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Mitchell, A R

    2005-01-20

    C-terminal peptide {alpha}-thioesters are valuable intermediates in the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins by native chemical ligation. They are prepared either by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. The present paper reviews the different methods available for the chemical synthesis of peptide {alpha}-thioesters using Fmoc-based SPPS.

  17. Problem-Based Learning in an Eleventh Grade Chemistry Class: "Factors Affecting Cell Potential"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Acar, Burcin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) on eleventh grade students' understanding of "The effects of temperature, concentration and pressure on cell potential" and also their social skills. Stratified randomly selected control and experimental groups with 20 students each were used in…

  18. Acid-Base Chemistry According to Robert Boyle: Chemical Reactions in Words as well as Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Examples of acid-base reactions from Robert Boyle's "The Sceptical Chemist" are used to illustrate the rich information content of chemical equations. Boyle required lengthy passages of florid language to describe the same reaction that can be done quite simply with a chemical equation. Reading or hearing the words, however, enriches the student's…

  19. Acid-base chemistry of white wine: analytical characterisation and chemical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Toso, Simona; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids) with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture), ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic "wine" especially adapted for testing.

  20. Efficient and Selective Chemical Labeling of Electrochemically Generated Peptides Based on Spirolactone Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Tao; Niu, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Tao; Tessari, Marco; de Vries, Marcel P.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bischoff, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Specific digestion of proteins is an essential step for mass spectrometry-based proteomics, and the chemical labeling of the resulting peptides is often used for peptide enrichment or the introduction of desirable tags. Cleavage of the peptide bond following electrochemical oxidation of Tyr or Trp r

  1. Classroom Action Research on Formative Assessment in a Context-Based Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelzang, Johannes; Admiraal, Wilfried F.

    2017-01-01

    Context-based science courses stimulate students to reconstruct the information presented by connecting to their prior knowledge and experiences. However, students need support. Formative assessments inform both teacher and students about students' knowledge deficiencies and misconceptions and how students can be supported. Research on formative…

  2. Acid-Base Chemistry of White Wine: Analytical Characterisation and Chemical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Prenesti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria. Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture, ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic “wine” especially adapted for testing.

  3. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  4. Introducing Relativity into Quantum Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wai-Kee; Blinder, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is not often realized by chemists that the special theory of relativity is behind several aspects of quantum chemistry. The Schrdinger equation itself is based on relations between space-time and energy-momentum four vectors. Electron spin is, of course, the most obvious manifestation of relativity. The chemistry of some heavy elements is…

  5. [Photonic crystals for analytical chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Li, Jincheng

    2009-09-01

    Photonic crystals, originally created to control the transmission of light, have found their increasing value in the field of analytical chemistry and are probable to become a hot research area soon. This review is hence composed, focusing on their analytical chemistry-oriented applications, including especially their use in chromatography, capillary- and chip-based electrophoresis.

  6. Determination of flumioxazin residue in food samples through a sensitive fluorescent sensor based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Yang, Linlin; Cai, Huijian; Zhang, Lan; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2014-11-01

    A sensitive and selective fluorescent sensor for flumioxazin was designed based on the formation of strong fluorescence compound (1,2,3-triazole compounds) via the reaction of the alkynyl group in flumioxazin with 3-azido-7-hydroxycoumarin, a weak-fluorescent compound, through the Cu(+)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. The fluorescence increase factor (represented by F/F0) of the system exhibited a good linear relationship with the concentrations of flumioxazin in the range of 0.25-6.0 μg/L with a detection limit of 0.18 μg/L (S/N=3). Also, the proposed fluorescent sensor demonstrated good selectivity for flumioxazin assay even in the presence of high concentration of other pesticides. Based on such high sensitivity and selectivity, the proposed fluorescent sensor has been applied to test the flumioxazin residue in some vegetable and water samples with satisfied results.

  7. O-methylation of natural phenolic compounds based on green chemistry using dimethyl carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakoso, N. I.; Pangestu, P. H.; Wahyuningsih, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    The alkyl aryl ether compounds, of which methyl eugenol and veratraldehyde are the simplest intermediates can be synthesized by reacting eugenol and vanillin with the green reagent dimethyl carbonate (DMC). The reaction was carried out under mild of temperature and pressure. Excellent yields and selective products were obtained (95-96%) after a few hours. In the end of the reaction, the catalysts (base and Phase Transfer Catalyst) can be recovered and regenerated.

  8. Chemistry and pharmacology of triaminedithiol technetium-based brain perfusion agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.D.; Walovitch, R.C.; Belonga, B.Q.; Cheesman, E.H.

    We have examined the effects of converting the technetium(V)oxo core to the technetium nitrido core in technetium complexes based on amine derivatives of the quadridentate ligand N,N'-bis(2',2'-dimethyl-2'-mercaptoethyl)-2,2-dimethylethylenediamine. Five neutral complexes containing the technetium (V) oxo core were prepared and brain uptake indices and biodistributions were carried out in rats.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable peptide-based polymers prepared by microwave-assisted click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Maarten; Nollet, Maria L; Weijers, Pascal; Dechesne, Annemarie C; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction was used to synthesize peptide triazole-based polymers from two novel peptide-based monomers: azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (1) and azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-glycolyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (2). The selected monomers have sites for enzymatic degradation as well as for chemical hydrolysis to render the resulting polymer biodegradable. Depending on the monomer concentration in DMF, the molecular mass of the polymers could be tailored between 4.5 and 13.9 kDa (corresponding with 33-100 amino acid residues per polymer chain). As anticipated, both polymers can be enzymatically degraded by trypsin and chymotrypsin, whereas the ester bond in the polymer of 2 undergoes chemical hydrolysis under physiological conditions, as was shown by a ninhydrin-based colorimetric assay and MALDI-TOF analysis. In conclusion, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction is an effective tool for synthesizing biodegradable peptide polymers, and it opens up new approaches toward the synthesis of (novel) designed biomedical materials.

  10. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and tutorial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Miller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based "lessons" to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web user interface (http://www.charmming.org. Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets, allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that "point and click" simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance.

  11. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin T; Singh, Rishi P; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based "lessons" to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that "point and click" simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance.

  12. What are they thinking? Automated analysis of student writing about acid-base chemistry in introductory biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudek, Kevin C; Prevost, Luanna B; Moscarella, Rosa A; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students' writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an introductory biology course. Students were asked to predict acid-base behavior of biological functional groups and to explain their answers. Student explanations were rated by two independent raters. Responses were also analyzed using SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys and a custom library of science-related terms and lexical categories relevant to the assessment item. These analyses revealed conceptual connections made by students, student difficulties explaining these topics, and the heterogeneity of student ideas. We validated the lexical analysis by correlating student interviews with the lexical analysis. We used discriminant analysis to create classification functions that identified seven key lexical categories that predict expert scoring (interrater reliability with experts = 0.899). This study suggests that computerized lexical analysis may be useful for automatically categorizing large numbers of student open-ended responses. Lexical analysis provides instructors unique insights into student thinking and a whole-class perspective that are difficult to obtain from multiple-choice questions or reading individual responses.

  13. Mechanism of Magnetostructural Transitions in Copper-Nitroxide-Based Switchable Molecular Magnets: Insights from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julie; Guennic, Boris Le; Fedin, Matvey V; Ovcharenko, Victor I; Calzado, Carmen J

    2015-07-20

    The gradual magnetostructural transition in breathing crystals based on copper(II) and pyrazolyl-substituted nitronyl nitroxides has been analyzed by means of DDCI quantum chemistry calculations. The magnetic coupling constants (J) within the spin triads of Cu(hfac)2L(Bu)·0.5C8H18 have been evaluated for the X-ray structures reported at different temperatures. The coupling is strongly antiferromagnetic at low temperature and becomes ferromagnetic when the temperature increases. The intercluster magnetic coupling (J') is antiferromagnetic and shows a marked dependence on temperature. The magnetostructural transition can be reproduced using the calculated J values for each structure in the simulation of the magnetic susceptibility. However, the μ(T) curve can be improved nicely by considering the coexistence of two phases in the transition region, whose ratio varies with temperature corresponding to both the weakly and strongly coupled spin states. These results complement a recent VT-FTIR study on the parent Cu(hfac)2L(Pr) compound with a gradual magnetostructural transition.

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  15. Fragment Screening of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase for Lead Generation-Structure-Based Hit Evaluation and Chemistry Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yafeng; Olsson, Thomas; Johansson, Carina A; Öster, Linda; Beisel, Hans-Georg; Rohman, Mattias; Karis, David; Bäckström, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is involved in the regulation of many biological processes by metabolizing the key bioactive lipid mediator, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. For the development of sEH inhibitors with improved physicochemical properties, we performed both a fragment screening and a high-throughput screening aiming at an integrated hit evaluation and lead generation. Followed by a joint dose-response analysis to confirm the hits, the identified actives were then effectively triaged by a structure-based hit-classification approach to three prioritized series. Two distinct scaffolds were identified as tractable starting points for potential lead chemistry work. The oxoindoline series bind at the right-hand side of the active-site pocket with hydrogen bonds to the protein. The 2-phenylbenzimidazole-4-sulfonamide series bind at the central channel with significant induced fit, which has not been previously reported. On the basis of the encouraging initial results, we envision that a new lead series with improved properties could be generated if a vector is found that could merge the cyclohexyl functionality of the oxoindoline series with the trifluoromethyl moiety of the 2-phenylbenzimidazole-4-sulfonamide series.

  16. Morphogen Electrochemically Triggered Self-Construction of Polymeric Films Based on Mussel-Inspired Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerten, Clément; Garnier, Tony; Lupattelli, Paolo; Chau, Nguyet Trang Thanh; Schaaf, Pierre; Jierry, Loïc; Boulmedais, Fouzia

    2015-12-15

    Inspired by the strong chemical adhesion mechanism of mussels, we designed a catechol-based electrochemically triggered self-assembly of films based on ethylene glycol molecules bearing catechol groups on both sides and denoted as bis-catechol molecules. These molecules play the role of morphogens and, in contrast to previously investigated systems, they are also one of the constituents, after reaction, of the film. Unable to interact together, commercially available poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) chains and bis-catechol molecules are mixed in an aqueous solution and brought in contact with an electrode. By application of defined potential cycles, bis-catechol molecules undergo oxidation leading to molecules bearing "reactive" quinone groups which diffuse toward the solution. In this active state, the quinones react with amino groups of PAH through Michael addition and Schiff's base condensation reaction. The application of cyclic voltammetry (CV) between 0 and 500 mV (vs Ag/AgCl, scan rate of 50 mV/s) of a PAH/bis-catechol solution results in a fast self-construction of a film that reaches a thickness of 40 nm after 60 min. The films present a spiky structure which is attributed to the use of bis-functionalized molecules as one component of the films. XPS measurements show the presence of both PAH and bis-catechol cross-linked together in a covalent way. We show that the amine/catechol ratio is an important parameter which governs the film buildup. For a given amine/catechol ratio, it does exist an optimum CV scan rate leading to a maximum of the film thickness as a function of the scan rate.

  17. Numerical study of variational data assimilation algorithms based on decomposition methods in atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Antokhin, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    The performance of a variational data assimilation algorithm for a transport and transformation model of atmospheric chemical composition is studied numerically in the case where the emission inventories are missing while there are additional in situ indirect concentration measurements. The algorithm is based on decomposition and splitting methods with a direct solution of the data assimilation problems at the splitting stages. This design allows avoiding iterative processes and working in real-time. In numerical experiments we study the sensitivity of data assimilation to measurement data quantity and quality.

  18. Development of quantitative structure-metabolism (QSMR) relationships for substituted anilines based on computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athersuch, Toby J; Wilson, Ian D; Keun, Hector C; Lindon, John C

    2013-09-01

    A novel stepwise classification approach for predicting the metabolic fate of substituted anilines, based on calculated physicochemical parameters of the parent anilines, was developed. Based on multivariate pattern recognition methods (PLS-DA or soft independent modelling of class analogy [SIMCA]), these models allowed prediction of N-acetylation and subsequent N-oxanilic acid formation. These classification methods provided an improved classification success when compared with existing quantitative structure-metabolism relationship models for substituted anilines. Modelling the physicochemical properties of the N-acetylated compounds was considered as an addition to the stepwise model. Inclusion of parameters describing the N-acetyl moiety had little effect on the predictive ability of a stepwise parent to N-acetyl to N-oxanilic acid PLS-DA model, and had a negative impact on that of SIMCA models. This was attributed to the relatively small contribution to the total parameter variance caused by differences arising as a result of N-acetylation compared to the contribution made by the substituent effects. Calculation of physicochemical properties incorporating the effect of solvation using ab initio methods improved the classification model in terms of both the visual separation in multivariate projections and prediction accuracy.

  19. Integrated Ecological River Health Assessments, Based on Water Chemistry, Physical Habitat Quality and Biological Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yoon Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated integrative river ecosystem health using stressor-based models of physical habitat health, chemical water health, and biological health of fish and identified multiple-stressor indicators influencing the ecosystem health. Integrated health responses (IHRs, based on star-plot approach, were calculated from qualitative habitat evaluation index (QHEI, nutrient pollution index (NPI, and index of biological integrity (IBI in four different longitudinal regions (Groups I–IV. For the calculations of IHRs values, multi-metric QHEI, NPI, and IBI models were developed and their criteria for the diagnosis of the health were determined. The longitudinal patterns of the river were analyzed by a self-organizing map (SOM model and the key major stressors in the river were identified by principal component analysis (PCA. Our model scores of integrated health responses (IHRs suggested that mid-stream and downstream regions were impaired, and the key stressors were closely associated with nutrient enrichment (N and P and organic matter pollutions from domestic wastewater disposal plants and urban sewage. This modeling approach of IHRs may be used as an effective tool for evaluations of integrative ecological river health..

  20. Thermodynamic Stability and Defect Chemistry of Bismuth-Based Lead-Free Double Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zewen; Meng, Weiwei; Wang, Jianbo; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-09-22

    Bismuth- or antimony-based lead-free double perovskites represented by Cs2 AgBiBr6 have recently been considered promising alternatives to the emerging lead-based perovskites for solar cell applications. These new perovskites belong to the Fm3‾ m space group and consist of two types of octahedra alternating in a rock-salt face-centered cubic structure. We show, by density functional theory calculations, that the stable chemical potential region for pure Cs2 AgBiBr6 is narrow. Ag vacancies are a shallow accepters and can easily form, leading to intrinsic p-type conductivity. Bi vacancies and AgBi antisites are deep acceptors and should be the dominant defects under the Br-rich growth conditions. Our results suggest that the growth of Cs2 AgBiBr6 under Br-poor/Bi-rich conditions is preferred for suppressing the formation of the deep defects, which is beneficial for maximizing the photovoltaic performance.

  1. [Novel access to indazoles based on palladium-catalyzed amination chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Kiyofumi

    2008-07-01

    Two efficient methods to construct the indazole nucleus have been developed, both of which utilize palladium-catalyzed intramolecular carbon-nitrogen bond formation. One is based on intramolecular Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction of 2-halobenzophenone tosylhydrazones. The catalyst system we developed for this reaction allows the cyclization to proceed under very mild conditions and thus could be applied to a wide range of substrates with acid- or base-sensitive functional groups. Furthermore, this methodology could be applied for the construction of benzoisoxazole ring system. In addition, catalytic C-H activation with palladium followed by intramolecular amination of benzophenone tosylhydrazones was also accomplished with the aid of the catalyst system such as Pd(OAc)(2)/Cu(OAc)(2)/AgOCOCF(3), which gave another route to indazoles. Using this combination, indazoles with various functional groups could be obtained in good to high yields, especially in the case of substrates having electron donating group such as methoxy group on benzene ring. Interesting chemo- and regioselectivity were also observed in this reaction.

