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Sample records for basement membrane collagen

  1. Glomerular Basement Membrane Type IV Collagen in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Alfred J.; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Matsukura, Hiro; Butkowski, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    Glomerular basement membrane is the major supporting structural element of the glomerular capillary wall. This is a highly complex locus which functionally serves as a filtration barrier, and has been the subject of detailed investigation. The composition of whole glomerular basement membrane suggests that collagen is a major component. Isolation and characterization of the collagenous domains has revealed that glomerular basement membrane is chiefly composed of type IV collagen. This molecul...

  2. Autoantibodies against basement membrane collagen type IV are associated with myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Olga McLeod; Pontus Dunér; Ann Samnegård; Per Tornvall; Jan Nilsson; Anders Hamsten; Eva Bengtsson

    2015-01-01

    Background: Collagen type IV is the major constituent of basement membranes underlying endothelial cells and is important for endothelial cell attachment and function. Autoantibodies against native collagen type IV have been found in various autoimmune diseases. Oxidation of LDL in the vascular wall results in the formation of reactive aldehydes, which could modify surrounding matrix proteins. Like oxidized LDL, these modified matrix proteins are likely to induce immune responses. We examined...

  3. Alport familial nephritis. Absence of 28 kilodalton non-collagenous monomers of type IV collagen in glomerular basement membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Kleppel, M M; Kashtan, C. E.; Butkowski, R J; Fish, A. J.; Michael, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Alport-type familial nephritis (FN), a genetic disorder, results in progressive renal insufficiency and sensorineural hearing loss. Immunochemical and biochemical analyses of the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of type IV collagen isolated from the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of three males with this disease demonstrate absence of the normally occurring 28-kilodalton (kD) NC1 monomers, but persistence of the 26- and 24-kD monomeric subunits derived from alpha 1 and 2 (both type IV) colla...

  4. Attachment of cells to basement membrane collagen type IV

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Of ten different cell lines examined, three showed distinct attachment and spreading on collagen IV substrates, and neither attachment nor spreading was enhanced by adding soluble laminin or fibronectin. This reaction was not inhibited by cycloheximide or antibodies to laminin, indicating a direct attachment to collagen IV without the need of mediator proteins. Cell-binding sites were localized to the major triple-helical domain of collagen IV and required an intact triple helical conformatio...

  5. Insufficient Folding of Type IV Collagen and Formation of Abnormal Basement Membrane-like Structure in Embryoid Bodies Derived from Hsp47-Null Embryonic Stem CellsD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Hiroshi; Adachi, Eijiro; Nagai, Naoko; Marutani, Toshihiro; Hosokawa, Nobuko; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    Hsp47 is a molecular chaperone that specifically recognizes procollagen in the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp47-null mouse embryos produce immature type I collagen and form discontinuous basement membranes. We established Hsp47-/- embryonic stem cell lines and examined formation of basement membrane and production of type IV collagen in embryoid bodies, a model for postimplantation egg-cylinder stage embryos. The visceral endodermal cell layers surrounding Hsp47-/- embryoid bodies were often diso...

  6. Assessment of proteolytic degradation of the basement membrane: a fragment of type IV collagen as a biochemical marker for liver fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Veidal Sanne S; Karsdal Morten A; Nawrocki Arkadiusz; Larsen Martin R; Dai Yueqin; Zheng Qinlong; Hägglund Per; Vainer Ben; Skjøt-Arkil Helene; Leeming Diana J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Collagen deposition and an altered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression profile are hallmarks of fibrosis. Type IV collagen is the most abundant structural basement membrane component of tissue, which increases 14-fold during fibrogenesis in the liver. Proteolytic degradation of collagens by proteases produces small fragments, so-called neoepitopes, which are released systemically. Technologies investigating MMP-generated fragments of collagens may provide more useful...

  7. Localization of type IV collagen a 1 to a 6 chains in basement membrane during mouse molar germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, N; Nakano, K; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Gunduz, M; Tsujigiwa, H; Nagatsuka, H; Ninomiya, Y; Siar, C H

    2001-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) putatively mediates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. Type IV collagen alpha chains, a major network-forming protein of the dental BM, was studied and results disclosed distinct expression patterns at different stages of mouse molar germ development. At the dental placode and bud stage, the BM of the oral epithelium expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains while the gubernaculum dentis, in addition to the above four chains, also expressed a 4 chain. An asymmetrical expression for alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains was observed at the bud stage. At the early bell stage, the BM associated with the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) of molar germ expressed alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 4 chains while the BM of the outer enamel epithelium (OEE) expressed only alpha 1 and a 2 chains. With the onset of dentinogenesis, the collagen a chain profile of the IEE BM gradually disappeared. Howeverfrom the early to late bell stage, the gubernaculum dentis consistently expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and a 6 chains resembling fetal oral mucosa. These findings suggest that stage- and position-specific distribution of type IV collagen alpha subunits occur during molar germ development and that these changes are essential for molar morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. PMID:11732842

  8. Deletion of the basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan type XVIII collagen causes hypertriglyceridemia in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Bishop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein lipase (Lpl acts on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the peripheral circulation, liberating free fatty acids for energy metabolism or storage. This essential enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle and migrates to the luminal side of the vascular endothelium where it acts upon circulating lipoproteins. Prior studies suggested that Lpl is immobilized by way of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the endothelium, but genetically altering endothelial cell heparan sulfate had no effect on Lpl localization or lipolysis. The objective of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix proteoglycans affect Lpl distribution and triglyceride metabolism. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined mutant mice defective in collagen XVIII (Col18, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan present in vascular basement membranes. Loss of Col18 reduces plasma levels of Lpl enzyme and activity, which results in mild fasting hypertriglyceridemia and diet-induced hyperchylomicronemia. Humans with Knobloch Syndrome caused by a null mutation in the vascular form of Col18 also present lower than normal plasma Lpl mass and activity and exhibit fasting hypertriglyceridemia. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report demonstrating that Lpl presentation on the lumenal side of the endothelium depends on a basement membrane proteoglycan and demonstrates a previously unrecognized phenotype in patients lacking Col18.

  9. Basement membrane proteoglycans are of epithelial origin in rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamane, Y; Yaoita, H; Couchman, J R

    1996-01-01

    sites on mice demonstrated the presence of rat basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and rat perlecan on interfollicular and follicular basement membranes including that separating dermal papillae from adjacent hair follicle epithelium. In contrast, the basement membranes of all dermal......-epidermal junction and hair follicle epithelium are of epidermal (epithelial) origin in vivo. Stratified rat keratinocytes cultured on a collagen matrix at the air-liquid interface showed the synthesis of perlecan, laminin 1, and type IV collagen in basement membranes, but not clearly detectable basement membrane...

  10. Glycosylation of human glomerular basement membrane collagen: increased content of hexose in ketoamine linkage and unaltered hydroxylysine-O-glycosides in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, J; Perejda, A J; Grant, G A; Rowold, E A; Kilo, C; Williamson, J R

    1982-01-01

    To study the glycosylation of glomerular basement membrane collagen (GBMC) in diabetes, kidneys were obtained at autopsy from 5 patients with insulin-requiring diabetes of long duration and diabetic complications, and from 5 control subjects. Glomeruli were prepared by sieving and collagen was isolated by limited pepsin proteolysis followed by salt precipitations. Amino acid analyses of the collagen preparations, after acid hydrolysis, indicated a composition consistent with that of type IV collagen. No differences in the relative contents of various amino acids, and in particular, 3-hydroxyproline, 4-hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine, were noted between diabetic and control samples. Non-enzymatic glucosylation was assessed by measuring hexose in ketoamine linkage with thiobarbituric acid after conversion to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. In 4 of the 5 patients studied, glucosylation values exceeded the mean +2 S.D. of the controls; in the fifth subject glucosylation was in the high normal range. No correlation between the severity of diabetes and hexose content of GBMC was noted, however. In further studies, enzymatic glycosylation of GBMC was assayed after alkaline hydrolysis by separation of glucosylgalactosyl-O-hydroxylysine, galactosyl-O-hydroxylysine, and unsubstituted hydroxylysine in an amino acid analyzer. No differences in the relative contents of hydroxylysine-O-glycosides were evident between diabetic and control GBMC. The results suggest that non-enzymatic glucosylation, but not glycosylation catalyzed by collagen glucosyl and galactosyl transferases, is increased in diabetes. The increased carbohydrate content of collagen may lead to decreased turnover and/or excessive accumulations of basement membrane collagen thus contributing to the vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:6218960

  11. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin

  12. Cross-reactivity of cell-mediated immunity between interstitial (type I) and basement membrane (type IV) collagens

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to homologous type I collagen that cross-reacts with type IV collagen. Mice immunized with native or denatured type I collagens and challenged with these same antigens or native type IV collagen develop a peak DTH response on day 7. Challenge with denatured type IV collagen or collagenase-treated type IV collagen failed to elicit DTH in type I collagen-sensitized mice. Type I collagen-sensitized spleen cells adoptively t...

  13. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Sherwood, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recent...

  14. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    OpenAIRE

    Troxell, Megan L.; Donald C Houghton

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopa...

  15. Proteolysis breaks tolerance toward intact α345(IV) collagen, eliciting novel anti-glomerular basement membrane autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Florina; Wang, Xu-Ping; Luo, Wentian; Ge, Linna; Miner, Jeffrey H; Kleinau, Sandra; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Wasiluk, Andrew; Heidet, Laurence; Kitching, A Richard; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2013-02-15

    Goodpasture disease is an autoimmune kidney disease mediated by autoantibodies against noncollagenous domain 1 (NC1) monomers of α3(IV) collagen that bind to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), usually causing rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). We identified a novel type of human IgG4-restricted anti-GBM autoantibodies associated with mild nonprogressive GN, which specifically targeted α345NC1 hexamers but not α3NC1 monomers. The mechanisms eliciting these anti-GBM autoantibodies were investigated in mouse models recapitulating this phenotype. Wild-type and FcγRIIB(-/-) mice immunized with autologous murine GBM NC1 hexamers produced mouse IgG1-restricted autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which bound to the GBM in vivo but did not cause GN. In these mice, intact collagen IV from murine GBM was not immunogenic. However, in Col4a3(-/-) Alport mice, both intact collagen IV and NC1 hexamers from murine GBM elicited IgG Abs specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which were not subclass restricted. As heterologous Ag in COL4A3-humanized mice, murine GBM NC1 hexamers elicited mouse IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers and induced anti-GBM Ab GN. These findings indicate that tolerance toward autologous intact α345(IV) collagen is established in hosts expressing this Ag, even though autoreactive B cells specific for α345NC1 hexamers are not purged from their repertoire. Proteolysis selectively breaches this tolerance by generating autoimmunogenic α345NC1 hexamers. This provides a mechanism eliciting autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which are restricted to noninflammatory IgG subclasses and are nonnephritogenic. In Alport syndrome, lack of tolerance toward α345(IV) collagen promotes production of alloantibodies to α345NC1 hexamers, including proinflammatory IgG subclasses that mediate posttransplant anti-GBM nephritis. PMID:23303673

  16. Genetic interaction between Caenorhabditis elegans teneurin ten-1 and prolyl 4-hydroxylase phy-1 and their function in collagen IV–mediated basement membrane integrity during late elongation of the embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topf, Ulrike; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Teneurins are a family of phylogenetically conserved proteins implicated in pattern formation and morphogenesis. The sole orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, ten-1, is important for hypodermal cell migration, neuronal migration, path finding and fasciculation, gonad development, and basement membrane integrity of some tissues. However, the mechanisms of TEN-1 action remain to be elucidated. Using a genome-wide RNA interference approach, we identified phy-1 as a novel interaction partner of ten-1. phy-1 codes for the catalytic domain of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase. Loss of phy-1 significantly enhanced the embryonic lethality of ten-1 null mutants. Double-mutant embryos arrested during late elongation with epidermal defects, disruption of basement membranes, and detachment of body wall muscles. We found that deletion of phy-1 caused aggregation of collagen IV in body wall muscles in elongated embryos and triggered the loss of tissue integrity in ten-1 mutants. In addition, phy-1 and ten-1 each genetically interact with genes encoding collagen IV. These findings support a functional mechanism in which loss of ten-1, together with a reduction of assembled and secreted basement membrane collagen IV protein, leads to detachment of the epidermis from muscle cells during late elongation of the embryo when mechanical stress is generated by muscle contractions. PMID:21795395

  17. Still more complexity in mammalian basement membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    At the epithelial/mesenchymal interface of most tissues lies the basement membrane (BM). These thin sheets of highly specialized extracellular matrix vary in composition in a tissue-specific manner, and during development and repair. For about two decades it has been apparent that all BMs contain...

  18. Molecular sieve of the rat glomerular basement membrane: a transmission electron microscopic study of enzyme-treated specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiyasu,Akira

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated rat glomerular basement membrane was treated with elastase and observed by transmission electron microscopy. The treatment with elastase revealed the fundamental structure of the glomerular basement membrane quite clearly, and enabled the observation of a sieve structure within the glomerular basement membrane. This sieve structure may play a major role in the filtration of blood as well as in the production of urine. Treatment with antibody showed that the sieve was mainly constituted of type IV collagen.

  19. Organogenesis of the kidney glomerulus: Focus on the glomerular basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a crucial component of the kidney's filtration barrier that separates the vasculature from the urinary space. During glomerulogenesis, the GBM is formed from fusion of two distinct basement membranes, one synthesized by the glomerular epithelial cell (podocyte) and the other by the glomerular endothelial cell. The main components of the GBM are laminin-521 (α5β2γ1), collagen α3α4α5(IV), nidogen and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan, agrin. By studying ...

  20. Heterogeneous distribution of a basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan in rat tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1987-01-01

    buoyant density HSPG from the murine Engelbreth-Holm swarm tumor. It was, however, confirmed that only a single population of antibodies was present in the serum. Despite the presence of similar epitopes on these two proteoglycans of different hydrodynamic properties, it was apparent that the PYS-2 HSPG...... recognized by this antiserum. Those basement membranes that lacked the HSPG strongly stained with antisera against laminin and type IV collagen. The striking distribution pattern is possibly indicative of multiple species of basement membrane HSPGs of which one type is recognized by this antiserum. Further...... represents a basement membrane proteoglycan of distinct properties reflected in its restricted distribution in vivo....

  1. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  2. Basement membrane abnormalities in human eyes with diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J;

    1996-01-01

    human eyes obtained at autopsy (seven normal, five diabetic without DR, and 13 diabetic with DR) by immunofluorescence with antibodies to 30 BM and extracellular matrix components. In non-DR eyes, no qualitative changes of ocular BM components were seen. In some DR corneas, epithelial BM was stained......Vascular and parenchymal basement membranes (BMs) are thickened in diabetes, but alterations in individual BM components in diabetic eyes, especially in diabetic retinopathy (DR), are obscure. To identify abnormalities in the distribution of specific constituents, we analyzed cryostat sections of...... discontinuously for laminin-1, entactin/nidogen, and alpha3-alpha4 Type IV collagen, in contrast to non-DR corneas. Major BM alterations were found in DR retinas compared to normals and non-DR diabetics. The inner limiting membrane (retinal BM) of DR eyes had accumulations of fibronectin (including cellular) and...

  3. The spatial organization of Descemet's membrane-associated type IV collagen in the avian cornea

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The organization of type IV collagen in the unconventional basement membrane of the corneal endothelium (Descemet's membrane) was investigated in developing chicken embryos using anti-collagen mAbs. Both immunofluorescence histochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were performed. In mature embryos (greater than 15 d of development), the type IV collagen of Descemet's membrane was present as an array of discrete aggregates of amorphous material at the interface between Descemet's membrane a...

  4. Immunohistochemical distribution of basement membrane proteins in the human inner ear from older subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiyama, Akira; Mowry, Sarah E.; Lopez, Ivan A.; Ishiyama, Gail

    2009-01-01

    The immunolocalization of several basement membrane (BM) proteins was investigated in vestibular endorgans microdissected from temporal bones obtained from subjects with a documented normal auditory and vestibular function (n = 5, average age = 88 years old). Fluorescent immunostaining using antibodies directed at collagen IVα2, nidogen-1, laminin-β2, α-dystroglycan, and tenascin-C was applied to cryosections from human cochlea, cristae ampullares, utricular and saccular maculae. Collagen IVα...