  2. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  3. Contributions of computational chemistry and biophysical techniques to fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has evolved from a novel approach in the search of new hits to a valuable alternative to the high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns of many pharmaceutical companies. The increasing relevance of FBDD in the drug discovery universe has been concomitant with an implementation of the biophysical techniques used for the detection of weak inhibitors, e.g. NMR, X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance (SPR). At the same time, computational approaches have also been progressively incorporated into the FBDD process and nowadays several computational tools are available. These stretch from the filtering of huge chemical databases in order to build fragment-focused libraries comprising compounds with adequate physicochemical properties, to more evolved models based on different in silico methods such as docking, pharmacophore modelling, QSAR and virtual screening. In this paper we will review the parallel evolution and complementarities of biophysical techniques and computational methods, providing some representative examples of drug discovery success stories by using FBDD.

  4. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  5. Chemistry Education and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sule Aycan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of mythological story in teaching chemistry. To this end the students in the class were divided into two homogenous groups. While the first group was thought in a traditional way, using a mythological story thought the second group. The story used was based on a Mountain just opposite the faculty.

  6. Yb-based heavy fermion compounds and field tuned quantum chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Eundeok [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The motivation of this dissertation was to advance the study of Yb-based heavy fermion (HF) compounds especially ones related to quantum phase transitions. One of the topics of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the Kondo and crystalline electric field (CEF) energy scales in Yb-based HF systems by means of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements. In these systems, the Kondo interaction and CEF excitations generally give rise to large anomalies such as maxima in ρ(T) and as minima in S(T). The TEP data were use to determine the evolution of Kondo and CEF energy scales upon varying transition metals for YbT2Zn20 (T = Fe, Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, and Co) compounds and applying magnetic fields for YbAgGe and YbPtBi. For YbT2Zn20 and YbPtBi, the Kondo and CEF energy scales could not be well separated in S(T), presumably because of small CEF level splittings. A similar effect was observed for the magnetic contribution to the resistivity. For YbAgGe, S(T) has been successfully applied to determine the Kondo and CEF energy scales due to the clear separation between the ground state and thermally excited CEF states. The Kondo temperature, TK, inferred from the local maximum in S(T), remains finite as magnetic field increases up to 140 kOe. In this dissertation we have examined the heavy quasi-particle behavior, found near the field tuned AFM quantum critical point (QCP), with YbAgGe and YbPtBi. Although the observed nFL behaviors in the vicinity of the QCP are different between YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the constructed H-T phase diagram including the two crossovers are similar. For both YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the details of the quantum criticality turn out to be complicated. We expect that YbPtBi will provide an additional example of field tuned quantum criticality, but clearly there are further experimental investigations left and more ideas needed to understand the basic physics of field-induced quantum

  7. The coordination chemistry of two symmetric fluorene-based organic ligands with cuprous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Fei; Zhao, Chao-Wei; Ma, Jian-Ping; Liu, Qi-Kui; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2013-12-15

    Two novel symmetric fluorene-based ligands, namely, 2,7-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluorene [L1 or (I), C21H18N4] and 2,7-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-9,9-dipropyl-9H-fluorene (L2), have been used to construct the coordination polymers catena-poly[[dichloridodicopper(I)(Cu-Cu)]-μ-2,7-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluorene], [Cu2Cl2(C21H18N4)]n, (II), and catena-poly[[tetra-μ2-chlorido-tetracopper(I)]-bis[μ-2,7-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-9,9-dipropyl-9H-fluorene

  8. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  9. Computational Chemistry-Based Identification of Ultra-Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis

    2008-08-31

    The current work seeks to identify novel, catalytically-active, stable, poison-resistant LWGS catalysts that retain the superior activity typical of conventional Cu catalysts but can be operated at similar or lower temperatures. A database for the Binding Energies (BEs) of the LWGS relevant species, namely CO, O and OH on the most-stable, close-packed facets of a set of 17 catalytically relevant transition metals was established. This BE data and a database of previously established segregation energies was utilized to predict the stability of bimetallic NSAs that could be synthesized by combinations of the 17 parent transition metals. NSAs that were potentially stable both in vacuo and under the influence of strong-binding WGS intermediates were then selected for adsorption studies. A set of 40 NSAs were identified that satisfied all three screener criteria and the binding energies of CO, O and OH were calculated on a set of 66, 43 and 79 NSA candidates respectively. Several NSAs were found that bound intermediates weaker than the monometallic catalysts and were thus potentially poison-resistant. Finally, kinetic studies were performed and resulted in the discovery of a specific NSA-based bimetallic catalyst Cu/Pt that is potentially a promising LWGS catalyst. This stable Cu/Pt subsurface alloy is expected to provide facile H{sub 2}O activation and remain relatively resistant from the poisoning by CO, S and formate intermediates.

  10. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  11. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  12. Computational medicinal chemistry in fragment-based drug discovery: what, how and when.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Obdulia; Urbano-Cuadrado, Manuel; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2011-01-01

    The use of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has increased in the last decade due to the encouraging results obtained to date. In this scenario, computational approaches, together with experimental information, play an important role to guide and speed up the process. By default, FBDD is generally considered as a constructive approach. However, such additive behavior is not always present, therefore, simple fragment maturation will not always deliver the expected results. In this review, computational approaches utilized in FBDD are reported together with real case studies, where applicability domains are exemplified, in order to analyze them, and then, maximize their performance and reliability. Thus, a proper use of these computational tools can minimize misleading conclusions, keeping the credit on FBDD strategy, as well as achieve higher impact in the drug-discovery process. FBDD goes one step beyond a simple constructive approach. A broad set of computational tools: docking, R group quantitative structure-activity relationship, fragmentation tools, fragments management tools, patents analysis and fragment-hopping, for example, can be utilized in FBDD, providing a clear positive impact if they are utilized in the proper scenario - what, how and when. An initial assessment of additive/non-additive behavior is a critical point to define the most convenient approach for fragments elaboration.

  13. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials. PMID:27498703

  14. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of enzymatically biodegradable PEG and peptide-based hydrogels prepared by click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Maarten; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2010-06-14

    Herein we describe the synthesis and rheological characterization of a series of enzymatically sensitive PEG and peptide-based hydrogels by the Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The hydrogels were synthesized by a combination of alkyne-functionalized star-shaped PEG molecules (two 4-armed PEGs with M(w) 10 and 20 kDa, respectively, and one 8-armed PEG of 20 kDa) and the protease-sensitive bis-azido peptide, N(alpha)-(azido)-D-alanyl-phenylalanyl-lysyl-(2-azidoethyl)-amide (6) in the presence of CuSO(4) and sodium ascorbate in aqueous solution. The swelling ratio and the storage modulus (G') of the hydrogels could be tailored by several parameters, for example, the initial solid content of the hydrogel, the molecular weight of the PEG derivative, and by the architecture of the PEG molecule (4- versus 8-armed PEG derivative). The peptide sequence, D-Ala-Phe-Lys, was sensitive toward the proteases plasmin and trypsin to render the hydrogels biodegradable.

  16. Neoglycopolymers based on 4-vinyl-1,2,3-triazole monomers prepared by click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzer, Martin; Chen, Gaojian; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Stenzel, Martina H

    2010-02-11

    The synthesis of a new glycomonomer based on mannose, prepared via CuAAC, is reported. The resulting 1,2,3-triazole linkage between mannose and the polymer backbone ensures the formation of highly stable glycopolymers, which will not undergo hydrolysis. The monomer 2'-(4-vinyl-[1,2,3]-triazol-1-yl)ethyl-O-alpha-D-mannopyranoside was polymerized in the presence of a RAFT agent - 3-benzylsulfanylthiocarbonylsulfanyl propionic acid - to yield well-defined polymers with molecular weights up to 51,500 g mol(-1) and a PDI of 1.16. The resulting polymer was employed as a macroRAFT agent in the polymerization of NIPAAm in order to generate thermo-responsive block copolymers, which undergo reversible micelle formation at elevated temperatures. The rapid interaction between the polymers prepared and ConA confirms the high affinity of these structures to proteins. While the linear glycopolymers already undergo a fast complexation with ConA, the reported rates have found to be exceeded by the micellar glycopolymer structure presented in the current contribution.

  17. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology.

  18. Assessing Changes in High School Students' Conceptual Understanding through Concept Maps before and after the Computer-Based Predict-Observe-Explain (CB-POE) Tasks on Acid-Base Chemistry at the Secondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Fatma; Ayas, Alipasa

    2015-01-01

    Although concept maps have been used as alternative assessment methods in education, there has been an ongoing debate on how to evaluate students' concept maps. This study discusses how to evaluate students' concept maps as an assessment tool before and after 15 computer-based Predict-Observe-Explain (CB-POE) tasks related to acid-base chemistry.…

  19. Detailed DSMC surface chemistry modeling of the oxidation of carbon-based ablators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Arnaud; Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-11-01

    This work employs a recently developed gas-surface interaction model (referred to herein as PSMM) constructed from molecular beam experimental data for use with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. While recent models have been proposed to produce macroscopic rates consistent with the experimental measurements for use in CFD solvers, this work aims to reproduce the microscopic details (including angular distributions and time-of-flight distributions) obtained from the experimental data for modeling gas-surface interactions in DSMC. The different mechanisms considered for the PSMM model include adsorption, desorption, surface participating and direct impact mechanisms. The microscopic data of probabilities and characteristic frequencies for each type of reaction are obtained from the macroscopic parameters of reaction rate constants and sticking coefficients. Numerical simulations closely resembling a recent set of molecular beam experiments were performed using this model within DSMC, and the performance of the Zhluktov-Abe and Alba models is also assessed. The molecular beam experiments in-volved the bombardment of a relatively smooth vitreous carbon surface using a hyperthermal O/O2 beam to understand the product formation and the detailed reaction mechanisms and scattering at the surface. A comparison of the numerical flux distributions from the Zhluktov-Abe and Alba models with experimental flux distributions of the scattered products at different temperatures showed significant discrepancies. The PSMM model was found to reproduce the scattered product mole fractions as a function of temperature, as well as the reactively scattered CO time-of-flight data. Future work will aim to improve the DSMC predicted time-of-flight data for inelastically and elastically scattered O atoms based on the experimental data.

  20. Laser-plasma accelerator and femtosecond photon sources-based ultrafast radiation chemistry and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y. A.

    2017-02-01

    The initial distribution of energy deposition triggered by the interaction of ionizing radiations (far UV and X rays, electron, proton and accelerated ions) with molecular targets or integrated biological systems is often decisive for the spatio-temporal behavior of radiation effects that take place on several orders of magnitude. This contribution deals with an interdisciplinary approach that concerns cutting-edge advances on primary radiation events, considering the potentialities of innovating strategies based on ultrafast laser science, from femtosecond photon sources to laser-driven relativistic particles acceleration. Recent advances of powerful TW laser sources (~ 1019 Wcm‑2) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultrashort relativistic particle beams in the energy domain 2.5–150 MeV open exciting opportunities for the development of high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF). Early radiation damages being dependent on the survival probability of secondary electrons and radial distribution of short-lived radicals inside ionization clusters, a thorough knowledge of these processes involves the real-time probing of primary events in the temporal range 10‑14–10‑11 s. In the framework of a closed synergy between low-energy radiation femtochemistry (LERF) and the emerging domain of HERF, the paper focuses on early phenomena that occur in the prethermal regime of low-energy secondary electrons, considering very short-lived quantum effects in aqueous environments. A high dose-rate delivered by femtosecond electron beam (~ 1011–1013 Gy s‑1) can be used to investigate early radiation processes in native ionization tracks, down to 10‑12 s and 10‑9 m. We explain how this breakthrough favours the innovating development of real-time nanodosimetry in biologically relevant environments and open new perspectives for spatio-temporal radiation biophysics. The emerging domain of HERF would provide guidance for understanding the specific bioeffects of

  1. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  2. A new green chemistry method based on plant extracts to synthesize gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Castillo, Milka Odemariz

    Extraordinary chemical and physical properties exhibited by nanomaterials, as compared to their bulk counterparts, have made the area of nanotechnology a growing realm in the past three decades. It is the nanoscale size (from 1 to 100 nm) and the morphologies of nanomaterials that provide several properties and applications not possible for the same material in the bulk. Magnetic and optical properties, as well as surface reactivity are highly dependent on the size and morphology of the nanomaterial. Diverse nanomaterials are being widely used in molecular diagnostics as well as in medicine, electronic and optical devices. Among the most studied nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles are of special interest due to their multifunctional capabilities. For instance, spherical gold nanoparticles measuring 15-20 nm in diameter have been studied due to their insulin binding properties. Also, thiol functionalized gold nanoparticles between 5 and 30 nm are used in the detection of DNA. Thus, harnessing the shape and size of gold nanoparticles plays an important role in science and technology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles via the reduction of gold salts, using citrate or other reducing agents, has been widely studied. In recent years, algae, fungi, bacteria, and living plants have been used to reduce trivalent gold (Au3+) to its zero oxidation state (Au 0) forming gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. In addition, plant biomasses have also been studied for their gold-reducing power and nanoparticle formation. Although there is information about the synthesis of the gold nanoparticles by biologically based materials; to our knowledge, the study of the use of alfalfa extracts has not been reported. This innovation represents a significant improvement; that is an environmentally friendly method that does not use toxic chemicals. Also, the problem of extracting the formed gold nanoparticles from biomaterials is addressed in this research but still remains to be

  3. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rockett; Dubey, M.K.; Wuebbles, D. J.; S. C. Olsen; W. Jia; Wang, D.

    2012-01-01

    The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheri...

  4. Unification of Anion Relay Chemistry (ARC) with the Takeda and Hiyama Cross-Coupling Reactions: Identification of an Effective Silicon-Based Transfer Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Amos B.; Hoye, Adam T.; Martinez-Solorio, Dionicio; Kim, Won-Suk; Tong, Rongbiao

    2012-01-01

    The unification of Anion Relay Chemistry (ARC) with the Takeda and Hiyama palladium-mediated cross-coupling processes to provide aryl-aryl, alkenyl-aryl and alkenyl-alkenyl coupling products, exploiting a common silicon-based transfer agent, has been achieved. These results provide a practical solution to the intermolecular cross-coupling of organolithium reagents without problematic lithium-halogen exchange and/or undesired homocoupling that has kept organolithium cross-couplings from achiev...