  5. Distribution of individual components of basement membrane in human colon polyps and adenocarcinomas as revealed by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Bartek, J; Couchman, J R; Kapuller, L L; Veselov, V V; Kovarik, J; Perevoshchikov, A G; Krutovskikh, V A

    1992-01-01

    -membrane components (laminin, entactin/nidogen, collagen type IV and large heparan sulfate proteoglycan), as well as to keratin 8. In all adenocarcinomas, including mucinous, basement membranes were altered more at the invasive front than in the parenchyma. The degree of this alteration was inversely correlated with...... basement-membrane components and to a specific keratin may constitute an adequate immunohistochemical test for the presence of invasion, and may be useful in the histologic analysis of polyps, especially in dubious cases....

  6. Development and heterogeneity of antigens in the immature nephron. Reactivity with human antiglomerular basement membrane autoantibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeraj, K.; Fish, A. J.; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was performed with 15 human anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and mouse monoclonal antibodies to Type IV collagen (MBM4) and renal basement membranes (MBM15) on renal tissue from 6 fetuses (gestational age, 15-23 weeks), 8 infants (age, 1-21 days), and 8 children and adults (ages, 3-27 years). Of the 15 human anti-GBM antibodies that react with GBM in adult glomeruli, only 4 identified antigens in the GBM of fetal and infant glomeruli. I...

  7. Expression of VLA-integrins and their related basement membrane ligands in gingiva from patients of various periodontitis categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürses, N.; Thorup, Alis Karabulut; Reibel, J.; Carter, G.W.; Holmstrup, Palle

    integrins, basement membrane, gingiva, periodontitis, periodontal disease activity immunofluorescence......integrins, basement membrane, gingiva, periodontitis, periodontal disease activity immunofluorescence...

  8. Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the Bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, J C; Savige, J; Seymour, A E; Dowling, J; Martinello, P; Colville, D; Sinclair, R; Naito, I; Jennings, G; Huxtable, C

    2000-08-01

    Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; alpha 3(IV), alpha 4(IV), and alpha 5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the alpha 6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses. PMID:10922317

  9. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans: localization in adult rat tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Couchman, J R

    1990-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been described as the major proteoglycan component of basement membranes. However, previous investigators have also provided evidence for the presence of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan in these structures. Recently we described the production and...... characterization of core protein-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) present in Reichert's membrane, a transient extra-embryonic structure of rodents. This CSPG was also demonstrated to be present in adult rat kidney. We report here the tissue distribution of...... epitopes recognized by these MAb. The ubiquitous presence of these epitopes in the basement membranes of nearly all adult rat tissues demonstrates that at least one CSPG is a constituent of most basement membranes, and by virtue of its unique distribution is distinct from other chondroitin and dermatan...

  10. Ultrastructural localization of the core protein of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in adult rat skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R;

    1990-01-01

    Basement membranes are complex extracellular matrices present at epithelial/mesenchymal interfaces of tissues. The dermal-epidermal junction has been shown to contain numerous components, some of the most well known being laminin, types IV and VII collagens, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, fibronec...... primarily within the basal lamina, apparently concentrated in the lamina densa. In addition, some of the proteoglycan was also present beneath the lamina densa, associated with the reticular lamina collagen fibrils....

  11. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, Stephen A; Dayal, Jasbani H.S; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R.; Kimble, Roy M; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W H Irwin; Leigh, Irene M.; McGrath, John A.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstra...

  12. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Watt

    Full Text Available Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3, in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention.

  13. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Stephen A; Dayal, Jasbani H S; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R; Kimble, Roy M; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W H Irwin; Leigh, Irene M; McGrath, John A; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Tolar, Jakub; South, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26380979

  14. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J;

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The....... Mouse decidual cells isolated from 6- to 7-day pregnant uteri explanted in vitro continue to synthesize basement-membrane-like extracellular matrix. Using immunohistochemistry and metabolic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and fluorography, it was shown that the decidual cells...... undergo pseudodecidualization. We thus showed that stromal cells from pregnant and nonpregnant mouse uteri synthesize significant amounts of basement-membrane components in vitro, and hence could serve as a good model for the study of normal basement-membrane components....

  15. Enhanced assembly of basement membrane matrix by endodermal cells in response to fibronectin substrata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austria, M R; Couchman, J R

    1991-01-01

    cells, in comparison to cells adherent to type I collagen-coated, vitronectin-coated or uncoated substrata. Direct effects of fibronectin or laminin on the degree of cell spreading or rate of proliferation were not responsible for enhanced matrix deposition. The effect did not result from a redirection...... of basement membrane components to the matrix, since there was no decrease in matrix constituents released to the culture supernatants. Furthermore, the synthesis and release of other molecules that are not basement membrane constituents was unaltered in response to different extracellular matrix...... substrata. Experiments with fibronectin fragments showed that a 105 x 10(3) Mr 'cell'-binding domain (containing the cell attachment sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) was an important contributor to enhanced matrix deposition, while the N-terminal 29 x 10(3) Mr heparin-binding domain also contributed to the effect...

  16. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S;

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left ve...

  17. Immunological characterization of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Accavitti, M A; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    Reichert's membrane, an extraembryonic membrane present in developing rodents, has been proposed as an in vivo model for the study of basement membranes. We have used this membrane as a source for isolation of basement membrane proteoglycans. Reichert's membranes were extracted in a guanidine/3-[...

  18. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor. (paper)

  19. Type IV collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type IV collagen is a highly specialized form of collagen found only in basement membranes. It is one of the major components of all basement membranes together with the glycoproteins laminin, nidogen, entactin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Basement membranes are ubiquitous, thin, sheetlike structures found frequently under epithelial and endothelial cell linings but also surrounding many cell types such as muscle, nerve, and fat. They function as a selective filtration barrier for macromolecules, for example, in the kidney, blood--brain barrier, and placenta, but also separate extracellular matrix from epithelial or endothelial cell layers as in gut, skin, cornea, lung, and blood vessels. Indications that basement membranes contained a collagen came from X-ray studies of intact basement membranes as early as 1951. Later, hydroxyproline and then hydroxylysine were detected in amino acid compositions of whole basement membranes. Because of the insolubility of basement membrane components, attempts were made to solubilize the collagen using Pronase, a method that had proved useful for type I collagen. The material that was isolated and characterized was clearly different from the other interstitial collagens known at that time, i.e., α1(I), α1(II), and α1(III). Basement membrane collagen was therefore designated type IV collagen

  20. Reticular basement membrane in asthma and COPD: Similar thickness, yet different composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen JW Liesker

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Jeroen JW Liesker1, Nick H Ten Hacken1, Mieke Zeinstra-Smith2, Steven R Rutgers1, Dirkje S Postma1, Wim Timens21Department of Pulmonology; 2Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Background: Reticular basement membrane (RBM thickening has been variably associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Even if RBM thickness is similar in both diseases, its composition might still differ. Objective: To assess whether RBM thickness and composition differ between asthma and COPD. Methods: We investigated 24 allergic asthmatics (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 92% predicted, and 17 nonallergic COPD patients (FEV1 60% predicted, and for each group a control group of similar age and smoking habits (12 and 10 persons, respectively. Snap-frozen sections of bronchial biopsies were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and for collagen I, III, IV, V, laminin and tenascin. RBM thickening was assessed by digital image analysis. Relative staining intensity of each matrix component was determined.Results: Mean (SD RBM thickness was not significantly different between asthma and COPD 5.5 (1.3 vs 6.0 (1.8 μm, but significantly larger than in their healthy counterparts, ie, 4.7 (0.9 and 4.8 (1.2 μm, respectively. Collagen I and laminin stained significantly stronger in asthma than in COPD. Tenascin stained stronger in asthma than in healthy controls of similar age, and stronger in COPD controls than in asthma controls (p 0.05.Conclusion: RBM thickening occurs both in asthma and COPD. We provide supportive evidence that its composition differs in asthma and COPD. Keywords: reticular basement membrane thickness, reticular basement membrane composition, asthma, biopsy, COPD, remodeling

  1. A unique covalent bond in basement membrane is a primordial innovation for tissue evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Aaron L; Vanacore, Roberto M; Chetyrkin, Sergei V; Pedchenko, Vadim K; Bhave, Gautam; Yin, Viravuth P; Stothers, Cody L; Rose, Kristie Lindsey; McDonald, W Hayes; Clark, Travis A; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Steele, Robert E; Ivy, Michael T; Hudson, Julie K; Hudson, Billy G

    2014-01-01

    Basement membrane, a specialized ECM that underlies polarized epithelium of eumetazoans, provides signaling cues that regulate cell behavior and function in tissue genesis and homeostasis. A collagen IV scaffold, a major component, is essential for tissues and dysfunctional in several diseases. Studies of bovine and Drosophila tissues reveal that the scaffold is stabilized by sulfilimine chemical bonds (S = N) that covalently cross-link methionine and hydroxylysine residues at the interface of adjoining triple helical protomers. Peroxidasin, a heme peroxidase embedded in the basement membrane, produces hypohalous acid intermediates that oxidize methionine, forming the sulfilimine cross-link. We explored whether the sulfilimine cross-link is a fundamental requirement in the genesis and evolution of epithelial tissues by determining its occurrence and evolutionary origin in Eumetazoa and its essentiality in zebrafish development; 31 species, spanning 11 major phyla, were investigated for the occurrence of the sulfilimine cross-link by electrophoresis, MS, and multiple sequence alignment of de novo transcriptome and available genomic data for collagen IV and peroxidasin. The results show that the cross-link is conserved throughout Eumetazoa and arose at the divergence of Porifera and Cnidaria over 500 Mya. Also, peroxidasin, the enzyme that forms the bond, is evolutionarily conserved throughout Metazoa. Morpholino knockdown of peroxidasin in zebrafish revealed that the cross-link is essential for organogenesis. Collectively, our findings establish that the triad-a collagen IV scaffold with sulfilimine cross-links, peroxidasin, and hypohalous acids-is a primordial innovation of the ECM essential for organogenesis and tissue evolution. PMID:24344311

  2. Basement membrane changes in capillaries of the ageing human retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powner, Michael B; Scott, Andrew; Zhu, Meidong; Munro, Peter M G; Foss, Alexander J E; Hageman, Gregory S; Gillies, Mark C; Fruttiger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The ultrastructural appearance of retinal capillaries can yield important information about disease mechanisms, but is not well characterised in human post mortem samples. We therefore aimed to create a baseline for the appearance of capillaries and establish how this is influenced by post mortem fixation delays and donor age. Methods Electron microscopy was used to characterise retinal capillaries in 20 anonymous donors (with no known eye diseases) of various ages and with various post mortem fixation delays. In addition, samples from six patients with conditions that are known to affect the retinal vasculature (four cases of type 2 diabetes without diabetic retinopathy, one case of diabetic retinopathy and one case of macular telangiectasia type 2) were analysed. Results Vacuoles were found in capillary basement membranes at the vessel—glia interface in all samples, from both the normal and disease cases. Vacuole frequency increased with donor age but was not influenced by post mortem fixation delays. Conclusion Vacuoles in the basement membrane are a normal feature of adult human retinal capillaries and do not indicate disease. Their incidence increases with age and might be a contributing factor to late-onset pathologies of the retinal vasculature. PMID:21606466

  3. Laminin isoforms in endothelial and perivascular basement membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Lema F.; Di Russo, Jacopo; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, one of the major functional components of basement membranes, are found underlying endothelium, and encasing pericytes and smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. Depending on the type of blood vessel (capillary, venule, postcapillary venule, vein or artery) and their maturation state, both the endothelial and mural cell phenotype vary, with associated changes in laminin isoform expression. Laminins containing the α4 and α5 chains are the major isoforms found in the vessel wall, with the added contribution of laminin α2 in larger vessels. We here summarize current data on the precise localization of these laminin isoforms and their receptors in the different layers of the vessel wall, and their potential contribution to vascular homeostasis. PMID:23263631

  4. MT1-MMP-mediated basement membrane remodeling modulates renal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggins, Karen S.; Mernaugh, Glenda [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Su, Yan; Quaranta, Vito [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu [Division of Cancer Cell Research, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Pozzi, Ambra [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Research Medicine, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Zent, Roy, E-mail: roy.zent@vanderbilt.edu [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Research Medicine, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling regulates multiple cellular functions required for normal development and tissue repair. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key mediators of this process and membrane targeted MMPs (MT-MMPs) in particular have been shown to be important in normal development of specific organs. In this study we investigated the role of MT1-MMP in kidney development. We demonstrate that loss of MT1-MMP leads to a renal phenotype characterized by a moderate decrease in ureteric bud branching morphogenesis and a severe proliferation defect. The kidneys of MT1-MMP-null mice have increased deposition of collagen IV, laminins, perlecan, and nidogen and the phenotype is independent of the MT-1MMP target, MMP-2. Utilizing in vitro systems we demonstrated that MTI-MMP proteolytic activity is required for renal tubule cells to proliferate in three dimensional matrices and to migrate on collagen IV and laminins. Together these data suggest an important role for MT1-MMP in kidney development, which is mediated by its ability to regulate cell proliferation and migration by proteolytically cleaving kidney basement membrane components.

  5. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  6. ER stress and basement membrane defects combine to cause glomerular and tubular renal disease resulting from Col4a1 mutations in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frances E.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Murray, Lydia S.; Lu, Yinhui; McNeilly, Sarah; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Lennon, Rachel; Sado, Yoshikazu; Brownstein, David G.; Mullins, John J.; Kadler, Karl E.; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Collagen IV is a major component of basement membranes, and mutations in COL4A1, which encodes collagen IV alpha chain 1, cause a multisystemic disease encompassing cerebrovascular, eye and kidney defects. However, COL4A1 renal disease remains poorly characterized and its pathomolecular mechanisms are unknown. We show that Col4a1 mutations in mice cause hypotension and renal disease, including proteinuria and defects in Bowman's capsule and the glomerular basement membrane, indicating a role for Col4a1 in glomerular filtration. Impaired sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and distal nephron despite elevated aldosterone levels indicates that tubular defects contribute to the hypotension, highlighting a novel role for the basement membrane in vascular homeostasis by modulation of the tubular response to aldosterone. Col4a1 mutations also cause diabetes insipidus, whereby the tubular defects lead to polyuria associated with medullary atrophy and a subsequent reduction in the ability to upregulate aquaporin 2 and concentrate urine. Moreover, haematuria, haemorrhage and vascular basement membrane defects confirm an important vascular component. Interestingly, although structural and compositional basement membrane defects occurred in the glomerulus and Bowman's capsule, no tubular basement membrane defects were detected. By contrast, medullary atrophy was associated with chronic ER stress, providing evidence for cell-type-dependent molecular mechanisms of Col4a1 mutations. These data show that both basement membrane defects and ER stress contribute to Col4a1 renal disease, which has important implications for the development of treatment strategies for collagenopathies. PMID:26839400

  7. Basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is abnormally associated with the glomerular capillary basement membrane of diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Abrahamson, D R; Bynum, K R; St John, P L; Couchman, J R

    1994-01-01

    exception being the normal glomerular capillary basement membrane (GBM), where it is absent. In the present study of mature kidneys we examined the distribution of BM-CSPG in streptozocin-induced diabetes mellitus in rats. We found BM-CSPG atypically associated with the GBM of diabetic animals as early as 1...... month after induction of diabetes mellitus. Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) of affected capillary loops showed BM-CSPG present in the subendothelial matrix in areas of GBM thickening and absent in areas where the GBM appears to be of normal thickness. Moreover, the association of BM-CSPG with regions of...... the pericapillary GBM affects the morphology of the capillary endothelial cells within these areas, directly displacing the cell body from the GBM proper and causing loss of fenestrae. These new data on BM-CSPG distribution reflect abnormal glomerular extracellular matrix protein biosynthesis...

  8. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the basement membrane (BM) and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 3H-proline labeled collagenous and non collagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.09 μg/ml, and TC-106 cells at 0.08 μg/ml. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels almost 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more than retinol palmitate. Furthermore, A549 cells treated with retinol acetate, under conditions whereby an anti-invasive state was induced,showed an increase in the number of cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABP), a decrease in the activity of type IV collagenase and ectosialyltransferase, and no change in the activity of transglutaminase

  9. Influence of a reconstituted basement membrane and its components on casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    M. L. Li; Aggeler, J; Farson, D A; Hatier, C; Hassell, J; Bissell, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    When primary mouse mammary epithelial cells are cultured on plastic, they rapidly lose their ability to synthesize and secrete most milk proteins even in the presence of lactogenic hormones, whereas cells cultured on released type I collagen gels show greatly enhanced mRNA levels and secretion rates of beta-casein and of some other milk proteins. We show here that culture on a reconstituted basement membrane from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor (EHS) allows greater than 90% of cells to produce hi...

  10. Fluid Mechanics of the Vascular Basement Membrane in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Hui, Jonathan; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter; Carare, Roxana; McLeod, Kenneth; Schaffer, David

    2013-11-01

    Beta-amyloid is a normal product of brain metabolic function and is found within the interstitial fluid of the brain. Failure of the clearance of beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. The vascular basement membrane (VBM) within the walls of cerebral arteries surrounds the spirally arranged smooth muscle cells and represents an essential pathway for removal of beta-amyloid from the brain. This process fails with the stiffening of arterial walls associated with aging. In this study we hypothesize that the deformation of the VBM associated with arterial pulsations drives the interstitial fluid to drain in the direction opposite of the arterial blood flow. This hypothesis is theoretically investigated by modeling the VBM as a thin, coaxial, fluid-filled porous medium surrounding a periodically deforming cylindrical tube. Flow and boundary conditions required to achieve such a backward clearance are derived through a control volume analysis of mass, momentum, and energy.

  11. The vascular basement membrane as "soil" in brain metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Shawn Carbonell

    Full Text Available Brain-specific homing and direct interactions with the neural substance are prominent hypotheses for brain metastasis formation and a modern manifestation of Paget's "seed and soil" concept. However, there is little direct evidence for this "neurotropic" growth in vivo. In contrast, many experimental studies have anecdotally noted the propensity of metastatic cells to grow along the exterior of pre-existing vessels of the CNS, a process termed vascular cooption. These observations suggest the "soil" for malignant cells in the CNS may well be vascular, rather than neuronal. We used in vivo experimental models of brain metastasis and analysis of human clinical specimens to test this hypothesis. Indeed, over 95% of early micrometastases examined demonstrated vascular cooption with little evidence for isolated neurotropic growth. This vessel interaction was adhesive in nature implicating the vascular basement membrane (VBM as the active substrate for tumor cell growth in the brain. Accordingly, VBM promoted adhesion and invasion of malignant cells and was sufficient for tumor growth prior to any evidence of angiogenesis. Blockade or loss of the beta1 integrin subunit in tumor cells prevented adhesion to VBM and attenuated metastasis establishment and growth in vivo. Our data establishes a new understanding of CNS metastasis formation and identifies the neurovasculature as the critical partner for such growth. Further, we have elucidated the mechanism of vascular cooption for the first time. These findings may help inform the design of effective molecular therapies for patients with fatal CNS malignancies.

  12. Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease superimposed on membranous nephropathy: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivera Noel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by pulmonary hemorrhage, crescentic glomerulonephritis and the presence of circulating anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies. The simultaneous occurrence of both anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and membranous nephropathy is rare. Case presentation A 59-year-old Hispanic man presented with acute onset of nausea and vomiting and was found to have renal insufficiency. Work-up included a kidney biopsy, which revealed anti-glomerular basement membrane disease with underlying membranous nephropathy. He was treated with emergent hemodialysis, intravenous corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, and cyclophosphamide without improvement in his renal function. Conclusion Simultaneous anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and membranous nephropathy is very rare. There have been 16 previous case reports in the English language literature that have been associated with a high mortality and morbidity, and a very high rate of renal failure resulting in hemodialysis. Co-existence of membranous nephropathy and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease may be immune-mediated, although the exact mechanism is not clear.

  13. Perlecan and basement membrane-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (bamacan) are two basement membrane chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans in the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Kapoor, R; Sthanam, M; Wu, R R

    1996-01-01

    perlecan but, in addition to being present as a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, it is also present as a hybrid molecule, with dermatan sulfate chains. A minor population of perlecan apparently lacks heparan sulfate chains totally, and some of this is substituted with chondroitin sulfate. The second species...... heparan sulfate proteoglycan, widespread in many basement membranes and connective tissues. We now identify two distinct proteoglycan species from this tumor source, which are substituted with galactosaminoglycans and which show basement membrane localization by immunohistochemistry. One species is...... is immunologically related to basement membrane-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (BM-CSPG) and bears chondroitin sulfate chains. No BM-CSPG was detectable which was substituted with heparan sulfate chains. A combination of immunological and molecular approaches, including cDNA cloning, showed that...

  14. Remodeling of basement membrane in patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoraş, Adriana; Grigoraş, Constantin Cristian; Giuşcă, Simona Eliza; Căruntu, Irina Draga; Amălinei, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    The "bronchial remodeling" specific for the asthmatic disease consists in irreversible changes of the bronchial wall, including glandular and smooth muscle fibers hyperplasia and÷or hypertrophy, goblet cells hyperplasia, and thickening of basement membrane (BM). We aimed to analyze the BM thickness in asthma patients, in order to validate the relationship between its changes and the disease severity defined in agreement with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria. The study group has been formed of 38 patients with different degrees of severity of asthma established by spirometry using Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), and two patients without asthma symptoms as controls. The specimens harvested by fibrobronchoscopy have been processed by paraffin embedding followed by Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) and Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. For each case, the BM measurement has been realized by a "point-by-point" method. Statistical analysis has been performed using SPSS 17 software, by applying non-parametric correlation tests. The quantitative assessment revealed a progressive increase in BM thickness during the course of the disease, from a mean value of 11.2 μm in stage 1 to that of 15.6 μm in stage 4. Even if this process has been noticed starting with the first stage of asthma, the differences in the BM size were statistically significant only for stages 1 and 3 (p=0.047), stages 1 and 4 (p=0.000), stages 2 and 3 (p=0.000), and stages 3 and 4 (p=0.000). Spearman's test has shown an opposite correlation between the BM thickness and asthma severity defined by FEV1 values (r=-0.86, pasthma and continues in a progressive modality, the BM thickening being correlated with the disease severity. Thus, we support the concept of biological consequences of BM thickening in asthma pathogenesis, a mechanism still incompletely deciphered. PMID:27151696

  15. Ultrastructural localization of type V collagen in rat kidney

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies specific for the alpha 1 (V) chain and native collagen molecules containing the alpha 1 (V) chain have been used in electron immunohistochemical studies of rat kidney to determine the ultrastructural distribution of this class of collagen molecules. In addition, antibodies against type I collagen and whole basement membrane were used as markers for interstitial collagen and authentic basement membranes. Our results indicate that type V collagen is present in the renal interstitium ...

  16. Detection of hidden nephritogenic antigen determinants in human renal and nonrenal basement membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshioka, K; Michael, A F; Velosa, J; Fish, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactivity of 10 human anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) autoantibodies with basement membrane antigens of human adult and infant kidney, lung, placenta, and skin was examined by ELISA and immunofluorescence microscopy. All autoantibodies were previously shown to react with adult kidney by indirect immunofluorescence and with collagenase-digested adult GBM by ELISA. Four antibodies (group A) were positive on infant and fetal kidney sections by immunofluorescence, and six antibodies ...

  17. Energy stored and dissipated in skeletal muscle basement membranes during sinusoidal oscillations.

    OpenAIRE

    Tidball, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    We subjected single skeletal muscle cells from frog semitendinosus to sinusoidal oscillations that simulated the strain experienced as the cells near the end of passive extension and begin active contraction in slow swimming. Other cells from which the basement membrane was removed by enzymatic and mechanical procedures were tested identically. Effectiveness of the basement membrane removal technique was evaluated by electron microscopy, by an electrophoretic and lectin-binding assay for depl...

  18. Attachment of oral bacteria to a basement-membrane-like matrix and to purified matrix proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, J R; S. R. John; Kramer, R H; Hoover, C.I.; Murray, P A

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the adherence of oral bacteria to an in vitro basement-membrane-like matrix and to selected individual macromolecular constituents of this matrix. Radiolabeled bacteria were incubated with basement-membrane-like matrices isolated from PF HR-9 cells. Bacteroides gingivalis 33277, Fusobacterium nucleatum FN-2, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans GA3(A) bound to the matrix in the range of 44 to 70%, considerably higher than the ranges of A. actin...

  19. Open collagen membrane technique in socket preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Both hard and soft tissue undergo change after tooth extraction. In particular, the bone tissue surrounding teeth with fenestration or dehiscence defects undergoes dramatic change following tooth extraction, which can compromise further rehabilitation of the area. Adequate alveolar bone volume and keratinized mucosa are critical to the success of implant therapy. Therefore, the anatomic dimension of the alveolar ridge must be adequate to achieve an esthetically acceptable outcome of implant therapy. Previous studies have proposed many clinical techniques for preserving the extraction socket. This article presents a procedure in which an open collagen membrane technique was adopted to maintain an adequate volume of hard tissue and a sufficient width of the keratinized mucosa for further esthetic and functional implantation. Through this simple technique, an adequate volume and architecture around the implant can be achieved, with a long-term prognosis for implant therapy expected. PMID:27433553

  20. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological activity of retinoids was assayed in an in vitro quantitative assay of human tumor cell invasion using human amnion basement membrane (BM). The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the BM and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 14C-proline labeled collagenous and noncollagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested, the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.009 μg/mL, and of TC-106 cells at 0.07 μg/mL. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels over 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more potent than retinol palmitate. The model system will be useful for investigating antiinvasive activity of other retinoids as well as other compounds

  1. Vascular basement membranes as pathways for the passage of fluid into and out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alan W J; Sharp, Matthew MacGregor; Albargothy, Nazira J; Fernandes, Rute; Hawkes, Cheryl A; Verma, Ajay; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of conventional lymphatics, drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes is along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Perivascular pathways are also involved in the entry of CSF into the brain by the convective influx/glymphatic system. The objective of this study is to differentiate the cerebral vascular basement membrane pathways by which fluid passes out of the brain from the pathway by which CSF enters the brain. Experiment 1: 0.5 µl of soluble biotinylated or fluorescent Aβ, or 1 µl 15 nm gold nanoparticles was injected into the mouse hippocampus and their distributions determined at 5 min by transmission electron microscopy. Aβ was distributed within the extracellular spaces of the hippocampus and within basement membranes of capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Nanoparticles did not enter capillary basement membranes from the extracellular spaces. Experiment 2: 2 µl of 15 nm nanoparticles were injected into mouse CSF. Within 5min, groups of nanoparticles were present in the pial-glial basement membrane on the outer aspect of cortical arteries between the investing layer of pia mater and the glia limitans. The results of this study and previous research suggest that cerebral vascular basement membranes form the pathways by which fluid passes into and out of the brain but that different basement membrane layers are involved. The significance of these findings for neuroimmunology, Alzheimer's disease, drug delivery to the brain and the concept of the Virchow-Robin space are discussed. PMID:26975356

  2. Basement membrane proteoglycans in glomerular morphogenesis: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is temporally and spatially restricted during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Bynum, K; St John, P L; Abrahamson, D R; Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    basement membrane (GBM) but present in other basement membranes of the nephron, including collecting ducts, tubules, Bowman's capsule, and the glomerular mesangium. In light of this unique pattern of distribution and of the complex histoarchitectural reorganization occurring during nephrogenesis, the...... vasculature and ureteric buds, its first appearance in nephron basement membrane occurs during the late comma stage. In capillary loop-stage glomeruli of prenatal animals, BM-CSPG is present in the presumptive mesangial matrix but undetectable in the GBM. However, as postnatal glomerular maturation progresses...... BM-CSPG is also found in both the lamina rara interna and lamina densa of the GBM in progressively increasing amounts, being most evident in the GBM of 21-day-old animals. Micrographs of glomeruli from 42-day-old animals show that BM-CSPG gradually disappears from the GBM and, by 56 days after birth...

  3. Optically Highlighting Basement Membrane Components in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Elliott Hagedorn & David Sherwood ### Abstract Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other genetically encoded fluorescent proteins provide a means to study gene expression pattern and protein localization in living tissues. Recently discovered GFP-like fluorophores and engineered variants have further expanded the fluorescent protein toolkit for in vivo imaging. Here we describe a technique using transgenic C. elegans that contain laminin or type IV collagen fused to the g...

  4. Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis induced by anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. II. Effects of injecting heterologous, homologous, or autologous glomerular basement membranes and complete Freund's adjuvant into sheep.

    OpenAIRE

    Steblay, R. W.; Rudofsky, U H

    1983-01-01

    The effects of injecting human, rabbit, rat, or single-kidney homologous glomerular basement membrane (GBM) or autologous GBM, each in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), into 15- to 18-month-old sheep are compared. All sheep receiving heterologous GBM and 3 of 6 sheep receiving homologous GBM had anti-GBM nephritis, but such sheep did not bind autoantibodies or have Goodpasturelike lesions in their lungs. Sheep given injections of human GBM had autoantibodies to antigenic determinants shared b...

  5. Expression of basement membrane components through morphological changes in the hair growth cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Gibson, W T

    1985-01-01

    membrane separating this from the epithelial cells of the hair bulb, and in the basement membrane and connective tissue sheath which underly the cells of the outer root sheath. Early in catagen, the transitional stage, staining of the dermal papilla matrix disappeared. Fibronectin persisted in the basement...... the increase in fibronectin expression. However, growing cells, even in a suprabasal position, always had some fibronectin at their surface. Immunoelectron microscopy of early anagen follicles confirmed the light microscopic findings and also showed that fibronectin was present in small vesicles close...

  6. Marine origin collagen membranes for drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, A.P.; A. Domingues; Joana M Silva; Perez-Martin, R. I.; Sotelo, C. G.; Silva, Tiago H.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Collagen is the most abundant protein of animal connective tissues, found in skins, bones or cartilages, which turn it into one of the key polymers to be considered for biomedical applications, namely tissue engineering and drug delivery. Current industrial procedures to extract collagen involves bovine and porcine as main sources. However, due to religious factors and the risk of transmitting diseases to humans, the search for new sources has been growing.M...

  7. Rituximab for the treatment of refractory simultaneous anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) and membranous nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bandak, Ghassan; Jones, Bruce A.; Li, Jian; Yee, Jerry; Umanath, Kausik

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease occurs rarely in the presence of another B-cell disorder, membranous nephropathy. The coexistence of these two autoimmune disorders would be anticipated to require differing, specific therapies targeted to each disease process. We describe a case of concomitant membranous nephropathy and anti-GBM disease in which conventional therapy, including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide, failed to attenuate the anti-GBM...

  8. The effect of bacterial cellulose membrane compared with collagen membrane on guided bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung In; An, Sung-Jun; Kang, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effects of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as a barrier membrane on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in comparison with those of the resorbable collagen membranes. MATERIALS AND METHODS BC membranes were fabricated using biomimetic technology. Surface properties were analyzed, Mechanical properties were measured, in vitro cell proliferation test were performed with NIH3T3 cells and in vivo study were performed with rat calvarial defect and histomorphometric analysis was done. The Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used (α<.05). RESULTS BC membrane showed significantly higher mechanical properties such as wet tensile strength than collagen membrane and represented a three-dimensional multilayered structure cross-linked by nano-fibers with 60 % porosity. In vitro study, cell adhesion and proliferation were observed on BC membrane. However, morphology of the cells was found to be less differentiated, and the cell proliferation rate was lower than those of the cells on collagen membrane. In vivo study, the grafted BC membrane did not induce inflammatory response, and maintained adequate space for bone regeneration. An amount of new bone formation in defect region loaded with BC membrane was significantly similar to that of collagen membrane application. CONCLUSION BC membrane has potential to be used as a barrier membrane, and efficacy of the membrane on GBR is comparable to that of collagen membrane. PMID:26816579

  9. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans made by different basement-membrane-producing tumors have immunological and structural similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R; Hassell, J R

    1985-01-01

    Using immunological assays, we determined the relationship between the heparan sulfate proteoglycans produced by two different murine basement-membrane-producing tumors, i.e., the mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) tumor and the L2 rat yolk-sac tumor. Antibodies prepared against the heparan sulfat...

  10. Cdc42 expression in keratinocytes is required for the maintenance of the basement membrane in skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xunwei; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Brakebusch, Cord

    2006-01-01

    , structure and number of hemidesomosomes were not significantly changed in the Cdc42 mutant skin compared with the control mice and no blister formation was observed in mutant skin. These data indicate that Cdc42 in keratinocytes is important for maintenance of the basement membrane of skin....