  5. Puzzling through General Chemistry: A Light-Hearted Approach to Engaging Students with Chemistry Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Several puzzles are designed to be used by chemistry students as learning tools and teach them basic chemical concepts. The topics of the puzzles are based on the chapters from Chemistry, The Central Science used in general chemistry course and the puzzles are in various forms like crosswords, word searches, number searches, puzzles based on…

  6. Carbon Flux Estimation By Using AGCM-Based Chemistry Transport Model for the Period 1990-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fluxes were estimated for 84 regions (54 lands + 30 oceans) over the globe during the period of 1990-2011. We used (1) the CCSR/NIES/FRCGC AGCM-based Chemistry Transport Model (ACTM), (2) atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 74 sites from GLOBALVIEW-CO2 (2013) data product, (3) Seasonally varying a presubtracted fluxes for atmosphere-ocean exchange (Takahashi et al., 2009), (4) interannually varying a priori fossil fuel fluxes (incl. cement production) from CDIAC global totals and EDGAR4.2 spatial distributions, and (5) 3-hourly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are constructed from the annually balanced CASA and JRA-25 reanalysis meteorology (Y. Niwa, Pers. Comm., 2013). As a result of time-dependent inversions, mean total flux (excluding fossil fuel) for the period 1990-2011 is estimated to be -3.33 GtC/yr, where land (incl. biomass burning and land use change) and ocean absorb an average rate of -1.98 and -1.35 GtC/yr, respectively. The land uptake is mainly due to northern land (-1.57 GtC/yr), while the tropical and southern lands contribute -0.03 and -0.38 GtC/yr, respectively. It is also found that Boreal North America and Boreal Eurasia show negative trends in the estimated fluxes during the analysis period. The global ocean sink has no clear long-term trend in the period. Results with different inversion settings and for other regions will be discussed. Our analysis suggests that no known transport bias in ACTM forward simulation allow us to estimate CO2 fluxes at good accuracy at hemispheric and regional scale. Acknowledgements. This study is supported by the JSPS KANEHI Kiban-A and Global Environment Research Fund (2-1401) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  7. Removal of triazine-based pollutants from water by carbon nanotubes: Impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of organic pollutants by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment or removal of pollutants during water purification require deep understanding of the impacts of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is an integral part of environmental systems and plays a key role affecting the behavior of organic pollutants. In this study, the effects of solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) and the presence of DOM on the removal of atrazine and lamotrigine by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated. The solubility of atrazine slightly decreased (∼5%) in the presence of DOM, whereas that of lamotrigine was significantly enhanced (by up to ∼70%). Simultaneous introduction of DOM and pollutant resulted in suppression of removal of both atrazine and lamotrigine, which was attributed to DOM-pollutant competition or blockage of adsorption sites by DOM. However the decrease in removal of lamotrigine was also a result of its complexation with DOM. Pre-introduction of DOM significantly reduced pollutant adsorption by the SWCNTs, whereas introduction of DOM after the pollutant resulted in the release of adsorbed atrazine and lamotrigine from the SWCNTs. These data imply that DOM exhibits higher affinity for the adsorption sites than the triazine-based pollutants. In the absence of DOM atrazine was a more effective competitor than lamotrigine for adsorption sites in SWCNTs. However, competition between pollutants in the presence of DOM revealed lamotrigine as the better competitor. Our findings help unravel the complex DOM-organic pollutant-CNT system and will aid in CNT-implementation in water-purification technologies.

  8. An improved high-order scheme for DNS of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows based on stiff chemistry solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Yu, Jiangfei; Bai, Xue-Song

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved numerical scheme for numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport. The method is based on a semi-implicit operator-splitting scheme with a stiff solver for integration of the chemical kinetic rates, developed by Knio et al. [O.M. Knio, H.N. Najm, P.S. Wyckoff, A semi-implicit numerical scheme for reacting flow II. Stiff, operator-split formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 154 (2) (1999) 428-467]. Using the material derivative form of continuity equation, we enhance the scheme to allow for large density ratio in the flow field. The scheme is developed for direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flow by employing high-order discretization for the spatial terms. The accuracy of the scheme in space and time is verified by examining the grid/time-step dependency on one-dimensional benchmark cases: a freely propagating premixed flame in an open environment and in an enclosure related to spark-ignition engines. The scheme is then examined in simulations of a two-dimensional laminar flame/vortex-pair interaction. Furthermore, we apply the scheme to direct numerical simulation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) process in an enclosure studied previously in the literature. Satisfactory agreement is found in terms of the overall ignition behavior, local reaction zone structures and statistical quantities. Finally, the scheme is used to study the development of intrinsic flame instabilities in a lean H2/air premixed flame, where it is shown that the spatial and temporary accuracies of numerical schemes can have great impact on the prediction of the sensitive nonlinear evolution process of flame instability.

  9. Evaluation of connectedness between the University courses of Physics and Chemistry basing on the graph model of intersubject links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnitetskaya, Tatyana; Ivanova, Elena

    2016-08-01

    An application of the graph model of inter-subject links to University courses of Physics and Chemistry is presented in this article. A part of inter-subject space with directions of inter-subject links from Physics to Chemistry in the group of physical concepts has been shown. The graph model of inter-subject links includes quantitative indicators. Its numerical values are given in the article. The degree of connectedness between the data of Physics and Chemistry courses is discussed for the courses considered. The effect of the courses placement within a curriculum on the value of their connectedness is shown. The placement of courses within a curriculum can provide the study of the courses at the same time or consecutive study, when one course precedes another.

  10. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  11. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  12. Smart, Sustainable, and Ecofriendly Chemical Design of Fully Bio-Based Thermally Stable Thermosets Based on Benzoxazine Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froimowicz, Pablo; R Arza, Carlos; Han, Lu; Ishida, Hatsuo

    2016-08-09

    A smart synthetic chemical design incorporating furfurylamine, a natural renewable amine, into a partially bio-based coumarin-containing benzoxazine is presented. The versatility of the synthetic approach is shown to be flexible and robust enough to be successful under more ecofriendly reaction conditions by replacing toluene with ethanol as the reaction solvent and even under solventless conditions. The chemical structure of this coumarin-furfurylamine-containing benzoxazine is characterized by FTIR, (1) H NMR spectroscopy and two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (2D (1) H-(1) H NOESY). The thermal properties of the resin toward polymerization are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the thermal stability of the resulting polymers by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results reveal that the furanic moiety induces a co-operative activating effect, thus lowering the polymerization temperature and also contributes to a better thermal stability of the resulting polymers. These results, in addition to those of natural renewable benzoxazine resins reviewed herein, highlight the positive and beneficial implication of designing novel bio-based polybenzoxazine and possibly other thermosets with desirable and competitive properties.

  13. Strong Relationships in Acid-Base Chemistry – Modeling Protons Based on Predictable Concentrations of Strong Ions, Total Weak Acid Concentrations, and pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acid-base regulation is often reduced to pigeonholing clinical states into categories of disorders based on arterial blood sampling. An earlier ambition to quantitatively explain disorders by measuring production and elimination of acid has not become standard clinical practice. Seeking back to classical physical chemistry we propose that in any compartment, the requirement of electroneutrality leads to a strong relationship between charged moieties. This relationship is derived in the form of a general equation stating charge balance, making it possible to calculate [H+] and pH based on all other charged moieties. Therefore, to validate this construct we investigated a large number of blood samples from intensive care patients, where both data and pathology is plentiful, by comparing the measured pH to the modeled pH. We were able to predict both the mean pattern and the individual fluctuation in pH based on all other measured charges with a correlation of approximately 90% in individual patient series. However, there was a shift in pH so that fitted pH in general is overestimated (95% confidence interval -0.072–0.210) and we examine some explanations for this shift. Having confirmed the relationship between charged species we then examine some of the classical and recent literature concerning the importance of charge balance. We conclude that focusing on the charges which are predictable such as strong ions and total concentrations of weak acids leads to new insights with important implications for medicine and physiology. Importantly this construct should pave the way for quantitative acid-base models looking into the underlying mechanisms of disorders rather than just classifying them. PMID:27631369

  14. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  15. What Are They Thinking? Automated Analysis of Student Writing about Acid-Base Chemistry in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna B.; Moscarella, Rosa A.; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students' writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an…

  16. Online organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online office hours were found to be effective, and discussion sessions can be placed online as well. A model was created that explains 36.1% of student performance based on GPA, ACT Math score, grade in previous chemistry course, and attendance at various forms of discussion. Online exams have been created which test problem-solving skills and is instantly gradable. In these exams, students can submit answers until time runs out for different numbers of points. These facets were combined effectively to create an entirely online organic chemistry course which students prefer over the in-person alternative. Lastly, there is a vision for where online organic chemistry is going and what can be done to improve education for all.

  17. Research-Based Development of a Lesson Plan on Shower Gels and Musk Fragrances Following a Socio-Critical and Problem-Oriented Approach to Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ralf; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    A case is described of the development of a lesson plan for 10th grade (age range 15-16) chemistry classes on the chemistry of shower gels. The lesson plan follows a socio-critical and problem-oriented approach to chemistry teaching. This means that, aside from learning about the basic chemistry of the components making up modern shower gels in…

  18. Philosophy of Mathematical Chemistry: A Personal Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Basak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the nature of mathematical chemistry, discrete mathematical chemistry in particular. Molecules and macromolecules can be represented by model objects using methods of discrete mathematics, e.g., graphs and matrices. Mathematical formalisms are further applied on the model objects to distill various quantitative characteristics. The end product of such an exercise can be a better understanding of chemistry, the development of quantitative scales for qualitative notions of chemistry, or an illumination of the structural basis of chemical and biological properties. The aforementioned aspects of mathematical chemistry are discussed based on my own practitioner’s perspective.

  19. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  20. Astronomical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, William

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of polar polyatomic molecules in higher-density regions of the interstellar medium by means of their rotational emission detected by radioastronomy has changed our conception of the universe from essentially atomic to highly molecular. We discuss models for molecule formation, emphasizing the general lack of thermodynamic equilibrium. Detailed chemical kinetics is needed to understand molecule formation as well as destruction. Ion molecule reactions appear to be an important class for the generally low temperatures of the interstellar medium. The need for the intrinsically high-quality factor of rotational transitions to definitively pin down molecular emitters has been well established by radioastronomy. The observation of abundant molecular ions both positive and, as recently observed, negative provides benchmarks for chemical kinetic schemes. Of considerable importance in guiding our understanding of astronomical chemistry is the fact that the larger molecules (with more than five atoms) are all organic.

  1. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  2. Environmental chemistry. Seventh edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, S.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This book presents a basic understanding of environmental chemistry and its applications. In addition to providing updated materials in this field, the book emphasizes the major concepts essential to the practice of environmental chemistry. Topics of discussion include the following: toxicological chemistry; toxicological chemistry of chemical substances; chemical analysis of water and wastewater; chemical analysis of wastes and solids; air and gas analysis; chemical analysis of biological materials and xenobiotics; fundamentals of chemistry; and fundamentals of organic chemistry.

  3. Mesoscale effects in electrochemical conversion: coupling of chemistry to atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Pereira, Nathalie; Ilavsky, Jan; Amatucci, Glenn G; Chupas, Peter J; Chapman, Karena W

    2014-04-30

    The complex coupling of atomic, chemical, and electronic transformations across multiple length scales underlies the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, the coupling of chemistry with atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron conversion electrodes is resolved by combining pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis for a series of Fe fluorides, oxyfluorides, and oxides. The data show that the anion chemistry of the initial electrode influences the abundance of atomic defects in the Fe atomic lattice. This, in turn, is linked to different atom mobilities and propensity for particle growth. Competitive nanoparticle growth in mixed anion systems contributes to a distinct nanostructure, without the interconnected metallic nanoparticles formed for single anion systems.

  4. Conjugation chemistry through acetals toward a dextran-based delivery system for controlled release of siRNA

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Lina

    2012-09-26

    New conjugation chemistry for polysaccharides, exemplified by dextran, was developed to enable the attachment of therapeutic or other functional moieties to the polysaccharide through cleavable acetal linkages. The acid-lability of the acetal groups allows the release of therapeutics under acidic conditions, such as that of the endocytic compartments of cells, regenerating the original free polysaccharide in the end. The physical and chemical behavior of these acetal groups can be adjusted by modifying their stereoelectronic and steric properties, thereby providing materials with tunable degradation and release rates. We have applied this conjugation chemistry in the development of water-soluble siRNA carriers, namely acetal-linked amino-dextrans, with various amine structures attached through either slow- or fast-degrading acetal linker. The carriers with the best combination of amine moieties and structural composition of acetals showed high in vitro transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in the delivery of siRNA. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Polyethylene-Based Macromolecular Architectures by Combining Polyhomologation with Powerful Linking Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-09-05

    Polyhomologation is a powerful method to prepare polyethylene-based materials with controlled molecular weight, topology and composition. This dissertation focuses on the discovery of new synthetic routes to prepare polyethylene-based macromolecular architectures by combining polyhomologation with highly orthogonal and efficient linking reactions such as Diels Alder, copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), and Glaser. Taking advantage of functionalized polyhomologation initiators, as well as of the efficient coupling chemistry, we were able to synthesize various types of polymethylene (polyethylene)-based materials with complex architectures including linear co/terpolymers, graft terpolymers, and tadpole copolymers. In the first project, a facile synthetic route towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining the anthracene/maleimide Diels–Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: (a) synthesis of α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy-polymethylene by polyhomologation using tri (9 anthracene-methyl propyl ether) borane as the initiator, (b) synthesis of furan-protected-maleimide-terminated poly(ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol and (c) Diels–Alder reaction between anthracene and maleimide-terminated polymers. In the case of triblock terpolymers, the α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy polymethylene was used as a macroinitiator for the ring-opening polymerization of D, L-lactide to afford an anthracene-terminated PM-b-PLA copolymer, followed by the Diels–Alder reaction with furan-protected maleimide-terminated poly (ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol to give the triblock terpolymers. The synthetic methodology is general and potentially applicable to a range of polymers. The coupling reaction applied in the second project of this dissertation was copper-catalyzed “click” cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC). Novel well-defined polyethylene-based

  6. Computer vision-based recognition of liquid surfaces and phase boundaries in transparent vessels, with emphasis on chemistry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Eppel, Sagi; Kachman, Tal

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize the liquid surface and the liquid level in transparent containers is perhaps the most commonly used evaluation method when dealing with fluids. Such recognition is essential in determining the liquid volume, fill level, phase boundaries and phase separation in various fluid systems. The recognition of liquid surfaces is particularly important in solution chemistry, where it is essential to many laboratory techniques (e.g., extraction, distillation, titration). A gener...

  7. Comparison of Oxygen Gauche Effects in Poly(Oxyethylene) and Poly(ethylene terephtylene) Based on Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The so-called oxygen gauche effect in poly(oxyethylene) (POE) and its model molecules such as 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) and diglyme (CH3OC2H4OC2H4OCH3) is manifested in the preference for gauche C-C bond conformations over trans. This has also been observed for poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Our previous quantum chemistry calculations demonstrated that the large C-C gauche population in DME is due, in part, to a low-lying tg +/- g+ conformer that exhibits a substantial 1,5 CH ... O attraction. New calculations will be described that demonstrate the accuracy of the original quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, an extension of this work to model molecules for PET will be presented. It is seen that the C-C gauche preference is much stronger in 1,2 diacetoxyethane than in DME. In addition, there exist low-lying tg +/- g+/- and g+/-g+/-g+/- conformers that exhibit 1,5 CH ... O attractions involving the carbonyl oxygens. It is expected that the -O-C-C-O- torsional properties will be quite different in these two polymers. The quantum chemistry results are used to parameterize rotational isomeric states models (RIS) and force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of these polymers.

  8. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  9. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  10. Understanding of catalysis on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through exploration of surface structure and chemistry during catalysis using in-situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Franklin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-09-14

    Two main categories of heterogeneous catalysts are metal and metal oxide which catalyze 80% chemical reactions at solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces. Metal oxide catalysts are much more complicated than metal catalysts. The reason is that the cations of the metal atoms could exhibit a few different oxidation states on surface of the same catalyst particle such as Co3O4 or change of their oxidation states under different reactive environments. For a metal catalyst, there is only one oxidation state typically. In addition, surface of a metal oxide can be terminated with multiple surface functionalities including O atoms with different binding configurations and OH group. For metal, only metal atoms are exposed typically. Obviously, the complication of surface chemistry and structure of a metal oxide makes studies of surface of an oxide catalyst very challenging. Due to the complication of surface of a meal oxide, the electronic and geometric structures of surface of a metal oxide and the exposed species have received enormous attention since oxide catalysts catalyze at least 1/3 chemical reactions in chemical and energy industries. Understanding of catalytic reactions on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts is fundamentally intriguing and of great practical interest in energy- and environment-related catalysis. Exploration of surface chemistry of oxide-based catalysts at molecular level during catalysis has remained challenging though it is critical in deeply understanding catalysis on oxide-based catalysts and developing oxide-based catalysts with high activity and selectivity. Thus, the overall objective of this project is to explore surface chemistry and structure of early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through in-situ characterization of surface of catalysts, measurements of catalytic performances, and then build an intrinsic correlation of surface chemistry and structure with their catalytic performances in a few

  11. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  12. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  13. Cofiring of difficult fuels: The effect of Ca-based sorbents on the gas chemistry in fluidised bed combustion; Kalsiumpohjaisten lisaeaineiden vaikutus leijukerrospolton kaasukemiaan vaikeiden polttoaineiden sekapoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeijaelae, M.; Partanen, J.; Fabritius, M.; Elo, T.; Virta, A.K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish the effects of Ca-based sorbents on sulphur, halogen and alkaline chemistry in fluidised bed combustion of difficult fuels, and to find out any restrictions on the use of these sorbents. The aim is to acquire sufficient knowledge to ensure the operational reliability of power plants and to minimise the emissions and costs of flue gas cleaning. The results enable the owner to anticipate necessary changes associated with slagging, fouling and emission control in the existing power plants, when there are plans to increase the range of fuels used. (orig.)

  14. Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Protein-Templated Click Chemistry: Fragment Linking and Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Milon; Unver, M Yagiz; Pal, Asish; Bakker, Matthijs; Berrier, Stephan P; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-10-10

    There is an urgent need for the development of efficient methodologies that accelerate drug discovery. We demonstrate that the strategic combination of fragment linking/optimization and protein-templated click chemistry is an efficient and powerful method that accelerates the hit-identification process for the aspartic protease endothiapepsin. The best binder, which inhibits endothiapepsin with an IC50 value of 43 μm, represents the first example of triazole-based inhibitors of endothiapepsin. Our strategy could find application on a whole range of drug targets.

  15. Unification of anion relay chemistry with the Takeda and Hiyama cross-coupling reactions: identification of an effective silicon-based transfer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amos B; Hoye, Adam T; Martinez-Solorio, Dionicio; Kim, Won-Suk; Tong, Rongbiao

    2012-03-14

    The unification of Anion Relay Chemistry (ARC) with the Takeda and Hiyama palladium-mediated cross-coupling processes to provide aryl-aryl, alkenyl-aryl, and alkenyl-alkenyl coupled products by exploiting a common silicon-based transfer agent has been achieved. These results provide a practical solution for intermolecular cross-coupling of organolithium reagents without the problematic lithium-halogen exchange and/or undesired homocoupling that has kept organolithium cross-couplings from achieving the same level of utility asother palladium-mediated methods (e.g., Suzuki organoboron, Negishi organozinc, Stille organotin, Kumada organomagnesium, etc.).

  16. Click chemistry approach: regioselective one-pot synthesis of some new 8-trifluoromethylquinoline based 1,2,3-triazoles as potent antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garudachari, B; Isloor, Arun M; Satyanarayana, M N; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Hegde, Gurumurthy

    2014-03-03

    Three series of 8-trifluoromethylquinoline based 1,2,3-triazoles derivatives (5a-c, 6a-d and 7a-c) were synthesized by multi-step reactions by click chemistry approach. Synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral studies and X-ray analysis. The final compounds were screened for their in-vitro antimicrobial activity by well plate method (zone of inhibition). Compounds 5c, 6b, 8b, 11 and 12 were found to be active against tested microbial strains. The results are summarized in Tables 5 and 6.

  17. International Year of Chemistry 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Zi-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Science China Chemistry would like to dedicate this special issue to the International Year of Chemistry (IYC) 2011,as part of the celebrations of IYC in China.Scientists from Australia,Brazil,Britain,Canada,Chile,China,France,Germany,India,Israel,Japan,Nepal,Pakistan,Saudi Arabia,Singapore,South Africa,and the USA have contributed 28 papers marking the event.Our authors from across the globe include students,members (a corresponding member) and fellows of national academies of sciences in several countries (Australia,Chile,China,France,India,Israel,Pakistan,and the USA),fellows of the British and Canadian Royal Societies,and two Nobel Laureates (Robert Grubbs and Ada Yonath).Here they present their work contributing to the IYC 2011 theme "Chemistry-our life,our future" [1].These papers cover fundamental chemistry,the chemical bases of life processes,and their potential applications.

  18. Zinc complexes developed as metallopharmaceutics for treating diabetes mellitus based on the bio-medicinal inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Biological trace metals such as iron, zinc, copper, and manganese are essential to life and health of humans, and the success of platinum drugs in the cancer chemotherapy has rapidly grown interest in developing inorganic pharmaceutical agents in medicinal chemistry, that is, medicinal inorganic chemistry, using essential elements and other biological trace metals. Transition metal complexes with unique chemical structures may be useful alternatives to the drugs available to address some of the incurable diseases. In this review, we emphasize that metal complexes are an expanding of interest in the research field of treatment of diabetes mellitus. Especially, orally active anti-diabetic and anti-metabolic syndrome zinc complexes have been developed and progressed since the discovery in 2001, where several highly potent anti-diabetic zinc complexes with different coordination structures have quite recently been disclosed, using experimental diabetic animals. In all of the complexes discussed, zinc is found to be biologically active and function by interacting with some target proteins related with diabetes mellitus. The design and screening of zinc complexes with higher activity is not efficient without consideration of the translational research. For the development of a clinically useful metallopharmaceutics, the research of zinc complexes on the long-term toxicity including side effects, clear-cut evidence of target molecule for the in vivo pharmacological action, and good pharmacokinetic property are essential in the current and future studies.

  19. College Chemistry: how a textbook can reveal the values embedded in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaude-Vincent, Bernadette

    2007-12-01

    This paper explores the norms, values and ethical attitudes that Linus Pauling wanted to convey to his students in his famous textbook College Chemistry. In this classic textbook, Pauling aimed to introduce beginners into the world of chemistry by presenting chemistry as a systematic science based on a collection of empirical data and a recent theoretical framework. In doing so, he expressed his epistemic and didactic choices clearly. College Chemistry therefore offers an ideal opportunity to examine some of the norms at the core of chemistry's 'moral economy'.

  20. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  1. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  2. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  3. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  4. Approaching isomerism in organic and inorganic compounds: activity based on the use of problem situations during initial chemistry teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    osé Euzébio Simões Neto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought investigate: i the understanding of isomerism by future chemistry teachers during initial training; and ii the construction of isomer concepts after an approach centered on problem situations (SP’s. Two problem situations related to isomerism (historical context and medicinal applications were elaborated. A textual learning material developed for this purpose and concrete molecular models were used of system resources in the problem situation resolution process. Data were colleted using a questionnaire, field observation and semi-structured interview, and analyzed according to the ideas presented by Meirieu (1998. The two SP’s had obstacles, transposable to only a few of the nine groups that responded. Inadequate use of the isomer concept was observed in many of the responses considered scarcely satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

  5. Study on Medical Chemistry Teaching Mode Based on Guidance Case%基于导学案的医用化学教学模式初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Medical chemistry teaching mode based on guidance case prominents the subject position of the student in the teaching process, improves the students' learning enthusiasm, autonomous learning ability and thinking ability, improves the teaching quality of medical chemistry. The author analyzes the effect of the teaching mode, and lists the program to how to perfect the teaching mode.%基于导学案的医用化学教学模式突出了教学过程中学员的主体地位,有效提高了学员的学习积极性、自主学习能力和思考能力,促进了医用化学教学质量的整体提升。笔者客观分析了本教学模式的实践效果,并对如何完善本教学模式进行了思考.

  6. A Study of Experimental Chemistry Scoring System Based on Improved FAHP%基于改进的FAHP的实验化学测评体系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂丽华; 林毅; 冯辉荣; 游秀花; 蔡向阳

    2014-01-01

    The scoring system's scientificity ,comprehensiveness ,fairness and operability will have a significant influence on students'learning interest ,cultivation of innovative skills ,,development of operational ability , and enthusiasm ,etc .This article has improved the existing scoring system of experimental chemistry based on improved fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) and uses three -demarcation method to ensure the influence that assessment criteria has on the assessment objectives ,w hich aims to build an experimental chemistry scoring system that is more practical and beneficial to the training of students .%指出了评分体系制定的科学性、全面性、公平性与可操作性,将会对学生的学习兴趣、创新能力的培养、动手能力的提高、积极性的调动等方面产生重要影响。利用改进的模糊层次分析法(FAHP),对已有的实验化学测评体系进行了改进,运用三标度法,确定了各评价指标对于评价目标的影响程度,制定出了较符合实际情况、有利于学生培养的实验化学测评体系。

  7. Chemistry to music: Discovering how Music-based Teaching affects academic achievement and student motivation in an 8th grade science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, William Gavin Lodge, Jr.

    Teachers should have access to new and innovative tools in order to engage and motivate their students in the classroom. This is especially important as many students view school as an antiquated and dull environment - which they must seemingly suffer through to advance. School need not be a dreaded environment. The use of music as a tool for learning can be employed by any teacher to create an engaging and exciting atmosphere where students actively participate and learn to value their classroom experience. Through this study, a product and process was developed that is now available for any 8th grade science teacher interested in using music to enhance their content. In this study 8th grade students (n=41) in a public school classroom actively interacted with modern songs created to enhance the teaching of chemistry. Data were collected and analyzed in order to determine the effects that the music treatment had on student achievement and motivation, compared to a control group (n=35). Current literature provides a foundation for the benefits for music listening and training, but academic research in the area of using music as a tool for teaching content was noticeably absent. This study identifies a new area of research called "Music-based Teaching" which results in increases in motivation for 8th grade students learning chemistry. The unintended results of the study are additionally significant as the teacher conducting the treatment experienced newfound enthusiasm, passion, and excitement for her profession.

  8. Striking a Balance: Experiment and Concept in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an inorganic chemistry course based on the premise that a balanced understanding of inorganic chemistry requires knowledge of the experimental, theoretical, and technological aspects of the subject. A detailed description of lectures and laboratories is included. (KR)

  9. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  10. A Global Scale Scenario for Prebiotic Chemistry: Silica-Based Self-Assembled Mineral Structures and Formamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The pathway from simple abiotically made organic compounds to the molecular bricks of life, as we know it, is unknown. The most efficient geological abiotic route to organic compounds results from the aqueous dissolution of olivine, a reaction known as serpentinization (Sleep, N.H., et al. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 12818–12822). In addition to molecular hydrogen and a reducing environment, serpentinization reactions lead to high-pH alkaline brines that can become easily enriched in silica. Under these chemical conditions, the formation of self-assembled nanocrystalline mineral composites, namely silica/carbonate biomorphs and metal silicate hydrate (MSH) tubular membranes (silica gardens), is unavoidable (Kellermeier, M., et al. In Methods in Enzymology, Research Methods in Biomineralization Science (De Yoreo, J., Ed.) Vol. 532, pp 225–256, Academic Press, Burlington, MA). The osmotically driven membranous structures have remarkable catalytic properties that could be operating in the reducing organic-rich chemical pot in which they form. Among one-carbon compounds, formamide (NH2CHO) has been shown to trigger the formation of complex prebiotic molecules under mineral-driven catalytic conditions (Saladino, R., et al. (2001) Biorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 9, 1249–1253), proton irradiation (Saladino, R., et al. (2015) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, 2746–2755), and laser-induced dielectric breakdown (Ferus, M., et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 112, 657–662). Here, we show that MSH membranes are catalysts for the condensation of NH2CHO, yielding prebiotically relevant compounds, including carboxylic acids, amino acids, and nucleobases. Membranes formed by the reaction of alkaline (pH 12) sodium silicate solutions with MgSO4 and Fe2(SO4)3·9H2O show the highest efficiency, while reactions with CuCl2·2H2O, ZnCl2, FeCl2·4H2O, and MnCl2·4H2O showed lower reactivities. The collections of compounds forming inside and outside the tubular

  11. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  12. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  13. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  14. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  15. Chemistry for Potters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  16. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chinese Journal of Chemistry is an international journal published in English by the Chinese Chemical Society with its editorial office hosted by Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Includes methods for determining melting and boiling points, illustrating the Finkelstein reaction, choosing acid-base indicators, growing perfect NaC1 cubes and "whiskers," bromination of alkenes, using vanadium in the laboratory, preparing phenylamine-copper (II) sulfate (VI) complex, simulating first-order chemical kinetics on a programmable…

  18. The Chemistry of Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Karin I.

    2017-01-01

    Exo-planets are common, and they span a large range of compositions. The origins of the observed diversity of planetary compositions is largely unconstrained, but must be linked to the planet formation physics and chemistry. Among planets that are Earth-like, a second question is how often such planets form hospitable to life. A fraction of exo-planets are observed to be ‘physically habitable’, i.e. of the right temperature and bulk composition to sustain a water-based prebiotic chemistry, but this does not automatically imply that they are rich in the building blocks of life, in organic molecules of different sizes and kinds, i.e. that they are chemically habitable. In this talk I will argue that characterizing the chemistry of protoplanetary disks, the formation sites of planets, is key to address both the origins of planetary bulk compositions and the likelihood of finding organic matter on planets. The most direct path to constrain the chemistry in disks is to directly observe it. In the age of ALMA it is for the first time possible to image the chemistry of planet formation, to determine locations of disk snowlines, and to map the distributions of different organic molecules. Recent ALMA highlights include constraints on CO snowline locations, the discovery of spectacular chemical ring systems, and first detections of more complex organic molecules. Observations can only provide chemical snapshots, however, and even ALMA is blind to the majority of the chemistry that shapes planet formation. To interpret observations and address the full chemical complexity in disks requires models, both toy models and astrochemical simulations. These models in turn must be informed by laboratory experiments, some of which will be shown in this talk. It is thus only when we combine observational, theoretical and experimental constraints that we can hope to characterize the chemistry of disks, and further, the chemical compositions of nascent planets.