  11. Monoclonal antibody GB3, a new probe for the study of human basement membranes and hemidesmosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrando, P.; Pisani, A.; Serieys, N.; Ortonne, J.P. (UER Medecine, Nice (France)); Hsi, Baeli; Yeh, Changjing (INSERM U210, Nice (France))

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody, GB3, has been raised against human amnion. Not only does GB3 bind to amniotic basement membrane, but it also recognizes an antigenic structure expressed by epidermal as well as by some other human basement membranes. This antigen is synthesized (and excreted) by cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes. It is expressed to a lesser extent by the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, but is not expressed by the SV40 virus-transformed SVK14 keratinocyte cell line. In ultrastructural studies, this antigen was located in the epidermal basement membrane, both in the lamina densa and in the lamina lucida, associated with hemidesmosomes. It was identified as a protein by in vitro proteolytic cleavage studies. The radio-immunoprecipitates from cultured human keratinocytes, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, showed that GB3 recognized five polypeptides of 93.5, 125, 130, 146 and 150 kD under reducing conditions. The tissue distribution of the antigen and the molecular weights (MWs) of its constitutive polypeptides suggest that it is different from other known components of basement membranes. It may provide a biochemical marker for hemidesmosomes. Furthermore, GB3 represents an interesting and original clinical probe, since the antigenic structure recognized by GB3 is lacking in Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa, a lethal genodermatosis in which a dermo-epidermal splitting occurs at the level of lamina lucida.

  12. Experimental orchitis induced in rats by passive transfer of an antiserum to seminiferous tubule basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, L; Denduchis, B; González, N N; Puig, R P

    1978-09-01

    A multifocal damage of the testis was obtained when rats were injected intravenously or under the tunica albuginea of the testis with a rabbit antiseminiferous tubule basement membrane serum. The damage was characterized by foci of perivascular and peritubular infiltrates of mononuclear round cells, infolding, thickening, and rupture of the seminiferous tubular wall and different degrees of injury of the germinal epithelium such as, cell disorganization, cell sloughing, and atrophy. Delamination and thickening of seminiferous tubule basement membrane and vacuolization of the Sertoli cell cytoplasm was often observed by electron microscopy. A linear deposit of rabbit gamma-globulin was detected by immunohistochemical techniques along the basement membranes of the seminiferous tubules and vessels. Testicular damage was not detected in rats injected with normal rabbit serum, used as control. In the kidneys of rats injected intravenously with the immune serum, a deposit of rabbit gamma-globulin was detected along glomerular basement membrane. Focal areas of mononuclear cell infiltrates, hypercellularity of glomeruli and thickening of glomerular capillary walls and Bowman's capsule were also observed. PMID:367304

  13. Monoclonal antibody GB3, a new probe for the study of human basement membranes and hemidesmosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monoclonal antibody, GB3, has been raised against human amnion. Not only does GB3 bind to amniotic basement membrane, but it also recognizes an antigenic structure expressed by epidermal as well as by some other human basement membranes. This antigen is synthesized (and excreted) by cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes. It is expressed to a lesser extent by the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, but is not expressed by the SV40 virus-transformed SVK14 keratinocyte cell line. In ultrastructural studies, this antigen was located in the epidermal basement membrane, both in the lamina densa and in the lamina lucida, associated with hemidesmosomes. It was identified as a protein by in vitro proteolytic cleavage studies. The radio-immunoprecipitates from cultured human keratinocytes, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, showed that GB3 recognized five polypeptides of 93.5, 125, 130, 146 and 150 kD under reducing conditions. The tissue distribution of the antigen and the molecular weights (MWs) of its constitutive polypeptides suggest that it is different from other known components of basement membranes. It may provide a biochemical marker for hemidesmosomes. Furthermore, GB3 represents an interesting and original clinical probe, since the antigenic structure recognized by GB3 is lacking in Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa, a lethal genodermatosis in which a dermo-epidermal splitting occurs at the level of lamina lucida

  14. Deposition of nucleosomal antigens (histones and DNA) in the epidermal basement membrane in human lupus nephritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Bruggen, M.C.J. van; Pijl, J.W. van der; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antinuclear autoantibodies complexed to nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate (HS) in the glomerular basement membrane. This binding is due to the binding of the positively charged histones to the strongly anionic HS. Nucleosomes and histones have been identified in glomerular deposits

  15. Effect of 137Cs gamma radiation on the fibronectin content in basement membrane of mouse small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of fibronectin in the small intestine of the mouse was investigated using an indirect immunofluorescence technique. Tissue fibronectin was preferentially located in the basement membrane and in the muscularis layer. Semiquantitative immunofluorescence determination of tissue fibronectin in the basement membrane showed only minor changes at 24 or 48 hours after 10 or 20 Gy of 137Cs gamma irradiation. (Auth.)

  16. Isotropic Versus Bipolar Functionalized Biomimetic Artificial Basement Membranes and Their Evaluation in Long-Term Human Cell Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Angela; Wistlich, Laura; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Walles, Heike; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    In addition to dividing tissues into compartments, basement membranes are crucial as cell substrates and to regulate cellular behavior. The development of artificial basement membranes is indispensable for the ultimate formation of functional engineered tissues; however, pose a challenge due to their complex structure. Herein, biodegradable electrospun polyester meshes are presented, exhibiting isotropic or bipolar bioactivation as a biomimetic and biofunctional model of the natural basement membrane. In a one-step preparation process, reactive star-shaped prepolymer additives, which generate a hydrophilic fiber surface, are electrospun with cell-adhesion-mediating peptides, derived from major components of the basement membrane. Human skin cells adhere to the functionalized meshes, and long-term co-culture experiments confirm that the artificial basement membranes recapitulate and preserve tissue specific functions. Several layers of immortalized human keratinocytes grow on the membranes, differentiating toward the surface and expressing typical epithelial markers. Fibroblasts migrate into the reticular lamina mimicking part of the mesh. Both cells types begin to produce extracellular matrix proteins and to remodel the initial membrane. It is shown at the example of skin that the artificial basement membrane design provokes biomimetic responses of different cell types and can thus be used as basis for the future development of basement membrane containing tissues. PMID:27283510

  17. Influence of a reconstituted basement membrane and its components on casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When primary mouse mammary epithelial cells are cultured on plastic, they rapidly lose their ability to synthesize and secrete most milk proteins even in the presence of lactogenic hormones, whereas cells cultured on release type I collagen gels show greatly enhanced mRNA levels and secretion rates of β-casein and of some other milk proteins. The authors show here that culture on a reconstituted basement membrane from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor (EHS) allows > 90% of cells to produce high levels of β-casein. By comparison, 30-40% of cells on released type 1 gels and only 2-10% of cells on plastic express β-casein after 6 days in culture. Because only 40% of cells from late pregnant gland produced β-casein before culture, the EHS matrix can both induce and maintain an increased level of casein gene expression. Individual basal lamina components were also evaluated. Type IV collagen and fibronectin had little effect on morphology and β-casein mRNA levels. In contrast, both laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan increased β-casein mRNA levels. Profound morphological differences were evident between cells cultured on plastic and on EHS matrix, the latter cells forming ducts, ductules, and lumina and resembling secretory alveoli. These results emphasize the vital role of the extracellular matrix in receiving and integrating structural and functional signals that can direct specific gene expression in differentiated tissues

  18. Subepithelial basement membrane thickness in patients with normal colonic mucosal appearance in colonoscopy:Results from southern Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fazilet Kayaselcuk; Ender Serin; Yǖksel Gumurdulu; Birol Ozer; Ilhan Tuncer; Sedat Boyacioglu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Our aims were to determine the normal limits of subepithelial basement membrane (SEBM) thickness in order to more accurately diagnose collagenous colitis in the population from southern Turkey and to investigate into links between SEBM thickness and age, and sex.METHODS: The study included 100 patients (mean age 50.0±13.3 years; male, 34; female, 66) with miscellaneous gastrointestinal symptoms, and normal colonic mucosal appearance in colonoscopic evaluation. Biopsies were taken from five different regions of the colon. SEBM was measured with a calibrated eyepiece on specimens prepared with specific stains for collagen. Intensity of inflammatory cells was graded semiquantitatively. Differences in SEBM thickness among the different colon regions, and relationships between SEBM thickness and age, sex, and density of inflammatory cells were statistically evaluated.RESULTS: The cecum and rectum showed the largest amounts of infiltrate. None of the specimens showed histologic findings of collagenous colitis. The SEBM thicknesses measured for each case ranged from 3-20 μm. The biggest thickness was observed in rectal mucosa (median value: 10 μm).Cecum and ascending colon showed similar SEBM thickness (median value: 5 μm). SEBM thickness was not correlated with patient age or sex, but was positively correlated with the intensity of inflammatory cells in each colon segment.CONCLUSION: In this patient group from southern Turkey,SEBM was thickest in the rectum. Our results indicate that,in this population, SEBM thickness is not correlated with age or sex, but is positively correlated with severity of inflammation. The findings also support the concept that measuring SEBM thickness at one segment in the colon is inadequate and may be misleading.

  19. The basement membrane constituents in the mouse embryo's tooth. An autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enamel organs isolated from the lower first teeth of 18-days old white mouse embryo by trypsin treatment were used in this study. The organs were cultured during periods of increasing time on a semi-solid medium containing cock serum. In another chase experiments, the organs were cultured on a liquid medium containing proline-3H, leucine-3H, and glucosamine-3H, were studied by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopes. It has been shown that the nature of the culture medium does not apparently interfere with the ability of the enamel to reconstitute the basement membrane. On the other hand, it have been found obvious differences concerning the kinetic of the used isotopes. The results indicate that the turn-over of the basement membrane constituents represents a continuous and homogenous process which continues to take place during, before and after reconstitution. 42 refs. (author)

  20. Ultrastructural and Temporal Changes of the Microvascular Basement Membrane and Astrocyte Interface Following Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Il; Kim, Eun Hee; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2009-01-01

    Microvascular integrity is lost during cerebral ischemia. Detachment of the microvascular basement membrane (BM) from the astrocyte, as well as degradation of the BM, is responsible for the loss of microvascular integrity. However, their ultrastructural and temporal changes during cerebral ischemia are not well known. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 48 hr. By using transmission electron microscopy, the p...

  1. Reticular basement membrane in asthma and COPD: Similar thickness, yet different composition

    OpenAIRE

    Jeroen JW Liesker; Ten Hacken, Nick H.; Mieke Zeinstra-Smith; Rutgers, Steven R; Dirkje S Postma; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Jeroen JW Liesker1, Nick H Ten Hacken1, Mieke Zeinstra-Smith2, Steven R Rutgers1, Dirkje S Postma1, Wim Timens21Department of Pulmonology; 2Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Background: Reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickening has been variably associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Even if RBM thickness is similar in both diseases, its composition might still differ. Objectiv...

  2. Tissue fibrocytes in patients with mild asthma: A possible link to thickness of reticular basement membrane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjermer Leif

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibroblasts, proposed as being derived from circulating fibrocytes, are considered to be important cells in thickening of the basement membrane in patients with asthma. We have studied the correlation of tissue fibrocyte levels to basement membrane thickness and the presence of fibrocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma and controls. Methods Patients with mild asthma (n = 9 were recruited and divided into two categories based on whether or not fibroblast-like cells could be established from BALF. Non-asthmatic healthy subjects (n = 5 were used as controls. Colocalization of the fibrocyte markers CD34, CD45RO, procollagen I, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were identified in bronchial biopsies from patients and controls by confocal microscopy. Kruskall-Wallis method was used to calculate statistical significance and Spearman coefficient of rank correlation was used to assess the degree of association. Results In patients with BALF fibroblasts, a 14-fold increase of tissue cells expressing CD34/CD45RO/α-SMA and a 16-fold increase of tissue cells expressing CD34/procollagen I was observed when compared to controls (p Conclusion These findings indicate a correlation between recruited fibrocytes in tissue and thickness of basement membrane. Fibroblast progenitor cells may therefore be important in airway remodeling in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma.

  3. Antigens of the basement membranes of the seminiferous tubules induce autoimmunity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, L; Satz, M L; Sztein, M B; Denduchis, B

    1982-05-01

    A preparation enriched in basement membranes from seminiferous tubules was isolated from rat testes (STBM) and injected with complete Freund's adjuvant into Wistar rats. In 60% of animals a mild multifocal orchitis was observed. In damaged areas, perivascular and peritubular mononuclear cell infiltrates and different degrees of cell sloughing of some seminiferous tubules were observed. Electron microscopy revealed focal thickenings and delamination of the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules as well as vacuolization of Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Using immunofluorescence discontinuous linear deposits of IgG were detected along the seminiferous tubular wall. Moreover, the same pattern of immunofluorescence was observed when the IgG eluted from the testes of the immunized rats was layered on sections of normal rat testis. Circulating antibodies to STBM were detected using passive haemagglutination in approximately 45% of the immunized rats, with titers ranging from 1:20 to 1:80. Leukocyte migration was inhibited when the spleen cells of the immunized rats were incubated with antigens from the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, whilst a negative reaction was obtained when the soluble fraction of testis homogenate was used. PMID:7050376

  4. Surface-bound basement membrane components accelerate amyloid-β peptide nucleation in air-free wells: an in vitro model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ozawa, Daisaku; Ookoshi, Tadakazu; Naiki, Hironobu

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β-peptide which consists of mainly 39-40 residues to the cortical and leptomeningeal vessel walls. There are no definite in vitro systems to support the hypothesis that the vascular basement membrane may act as a scaffold of amyloid β-peptide carried by perivascular drainage flow and accelerate its amyloid fibril formation in vivo. We previously reported the critical roles of interfaces and agitation on the nucleation of amyloid fibrils at low concentrations of amyloid β-peptide monomers. Here, we reproduced the perivascular drainage flow in vitro by using N-hydroxysuccinimide-Sepharose 4 Fast flow beads as an inert stirrer in air-free wells rotated at 1rpm. We then reproduced the basement membranes in the media of cerebral arteries in vitro by conjugating Matrigel and other proteins on the surface of Sepharose beads. These beads were incubated with 5μM amyloid β(1-40) at 37°C without air, where amyloid β(1-40) alone does not form amyloid fibrils. Using the initiation time of fibril growth kinetics (i.e., the lag time of fibril growth during which nuclei, on-pathway oligomers and protofibrils are successively formed) as a parameter of the efficiency of biological molecules to induce amyloid fibril formation, we found that basement membrane components including Matrigel, laminin, fibronectin, collagen type IV and fibrinogen accelerate the initiation of amyloid β-peptide fibril growth in vitro. These data support the essential role of vascular basement membranes in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. PMID:23608949

  5. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 0C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H and E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers.

  6. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Lei; Yang Wei; Mao Xuan; Mou Shansong; Tang Shunqing [Biomedical Engineering Institute, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: tshunqt@jnu.edu.cn, E-mail: tmuss@jnu.edu.cn

    2008-12-15

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 {sup 0}C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H and E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers.

  7. Intercellular deposits of basement membrane material in active human pituitary adenomas detected by immunostaining for laminin and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-eight human pituitary adenomas (24 endocrine active and 14 endocrine inactive tumors) were studied immunohistochemically for the presence of the basement membrane component, laminin, and ultrastructurally for the presence of basement membrane. Immunoreactivity of laminin delineated staining...... of epithelial and endothelial basement membranes, the reaction product being confined mostly to the perivascular zones. Moreover, a hitherto undescribed presence of intercellular laminin-positive droplets was observed in ten of the active adenomas (nine patients with hyperprolactinemia and....../or acromegalia and one patient with Cushing's syndrome). Concurrently, at the ultrastructural level, bunches of basement membrane-like material intermingled between the adenoma cells were demonstrated in seven of these ten active adenomas. Furthermore, secretory granules were entrapped occasionally in this...

  8. C3d fragment of complement interacts with laminin and binds to basement membranes of glomerulus and trophoblast

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal antibodies generated against human placental homogenate were found to react specifically with human complement component C3. In immunofluorescence of human tissues, these antibodies gave a bright linear staining outlining the glomerular basement membrane of the adult kidney and the trophoblast basement membrane of placenta. An identical staining pattern was observed with a rabbit C3d antiserum which also prevented binding of the monoclonal antibodies to tissue sections. O...