  19. Identification of target proteins of mangiferin in mice with acute lung injury using functionalized magnetic microspheres based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Nie, Yan; Li, Yunjuan; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wei; Deng, Jiagang; Wang, Peng George; Bai, Gang

    2015-11-18

    Prevention of the occurrence and development of inflammation is a vital therapeutic strategy for treating acute lung injury (ALI). Increasing evidence has shown that a wealth of ingredients from natural foods and plants have potential anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone that is primarily obtained from the peels and kernels of mango fruits and the bark of the Mangifera indica L. tree, alleviated the inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. Mangiferin-modified magnetic microspheres (MMs) were developed on the basis of click chemistry to capture the target proteins of mangiferin. Mass spectrometry and molecular docking identified 70 kDa heat-shock protein 5 (Hspa5) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (Ywhae) as mangiferin-binding proteins. Furthermore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that mangiferin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by binding Hspa5 and Ywhae to suppress downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thoroughly revealing the mechanism and function of mangiferin will contribute to the development and utilization of agricultural resources from M. indica L.

  20. Novel carbamoyl type quinine and quinidine based chiral anion exchangers implementing alkyne-azide cycloaddition immobilization chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettegger, Hubert; Kohout, Michal; Mimini, Vebi; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-11

    The synthesis and chromatographic evaluation of a series of new Cinchona derived chiral weak anion exchangers is presented. Huisgen Cu(I) mediated alkyne-azide cycloaddition, so-called click chemistry, was used as an immobilization strategy. In this way it was possible to immobilize about 90% of offered selector via 1,2,3-triazole linker, which displays a more efficient way of binding the selector to modified silica compared to common radical mediated thiol-ene addition. Problems associated with potential radical scavenging properties of chiral selectors thereby could be circumvented. The evaluation of the synthesized chiral stationary phases regarding chromatographic behavior was carried out using polar organic mode mobile phase composition and a set of representative chiral organic acids. Different loading densities revealed an optimum selector density of about 310μmol/g chiral stationary phase with respect to resolution and selectivity. A decrease of performance was observed for higher loading, indicating mutual spatial influence of selector units leading to sterical hindrance. In addition, we observed that the effect of free azide groups on retention is negligible and the overall chromatographic behavior is comparable to other Cinchona derived chiral stationary phases.

  1. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of the first (99m)Tc(I)-specific semi-rigid tridentate ligand based on a click chemistry strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizani, Sihem; Malek Saied, Nadia; Picard, Claude; Benoist, Eric; Saidi, Mouldi

    2014-03-01

    A novel bifunctional chelating agent based on a click chemistry strategy has been synthesized and characterized on the basis of spectroscopic techniques. The metal chelating part of this new class of tridentate N2O ligand combined a triazole unit and an aromatic ring. This latter semi-rigid framework induced a pre-organization of the chelating cavity, improving the stability of the corresponding metallic complexes (M = (99m) Tc, Re). Thus, the (99m) Tc(CO)3 complex, obtained with good yield and excellent radiochemical purity (>90%), exhibited a high in vitro serum stability. Tissue biodistribution in normal mice showed a rapid clearance, no long-term retention in organs and no in vivo reoxidation of technetium-99m, making this compound a promising (99m)Tc-chelating system.

  2. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  3. Organic chemistry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-15

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  4. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  5. The effect of learning styles and attitude on preservice elementary teachers' conceptual understanding of chemistry and the nature of matter in a simulation-based learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaroudi, Mo H.

    This causal-comparative descriptive study investigated the achievement of pre-service elementary teachers taking an introductory physical science course that integrates inquiry-based instruction with computer simulations. The study was intended to explore if pre-service elementary teachers with different attitudes towards science as well as students with different learning styles would benefit differentially. Four research questions including four hypotheses were developed. The first major question consist of four specific hypothesis that addressed preservice elementary teachers' learning styles (Active/Reflective, Sensing/Intuitive, Visual/Verbal, and Sequential/Global) and their conceptual understanding of chemistry and the particulate nature of matter in a science class which use hands-on learning integrated with computer based simulated activities. The second major question pertained to the relationship between preservice teachers learning science and chemistry and their attitude towards science. The third major question related to preservice elementary teachers science and chemistry achievement gain scores and attitude average affected by their learning styles. Finally, the fourth question pertained to the dissipation or the minimization of preservice elementary teachers' science and chemistry misconceptions over the course of study. Three instruments were given to preservice elementary teachers in three different classes: pretest/posttest for the science conceptual understanding examination, and pretest-only for the science attitude and learning styles instruments. Total usable science attitude surveys returned was 67 out of 70. The overall average mean was 3.13 (SD = .51) on a five point scale. Total return of science achievement instrument was 65, with a total mean test score (quantitative and qualitative together) of 6.38 (SD = 3.05) on the pretest, with a post test mean of 9.06 (SD = 4.19). Results revealed no statistically significant achievement gain

  6. Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Diane

    This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

  7. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  8. Supramolecular chemistry of pyrazolyl complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the progress in the supramolecular chemistry of the pyrazolyl-based metal complexes. The text is written under the structural point of view, emphasizing the role of the covalent and non-covalent interactions in the rational construction of super and supramolecules.

  9. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  10. Organometallic frustrated Lewis pair chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erker, Gerhard

    2011-08-07

    Frustrated Lewis pairs are playing an increasingly important role in organometallic chemistry. Examples are presented and discussed where organometallic systems themselves serve as the Lewis base or Lewis acid components in frustrated Lewis pair chemistry, mostly through their attached functional groups. Activation of dihydrogen takes place easily in many of these systems. This may lead to the generation of novel catalyst systems but also in many cases to the occurrence of specific reactions at the periphery of the organometallic frameworks. Increasingly, FLP reactions are used to carry out functional group conversions in organometallic systems under mild reaction conditions. The limits of typical FLP reactivity are explored with selected organometallic examples, a discussion that points toward new developments, such as the discovery of facile new 1,1-carboboration reactions. Learning more and more about the broad spectrum of frustrated Lewis pair chemistry helps us to find novel reactions and applications.

  11. Chemistry and biology of oligovalent β-(1→2)-linked oligomannosides: new insights into carbohydrate-based adjuvants in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Chinmoy; Mäkinen, Kaarina; Savolainen, Johannes; Leino, Reko

    2013-06-10

    A series of oligovalent carbohydrate assemblies (ranging from mono- to pentavalent), derived from three structurally different β-linked or β-(1→2)-linked mannosides, has been chemically synthesized, and the respective compounds have been biologically evaluated in order to investigate their immunostimulatory properties. The Crich methodology for β-mannosylation was successfully utilized to introduce the β-linkages, and a click chemistry protocol was utilized to generate the oligovalent derivatives. A convenient protecting group strategy involving the simultaneous use of both p-methoxybenzyl and benzylidene groups was employed, which allowed a simple and cost-effective global deprotection step. The immunomodulatory properties of the synthesized multivalent mannosides were evaluated by assessing cytokine production in human white blood cell cultures. The Th2-type cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-5 (IL-4 and IL-5), the Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ), the Treg cytokine IL-10, and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were included in the screening. A single trivalent acetylated mannobiose derivative was identified as a potent inducer of Treg and Th1 immune response, resulting in strong IL-10 and moderate IFN-γ productions dose-dependently, while inducing no Th2 cytokine response. The immunomodulatory properties of this trivalent mannoside were further studied in vitro in allergen (Bet v)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of birch pollen allergic subjects. Stimulation with birch pollen induced strong IL-4 and IL-5 responses, which could be suppressed by the trivalent acetylated mannobiose derivative. The IL-10 response was also suppressed, whereas the production of IFN-γ was strongly enhanced. The results suggest that the identified lead compound has suppressive effects on the Th2-type allergic inflammatory response and shows potential as a possible lead adjuvant for the specific immunotherapy of

  12. 1,2,3-Triazolyl ester of Ketorolac: A "Click Chemistry"-based highly potent PAK1-blocking cancer-killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Takahashi, Hideaki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Shahinozzaman, M D; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2017-01-27

    An old anti-inflammatory/analgesic drug called Toradol is a racemic form of Ketorolac (50% R-form and 50% S-form) that blocks the oncogenic RAC-PAK1-COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) signaling, through the direct inhibition of RAC by the R-form and of COX-2 by the S-form, eventually down-regulating the production of prostaglandins. However, due to its COOH moiety which is clearly repulsive to negatively-charged phospholipid-based plasma membrane, its cell-permeability is rather poor (the IC50 against the growth of human cancer cells such as A549 is around 13 μM). In an attempt to boost its anti-cancer activity, hopefully by increasing its cell-permeability through abolishing the negative charge, yet keeping its water-solubility, here we synthesized a 1,2,3-triazolyl ester of Toradol through "Click Chemistry". The resultant water-soluble "azo" derivative called "15K" was found to be over 500 times more potent than Toradol with the IC50 around 24 nM against the PAK1-dependent growth of A549 cancer cells, inactivating PAK1 in cell culture with the apparent IC50 around 65 nM, and inhibiting COX-2 in vitro with the IC50 around 6 nM. Furthermore, the Click Chemistry boosts the anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac by 5000 times against the PAK1-independent growth of B16F10 melanoma cells. Using a multi-drug-resistant (MDR) cancer cell line (EMT6), we found that the esterization of Ketorolac boosts its cell-permeability by at least 10 folds. Thus, the Click Chemistry dramatically boosts the anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac, at least in three ways: increasing its cell-permeability, the anti-PAK1 activity of R-form and anti-COX-2 activity of S-form. The resultant "15K" is so far among the most potent PAK1-blockers, and therefore would be potentially useful for the therapy of many different PAK1-dependent diseases/disorders such as cancers.

  13. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  14. Pollution prevention through chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, J.J.; Anastas, P.T.; Hassur, S.M.; Tobin, P.S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics

    1995-09-01

    Prosperity without pollution, and the consideration of how to achieve this economic and environmental imperative, has become the fundamental environmental theme of the 1990s. The new strategy--pollution prevention--will serve s the keystone of federal, state, and local environmental policy. The challenge is to switch from two decades of environmental policy based on pollution controls and government-mandated regulations to a future environmental policy based on pollution prevention, source reduction, recycling, and waste minimization. To make this change will require a new social compact among environmental, industrial, and regulatory interests. This chapter focuses on the role of chemistry and the contributions of synthetic and process analytical chemists. It also describes the implementation of pollution prevention concepts into the premanufacturing notice review process mandated by Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and discusses the implications of pollution prevention for chemical safety. 55 refs.

  15. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  16. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina

    2014-08-01

    Investigating and assessing the chemical composition of precipitation and atmospheric deposition is essential to understanding how atmospheric pollutants contribute to contemporary environmental concerns including ecosystem acidification and eutrophication, loss of biodiversity, air pollution and global climate change. Evidence of the link between atmospheric deposition and these environmental issues is well established. The state of scientific understanding of this link is that present levels of atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen adversely affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, putting forest sustainability and aquatic biodiversity at risk. Nitrogen and phosphorus loadings are linked to impacts on the diversity of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation through biological cycling, and atmospheric deposition plays a major role in the emission-transport-conversion-loss cycle of chemicals in the atmosphere as well as the formation of particulate matter and ozone in the troposphere. Evidence also shows that atmospheric constituents are changing the earth's climate through direct and indirect atmospheric processes. This Special Issue, comprising a single article titled "A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus", presents a recent comprehensive review of precipitation chemistry and atmospheric deposition at global and regional scales. The information in the Special Issue, including all supporting data sets and maps, is anticipated to be of great value not only to the atmospheric deposition community but also to other science communities including those that study ecosystem impacts, human health effects, nutrient processing, climate change, global and hemispheric modeling and biogeochemical cycling. Understanding and quantifying pollutant loss from the atmosphere is, and will remain, an important component of each of these scientific fields as they

  17. Gas-Phase Covalent And Non-Covalent Ion/ion Chemistry Of Biological Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Stutzman, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion chemistry involves the interaction of oppositely charged ions inside of the mass spectrometer. During this gas-phase chemistry, particle transfer (i.e., proton and electron) or synthesis can occur at rapid reaction rates. Particle transfer represents a mature area of ion/ion chemistry, while selective covalent modification represents a fairly new area of gas-phase chemistry. Gas-phase covalent chemistry is based on traditional solution phase organic chemistry. The work de...

  18. Elementary and brief introduction of hadronic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2013-10-01

    The discipline, today known as Quantum Chemistry for atomic and subatomic level interactions has no doubt made a significant historical contributions to the society. Despite of its significant achievements, quantum chemistry is also known for its widespread denial of insufficiencies it inherits. An Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures without any quantitative scientific contents. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper-mathematics [1-4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli's mathematics[3-5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6-8]. In the present discussion, we have briefly reviewed the conceptual foundations of Hadronic Chemistry that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Representations of Nature of Science in Nordic Upper Secondary School Textbooks Using Framework of Analysis Based on Philosophy of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Veli-Matti; Aksela, Maija; Lavonen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how the different aspects of nature of science (NOS) were represented in Finnish and Swedish upper secondary school chemistry textbooks. The dimensions of NOS were analyzed from five popular chemistry textbook series. The study provides a quantitative method for analysis of representations of NOS in chemistry…

  20. Improving Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure through Broad-Based Use of Computer Models in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Several articles suggest how to incorporate computer models into the organic chemistry laboratory, but relatively few papers discuss how to incorporate these models broadly into the organic chemistry lecture. Previous research has suggested that "manipulating" physical or computer models enhances student understanding; this study…

  1. Prediction of logP for Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes: Comparison of statistical and quantum-chemistry based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetko, Igor V; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Talmaciu, Mona; Platts, James A; Ravera, Mauro; Gabano, Elisabetta

    2016-03-01

    The octanol/water partition coefficient, logP, is one of the most important physico-chemical parameters for the development of new metal-based anticancer drugs with improved pharmacokinetic properties. This study addresses an issue with the absence of publicly available models to predict logP of Pt(IV) complexes. Following data collection and subsequent development of models based on 187 complexes from literature, we validate new and previously published models on a new set of 11 Pt(II) and 35 Pt(IV) complexes, which were kept blind during the model development step. The error of the consensus model, 0.65 for Pt(IV) and 0.37 for Pt(II) complexes, indicates its good accuracy of predictions. The lower accuracy for Pt(IV) complexes was attributed to experimental difficulties with logP measurements for some poorly-soluble compounds. This model was developed using general-purpose descriptors such as extended functional groups, molecular fragments and E-state indices. Surprisingly, models based on quantum-chemistry calculations provided lower prediction accuracy. We also found that all the developed models strongly overestimate logP values for the three complexes measured in the presence of DMSO. Considering that DMSO is frequently used as a solvent to store chemicals, its effect should not be overlooked when logP measurements by means of the shake flask method are performed. The final models are freely available at http://ochem.eu/article/76903.

  2. Teacher Conceptions and Approaches Associated with an Immersive Instructional Implementation of Computer-Based Models and Assessment in a Secondary Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Noemi; Liu, Xiufeng; Gregorius, Roberto Ma.; Smith, Erica; Park, Mihwa

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports on a case study of an immersive and integrated multi-instructional approach (namely computer-based model introduction and connection with content; facilitation of individual student exploration guided by exploratory worksheet; use of associated differentiated labs and use of model-based assessments) in the implementation of coupled computer-based models and assessment in a high-school chemistry classroom. Data collection included in-depth teacher interviews, classroom observations, student interviews and researcher notes. Teacher conceptions highlighted the role of models as tools; the benefits of abstract portrayal via visualizations; appropriate enactment of model implementation; concerns with student learning and issues with time. The case study revealed numerous challenges reconciling macro, submicro and symbolic phenomena with the NetLogo model. Nonetheless, the effort exhibited by the teacher provided a platform to support the evolution of practice over time. Students' reactions reflected a continuum of confusion and benefits which were directly related to their background knowledge and experiences with instructional modes. The findings have implications for the role of teacher knowledge of models, the modeling process and pedagogical content knowledge; the continuum of student knowledge as novice users and the role of visual literacy in model decoding, comprehension and translation.