  9. Identification of the cutaneous basement membrane zone antigen and isolation of antibody in linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zone, J J; Taylor, T B; Kadunce, D P; Meyer, L J

    1990-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare blistering skin disease characterized by basement membrane zone deposition of IgA. This study identifies a tissue antigen detected by patient serum and then isolates the autoantibody using epidermis and protein bands blotted on nitrocellulose as immunoabsorbents. Sera from 10 patients (9 with cutaneous disease and 1 with cicatrizing conjunctivitis) were evaluated. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed an IgA anti-basement membrane antibody in 6 of...

  10. Cytotoxicity of bovine and porcine collagen membranes in mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Carneiro, Karine Fernandes; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Magalhães, Denildo

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the cytotoxicity and the release of nitric oxide induced by collagen membranes in human mononuclear cells. Peripheral blood was collected from each patient and the separation of mononuclear cells was performed by Ficoll. Then, 2x10(5) cells were plated in 48-well culture plates under the membranes in triplicate. The polystyrene surface was used as negative control. Cell viability was assessed by measuring mitochondrial activity (MTT) at 4, 12 and 24 h, with dosage levels of nitrite by the Griess method for the same periods. Data had non-normal distribution and were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were observed between the membranes and the control in the experimental period, although there was a significant reduction in viability over time (p<0.01). At 4 and 12 h, the porcine membrane induced a higher release of nitrite compared with the control and bovine membrane, respectively (p<0.01), and this difference was maintained at 24 h (p<0.05). This in vitro study showed that the porcine collagen membrane induces an increased production of proinflammatory mediators by mononuclear cells in the first hours of contact, decreasing with time. PMID:22460313

  11. Basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the L2 rat yolk sac carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Wewer, U; Albrechtsen, R

    1984-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the L2 rat yolk sac carcinoma has been purified and partially characterized. The proteoglycan has an apparent Mr of 750 000, 35% of which represents the core protein. The core protein seems to be homogeneous, whereas the heparan sulfate chains are heterogeneous w...... with an Mr of about 50 000-70 000, with 30% of the glucosamine being N-sulfated. Antibodies raised against the core protein of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan reacted with basement membranes of various rat and human tissue....

  12. Manufacture and scanning electron microscopic observation of human dermis collagen membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Introduction Collagen is a kind of biomacromolecule and can be used as cover material for burn wounds. In this article,we report the scanning electron microscopic observation of human dermis collagen membrane prepared by three methods.

  13. Pericytes regulate vascular basement membrane remodeling and govern neutrophil extravasation during inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Wang

    Full Text Available During inflammation polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs traverse venular walls, composed of the endothelium, pericyte sheath and vascular basement membrane. Compared to PMN transendothelial migration, little is known about how PMNs penetrate the latter barriers. Using mouse models and intravital microscopy, we show that migrating PMNs expand and use the low expression regions (LERs of matrix proteins in the vascular basement membrane (BM for their transmigration. Importantly, we demonstrate that this remodeling of LERs is accompanied by the opening of gaps between pericytes, a response that depends on PMN engagement with pericytes. Exploring how PMNs modulate pericyte behavior, we discovered that direct PMN-pericyte contacts induce relaxation rather than contraction of pericyte cytoskeletons, an unexpected response that is mediated by inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in pericytes. Taking our in vitro results back into mouse models, we present evidence that pericyte relaxation contributes to the opening of the gaps between pericytes and to the enlargement of the LERs in the vascular BM, facilitating PMN extravasation. Our study demonstrates that pericytes can regulate PMN extravasation by controlling the size of pericyte gaps and thickness of LERs in venular walls. This raises the possibility that pericytes may be targeted in therapies aimed at regulating inflammation.

  14. Laminin, a noncollagenous component of epithelial basement membranes synthesized by a rat yolk sac tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U; Albrechtsen, R; Ruoslahti, E

    1981-01-01

    Laminin, a glycoprotein antigenically similar or identical to a component of epithelial basement membranes, was identified as a major component of the abundant extracellular matrix synthesized by an experimentally induced rat yolk sac tumor. Immunocytochemical staining revealed laminin in cultured...... polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 200,000 and 400,000. These comigrated with the polypeptides of mouse laminin isolated previously. The yolk sac tumor tissue grown in vivo contained laminin in the tumor cells and in the extracellular material as evidenced by immunofluorescence and...... membranes in rat tissues in a manner indistinguishable from antilaminin. The presence of laminin in rat yolk sac cells, the presumed origin of our yolk sac tumor, was studied in some detail. Laminin was found to be present in normal cells of the visceral as well as the parietal yolk sac layer and in their...

  15. Specific fixation of bovine brain and retinal acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors to mouse embryonic eye basement membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeling pattern of mouse embryonic eye frozen sections incubated with radioiodinated brain acidic and basic fibroblasts growth factors (aFGF and bFGF) was investigated by autoradiography. Both growth factors bind to basement membranes in a dose-dependent way, with a higher affinity for bFGF. Similar data were obtained with eye-derived growth factors (EDGF), the retinal forms of FGF. There was a heterogeneity in the affinity of the various basement membranes toward these growth factors. The specificity of the growth factor-basement membrane interaction was demonstrated by the following experiments: (i) an excess of unlabeled growth factor displaced the labeling; (ii) unrelated proteins with different isoelectric points did not modify the labeling; and (iii) iodinated EGF or PDGF did not label basement membrane. In order to get a better understanding of the nature of this binding, the authors performed the incubation of the frozen sections with iodinated FGFs preincubated with various compounds. These results demonstrate that FGFs bind specifically to basement membranes, probably on the polysaccharidic part of the proteoheparan sulfate, and suggest that this type of interaction may be a general feature of the mechanism of action of these growth factors

  16. The central role of vascular extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: the matrix preloaded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Suresh C

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vascular endothelial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix is a compilation of different macromolecules organized by physical entanglements, opposing ionic charges, chemical covalent bonding, and cross-linking into a biomechanically active polymer. These matrices provide a gel-like form and scaffolding structure with regional tensile strength provided by collagens, elasticity by elastins, adhesiveness by structural glycoproteins, compressibility by proteoglycans – hyaluronans, and communicability by a family of integrins, which exchanges information between cells and between cells and the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues. Each component of the extracellular matrix and specifically the capillary basement membrane possesses unique structural properties and interactions with one another, which determine the separate and combined roles in the multiple diabetic complications or diabetic opathies. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and their parallel companion (atheroscleropathy are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities and chronic injurious stimuli. The adaptable quality of a matrix or form genetically preloaded with the necessary information to communicate and respond to an ever-changing environment, which supports the interstitium, capillary and arterial vessel wall is individually examined.

  17. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A. J.; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous ...

  18. Case with Brunsting-Perry-like localized subepidermal blister formations and immunoglobulin G antibodies against unidentified basement membrane zone antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Shibuya, Mami; Dainichi, Teruki; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    Brunsting-Perry type bullous pemphigoid is defined by the blister formation limited to the head and neck, and autoantibodies to type VII collagen are detected in several cases. However, the pathomechanisms and autoantigens in this condition remain unknown. We report a 20-year-old female patient with a more than 2-year history of recurrent tense blisters localized on the face with no distinct atrophic scar formation. The patient had neither extensive sun exposure nor a history suggestive of contact dermatitis. Oral betamethasone was effective on the skin lesions. Histopathology revealed subepidermal blister formation with dermal infiltrates of neutrophils. Although direct and indirect immunofluorescence tests detected immunoglobulin G antibodies to the basement membrane zone (BMZ), no known dermal or epidermal autoantigens were detected in immunoblot analyses. Therefore, this case may be a rare variant of Brunsting-Perry type localized bullous pemphigoid with autoantibodies to an undetermined BMZ antigen. PMID:26362108

  19. Changes in the molecular sieve of glomerular basement membrane in rats with aminonucleoside nephrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaya,Yasumasa

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available Isolated and purified glomerular basement membranes (GBM of normal and aminonucleoside (PAN nephrosis rats were observed by electron microscopy after negative staining. Although GBM of normal rats appeared as a molecular sieve with uniform pores, GBM of nephrotic rats showed enlargement and elongation of the pores. For an average of fifty pores, the long dimension was 40.4+/-10.7 A and the short dimension 13.8+/-3.6 A in nephrosis whereas the long dimension was 12.3+/-2.5 A and the short dimension 8.4+/-1.0 A in normal rats. Changes in the pores in GBM were thought to result in increased permeability of serum protein and hence proteinuria.

  20. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: A Kidney-Centric View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2015-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published works on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  1. Basement membrane changes in breast cancer detected by immunohistochemical staining for laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, R; Nielsen, M; Wewer, U;

    1981-01-01

    micrometastases were present, these cells also stained strongly for laminin. In nonmalignant breast tissues, the epithelial cells of the duct were positive for laminin, but the staining was weaker than in the carcinomas. Pretreatment of the fixed tissue sections with trypsin markedly enhanced the staining of......The distribution of the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin was studied by the immunoperoxidase technique in benign and malignant human breast tissue and in axillary lymph nodes from patients with breast cancer. An antiserum prepared against rat laminin was used. The specificity of this...... molecular weights of 400,000 and 200,000 of rat laminin in sodium dodecyl sulfate:polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The neoplastic cells in malignant breast tissues showed strong cytoplasmic staining for laminin, and a positive reaction was aslo found in lymph node metastases. In some cases in which only...

  2. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at defined times (0-163 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride in phosphate-buffered saline to maximize the recovery of 35S-proteoglycans. Glomeruli were isolated from the renal cortex and analyzed for 35S-proteoglycans by autoradiographic, biochemical, and immunochemical methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of [35S]heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-[(cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio]-1-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane of rat glomeruli. Autoradiographic analysis showed that 18% of total radioactivity present at the end of the labeling period was associated with the glomerular basement membrane

  3. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavan, L.A.; Davies, M.; Couchman, J.R.; Williams, M.A.; Mason, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium (35S)sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at defined times (0-163 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride in phosphate-buffered saline to maximize the recovery of 35S-proteoglycans. Glomeruli were isolated from the renal cortex and analyzed for 35S-proteoglycans by autoradiographic, biochemical, and immunochemical methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of (35S)heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-((cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio)-1-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane of rat glomeruli. Autoradiographic analysis showed that 18% of total radioactivity present at the end of the labeling period was associated with the glomerular basement membrane.

  4. [3H]glucosamine and [3H]proline radioautography of embryonic mouse dental basement membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]proline and [3H]glucosamine radioautography was performed to analyze the labeling pattern of mouse embryonic dental basement membrane before and during odontoblast terminal differentiation. Sixteen- and eighteen-day-old first lower molars and trypsin-isolated enamel organs, as well as EDTA-isolated dental papillae, were used. Continuous labeling for 12 to 24 hr was required with [3H]proline to obtain a clear labeling of epithelial-mesenchymal junction in intact tooth germs or accumulation of surface label in trypsin-isolated enamel organs. With [3H]glucosamine, after 6-hr labeling, the epithelial-mesenchymal junction was heavily labeled and the trypsin-isolated enamel organs accumulated substantial amounts of surface label, corresponding to the redeposited basement membrane. At Day 16 stage, these labels always had a uniform distribution and decreased during chase without any redistribution. At Day 18 stage, when the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts occurred the label accumulated in a unique pattern: much more label was at the epithelial surface corresponding to the top of the cusps than in the apical parts. During chase and only in intact tooth germs epithelial surfaces which had labeled poorly during pulse became labeled, but those labeling heavily during pulse lost label. This pattern existed only in the presence of mesenchyme. EDTA treatment of [3H]glucosamine-labeled teeth enabled us to obtain isolated dental papillae with surface label. Distribution of this label was exactly the same as that for the epithelial-mesenchymal junction of intact teeth. During chase, these dental papillae completely lost the surface label. The mesenchyme seen to control the synthesis and/or the degradation of epithelially derived [3H]glucosamine-labeled material

  5. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case.

  6. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  7. Evaluation of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) cross-linked collagen membranes and concerns on osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chenyu; Deng, Jia; Xiang, Lin; Wu, Yingying; Wei, Xiawei; Qu, Yili; Man, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Collagen membranes have ideal biological and mechanical properties for supporting infiltration and proliferation of osteoblasts and play a vital role in guided bone regeneration (GBR). However, pure collagen can lead to inflammation, resulting in progressive bone resorption. Therefore, a method for regulating the level of inflammatory cytokines at surgical sites is paramount for the healing process. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component extracted from green tea with numerous biological activities including an anti-inflammatory effect. Herein, we present a novel cross-linked collagen membrane containing different concentrations of EGCG (0.0064%, 0.064%, and 0.64%) to regulate the level of inflammatory factors secreted by pre-osteoblast cells; improve cell proliferation; and increase the tensile strength, wettability, and thermal stability of collagen membranes. Scanning electron microscope images show that the surfaces of collagen membranes became smoother and the collagen fiber diameters became larger with EGCG treatment. Measurement of the water contact angle demonstrated that introducing EGCG improved membrane wettability. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicated that the backbone of collagen was intact, and the thermal stability was significant improved in differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical properties of 0.064% and 0.64% EGCG-treated collagen membranes were 1.5-fold greater than those of the control. The extent of cross-linking was significantly increased, as determined by a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid solution assay. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and live/dead assays revealed that collagen membrane cross-linked by 0.0064% EGCG induced greater cell proliferation than pure collagen membranes. Additionally, real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that EGCG significantly affected the production of inflammatory factors secreted by MC3T3-E1 cells. Taken together, our

  8. Basement membrane and interstitial proteoglycans produced by MDCK cells correspond to those expressed in the kidney cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Multiple proteoglycans (PGs) are present in all basement membranes (BM) and may contribute to their structure and function, but their effects on cell behavior are not well understood. Their postulated functions include: a structural role in maintaining tissue histoarchitecture, or aid in selectiv...

  9. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  10. Functional differentiation and alveolar morphogenesis of primary mammary cultures on reconstituted basement membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARCELLOS-HOFF, M. H; AGGELER, J.; RAM, T. G; BISSELL, M. J

    1989-02-01

    An essential feature of mammary gland differentiation during pregnancy is the formation of alveoli composed of polarized epithelial cells, which, under the influence of lactogenic hormones, secrete vectorially and sequester milk proteins. Previous culture studies have described either organization of cells polarized towards lumina containing little or no demonstrable tissue-specific protein, or establishment of functional secretory cells exhibiting little or no glandular architecture. In this paper, we report that tissue-specific vectorial secretion coincides with the formation of functional alveoli-like structures by primary mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane matrix (derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm murine tumour). Morphogenesis of these unique three-dimensional structures was initiated by cell-directed remodelling of the exogenous matrix leading to reorganization of cells into matrixensheathed aggregates by 24 h after plating. The aggregates subsequently cavitated, so that by day 6 the cells were organized into hollow spheres in which apical cell surfaces faced lumina sealed by tight junctions and basal surfaces were surrounded by a distinct basal lamina. The profiles of proteins secreted into the apical (luminal) and basal (medium) compartments indicated that these alveoli-like structures were capable of an appreciable amount of vectorial secretion. Immunoprecipitation with a broad spectrum milk antiserum showed that more than 80% of caseins were secreted into the lumina, whereas iron-binding proteins (both lactoferrin and transferrin) were present in comparable amounts in each compartment. Thus, these mammary cells established protein targeting pathways directing milk-specific proteins to the luminal compartment. A time course monitoring secretory activity demonstrated that establishment of tissue-specific vectorial secretion and increased total and milk protein secretion coincided with functional alveolar

  11. Deletion of PPAR-γ in immune cells enhances susceptibility to antiglomerular basement membrane disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristen Chafin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristen Chafin2, Sarah Muse2, Raquel Hontecillas5, Josep Bassaganya-Riera5, David L Caudell2, Samuel K Shimp III4, M Nichole Rylander4, John Zhang6, Liwu Li3, Christopher M Reilly1,21Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 3Department of Biological Sciences, 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 5Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 6Medical University of SC, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ has been shown to be immunoregulatory in autoimmune diseases by inhibiting production of a number of inflammatory mediators. We investigated whether PPAR-γ gene deletion in hematopoietic cells would alter disease pathogenesis in the antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM mouse model. PPAR-γ+/+ and PPAR-γ-/- mice were immunized with rabbit antimouse GBM antibodies and lipopolysaccharide and evaluated for two weeks. Although both the PPAR-γ+/+ and PPAR-γ-/- mice had IgG deposition in the glomerulus and showed proteinuria two weeks after injection, glomerular and tubulointerstitial disease in PPAR-γ-/- mice were significantly more severe compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ animals. We observed that the PPAR-γ-/- mice had decreased CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and an increased CD8+:CD4+ ratio as compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ mice, suggesting that PPAR-γ has a role in the regulation of T cells. Furthermore, plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly increased in the PPAR-γ-/- mice at two weeks as compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ animals. Taken together, these studies show that

  12. Vascular Basement Membrane-derived Multifunctional Peptide, a Novel Inhibitor of Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo CAO; Shu-Ping PENG; Li SUN; Hui LI; Li WANG; Han-Wu DENG

    2006-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane-derived multifunctional peptide (VBMDMP) gene (fusion gene of the human immunoglobulin G3 upper hinge region and two tumstatin-derived fragments) obtained by chemical synthesis was cloned into vector pUC 19, and introduced into the expression vector pGEX-4T-1 to construct a prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1-VBMDMP. Recombinant VBMDMP produced in Escherichia coli has been shown to have significant activity of antitumor growth and antimetastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma transplanted into mouse C57B1/6. In the present study, we have studied the ability of rVBMDMP to inhibit endothelial cell tube formation and proliferation, to induce apoptosis in vitro, and to suppress tumor growth in vivo. The experimental results showed that rVBMDMP potently inhibited proliferation of human endothelial (HUVEC-12) cells and human colon cancer (SW480) cells in vitro, with no inhibition of proliferation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. rVBMDMP also significantly inhibited human endothelial cell tube formation and suppressed tumor growth of SW480 cells in a mouse xenograft model. These results suggest that rVBMDMP is a powerful therapeutic agent for suppressing angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  13. Anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis in an HIV positive patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo José Bellotto Monteiro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case of a patient with HIV infection, diagnosed 18 months prior to the development of an anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; this is probably the first report of such an association. A 30-year-old white man presented with elevation of serum creatinine (1.3 - 13.5 mg/dL within one month. At admission, the urinalysis showed proteinuria of 7.2 g/L and 8,000,000 erythrocytes/mL. Renal biopsy corresponded to a crescentic diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis mediated by anti-GBM, and serum testing for anti-GBM antibodies was positive; antinuclear antibodies (ANA and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA were also positive. The patient underwent hemodyalisis and was treated with plasmapheresis, cyclophosphamide and prednisone. The association described here is not casual, as crescentic glomerulonephritis is not common in HIV-positive patients, anti-GBM glomerulonephritis is rare and anti-GBM antibodies are frequently observed in HIV-positive subjects when compared to the overall population. Based on the current case and on the elevated frequency of the positivity for such antibodies in this group of patients, it is advisable to be aware of the eventual association between these two conditions and to promote an active search for anti-GBM antibodies and early diagnosis of eventual urinary abnormalities in HIV-positive subjects, considering the severity of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis.

  14. Binding of Streptococcus mutans antigens to heart and kidney basement membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, M W; Barua, P K; Bergey, E J; Nisengard, R J; Neiders, M E; Albini, B

    1984-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, alkali-extracted components of Streptococcus mutans were found to bind in vitro to capillary walls and sarcolemmal sheaths of monkey cardiac muscle and to glomerular and tubular basement membranes of monkey kidney. Adsorption of S. mutans components to tissue fragments was also detected by indirect radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting on nitrocellulose paper. Antibodies did not bind to untreated, control tissues in these experiments, proving that antigens shared by S. mutans and tissue components were not involved. Rabbit and monkey heart and kidney components bound S. mutans antigens of 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr. Monkey heart also bound molecules of 90,000 and 120,000 Mr. Rabbits immunized by intravenous injection of disrupted S. mutans cells developed severe nephritis that was characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulins, complement component C3, and S. mutans antigens in the glomeruli. Immunoglobulin G eluted from nephritic kidneys reacted in immunoblots with the 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr components of S. mutans extract, indicating that the antigens that bound to tissue in vitro also bound in vivo and reacted with antibodies in situ. Antibodies to other S. mutans antigens were not detected in the kidney eluate, although they were present in the serum of the same rabbit. Images PMID:6384042

  15. Chitosan-Coated Collagen Membranes Promote Chondrocyte Adhesion, Growth, and Interleukin-6 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Mighri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Designing scaffolds made from natural polymers may be highly attractive for tissue engineering strategies. We sought to produce and characterize chitosan-coated collagen membranes and to assess their efficacy in promoting chondrocyte adhesion, growth, and cytokine secretion. Porous collagen membranes were placed in chitosan solutions then crosslinked with glutaraldehyde vapor. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analyses showed elevated absorption at 1655 cm-1 of the carbon–nitrogen (N=C bonds formed by the reaction between the (NH2 of the chitosan and the (C=O of the glutaraldehyde. A significant peak in the amide II region revealed a significant deacetylation of the chitosan. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images of the chitosan-coated membranes exhibited surface variations, with pore size ranging from 20 to 50 µm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS revealed a decreased C–C groups and an increased C–N/C–O groups due to the reaction between the carbon from the collagen and the NH2 from the chitosan. Increased rigidity of these membranes was also observed when comparing the chitosan-coated and uncoated membranes at dried conditions. However, under wet conditions, the chitosan coated collagen membranes showed lower rigidity as compared to dried conditions. Of great interest, the glutaraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan-coated collagen membranes promoted chondrocyte adhesion, growth, and interleukin (IL-6 secretion. Overall results confirm the feasibility of using designed chitosan-coated collagen membranes in future applications, such as cartilage repair.

  16. Renal Fibrosis : Collagen Composition and Assembly Regulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transdifferentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zeisberg, Michael; Bonner, Gary; Maeshima, Yohei; Colorado, Pablo; Müller, Gerhard A; Strutz, Frank; Kalluri, Raghu

    2001-01-01

    Type IV collagen is a major component of basement membranes and it provides structural and functional support to various cell types. Type IV collagen exists in a highly complex suprastructure form and recent studies implicate that protomer (the trimeric building unit of type IV collagen) assembly is mediated by the NC1 domain present in the C-terminus of each collagen α-chain polypeptide. Here we show that type IV collagen contributes to the maintenance of the epithelial phenotype of proximal...

  17. Distribution of two basement membrane proteoglycans through hair follicle development and the hair growth cycle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; King, J L; McCarthy, K J

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of two distinct populations of basement membrane proteoglycans has been monitored through hair growth development in the rat embryo and subsequent hair growth cycle. An antiserum against a small heparan sulfate proteoglycan uniformly stained the dermal-epidermal junction of...... embryonic rats throughout the period of hair follicle formation. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies recognizing a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan only weakly stained 16-d embryo dermal-epidermal junction, but strong staining was associated with hair follicle buds as they...... developed. Through the hair growth cycle, it was found that the heparan sulfate proteoglycan persisted around the follicles, while the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan decreased in amount through catagen until it was undetectable at the base and dermal papilla of the telogen follicle. As anagen commenced...

  18. De novo adipogenesis in mice at the site of injection of basement membrane and basic fibroblast growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; TORIYAMA, KAZUHIRO; Nicodemou-Lena, Eleni; Inou, Kazuhiko; Torii, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Autografting of fat pads has a long history in plastic and reconstructive surgery for augmentation of lost soft tissue. However, the results are disappointing because of absorption of the grafts with time. The fate of transplanted fat is linked to adipose precursor cells distributed widely in connective tissues. Adipocyte precursor cells can proliferate and mature into adipocytes even in the adult body depending on microenvironment. When reconstituted basement membrane, Matrigel, supplemented...

  19. Effect of reconstituted basement membrane components on the growth of a panel of human tumour cell lines in nude mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Topley, P.; Jenkins, D C; Jessup, E. A.; Stables, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel), when co-injected with either established or primary human tumour cells, can improve the growth of subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The human adenocarcinoma cell lines A549, SW480, and WiDr, and the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080scc2 exhibit varying degrees of tumourigenicity in nude mice. All these lines showed increased tumorigenicity and/or growth rate, together with a change towards a more differenti...

  20. A Possible Clue for the Production of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Associated with Ureteral Obstruction and Hydronephrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Emiko; Kamata, Kouju

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis (anti-GBM GN) is an autoimmune disease with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Based on a case report of anti-GBM GN following hydronephrosis, we hypothesized that hydronephrosis may act as a trigger for the development of anti-GBM antibodies. Patients and Methods We evaluated 11 patients who were diagnosed with hydronephrosis. It was measured with serum anti-GBM antibody. These patients’ medical...

  1. Comparison of double filtration plasmapheresis with immunoadsorption therapy in patients with anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi-yan; Tang, Zheng; Chen, Dong-mei; Gong, De-Hua; Ji, Da-Xi; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) and (IA) are both used to clear antibody. However, the clinical efficacy and safety of DFPP in patients with anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease are unclear. Methods The 28 enrolled patients diagnosed serologically and pathologically with anti-GBM disease from 2003 to 2013 included 16 treated with DFPP and 12 with IA, with all patients administered immunosuppressive agents. DFPP consisted of an EC50W filter for plasma separat...

  2. Human skin basement membrane-associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan: distinctive differences in ultrastructural localization as a function of developmental age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horiguchi, Y; Fine, J D; Couchman, J R

    1991-01-01

    different developmental ages using two monoclonal antibodies to a well-characterized basement membrane-associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan. A series of foetal skin specimens (range, 54-142 gestational days) were examined using an immunoperoxidase immunoelectron microscopic technique. In specimens...... representing very early developmental ages, very diffuse immunoreaction products were detected. However, by approximately 76 gestational days, some accentuation of heparan sulphate proteoglycan was noted along the lamina densa, and by 142 gestational days, the distribution of heparan sulphate proteoglycan was...

  3. A Case of Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis Associated with Thrombotic Microangiopathy and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akishi Momose

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first report of a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN associated with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM antibody. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for high fever and anuria. On the first hospital day, we initiated hemodialysis for renal dysfunction. Laboratory data revealed normocytic-normochromic anemia with schistocytes in the peripheral smear, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, decreased serum haptoglobin, and negative results for both direct and indirect Coombs tests. Based on these results, we diagnosed TMA. Assays conducted several days later indicated a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin motif 13 (ADAMTS13 activity of 31.6%, and ADAMTS13 inhibitors were negative. We started plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma and steroid pulse therapy. Anti-GBM antibody was found to be positive. Renal biopsy showed FGN. Blood pressure rose on the 46th hospital day, and mild convulsions developed. Based on magnetic resonance imaging of the head, the patient was diagnosed with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension persisted despite administration of multiple antihypertensive agents, and the patient experienced a sudden generalized seizure. Computed tomography of the head showed multiple cerebral hemorrhages. However, his blood pressure subsequently decreased and the platelet count increased. TMA remitted following 36 plasma exchange sessions, but renal function was not restored, and maintenance hemodialysis was continued. The patient was discharged on the 119th day of hospitalization. In conclusion, it was shown that TMA, FGN and anti-GBM antibody were closely related.

  4. Long-term outcome of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease treated with immunoadsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Biesenbach

    Full Text Available Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibody disease may lead to acute crescentic glomerulonephritis with poor renal prognosis. Current therapy favours plasma exchange (PE for removal of pathogenic antibodies. Immunoadsorption (IAS is superior to PE regarding efficiency of antibody-removal and safety. Apart from anecdotal data, there is no systemic analysis of the long-term effects of IAS on anti-GBM-disease and antibody kinetics.To examine the long-term effect of high-frequency IAS combined with standard immunosuppression on patient and renal survival in patients with anti-GBM-disease and to quantify antibody removal and kinetics through IAS.Retrospective review of patients treated with IAS for anti-GBM-antibody disease confirmed by biopsy and/or anti-GBM-antibodies.University Hospital of Vienna, Austria.10 patients with anti-GBM-disease treated with IAS.Patient and renal survival, renal histology, anti-GBM-antibodies.Anti-GBM-antibodies were reduced by the first 9 IAS treatments (mean number of 23 to negative levels in all patients. Renal survival was 40% at diagnosis, 70% after the end of IAS, 63% after one year and 50% at the end of observation (mean 84 months, range 9 to 186. Dialysis dependency was successfully reversed in three of six patients. Patient survival was 90% at the end of observation.IAS efficiently eliminates anti-GBM-antibodies suggesting non-inferiority to PE with regard to renal and patient survival. Hence IAS should be considered as a valuable treatment option for anti-GBM-disease, especially in patients presenting with a high percentage of crescents and dialysis dependency due to an unusual high proportion of responders.

  5. Ultrastructural morphometry of capillary basement membrane thickness in normal and transgenic diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Edward C; Audette, Janice L; Veitenheimer, Nicole J; Risan, Jessica A; Laturnus, Donna I; Epstein, Paul N

    2003-04-01

    Capillary basement membrane (CBM) thickening is an ultrastructural hallmark in diabetic patients and in animal models of diabetes. However, the wide variety of tissues sampled and diverse methods employed have made the interpretation of thickness data difficult. We showed previously that acellular glomerular BMs in OVE26 transgenic diabetic mice were thickened beyond normal age-related thickening, and in the current study we hypothesized that other microvascular BMs likewise would show increased widths relative to age-matched controls. Accordingly, a series of tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, ocular retina and choriod, peripheral nerve, lung, pancreas, and renal glomerulus was collected from 300-350-day-old normal and transgenic mice. Transmission electron micrographs of cross sections through capillary walls were prepared, and CBM thickness (CBMT) was determined by the "orthogonal intercept" method. Morphometric analyses showed highly variable transgene-related BMT increases in the sampled tissues, with glomerular BM showing by far the greatest increase (+87%). Significant thickness increases were also seen in the retina, pulmonary alveolus, and thoracoabdominal diaphragm. BMT increases were not universal; however, most were modestly widened, and those that were thickest in controls generally showed the greatest increase. Although the pathogenesis of diabetes-related increases in CBM is poorly understood, data in the current study showed that in OVE26 transgenic mice increased BMT was a frequent concomitant of hyperglycemia. Accordingly, it seems likely that hyperglycemia-induced microvascular damage may be a contributing factor in diabetic BM disease, and that microvessel cellular and extracellular heterogeneity may limit the extent of CBM thickening in diverse tissues. PMID:12629676

  6. Upregulation of basement membrane-degrading metalloproteinase secretion after balloon injury of pig carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, K M; Fisher, M; Banning, A P; Thurston, V J; Baker, A H; Fabunmi, R P; Groves, P H; Davies, M; Newby, A C

    1996-12-01

    Basement membrane-degrading metalloproteinases (gelatinases) appear necessary for vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation in culture and for intimal migration of cells after balloon injury to the rat carotid artery. We investigated in the present study the secretion of gelatinases from pig carotid artery tissue after balloon injury. Segments of injured artery and segments proximal and distal to the area of injury were removed 3, 7, and 21 days after balloon dilatation. Medial explants from these segments were then cultured for 3 days, and the serum-free conditioned media were subjected to gelatin zymography. Production of 72- and 95-kD gelatinases was quantified by densitometry. Balloon-injured segments secreted significantly more 72- and 95-kD gelatinase than did paired distal segments at all time points. Release of both gelatinase activities was increased at 3 and 7 days relative to segments from uninjured arteries but declined again by 21 days after balloon injury. Similar results were found for gelatinase levels in extracts of arterial tissue. Consistent with the protein secretion data, in situ hybridization demonstrated that the mRNAs for both gelatinases were upregulated after balloon injury. Expression was prominent in medial smooth muscle cells, particularly around foci of necrosis, and in neointimal cells 3 and 7 days after balloon injury; 72-kD gelatinase mRNA persisted after 21 days and was prominent in regrown endothelial cells. The upregulation of gelatinase activity paralleled the time course of smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation in this model. We conclude that increased gelatinase production occurs in response to balloon injury and may play a role in permitting migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:8943956

  7. The process of collagen biomineralization observed by AFM in a model dual membrane diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation and simulation of naturally occurring mineralization can offer some new ideas in the design and fabrication of new functional materials for bone analogues. In this paper, a model dual membrane diffusion system (DMDS) was used to study the mineralization behaviour of collagen. The process of mineralization was observed by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the surface roughness and hardness of mineralized collagen fibers increased with time during the process of mineralization. The adhesion force of mineralized collagen fibers decreased with mineralization time. The micromechanical properties and microstructure changes of mineralized collagen fibers suggested that the mineralization was a step-by-step assembling process.