  3. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provid...

  4. Exploring a Framework for Professional Development in Curriculum Innovation: Empowering Teachers for Designing Context-Based Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Machiel J.; De Jong, Onno; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Pilot, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Involving teachers in early stages of context-based curriculum innovations requires a professional development programme that actively engages teachers in the design of new context-based units. This study considers the implementation of a teacher professional development framework aiming to investigate processes of professional development. The…

  5. Practice of Case-Based Teaching in Analytical Chemistry%案例教学法在分析化学理论教学中的实践研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何婧琳; 曹忠; 李丹; 张玲; 谭淑珍; 陈平; 李伟

    2016-01-01

    研究了案例教学法在分析化学理论教学中的实践,内容包括案例选材、设计、实施和案例模型评估。案例教学法模式在促进学生扎实学习理论知识的同时,改进学生对于分析化学课程的认知,提高学生的专业技能。案例教学法在分析化学理论教学中的实践可以在教师教学和学生学习之间建立良好的互动关系,并最终改善分析化学课程教学。%This paper focuses on an investigation of case-based teaching in the analytical chemistry course. The research includes an overview of the selection, design, implementation, and evaluation of the case model. The case-based teaching model makes students active and improves their views and skil s in analytical chemistry course. Research of case-based teaching in analytical chemistry course wil build an excel ent rapport between teachers and students, and, ultimately, lead to improvements in analytical chemistry course.

  6. Analog series-based scaffolds: computational design and exploration of a new type of molecular scaffolds for medicinal chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Computational design of and systematic search for a new type of molecular scaffolds termed analog series-based scaffolds. Materials & methods: From currently available bioactive compounds, analog series were systematically extracted, key compounds identified and new scaffolds isolated from them. Results: Using our computational approach, more than 12,000 scaffolds were extracted from bioactive compounds. Conclusion: A new scaffold definition is introduced and a computational methodology developed to systematically identify such scaffolds, yielding a large freely available scaffold knowledge base.

  7. Laboratory and project based learning in the compulsory course Biological Chemistry enhancing collaboration and technical communication between groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Bysted, Anette; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe how changes of laboratory training and project based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and presentation.......The aim of this paper was to describe how changes of laboratory training and project based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and presentation....

  8. Advances in analytical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  9. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and mass spectrometry-based analysis of palmitoylation sites of in vitro palmitoylated rat brain tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Hou, Junjie; Xie, Zhensheng; Deng, Jianwei; Wang, Xiaoming; Chen, Danfang; Yang, Fuquan; Gong, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that the palmitoyl group of α-tubulin mediates the hydrophobic interaction between microtubules and intracellular membranes and that palmitoylated tubulin plays a role in signal transduction. There are 20 cysteine residues per α/β tubulin heterodimer. C376 of α-tubulin was reported to be predominantly palmitoylated and C20, C213 and C305 of α-tubulin were palmitoylated at lower levels. The previous method used for the analysis of the palmitoylation sites on α-tubulin was based on ³H-labeling, enzymolysis, purification and sequencing. This approach, although efficient, is laborious. Mass spectrometry (MS), especially tandem MS, has been shown to be a successful method for identification of various post-translational modifications of proteins. We report here a convenient MS-based method to comprehensively analyze the palmitoylation sites of the α/β tubulin heterodimer. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and streptavidin agarose affinity purification were applied to enrich palmitoylated peptides from tubulin. After nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, database searching and manual analysis of the spectra revealed that 11 cysteine residues of the α/β tubulin heterodimer were palmitoylated.

  10. HCOOH distributions from IASI for 2008-2014: comparison with ground-based FTIR measurements and a global chemistry-transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Matthieu; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Müller, Jean-François; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2016-07-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. It is a major contributor to rain acidity in remote areas. There are, however, large uncertainties on the sources and sinks of HCOOH and therefore HCOOH is misrepresented by global chemistry-transport models. This work presents global distributions from 2008 to 2014 as derived from the measurements of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), based on conversion factors between brightness temperature differences and representative retrieved total columns over seven regions: Northern Africa, southern Africa, Amazonia, Atlantic, Australia, Pacific, and Russia. The dependence of the measured HCOOH signal on the thermal contrast is taken into account in the conversion method. This conversion presents errors lower than 20 % for total columns ranging between 0.5 and 1 × 1016 molec cm-2 but reaches higher values, up to 78 %, for columns that are lower than 0.3 × 1016 molec cm-2. Signatures from biomass burning events are highlighted, such as in the Southern Hemisphere and in Russia, as well as biogenic emission sources, e.g., over the eastern USA. A comparison between 2008 and 2014 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements obtained at four locations (Maido and Saint-Denis at La Réunion, Jungfraujoch, and Wollongong) is shown. Although IASI columns are found to correlate well with FTIR data, a large bias (> 100 %) is found over the two sites at La Réunion. A better agreement is found at Wollongong with a negligible bias. The comparison also highlights the difficulty of retrieving total columns from IASI measurements over mountainous regions such as Jungfraujoch. A comparison of the retrieved columns with the global chemistry-transport model IMAGESv2 is also presented, showing good representation of the seasonal and interannual cycles over America, Australia, Asia, and Siberia. A global model underestimation of the distribution

  11. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  12. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  13. Green Chemistry Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolopajlo, Larry

    2017-02-01

    This chapter attempts to show how the practice of chemistry teaching and learning is enriched by the incorporation of green chemistry (GC) into lectures and labs. To support this viewpoint, evidence from a wide range of published papers serve as a cogent argument that GC attracts and engages both science and nonscience students, enhances chemistry content knowledge, and improves the image of the field, while preparing the world for a sustainable future. Published pedagogy associated with green and sustainable chemistry is critically reviewed and discussed.

  14. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  15. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  16. Teachers’ Professional Development in Context-based Chemistry Education : Strategies to Support Teachers in Developing Domain-specific Expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, R.

    2013-01-01

    The international trend of redesigning science curricula in terms of meaningful context-based programmes, involves a tremendous change in teachers’ practices. The successful implementation of such new curricula requires that teachers develop new domain-specific expertise in teaching innovative mater

  17. Combinatorial Solid-Phase Synthesis of Aromatic Oligoamides: A Research-Based Laboratory Module for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Amelia A.

    2016-01-01

    A five-week, research-based experiment suitable for second-semester introductory organic laboratory students is described. Each student designs, prepares, and analyzes a combinatorial array of six aromatic oligoamides. Molecules are prepared on solid phase via a six-step synthetic sequence, and purities and identities are determined by analysis of…

  18. Students Using a Novel Web-Based Laboratory Class Support System: A Case Study in Food Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kolk, Koos; Beldman, Gerrit; Hartog, Rob; Gruppen, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The design, usage, and evaluation of a Web-based laboratory manual (WebLM) are described. The main aim of the WebLM is to support students while working in the laboratory by providing them with just-in-time information. Design guidelines for this electronic manual were derived from literature on cognitive load and user interface design. The WebLM…

  19. Synthetic scope, computational chemistry and mechanism of a base induced 5-endo cyclization of benzyl alkynyl sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motto, John M.; Castillo, Álvaro; Montemayer, Laura K.; Sheepwash, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of the reaction of aryl substituted benzyl 1-alkynyl sulfides with potassium alkoxide in acetonitrile, which produces 2-aryl 2,3-dihydrothiophenes in poor to good yields. The cyclization is most efficient with electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring. Evidence indicates there is rapid exchange of protons and tautomerism of the alkynyl unit prior to cyclization. Theoretical calculations were also conducted to help rationalize the base induced 5-endo cyclization of benzyl 1-propynyl sulfide (1a). The potential energy surface was calculated for the formation of 2,3-dihydrothiophene in a reaction of benzyl 1-propynyl sulfide (1a) with potassium methoxide. Geometries were optimized with CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) in acetonitrile with the CPCM solvent model. It is significant that the benzyl propa-1,2-dien-1-yl sulfane (6) possessed a lower benzylic proton affinity than the benzyl prop-2-yn-1-yl sulfane (8) thus favoring the base induced reaction of the former. From benzyl(propa-1,2-dien-1-yl sulfane (6), 2,3-dihydrothiophene can be formed via a conjugate base that undergoes 5-endo-trig cyclization followed by a protonation step. PMID:21442022

  20. Molecular simulations of polycation-DNA binding exploring the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence in nuclear localization sequence based polycations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-10-10

    Gene therapy relies on the delivery of DNA into cells, and polycations are one class of vectors enabling efficient DNA delivery. Nuclear localization sequences (NLS), cationic oligopeptides that target molecules for nuclear entry, can be incorporated into polycations to improve their gene delivery efficiency. We use simulations to study the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence on the DNA-binding behavior of NLS-grafted polycations by systematically mutating the residues in the grafts, which are based on the SV40 NLS (peptide sequence PKKKRKV). Replacing arginine (R) with lysine (K) reduces binding strength by eliminating arginine-DNA interactions, but placing R in a less hindered location (e.g., farther from the grafting point to the polycation backbone) has surprisingly little effect on polycation-DNA binding strength. Changing the positions of the hydrophobic proline (P) and valine (V) residues relative to the polycation backbone changes hydrophobic aggregation within the polycation and, consequently, changes the conformational entropy loss that occurs upon polycation-DNA binding. Since conformational entropy loss affects the free energy of binding, the positions of P and V in the grafts affect DNA binding affinity. The insight from this work guides synthesis of polycations with tailored DNA binding affinity and, in turn, efficient DNA delivery.

  1. 基于泛在学习的有机化学教学模式研究%Research on Organic Chemistry Teaching Model Based on Ubiquitous Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟娜; 刘志红

    2016-01-01

    在基于泛在学习的有机化学教学中,以互联网“微时代”下的微信、微课等信息分享、自我表达方式为媒介,构建并实施“创境设疑,自主预习-在线测试,建构新知-汇报分享,体验成功-互动交流,拓展延伸”的教学模式,使学生在轻松、愉快的氛围中不断激发学习兴趣,提高自主学习能力。%Based on the ubiquitous learning theory, a new teaching mode of environment creating and question design, online test for construction of new knowledge, report sharing and success experience, interaction expansion and extension was constructed and carried out in the Organic Chemistry teaching with the help of new media information sharing and self-expression through the way of Wechat and micro-lesson,which can stimulate the learning interest of students and improve the ability of autonomous learning continuously in a relaxed and pleasant atmosphere.

  2. High School Chemistry Inquiry Learning Model Based on MiniQuest%基于MiniQuest的中学化学探究式学习模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘云峰

    2016-01-01

    MiniQuest is an online teaching module designed by teachers, which allows students to participate in a real research topic or question, the purpose is to promote the development of learners' critical thinking and the ability to construct knowl-edge. In the background to enhance the students' information literacy curriculum reform to promote inquiry-based learning and the international community is concerned, MiniQuest based learning model worthy of being re-promoted and widely applied to the teaching process. This paper introduces MiniQuest learning mode, then given a high school chemistry teaching design cases based MiniQuest and all aspects of the instructional design analysis, summary.%MiniQuest是由教师设计的在线教学模块,它使学生参与到一个真实主题或问题的研究中,目的是为促进学习者批判性思维和知识建构能力的发展。在课程改革提倡探究式学习和国际社会普遍关注学生信息素养提升的背景下,基于MiniQuest学习模式值得被重新提倡并广泛运用到教学过程中。本文对MiniQuest学习模式进行介绍,之后给出一份基于MiniQuest的中学化学教学设计案例,并对该教学设计各个环节进行分析、总结。

  3. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  4. Chiral N-phosphonyl imine chemistry:asymmetric additions of glycine enolate to diphenyl diamine-based phosphonyl imines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PINDI; Suresh; KATTAMURI; Padmanabha; V.

    2010-01-01

    Diphenyl diamine-based phosphonyl imines attached by the N-isopropyl group in the auxiliary have been synthesized in good yields under convenient reaction conditions.These new chiral N-phosphonyl imines can react with glycine enolate smoothly to give chiral α-β diamino esters in good yields(72%-90%) and up to excellent diastereoselectivity(>99:1 dr).By treatment with HBr,the chiral auxiliary can be readily removed.The absolute structure has been unambiguously determined by converting a product to a known sample.

  5. Probing the radical chemistry in UV/persulfate-based saline wastewater treatment: kinetics modeling and byproducts identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Zhaohui; Hu, Yin; Wang, Baohui; Gao, Simeng

    2014-08-01

    The effect of Cl(-) on the oxidative degradation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) was investigated in UV/S2O8(2-) system to elucidate the chlorination pathways in saline wastewaters. Lower amount of Cl(-) as well as Br(-) enhanced the decoloration of AO7, but such promotion effect reduced gradually with the increasing halide ion dosage. The dye mineralization was found to be inhibited by Cl(-), especially under acidic conditions. Results of kinetics modeling demonstrated that the fraction of different oxidizing radicals largely depended on the content of Cl(-). At the initial pH of 6.5, Cl2(-) was much more abundant than SO4(-). The significance of Cl2(-) for AO7 degradation increased with the increasing Cl(-) concentration and overwhelmed that of SO4(-) at [Cl(-)]>1mM. Without Cl(-), SO4(-) was the predominant radical for AO7 degradation under acidic conditions, while OH prevailed gradually at higher pH. Under high salinity conditions, more OH can be formed and contributed to the dye degradation especially in alkaline medium, leading to higher destruction efficiency of AO7. Several chlorinated byproducts were detected in the presence of chloride ions, and SO4(-)/Cl2(-)-based degradation pathways of AO7 were proposed. This work provides further understanding of the complex reaction mechanisms for SO4(-)-based advanced oxidation processes in chloride-rich environments.

  6. A quantum chemistry study on the performance of porphyrin-based solar cell sensitisers; Zinc and anchor group position effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Foroogh; Izadyar, Mohammad; Nakhaeipour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this work, ten porphyrin derivatives, including free-base zinc-metalised compounds were studied by varying the position of the carboxyl anchoring group and the alkyl substituents length on the remaining three phenyl rings with the aim of the cell efficiency investigation. Theoretical performances of the sensitisers in the dye-sensitised solar cell systems have been discussed by analysis of the optical absorption, the oxidised potential of ground and excited states, light-harvesting efficiency and electron injection efficiency. Due to lower symmetry of free-based porphyrins, they showed broader bands than zinc porphyrins. The second group sensitisers are better than the first one due to the smaller oxidation potential energy, higher open-circuit voltage and light-harvesting efficiency. The influence of long alkyl substituents on the photovoltaic parameters is not perceptible but ortho and meta positions of anchoring group modify the solar cell performance. Finally, some correlations between the quantum reactivity indices and photovoltaic parameters have obtained and discussed.

  7. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  8. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  9. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  10. Bioorganic and bioinorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E; Creus, Marc; Gademann, Karl; Giese, Bernd; Ward, Thomas R; Woggon, Wolf D; Chougnet, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    The interdisciplinary projects in bioinorganic and bioorganic chemistry of the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel led to the preparation of new systems that mimic biologically important processes and to the discovery of compounds from natural sources which are very promising with respect to medical applications. The advances in these areas are reported here.