  8. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane...... zone of stratified epithelia. Immunohistochemical studies have previously reported changes in steady-state levels of different alpha(IV) chains in several epithelial cancer types. In the present study we aimed to quantitatively determine the mRNA levels of type IV collagen (alpha1/alpha 4/alpha 6) and...... type VII collagen (alpha1) during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for alpha1(IV), alpha 4(IV), alpha 6(IV), and alpha1(VII) in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 33), adenomas (n = 29) and in normal tissue from the same individuals. In...

  9. Preparation of polysaccharide loaded collagen membrane with anti-oxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zibin; Ding, Shengli; He, Xiaohong; Dai, Xuemei; Xiao, Qian; Yang, Min; Leng, Xue; Ma, Yanshun; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The scavenging activity of polysaccharides from Lycium barbarum, Lentinus edodes and Ganoderma Lucidum Karst to DPPH free radicals was investigated. It was found that among the three polysaccharides, Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) exhibits the best scavenging activity. Polysaccharide loaded collagen membranes were prepared by mixing LBP with collagen, starch, glycerol, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and glutaraldehyde. In vitro drug release from membranes was evaluated. With increasing the immersion time, the release rate first increases and then slows down. Meanwhile, the scavenging activity to DPPH radicals exhibits similar variation, in agreement with a good release effect of the membrane. The optimal formulation of collagen membrane and preparation parameters were obtained considering the overall properties and the scavenging activity to radicals. PMID:26406078

  10. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical localization of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in Bruch's membrane of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, W L; Essner, E; McCarthy, K J;

    1992-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (Mab 4D5 and 2D6) raised against the core protein of a basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan from Reichert's membrane of the rat, were used for ultrastructural immunoperoxidase localization of this protein in Bruch's membrane of the rat. Immunoreactivity for...... both antibodies was found in the basal lamina (basement membrane) of the choriocapillary endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium, in collagen fibers in the collagenous zones, and surrounding the elastic layer....

  11. Endothelial monolayers on collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes: cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Donggu; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Yoon, Sik; Jin, Songwan

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer lining over the entire vascular wall and play an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis and cancer metastasis. Loss of proper endothelial function can lead to vascular diseases. Therefore, the endothelial monolayer is particularly important in tissue regeneration and mimicking vascular tissue in vitro. Numerous studies have described the effects of ECs on nanofibers made from a variety of synthetic polymer materials designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, little is known about maintaining the integrity of ECs in in vitro systems. Here we describe polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes coated with collagen gel that overcome many limitations of conventional nanofibers used for engineering endothelia. We investigated cell-cell and cell-ECM junctional complexes using collagen-coated and conventional nanofibrous membranes. Conventional nanofibrous membranes alone did not form a monolayer with ECs, whereas collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes did. Several concentrations of collagen in the gel coating promoted the formation of cell-cell junctional complexes, facilitated the deposition of laminin, and increased the focal contact organization of ECs. These results suggest the possible use of collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes for vascular tissue engineering applications and a vascular platform for organ-on-a-chip systems. PMID:27186924

  12. The distribution of IgG subclass deposition on renal tissues from patients with anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    OpenAIRE

    QU, ZHEN; Cui, Zhao; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal injury of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease is defined by the linear deposition of IgG along GBM and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. To date, the distribution of anti-GBM IgG subclasses on renal tissue is still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the deposition of the four IgG subclasses using immunohistochemistry in the renal biopsy specimens from 46 patients with anti-GBM disease. Results All four IgG subclasses can be detected within the GB...

  13. Overexpression of β1-chain-containing laminins in capillary basement membranes of human breast cancer and its metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laminins are the major components of vascular and parenchymal basement membranes. We previously documented a switch in the expression of vascular laminins containing the α4 chain from predominantly laminin-9 (α4β2γ1) to predominantly laminin-8 (α4β1γ1) during progression of human brain gliomas to high-grade glioblastoma multiforme. Here, differential expression of laminins was studied in blood vessels and ductal epithelium of the breast. In the present study the expressions of laminin isoforms α1–α5, β1–β3, γ1, and γ2 were examined during progression of breast cancer. Forty-five clinical samples of breast tissues including normal breast, ductal carcinomas in situ, invasive ductal carcinomas, and their metastases to the brain were compared using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry for various chains of laminin, in particular laminin-8 and laminin-9. Laminin α4 chain was observed in vascular basement membranes of most studied tissues, with the highest expression in metastases. At the same time, the expression of laminin β2 chain (a constituent of laminin-9) was mostly seen in normal breast and carcinomas in situ but not in invasive carcinomas or metastases. In contrast, laminin β1 chain (a constituent of laminin-8) was typically found in vessel walls of carcinomas and their metastases but not in those of normal breast. The expression of laminin-8 increased in a progression-dependent manner. A similar change was observed from laminin-11 (α5β2γ1) to laminin-10 (α5β1γ1) during breast tumor progression. Additionally, laminin-2 (α2β1γ1) appeared in vascular basement membranes of invasive carcinomas and metastases. Chains of laminin-5 (α3β3γ2) were expressed in the ductal epithelium basement membranes of the breast and diminished with tumor progression. These results suggest that laminin-2, laminin-8, and laminin-10 are important components of tumor microvessels and may associate with breast tumor progression. Angiogenic switch

  14. The Goodpasture-like syndrome in mice induced by intravenous injections of anti-type IV collagen and anti-laminin antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Yaar, M; Foidart, J. M.; Brown, K S; Rennard, S. I.; Martin, G R; Liotta, L.

    1982-01-01

    Laminin and Type IV collagen are both components of basement membrane. Antibodies to these two proteins, when injected into mice, were found to accumulate in all basement membranes examined, but at highest levels in kidney, liver, and spleen. An acute respiratory distress syndrome was noted shortly after injection. A transient segmental proliferative glomerulonephritis was observed both in the heterologous (early) and autologous (late) phase. The glomerular basement membrane of mice injected ...

  15. Lens capsule as a model to study type IV collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Christopher F.; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    The study of collagen IV has benefited greatly from the seminal work conducted by Arthur Veis and colleagues over three decades ago. Through a series of electron microscopy studies focused on lens basement membrane, an appreciation was gained for the distinct network-forming properties of collagen IV. Veis correctly suggested that network assembly is a phenomenon of the non-collagenous termini of the molecule. This review seeks to document how the field advanced following these seminal conclu...

  16. Rheumatic fever–associated Streptococcus pyogenes isolates aggregate collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkla, Katrin; Rohde, Manfred; Jansen, Wouter T. M.; Kaplan, Edward L.; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.; Talay, Susanne R.

    2003-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is a serious autoimmune sequel of Streptococcus pyogenes infection. This study shows that serotype M3 and M18 S. pyogenes isolated during outbreaks of rheumatic fever have the unique capability to bind and aggregate human basement membrane collagen type IV. M3 protein is identified as collagen-binding factor of M3 streptococci, whereas M18 isolates bind collagen through a hyaluronic acid capsule, revealing a novel function for M3 protein and capsule. Following in vivo mo...

  17. Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1994-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene

  18. Characterization of a synthetic peptide from type IV collagen that promotes melanoma cell adhesion, spreading, and motility

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion and motility of tumor cells on basement membranes is a central consideration in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Basement membrane type IV collagen directly promotes the adhesion and migration of various tumor cell types in vitro. Our previous studies demonstrated that tumor cells adhered and spread on surfaces coated with intact type IV collagen or either of the two major enzymatically purified domains of this protein. Only one of these major domains, the pepsin-generated maj...

  19. Collagens

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Marion K.; Hahn, Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    The collagens represent a family of trimeric extracellular matrix molecules used by cells for structural integrity and other functions. The three α chains that form the triple helical part of the molecule are composed of repeating peptide triplets of glycine-X-Y. X and Y can be any amino acid but are often proline and hydroxyproline, respectively. Flanking the triple helical regions (i.e., Col domains) are non-glycine-X-Y regions, termed non-collagenous domains. These frequently contain recog...

  20. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now...... obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... This molecular architecture is novel for an extracellular matrix molecule, but it resembles that of a group of intracellular proteins, including some proposed to stabilize the mitotic chromosome scaffold. We have previously proposed a similar stabilizing role for bamacan in the basement membrane matrix...

  1. Bone marrow transplantation restores epidermal basement membrane protein expression and rescues epidermolysis bullosa model mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Yasuyuki; Abe, Riichiro; Inokuma, Daisuke; Sasaki, Mikako; Hoshina, Daichi; Natsuga, Ken; Nishie, Wataru; McMillan, James R.; Nakamura, Hideki; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Akiyama, Masashi; Sawamura, Daisuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to treat congenital protein deficiencies using bone marrow-derived cells have been reported. These efforts have been based on the concepts of stem cell plasticity. However, it is considered more difficult to restore structural proteins than to restore secretory enzymes. This study aims to clarify whether bone marrow transplantation (BMT) treatment can rescue epidermolysis bullosa (EB) caused by defects in keratinocyte structural proteins. BMT treatment of adult collagen XVII (Col17) ...

  2. Murine membranous nephropathy: immunization with α3(IV) collagen fragment induces subepithelial immune complexes and FcγR-independent nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Jun; Malekpour, Mahdi; Luo, Wentian; Ge, Linna; Olaru, Florina; Wang, Xu-Ping; Bah, Maimouna; Sado, Yoshikazu; Heidet, Laurence; Kleinau, Sandra; Fogo, Agnes B; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2012-04-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults and a significant cause of end-stage renal disease, yet current therapies are nonspecific, toxic, and often ineffective. The development of novel targeted therapies requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, but progress is hampered by the lack of a robust mouse model of disease. We report that DBA/1 mice as well as congenic FcγRIII(-/-) and FcRγ(-/-) mice immunized with a fragment of α3(IV) collagen developed massive albuminuria and nephrotic syndrome, because of subepithelial deposits of mouse IgG and C3 with corresponding basement membrane reaction and podocyte foot process effacement. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings were characteristic of MN. Although immunized mice produced genuine anti-α3NC1 autoantibodies that bound to kidney and lung basement membranes, neither crescentic glomerulonephritis nor alveolitis ensued, likely because of the predominance of mouse IgG1 over IgG2a and IgG2b autoantibodies. The ablation of activating IgG Fc receptors did not ameliorate injury, implicating subepithelial deposition of immune complexes and consequent complement activation as a major effector pathway. We have thus established an active model of murine MN. This model, leveraged by the availability of genetically engineered mice and mouse-specific reagents, will be instrumental in studying the pathogenesis of MN and evaluating the efficacy of novel experimental therapies. PMID:22371398

  3. Periodontal Responses to Augmented Corticotomy with Collagen Membrane Application during Orthodontic Buccal Tipping in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Yeol Lee; Hyo-Won Ahn; Yeek Herr; Young-Hyuk Kwon; Seong-Hun Kim; Eun-Cheol Kim

    2014-01-01

    This prospective randomized split-mouth study was performed to examine the effects of absorbable collagen membrane (ACM) application in augmented corticotomy using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), during orthodontic buccal tipping movement in the dog. After buccal circumscribing corticotomy and DBBM grafting into the decorticated area, flaps were repositioned and sutured on control sides. ACM was overlaid and secured with membrane tacks, on test sides only, and the flaps were reposit...

  4. C3A Cell Behaviors on Micropatterned Chitosan? Collagen?Gelatin Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Bo-Yi; Chou, Pei-Hsun; Chen, Chang-An; Yi-ming SUN; Kung, Shieh-Shiuh

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The influence of the properties and surface micropatterning of chitosan?collagen?gelatin (CCG) blended membranes on C3A cell's activities has been investigated. It is aimed to guide the cell growth and improve the growth rate in vitro for the application in tissue engineering. Masters with micropatterns are prepared on stainless steel plates by photolithography. The CCG membranes with surface micropatterns are then fabricated by soft lithography and dry?wet phase inversion...

  5. Type VII Collagen Expression in the Human Vitreoretinal Interface, Corpora Amylacea and Inner Retinal Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wullink, Bart; Pas, Hendri H.; Van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Kuijer, Roel; Los, Leonoor I.

    2015-01-01

    Type VII collagen, as a major component of anchoring fibrils found at basement membrane zones, is crucial in anchoring epithelial tissue layers to their underlying stroma. Recently, type VII collagen was discovered in the inner human retina by means of immunohistochemistry, while proteomic investiga

  6. Role of LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin in partitioning of collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is extracellular matrix protein composed of two α1(I and one α2(I polypeptides that fold into triple helix. Collagen polypeptides are translated in coordination to synchronize the rate of triple helix folding to the rate of posttranslational modifications of individual polypeptides. This is especially important in conditions of high collagen production, like fibrosis. It has been assumed that collagen mRNAs are targeted to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER after translation of the signal peptide and by signal peptide recognition particle (SRP. Here we show that collagen mRNAs associate with the ER membrane even when translation is inhibited. Knock down of LARP6, an RNA binding protein which binds 5' stem-loop of collagen mRNAs, releases a small amount of collagen mRNAs from the membrane. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin filaments has a similar, but stronger effect. In the absence of LARP6 or nonmuscle myosin filaments collagen polypeptides become hypermodified, are poorly secreted and accumulate in the cytosol. This indicates lack of coordination of their synthesis and retro-translocation due to hypermodifications and misfolding. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin does not alter the secretory pathway through ER and Golgi, suggesting that the role of nonmuscle myosin is primarily to partition collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane. We postulate that collagen mRNAs directly partition to the ER membrane prior to synthesis of the signal peptide and that LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin filaments mediate this process. This allows coordinated initiation of translation on the membrane bound collagen α1(I and α2(I mRNAs, a necessary step for proper synthesis of type I collagen.

  7. Sequential occurrence of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease 9 years after anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pui Shan Julia; Leung, Moon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 63-year-old Chinese man, having a history of anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibody anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated pulmonary-renal syndrome 9 years ago, presented with second episode of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and alveolar haemorrhage compatible with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease. In first presentation, his anti-GBM antibody was negative. This time, anti-MPO antibody was negative, but anti-GBM antibody was positive. The long interval of sequential development of anti-GBM disease after ANCA-associated vasculitis in this patient may provide clues to the potential immunological links between these two distinct conditions. Clinicians should be aware of such double-positive association.

  8. A role for PDGF-C/PDGFRα signaling in the formation of the meningeal basement membranes surrounding the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrae, Johanna; Gouveia, Leonor; Gallini, Radiosa; He, Liqun; Fredriksson, Linda; Nilsson, Ingrid; Johansson, Bengt R; Eriksson, Ulf; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) is one of three known ligands for the tyrosine kinase receptor PDGFRα. Analysis ofPdgfcnull mice has demonstrated roles for PDGF-C in palate closure and the formation of cerebral ventricles, but redundancy with other PDGFRα ligands might obscure additional functions. In search of further developmental roles for PDGF-C, we generated mice that were double mutants forPdgfc(-/-)andPdgfra(GFP/+) These mice display a range of severe phenotypes including spina bifida, lung emphysema, abnormal meninges and neuronal over-migration in the cerebral cortex. We focused our analysis on the central nervous system (CNS), where PDGF-C was identified as a critical factor for the formation of meninges and assembly of the glia limitans basement membrane. We also present expression data onPdgfa,PdgfcandPdgfrain the cerebral cortex and microarray data on cerebral meninges. PMID:26988758

  9. Defective muscle basement membrane and lack of M-laminin in the dystrophic dy/dy mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Christmas, P; Wu, X R;

    1994-01-01

    M-laminin is a major member of the laminin family of basement membrane proteins. It is prominently expressed in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. M-laminin is deficient in patients with the autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy but is normal in patients with the sex......-linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. We have examined M-laminin expression in mice with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by the mutation dy. The heavy chain of M-laminin was undetectable in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and peripheral nerve by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in...... tissue from dy/dy mice, suggesting that M-laminin heavy-chain mRNA may be produced at very low levels or is unstable. Information about the chromosomal localization of the M heavy-chain in human and mouse suggests that a mutation in the M-chain gene causes the muscular dystrophy in dy/dy mice. The dy...