  11. Mathematics and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, R.; Stumbles, A.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between mathematics and chemistry has been changing rapidly in recent years. Some chemistry teachers have experienced difficulties in their teaching with the introduction of modern mathematics in the schools. Some suggestions for reinforcing the concepts and language of modern mathematics are put forth. (Author/MA)

  12. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  13. Tridentate Lewis Acids Based on 1,3,5-Trisilacyclohexane Backbones and an Example of Their Host-Guest Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisheim, Eugen; Reuter, Christian G; Heinrichs, Peter; Vishnevskiy, Yury V; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2015-08-24

    Directed tridentate Lewis acids based on the 1,3,5-trisilacyclohexane skeleton with three ethynyl groups [CH2Si(Me)(C2H)]3 were synthesised and functionalised by hydroboration with HB(C6F5)2, yielding the ethenylborane {CH2Si(Me)[C2H2B(C6F5)2]}3, and by metalation with gallium and indium organyls affording {CH2Si(Me)[C2M(R)2]}3 (M = Ga, In, R = Me, Et). In the synthesis of the backbone the influence of substituents (MeO, EtO and iPrO groups at Si) on the orientation of the methyl group was studied with the aim to increase the abundance of the all-cis isomer. New compounds were identified by elemental analyses, multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy and in some cases by IR spectroscopy. Crystal structures were obtained for cis-trans-[CH2Si(Me)(Cl)]3, all-cis-[CH2Si(Me)(H)]3, all-cis-[CH2Si(Me)(C2H)]3, cis-trans-[CH2Si(Me)(C2H)]3 and all-cis-[CH2Si(Me)(C2SiMe3)]3. A gas-phase electron diffraction experiment for all-cis-[CH2Si(Me)(C2H)]3 provides information on the relative stabilities of the all-equatorial and all-axial form; the first is preferred in both solid and gas phase. The gallium-based Lewis acid {CH2Si(Me)[C2Ga(Et)2]}3 was reacted with a tridentate Lewis base (1,3,5-trimethyl-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane) in an NMR titration experiment. The generated host-guest complexes involved in the equilibria during this reaction were identified by DOSY NMR spectroscopy by comparing measured diffusion coefficients with those of the suitable reference compounds of same size and shape.

  14. Electrochemical impedimetric sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers/sol-gel chemistry for methidathion organophosphorous insecticide recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Idriss; Hayat, Akhtar; Piletsky, Sergey; Piletska, Elena; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Noguer, Thierry; Rouillon, Régis

    2014-12-01

    We report here a novel method to detect methidathion organophosphorous insecticides. The sensing platform was architected by the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers and sol-gel technique on inexpensive, portable and disposable screen printed carbon electrodes. Electrochemical impedimetric detection technique was employed to perform the label free detection of the target analyte on the designed MIP/sol-gel integrated platform. The selection of the target specific monomer by electrochemical impedimetric methods was consistent with the results obtained by the computational modelling method. The prepared electrochemical MIP/sol-gel based sensor exhibited a high recognition capability toward methidathion, as well as a broad linear range and a low detection limit under the optimized conditions. Satisfactory results were also obtained for the methidathion determination in waste water samples.

  15. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on Ni-xCr- 9Fe-yC in Ar, water, and a LiOH-boric acid solution. Cr and C improve the resistance of Ni-base alloys to IG cracking in both Ar and water at 360C. Since creep plays a role in IG cracking, one possible explanation for the role of the environment involves its effect on the creep. Experiments were conducted on the role of C in the deformation behavior and failure mode of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. Constant load experiments were conducted on Ni-16Cr-9Fe to determine if the CLT test is more aggressive than CERT. The electron backscattering technique in a SEM is being developed in order to extend the IG cracking studies to grain sizes typical of commercial alloys, 20-30 microns.

  16. Exploration of aziridine- and β-lactam-based hybrids as both bioactive substances and synthetic intermediates in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    The concept of pharmacophore hybridization is attracting an increasing interest from medicinal chemists. Whereas the main motivation for the application of this methodology relates to the pharmacological advantages associated with hybrid molecules, molecular hybridization can also deliver a synthetic advantage through selective chemical modification of the more reactive entity within hybrid systems. Moreover, if both features are combined, new hybrid structures result displaying both a biological and a synthetic benefit, and elaboration of this methodology might culminate in structural diversity and chemical novelty. In this perspective, a new approach based on hybrid structures combining a biologically interesting yet rather chemically reactive nucleus with a privileged heterocyclic scaffold is discussed by means of β-lactam-purine chimeras useful in antiviral research and aziridine-(iso)quinoline hybrids for antimalarial purposes.

  17. Nuclear chemistry of transactinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagame, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    The current status on the nuclear chemistry studies of transactinide elements is reviewed. The production of transactinides in heavy ion reactions is briefly discussed, and nuclear properties on the stability of transactinides are presented. Chemical properties of the trans-actinide elements 104, 105 and 106, and a typical experimental technique used to study these properties on an atom-at-a-time base are introduced. (author)

  18. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  19. Applying the Power of Reticular Chemistry to Finding the Missing alb-MOF Platform Based on the (6,12)-Coordinated Edge-Transitive Net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijie; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Jiang, Hao; Bhatt, Prashant M; Guillerm, Vincent; Dauzon, Emilie; Xue, Dong-Xu; O'Keeffe, Michael; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Highly connected and edge-transitive nets are of prime importance in crystal chemistry and are regarded as ideal blueprints for the rational design and construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We report the design and synthesis of highly connected MOFs based on reticulation of the sole two edge-transitive nets with a vertex figure as double six-membered-ring (d6R) building unit, namely the (4,12)-coordinated shp net (square and hexagonal-prism) and the (6,12)-coordinated alb net (aluminum diboride, hexagonal-prism and trigonal-prism). Decidedly, the combination of our recently isolated 12-connected (12-c) rare-earth (RE) nonanuclear [RE9(μ3-OH)12(μ3-O)2(O2C-)12] carboxylate-based cluster, points of extension matching the 12 vertices of hexagonal-prism d6R, with 4-connected (4-c) square porphyrinic tetracarboxylate ligand led to the formation of the targeted RE-shp-MOF. This is the first time that RE-MOFs based on 12-c molecular building blocks (MBBs), d6R building units, have been deliberately targeted and successfully isolated, paving the way for the long-awaited (6,12)-c MOF with alb topology. Indeed, combination of a custom-designed hexacarboxylate ligand with RE salts led to the formation of the first related alb-MOF, RE-alb-MOF. Intuitively, we successfully transplanted the alb topology to another chemical system and constructed the first indium-based alb-MOF, In-alb-MOF, by employing trinuclear [In3(μ3-O)(O2C-)6] as the requisite 6-connected trigonal-prism and purposely made a dodecacarboxylate ligand as a compatible 12-c MBB. Prominently, the dodecacarboxylate ligand was employed to transplant shp topology into copper-based MOFs by employing the copper paddlewheel [Cu2(O2C-)4] as the complementary square building unit, affording the first Cu-shp-MOF. We revealed that highly connected edge-transitive nets such shp and alb are ideal for topological transplantation and deliberate construction of related MOFs based on minimal edge-transitive nets.

  20. Based on Five Years of Physical Chemistry Teaching in Vocational Integration Scenarios%基于工作情境的五年高职物理化学教学整合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    眭惟红

    2016-01-01

    Physical chemistry as chemistry,chemical engineering professional courses,four basic chemistry chemical engineering is the most difficult courses,students logical thinking and high computing power requirements,in order to stimulate students’ interest in learning,improve their analysis and ability to solve problems,I try to ammonia process as an example of the physical chemistry curriculum-based integration work context,theory and practice linked to achieve mastery,and achieved good results.%物理化学作为化学、化工专业的必修课,是化工专业四大基础化学中最难的课程,对学生的逻辑思维和运算能力要求极高,为了激发学生的学习兴趣,提高学生分析和解决问题的能力,笔者尝试以合成氨的工艺为例对物理化学课程进行基于工作情境的整合,将理论与实践联系起来,做到融会贯通,取得了较好的效果。

  1. Chemistry, photophysics, and ultrafast kinetics of two structurally related Schiff bases containing the naphthalene or quinoline ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fita, P.; Luzina, E.; Dziembowska, T.; Radzewicz, Cz.; Grabowska, A.

    2006-11-01

    The two structurally related Schiff bases, 2-hydroxynaphthylidene-(8-aminoquinoline) (HNAQ) and 2-hydroxynaphthylidene-1'-naphthylamine (HNAN), were studied by means of steady-state and time resolved optical spectroscopies as well as time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. The first one, HNAQ, is stable as a keto tautomer in the ground state and in the excited state in solutions, therefore it was used as a model of a keto tautomer of HNAN which exists mainly in its enol form in the ground state at room temperature. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer in the HNAN molecule leads to a very weak (quantum yield of the order of 10-4) strongly Stokes-shifted fluorescence. The characteristic time of the proton transfer (about 30fs) was estimated from femtosecond transient absorption data supported by global analysis and deconvolution techniques. Approximately 35% of excited molecules create a photochromic form whose lifetime was beyond the time window of the experiment (2ns). The remaining ones reach the relaxed S1 state (of a lifetime of approximately 4ps), whose emission is present in the decay associated difference spectra. Some evidence for the back proton transfer from the ground state of the keto form with the characteristic time of approximately 13ps was also found. The energies and orbital characteristics of main electronic transitions in both molecules calculated by TDDFT method are also discussed.

  2. Determination of copper(II) in the dairy product by an electrochemical sensor based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Suyan; Xie, Lidan; Gao, Sen; Liu, Qida; Lin, Zhenyu; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-11-30

    Herein, a novel sensitive electrochemical sensor for copper(II) based on Cu(I) catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC) is described. The catalyst of Cu(I) species is derived from electrochemical reduction of Cu(II) through bulk electrolysis (BE) with coulometry technique. The propargyl-functionalized ferrocene (propargyl-functionalized Fc) is covalently coupled onto the electrode surface via CuAAC reaction and forms propargyl-functionalized Fc modified gold electrode, which allows a good and stable electrochemical signal. The change of current at peak (dI), detected by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), exhibits a linear response to the logarithm of Cu(II) concentration in the range of 1.0×10(-14)-1.0×10(-9) mol L(-1). It is also found that the proposed sensor has a good selectivity for copper(II) assay even in the presence of other common metal ions. Additionally, the proposed method has been applied to determine copper(II) in the dairy product (yoghurt) with satisfactory results.

  3. Interpenetrating networks based on gelatin methacrylamide and PEG formed using concurrent thiol click chemistries for hydrogel tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Michael A; Adams, André A; Naciri, Jawad; North, Stella H; Ligler, Frances S

    2014-02-01

    The integration of biological extracellular matrix (ECM) components and synthetic materials is a promising pathway to fabricate the next generation of hydrogel-based tissue scaffolds that more accurately emulate the microscale heterogeneity of natural ECM. We report the development of a bio/synthetic interpenetrating network (BioSINx), containing gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) polymerized within a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) framework to form a mechanically robust network capable of supporting both internal cell encapsulation and surface cell adherence. The covalently crosslinked PEG network was formed by thiol-yne coupling, while the bioactive GelMA was integrated using a concurrent thiol-ene coupling reaction. The physical properties (i.e. swelling, modulus) of BioSINx were compared to both PEG networks with physically-incorporated gelatin (BioSINP) and homogenous hydrogels. BioSINx displayed superior physical properties and significantly lower gelatin dissolution. These benefits led to enhanced cytocompatibility for both cell adhesion and encapsulation; furthermore, the increased physical strength provided for the generation of a micro-engineered tissue scaffold. Endothelial cells showed extensive cytoplasmic spreading and the formation of cellular adhesion sites when cultured onto BioSINx; moreover, both encapsulated and adherent cells showed sustained viability and proliferation.

  4. An orthogonal click-chemistry approach to design poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-based nanomaterials for controlled immunostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragupathy, Lakshminarayanan; Millar, Douglas G; Tirelli, Nicola; Cellesi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    A versatile approach is proposed for the synthesis of novel immunoactive nanomaterials based on biocompatible poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMMA). Propargyl-terminated PGMMA is synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization and then modified through the introduction of dangling acrylate groups, at controlled degree of functionalisation. Acrylates are then able to react quantitatively with thiols, such as immunoactive thiomannose, through Michael-type addition under mild conditions and at a physiologically acceptable pH. The terminal propargyl group can be modified independently with azide end-capping groups and it is utilized to graft the macromolecules to a fluorescent dye. The resulting mannose-linked PGMMAs confirm a safe cytotoxic profile and are able to stimulate cytokine production (TNFα), membrane protein expression (CD40), and cellular uptake in bone marrow derived dendritic cells. Cell stimulation is dependent on the mannose content and enhanced by serum proteins, suggesting a role for mannose-binding receptors and/or complement receptors in the cell membrane.

  5. Geometric isomerism in coordination cages based on tris-chelate vertices: a tool to control both assembly and host/guest chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherell, Alexander J; Ward, Michael D

    2016-10-18

    This 'Perspective' article summarises recent work from the authors' research group on the exploitation of the simple fac/mer geometric isomerism of octahedral metal tris-chelates as a tool to control the chemistry of coordination cages based on bis(pyrazolyl-pyridine) ligands, in two different respects. Firstly this geometric isomerism plays a major role in controlling the guest binding properties of cages because a fac tris-chelate arrangement of pyrazolyl-pyridine chelates around a metal ion vertex results in formation of a convergent set of inwardly-directed C-H protons in a region of high positive electrostatic potential close to a metal cation. This collection of δ+ protons therefore provides a charge-assisted hydrogen-bond donor site, which interacts with the electron-rich regions of guest molecules that are of the correct size and shape to occupy the cage cavity, and the strength of this hydrogen-bonding interaction plays a major role in guest recognition in non-aqueous solvents. Secondly the ability to prepare mononuclear complexes with either a fac or mer arrangement of ligands provides an entry into the controlled, stepwise assembly of heterometallic cages based on a combination of kinetically inert and kinetically labile metal ions at different sites. This has allowed introduction of useful physical properties such as redox activity or luminescence, commonly associated with inert metal ions which are not amenable to participation in thermodynamic self-assembly processes, to be incorporated in a predictable way into the superstructures of coordination cages at specific sites.

  6. The Twelve Principles of CO2 CHEMISTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emilia S

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  7. The twelve principles of CO2 Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emelia S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  8. Annual Report 1984. Chemistry Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funck, Jytte; Nielsen, Ole John

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, an......, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general.......This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry...

  9. Isoprene and monoterpene fluxes from Central Amazonian rainforest inferred from tower-based and airborne measurements, and implications on the atmospheric chemistry and the local carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the isoprene and monoterpene source strengths of a pristine tropical forest north of Manaus in the central Amazon Basin using three different micrometeorological flux measurement approaches. During the early dry season campaign of the Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001, a tower-based surface layer gradient (SLG technique was applied simultaneously with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system. Airborne measurements of vertical profiles within and above the convective boundary layer (CBL were used to estimate fluxes on a regional scale by application of the mixed layer gradient (MLG technique. The mean daytime fluxes of organic carbon measured by REA were 2.1 mg C m−2 h−1 for isoprene, 0.20 mg C m−2 h−1 for α-pinene, and 0.39 mg C m−2 h−1 for the sum of monoterpenes. These values are in reasonable agreement with fluxes determined with the SLG approach, which exhibited a higher scatter, as expected for the complex terrain investigated. The observed VOC fluxes are in good agreement with simulations using a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM.

    In contrast, the model-derived mixing ratios of VOCs were by far higher than observed, indicating that chemical processes may not be adequately represented in the model. The observed vertical gradients of isoprene and its primary degradation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK and methacrolein (MACR suggest that the oxidation capacity in the tropical CBL is much higher than previously assumed. A simple chemical kinetics model was used to infer OH radical concentrations from the vertical gradients of (MVK+MACR/isoprene. The estimated range of OH concentrations during the daytime was 3–8×106 molecules cm−3, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than is estimated for the tropical CBL by current state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry and transport models

  10. Isoprene and monoterpene fluxes from Central Amazonian rainforest inferred from tower-based and airborne measurements, and implications on the atmospheric chemistry and the local carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the isoprene and monoterpene source strengths of a pristine tropical forest north of Manaus in the central Amazon Basin using three different micrometeorological flux measurement approaches. During the early dry season campaign of the Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001, a tower-based surface layer gradient (SLG technique was applied simultaneously with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system. Airborne measurements of vertical profiles within and above the convective boundary layer (CBL were used to estimate fluxes on a landscape scale by application of the mixed layer gradient (MLG technique. The mean daytime fluxes of organic carbon measured by REA were 2.1 mg C m−2 h−1 for isoprene, 0.20 mg C m−2 h−1 for α-pinene, and 0.39 mg C m−2 h−1 for the sum of monoterpenes. These values are in reasonable agreement with fluxes determined with the SLG approach, which exhibited a higher scatter, as expected for the complex terrain investigated. The observed VOC fluxes are in good agreement with simulations using a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM.

    In contrast, the model-derived mixing ratios of VOCs were by far higher than observed, indicating that chemical processes may not be adequately represented in the model. The observed vertical gradients of isoprene and its primary degradation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK and methacrolein (MACR suggest that the oxidation capacity in the tropical CBL is much higher than previously assumed. A simple chemical kinetics model was used to infer OH radical concentrations from the vertical gradients of (MVK+MACR/isoprene. The estimated range of OH concentrations during the daytime was 3–8×106 molecules cm−3, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than is estimated for the tropical CBL by current state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry and transport models

  11. Conducting water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-based nuclear power plant units constructed without using copper containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyapkov, V. F.

    2014-07-01

    The secondary coolant circuit water chemistry with metering amines began to be put in use in Russia in 2005, and all nuclear power plant units equipped with VVER-1000 reactors have been shifted to operate with this water chemistry for the past seven years. Owing to the use of water chemistry with metering amines, the amount of products from corrosion of structural materials entering into the volume of steam generators has been reduced, and the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of pipelines and equipment has been slowed down. The article presents data on conducting water chemistry in nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 reactors for the secondary coolant system equipment made without using copper-containing alloys. Statistical data are presented on conducting ammonia-morpholine and ammonia-ethanolamine water chemistries in new-generation operating power units with VVER-1000 reactors with an increased level of pH. The values of cooling water leaks in turbine condensers the tube system of which is made of stainless steel or titanium alloy are given.

  12. A Discovery-Based Experiment Involving Rearrangement in the Conversion of Alcohols to Alkyl Halides: Permanent Magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in the First-Semester Organic Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Tucker, Ryand J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in large-section first-semester organic chemistry lab courses is limited by the availability of experiments that not only hinge on first-semester lecture topics, but which also produce at least 0.5 mL of neat liquid sample. This article reports a discovery-based experiment that meets both…

  13. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  14. Chemistry on electrospun polymeric nanofibers: merely routine chemistry or a real challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Seema; Wendorff, Joachim H; Greiner, Andreas

    2010-08-03

    Nanofiber-based non-wovens can be prepared by electrospinning. The chemical modification of such nanofibers or chemistry using nanofibers opens a multitude of application areas and challenges. A wealth of chemistry has been elaborated in recent years on and with electrospun nanofibers. Known methods as well as new methods have been applied to modify the electrospun nanofibers and thereby generate new materials and new functionalities. This Review summarizes and sorts the chemistry that has been reported in conjunction with electrospun nanofibers. The major focus is on catalysis and nanofibers, enzymes and nanofibers, surface modification for biomedical and specialty applications, coatings of fibers, crosslinking, and bulk modifications. A critical focus is on the question: what could make chemistry on or with nanofibers different from bulk chemistry?

  15. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  16. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry is the ideal supplementary text for practicing chemists and students who want to sharpen their mathematics skills while enrolled in general through physical chemistry courses. This book specifically emphasizes the use of mathematics in the context of physical chemistry, as opposed to being simply a mathematics text. This 4e includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The early chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, wit

  17. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  18. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  19. Fluorine in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Since its first use in the steroid field in the late 1950s, the use of fluorine in medicinal chemistry has become commonplace, with the small electronegative fluorine atom being a key part of the medicinal chemist's repertoire of substitutions used to modulate all aspects of molecular properties including potency, physical chemistry and pharmacokinetics. This review will highlight the special nature of fluorine, drawing from a survey of marketed fluorinated pharmaceuticals and the medicinal chemistry literature, to illustrate key concepts exploited by medicinal chemists in their attempts to optimize drug molecules. Some of the potential pitfalls in the use of fluorine will also be highlighted.

  20. Modelling transport and transformation of mercury fractions in heavily contaminated mountain streams by coupling a GIS-based hydrological model with a mercury chemistry model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Larssen, Thorjørn; Vogt, Rolf D; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Hua

    2011-10-01

    Many heavily polluted areas are located in remote regions that lack routine hydrologic monitoring. A modelling method that can produce scenarios of water chemistry trends for regions that lack hydrological data is therefore needed. The Wanshan mining area, in Guizhou province in south-western China, is such a region, as it is heavily polluted with mercury (Hg). In order to model Hg transport in a stream draining the Wanshan mining area, a Geographic Information System (GIS) hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was coupled with a simulation model for Hg fractions in water (WASP Hg). Hydrological variations in the stream flow can thereby be simulated based on readily available precipitation data. The WASP 7 MERC Hg model was used for simulating variations in total Hg, dissolved Hg and methyl-Hg concentrations. The results of HEC-HMS modelling of flow show clear seasonal variation. Winter (Oct-Dec) constitutes the dry season with low flow, while the summer season (Jun-Aug) is rainy with high flow. 48% of total annual precipitation happens in the three summer months. The stream flows at the high flow events were several times higher than normal flow. The modelled total suspended solids and Hg concentrations were tested against monitoring data from two sampling campaigns conducted in September 2007 and August 2008. The model produced reasonable simulations for TSS, THg, DHg and MeHg, with relative errors generally around 10% for the modelled parameters. High flow events are the main contributors for release of both suspended particles and Hg. The three high flow events account for about 50% of annual discharge of THg. The annual total discharge of Hg was 8.8 kg Hg high up in the stream and 2.6 kg where the stream meets a large river 20 km downstream of the pollution source. Hence, about 70% of Hg is retained in the stream through sedimentation.

  1. PREFACE: 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry is an international conference organized by 4 chemistry departments of 4 universities in central Java, Indonesia. The universities are Sebelas Maret University, Diponegoro University, Semarang State University and Soedirman University. The venue was at Solo, Indonesia, at September 8-9, 2015. The total conference participants are 133 including the invited speakers. The conference emphasized the multidisciplinary chemical issue and impact of today's sustainable chemistry which covering the following topics: • Material innovation for sustainable goals • Development of renewable and sustainable energy based on chemistry • New drug design, experimental and theoretical methods • Green synthesis and characterization of material (from molecule to functionalized materials) • Catalysis as core technology in industry • Natural product isolation and optimization

  2. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere - Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Jia, W.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Rockett, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART chemical transport model. Since future growth is highly uncertain we evaluate the impact for two world evolution scenarios, one based on a high emitting scenario (IPCC A1FI) and the other on a low emitting scenario (IPCC B1), as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario the world evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the same world evolution scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall between the above two bounding scenarios. However, the magnitude of these changes is

  3. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere - Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Jia, W.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Rockett, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2) to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on the stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers) model. Since future growth is highly uncertain, we evaluate the impact of two world evolution scenarios, one based on an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) high-emitting scenario (A1FI) and the other on an IPCC low-emitting scenario (B1), as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the evolution growth scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall

  4. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rockett

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050 H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART chemical transport model. Since future growth is highly uncertain we evaluate the impact for two world evolution scenarios, one based on a high emitting scenario (IPCC A1FI and the other on a low emitting scenario (IPCC B1, as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario the world evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the same world evolution scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall between the above two bounding scenarios. However, the magnitude of

  5. Acid-base chemistry in the formation of Mackay-type icosahedral clusters: μ3-acidity analysis of Sc-rich phases of the Sc-Ir system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiming; Stacey, Timothy E; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-05-19

    The crystal structures of intermetallic phases offer a wealth of geometrical features (helices, multishelled clusters, and host-guest motifs) whose formation has yet to be explained or predicted by chemical theory. A recently developed extension of the acid-base concept to metallic systems, the μ3-acidity model, provides an avenue for developing this understanding for intermetallics formed from transition metals. In this Article, we illustrate how this approach can be used to understand one of the most striking geometrical entities to emerge in intermetallic chemistry, the Mackay cluster of icosahedral quasicrystals. We present μ3-acidity analyses, based on DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations, for a series of Sc-Ir intermetallics: ScIr (CsCl-type), Sc2Ir (Ti2Ni-type), Sc11Ir4, and the Mackay cluster containing phases Sc57Ir13 and Sc44Ir7. We begin by illustrating that a μ3-acidity model correctly predicts that each of these phases is stable relative to disproportionation into their neighboring compounds when a common set of Hückel parameters and d-orbital occupancies is used. Next, we explain these results by developing a relationship between the distance distribution of homoatomic contacts within an atom's coordination sphere and the μ3-neutralization it experiences. For a given average homoatomic distance, the role of heteroatomic contacts is higher when the distribution of homoatomic contacts is narrower. This effect is key to the strength of the acid-base neutralization of the Sc-rich phases, where the Sc atoms find a scarcity of Ir atoms from which to obtain neutralization. Under these circumstances, Sc-Ir contacts should be maximized, whereas the number and distance variations of the Sc-Sc contacts should be minimized. These expectations are borne out by the observed crystal structures. In particular, the Mackay clusters of Sc57Ir13 and Sc44Ir7, in which a central Ir atom is icosahedrally coordinated by a pentagonal dodecahedral array of face-sharing Sc

  6. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2 to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050 H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on the stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers model. Since future growth is highly uncertain, we evaluate the impact of two world evolution scenarios, one based on an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change high-emitting scenario (A1FI and the other on an IPCC low-emitting scenario (B1, as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the evolution growth scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two

  7. Nutraceuticals based computational medicinal chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the edible biomedicinal products called nutraceuticals have been becoming more popular among the pharmaceutical industries and the consumers. In the process of developing nutraceuticals, in silico approaches play an important role in structural elucidation, receptor-ligand interactions, drug designing etc., that critically help the laboratory experiments to avoid biological and financial risk. In this thesis, three nutraceuticals possessing antimicrobial and anticancer activi...

  8. Asymmetric translation between multiple representations in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yulan I.; Son, Ji Y.; Rudd, James A., II

    2016-03-01

    Experts are more proficient in manipulating and translating between multiple representations (MRs) of a given concept than novices. Studies have shown that instruction using MR can increase student understanding of MR, and one model for MR instruction in chemistry is the chemistry triplet proposed by Johnstone. Concreteness fading theory suggests that presenting concrete representations before abstract representations can increase the effectiveness of MR instruction; however, little work has been conducted on varying the order of different representations during instruction and the role of concreteness in assessment. In this study, we investigated the application of concreteness fading to MR instruction and assessment in teaching chemistry. In two experiments, undergraduate students in either introductory psychology courses or general chemistry courses were given MR instruction on phase changes using different orders of presentation and MR assessment questions based on the representations in the chemistry triplet. Our findings indicate that the order of presentation based on levels of concreteness in MR chemistry instruction is less important than implementation of comprehensive MR assessments. Even after MR instruction, students display an asymmetric understanding of the chemical phenomenon on the MR assessments. Greater emphasis on MR assessments may be an important component in MR instruction that effectively moves novices toward more expert MR understanding.

  9. Indicators: Soil Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical makeup of the soil can provide information on wetland condition, wetland water quality and services being provided by the wetland ecosystem. Analyzing soil chemistry reveals if the soil is contaminated with a toxic chemical or heavy metal.

  10. Chemistry for Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sanae; Majoros, Bela

    1988-01-01

    Reports two methods for interesting children in chemistry. Describes a method for producing large soap bubbles and films for study. Examines the use of simple stories to explain common chemical concepts with example given. Lists titles of available stories. (ML)

  11. Beauty in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Atkins

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  12. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  13. Uncertainty in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Fredric M

    2010-09-01

    It might come as a disappointment to some chemists, but just as there are uncertainties in physics and mathematics, there are some chemistry questions we may never know the answer to either, suggests Fredric M. Menger.

  14. Chemistry at large

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy. K.M. Sanders

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A new book introduces young researchers to supramolecular chemistry, starting from the basics and working up to the more complicated aspects of the topic. While the text is inspiring for new graduates, it lacks a critical view.

  15. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  16. Water Chemistry: Seeking Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the available literature in water chemistry is presented. Materials surveyed include: texts, reference books, bibliographic resources, journals, American Chemical Society publications, proceedings, unpublished articles, and reports. (BT)

  17. Simplified Model for Reburning Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Hansen, Stine

    2010-01-01

    In solid fuel flames, reburn-type reactions are often important for the concentrations of NOx in the near-burner region. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in these flames, it is necessary to have an adequate model for volatile/NO interactions. Simple models consisting of global steps...... or based on partial-equilibrium assumptions have limited predictive capabilities. Reburning models based on systematic reduction of a detailed chemical kinetic model offer a high accuracy but rely on input estimates of combustion intermediates, including free radicals. In the present work, an analytically...

  18. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  19. Structural transition metal chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, K M

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is divided up into five chapters as outlined below. Chapter 1 gives the background to the techniques used in this thesis including X-ray structure determination and ab initio methods. An overview of some recent studies using ab initio methods to study transition metal complexes is also given. Chapter 2 investigates structural trans influence in a number of transition metal and p-block complexes. The database and ab initio studies showed that the classical trans influence model based on Pt(II) chemistry does not always hold. For some systems (eg. d sup 1 sup 0 s sup 0 for Sb sup V and Sn sup I sup V) the cis influence is of similar magnitude to the trans influence. For other systems (d sup 0), the trans influence is not as powerful as usually assumed. Chapter 3 is an investigation into the bridging chloride unit. A database study was performed on three systems (M-CI-M', M-CI...H and M-CI...Li/Na/K). Reaction pathway analysis was carried out for the M-CI-M' case and showed that bond order is not con...

  20. Forensic Chemistry Training

    OpenAIRE

    GERÇEK, Zuhal

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analy...