  10. (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and (/sup 3/H)proline radioautography of embryonic mouse dental basement membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, M.; Ruch, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)proline and (/sup 3/H)glucosamine radioautography was performed to analyze the labeling pattern of mouse embryonic dental basement membrane before and during odontoblast terminal differentiation. Sixteen- and eighteen-day-old first lower molars and trypsin-isolated enamel organs, as well as EDTA-isolated dental papillae, were used. Continuous labeling for 12 to 24 hr was required with (/sup 3/H)proline to obtain a clear labeling of epithelial-mesenchymal junction in intact tooth germs or accumulation of surface label in trypsin-isolated enamel organs. With (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, after 6-hr labeling, the epithelial-mesenchymal junction was heavily labeled and the trypsin-isolated enamel organs accumulated substantial amounts of surface label, corresponding to the redeposited basement membrane. At Day 16 stage, these labels always had a uniform distribution and decreased during chase without any redistribution. At Day 18 stage, when the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts occurred the label accumulated in a unique pattern: much more label was at the epithelial surface corresponding to the top of the cusps than in the apical parts. During chase and only in intact tooth germs epithelial surfaces which had labeled poorly during pulse became labeled, but those labeling heavily during pulse lost label. This pattern existed only in the presence of mesenchyme. EDTA treatment of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled teeth enabled us to obtain isolated dental papillae with surface label. Distribution of this label was exactly the same as that for the epithelial-mesenchymal junction of intact teeth. During chase, these dental papillae completely lost the surface label. The mesenchyme seen to control the synthesis and/or the degradation of epithelially derived (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled material.

  11. Histones have high affinity for the glomerular basement membrane. Relevance for immune complex formation in lupus nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiedeke, T.M.; Stoeckl, F.W.W.; Weber, R.; Sugisaki, Y.; Batsford, S.R.; Vogt, A.

    1989-06-01

    An effort has been made to integrate insights on charge-based interactions in immune complex glomerulonephritis with nuclear antigen involvement in lupus nephritis. Attention was focussed on the histones, a group of highly cationic nuclear constituents, which could be expected to bind to fixed anionic sites present in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). We demonstrated that all histone subfractions, prepared according to Johns, have a high affinity for GBM and the basement membrane of peritubular capillaries. Tissue uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled histones was measured by injecting 200 micrograms of each fraction into the left kidney via the aorta and measuring organ uptake after 15 min. In glomeruli isolated from the left kidneys, the following quantities of histones were found: f1, 13 micrograms; f2a (f2al + f2a2), 17 micrograms; f2b, 17 micrograms; and f3, 32 micrograms. Kinetic studies of glomerular binding showed that f1 disappeared much more rapidly than f2a. The high affinity of histones (pI between 10.5 and 11.0; mol wt 10,000-22,000) for the GBM correlates well with their ability to form aggregates (mol wt greater than 100,000) for comparison lysozyme (pI 11, mol wt 14,000), which does not aggregate spontaneously bound poorly (0.4 micrograms in isolated glomeruli). The quantity of histones and lysozyme found in the isolated glomeruli paralleled their in vitro affinity for a Heparin-Sepharose column (gradient elution studies). This gel matrix contains the sulfated, highly anionic polysaccharide heparin, which is similar to the negatively charged heparan sulfate present in the GBM. Lysozyme eluted with 0.15 M NaCl, f1 with 1 M NaCl, and f2a, f2b, and f3 could not be fully desorbed even with 2 M NaCl; 6 M guanidine-HCl was necessary.

  12. Different collagen types define two types of idiopathic epiretinal membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Kritzenberger, Michaela; Junglas, Benjamin; Framme, Carsten; Helbig, Horst; Gabel, Veit-Peter; Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Tamm, Ernst R.; Hillenkamp, Jost

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To identify differences in extracellular matrix contents between idiopathic epiretinal membranes (IEM) of cellophane macular reflex (CMRM) or preretinal macular fibrosis (PMFM) type. Methods and results: IEM were analyzed by light and quantitative transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Substantial differences between CMRM and PMFM were observed regarding the nature of extracellular fibrils. In CMRM, the fibrils were thin with...

  13. 19-DEJ-1, a hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complex-associated monoclonal antibody. Definition of a new skin basement membrane antigenic defect in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    normally expressed in one or more forms of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) known to have structural and antigenic defects in skin basement membrane, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence 46 specimens of clinically normal skin from 43 patients representing each of the four forms of inherited EB (simplex, 15...

  14. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains, the...... function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose...... receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens. The...

  15. Identification and expression profile of a putative basement membrane protein gene in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Da-Wei

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The midgut undergoes histolysis and remodeling during the larval to adult transition in holometabolous insects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Results Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH, we identified a 531 bp cDNA predicted to encode a 176 amino acid protein, which we call hmg176. Northern and western blot analysis suggested that high levels of hmg176 are expressed in the midgut during molting, but not during metamorphosis. HMG176 protein was detected by immunofluorescence within the membrane of fat bodies and the basement membrane of the midgut of both molting and feeding larvae, but not in metamorphically committed larvae. In situ hybridization revealed that hmg176 transcripts mainly localized to the columnar cells of the midgut. Interestingly, a non-steroidal ecdysone agonist, RH-2485, significantly upregulated expression of hmg176. Conclusion These observations suggest that hmg176 encodes a larval-specific protein that may participate in sustaining larval midgut during larval development, possibly in response to ecdysteroid in vivo. This study will enlighten our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tissue histolysis during metamorphosis.

  16. A direct contact between astrocyte and vitreous body is possible in the rabbit eye due to discontinuities in the basement membrane of the retinal inner limiting membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haddad

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Different from most mammalian species, the optic nerve of the rabbit eye is initially formed inside the retina where myelination of the axons of the ganglion cells starts and vascularization occurs. Astrocytes are confined to these regions. The aforementioned nerve fibers known as medullated nerve fibers form two bundles that may be identified with the naked eye. The blood vessels run on the inner surface of these nerve fiber bundles (epivascularization and, accordingly, the accompanying astrocytes lie mostly facing the vitreous body from which they are separated only by the inner limiting membrane of the retina. The arrangement of the astrocytes around blood vessels leads to the formation of structures known as glial tufts. Fragments (N = 3 or whole pieces (N = 3 of the medullated nerve fiber region of three-month-old male rabbits (Orictolagus cuniculus were fixed in glutaraldehyde followed by osmium tetroxide, and their thin sections were examined with a transmission electron microscope. Randomly located discontinuities (up to a few micrometers long of the basement membrane of the inner limiting membrane of the retina were observed in the glial tufts. As a consequence, a direct contact between the astrocyte plasma membrane and vitreous elements was demonstrated, making possible functional interactions such as macromolecular exchanges between this glial cell type and the components of the vitreous body.

  17. In vivo imaging of basement membrane movement: ECM patterning shapes Hydra polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Zamir, Evan A.; Little, Charles D.; Özbek, Suat; Münder, Sandra; David, Charles N.; Li, Li; Sarras, Michael P.; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Growth and morphogenesis during embryonic development, asexual reproduction and regeneration require extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We used the simple metazoan Hydra to examine the fate of ECM during tissue morphogenesis and asexual budding. In growing Hydra, epithelial cells constantly move towards the extremities of the animal and into outgrowing buds. It is not known, whether these tissue movements involve epithelial migration relative to the underlying matrix or whether cells and ECM are displaced as a composite structure. Furthermore, it is unclear, how the ECM is remodeled to adapt to the shape of developing buds and tentacles. To address these questions, we used a new in vivo labeling technique for Hydra collagen-1 and laminin, and tracked the fate of ECM in all body regions of the animal. Our results reveal that Hydra ‘tissue movements’ are largely displacements of epithelial cells together with associated ECM. By contrast, during the evagination of buds and tentacles, extensive movement of epithelial cells relative to the matrix is observed, together with local ECM remodeling. These findings provide new insights into the nature of growth and morphogenesis in epithelial tissues. PMID:22194305

  18. The collagen turnover profile is altered in patients with inguinal and incisional hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Mortensen, Joachim H; Sorensen, Lars T;

    2015-01-01

    the interstitial matrix (types I, III, and V collagens) and in the basement membrane (type IV collagen). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with 3 different types of hernias were included: Primary unilateral inguinal hernia (n = 17), multiple hernias defined as ≥3 hernias (n = 21), and incisional hernia...... degradation (C1M, C3M, C5M, and C4M) were measured in serum by validated, solid-phase competitive assays. RESULTS: In inguinal hernia patients, the turnover of the interstitial matrix collagens type III (P < .042) and V (P < .001) was decreased compared with controls, whereas the turnover of the basement...... membrane collagen type IV was increased (P < .001). In incisional hernia patients, the turnover of type V collagen was decreased (P = .048) and the turnover of type IV collagen was increased compared with the hernia-free controls (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Hernia patients demonstrated systemically altered...

  19. Treatment of gingival recession with collagen membrane and DFDBA: a histometric study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Pimentel Rosetti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we evaluated the findings related to the use of resorbable collagen membranes in humans along with DFDBA (demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft. The aim of this subsequent study was to histometrically evaluate in dogs, the healing response of gingival recessions treated with collagen membrane + DFDBA (Guided Tissue Regeneration, GTR compared to a coronally positioned flap (CPF. Two types of treatment were randomly carried out in a split-mouth study. Group 1 was considered as test (GTR: collagen membrane + DFDBA, whereas Group 2 stood for the control (only CPF. The dogs were given chemical bacterial plaque control with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate during a 90-day repair period. Afterwards, the animals were killed to obtain biopsies and histometric evaluation of the process of cementum and bone formation, epithelial migration and gingival level. A statistically significant difference was found between groups with a larger extension of neoformed cementum (GTR = 32.72%; CPF = 18.82%; p = 0.0004, new bone (GTR = 23.20%; CPF = 09.90%; p = 0.0401 and with a smaller area of residual gingival recession in the test group (GTR = 50.69%; CPF = 59.73%; p = 0.0055 compared to the control group. The only item assessed that showed no statistical difference was epithelial proliferation on the root surface, with means of 15.14% for the GTR group and 20.34% for the CPF group (p = 0.0890. Within the limits of this study we concluded that the treatment of gingival recession defects with GTR, associating collagen membrane with DFDBA, showed better outcomes in terms of a larger extension of neoformed cementum and bone, as well as in terms of a smaller proportion of residual recessions.

  20. Synthesis and localization of two sulphated glycoproteins associated with basement membranes and the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogan, B L; Taylor, A; Kurkinen, M; Couchman, J R

    1982-01-01

    Two sulphated glycoproteins (sgps) of apparent molecular weight (Mr) 180,000 and 150,000, are synthesized by murine PYS and PF HR9 parietal endoderm and Swiss 3T3 cells. The Mr 150,000 sgp has a similar chemical structure to the sulphated glycoprotein, C, synthesized and laid down in Reichert...... interactions and are not precursors or products of each other. They contain asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, but these are not the exclusive sites of sulphate labeling. Antiserum raised against the Mr 150,000 sgp C of Reichert's membranes has been used in an immunohistochemical analysis of rat skin. In...

  1. Collagen IV in normal skin and in pathological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type IV collagen is a type of collagen found primarily in the skin within the basement membrane zone. The type IV collagen C4 domain at the C-terminus is not removed in post-translational processing, and the fibers are thus link head-to-head, rather than in a parallel fashion. Also, type IV collagen lacks a glycine in every third amino-acid residue necessary for the tight collagen helix. Thus, the overall collagen-IV conformation is structurally more pliable and kinked, relative to other collagen subtypes. These structural features allow collagen IV to form sheets, which is the primary structural form found in the cutaneous basal lamina. There are six human genes associated with collagen IV, specifically COL4A1, COL4A2, COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 and COL4A6. The aim of this review is to highlight the significance of this protein in normal skin, and in selected diseases. Results: The alpha 3 protein constituent of type IV collagen is thought to be the antigen implicated in Goodpasture′s syndrome, wherein the immune system attacks the basement membranes of the renal glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli. In addition, mutations to the genes coding for type IV collagen lead to the Alport syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibodies directed against denatured human type IV collagen have been described in rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and SLE. Structural studies of collagen IV have been utilized to differentiate between subepidermal blistering diseases, including bullous pemphigoid, acquired epidermolysis bullosa, anti-epiligrin cicatricial pemphigoid, and bullous lupus erythematosus. Collagen IV is also of importance in wound healing and in embryogenesis. Conclusions: Pathological studies have demonstrated that minor structural differences in collagen IV can lead to distinct, clinically different diseases.

  2. Genome wide analysis indicates genes for basement membrane and cartilage matrix proteins as candidates for hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrijsen, Ineke C M; Leegwater, Peter A J; Martin, Alan J; Harris, Stephen J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Heuven, Henri C M; Hazewinkel, Herman A W

    2014-01-01

    Hip dysplasia, an abnormal laxity of the hip joint, is seen in humans as well as dogs and is one of the most common skeletal disorders in dogs. Canine hip dysplasia is considered multifactorial and polygenic, and a variety of chromosomal regions have been associated with the disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study in Dutch Labrador Retrievers, comparing data of nearly 18,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 48 cases and 30 controls using two different statistical methods. An individual SNP analysis based on comparison of allele frequencies with a χ(2) statistic was used, as well as a simultaneous SNP analysis based on Bayesian variable selection. Significant association with canine hip dysplasia was observed on chromosome 8, as well as suggestive association on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, 20, 25 and 32. Next-generation DNA sequencing of the exons of genes of seven regions identified multiple associated alleles on chromosome 1, 5, 8, 20, 25 and 32 (phip dysplasia. These genes are involved in hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix integrity of basement membrane and cartilage. The functions of the genes are in agreement with the notion that disruptions in endochondral bone formation in combination with soft tissue defects are involved in the etiology of hip dysplasia. PMID:24498183

  3. Glomerular extraction of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody in normal Wistar and in Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our results show that A-GBM antibody is, unfortunably, not a suitable indicator for glomerular plasma flow distribution studies. Its fixation is influenced by other factors, among which the size of the glomeruli and hence the glomerular basement membrane surface area are probably predominant. This is suggested: 1) by the parallel patterns of antibody fixation and glomerular size found in normal and in DI rats; 2) by the simultaneous restoration of size and A-GBM fixation heterogeneity in treated DI rats; 3) by the correlation between size and A-GBM fixation found in the various glomeruli of a given rat. Further experiments are required to determine whether other factors are also involved in the process of A-GBM fixation. Because the A-GBM antibody is not an adequate blood flow indicator, it was not possible to study the influence of ADH on GPF distribution as we had first intended. Nevertheless, the use of Brattleboro rats in these experiments disclosed the fact that their deep glomeruli are abnormally small and that this anomaly can be reversed, or prevented, by chronic vasopressin treatment. It is not possible to determine from the present experiments whether ADH has a direct effect on kidney morphology or acts indirectly through the correction of the DI and its consequences or other mechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Skin Basement Membrane: The Foundation of Epidermal Integrity—BM Functions and Diverse Roles of Bridging Molecules Nidogen and Perlecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis functions in skin as first defense line or barrier against environmental impacts, resting on extracellular matrix (ECM of the dermis underneath. Both compartments are connected by the basement membrane (BM, composed of a set of distinct glycoproteins and proteoglycans. Herein we are reviewing molecular aspects of BM structure, composition, and function regarding not only (i the dermoepidermal interface but also (ii the resident microvasculature, primarily focusing on the per se nonscaffold forming components perlecan and nidogen-1 and nidogen-2. Depletion or functional deficiencies of any BM component are lethal at some stage of development or around birth, though BM defects vary between organs and tissues. Lethality problems were overcome by developmental stage- and skin-specific gene targeting or by cell grafting and organotypic (3D cocultures of normal or defective cells, which allows recapitulating BM formation de novo. Thus, evidence is accumulating that BM assembly and turnover rely on mechanical properties and composition of the adjacent ECM and the dynamics of molecular assembly, including further “minor” local components, nidogens largely functioning as catalysts or molecular adaptors and perlecan as bridging stabilizer. Collectively, orchestration of BM assembly, remodeling, and the role of individual players herein are determined by the developmental, tissue-specific, or functional context.

  5. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I are...... the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  6. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I are...

  7. In situ forming collagen-hyaluronic acid membrane structures: mechanism of self-assembly and applications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Jakus, Adam E; Shah, Ramille N

    2013-02-01

    Bioactive, in situ forming materials have the potential to complement minimally invasive surgical procedures and enhance tissue healing. For such biomaterials to be adopted in the clinic, they must be cost-effective, easily handled by the surgeon and have a history of biocompatibility. To this end, we report a novel and facile self-assembling strategy to create membranes and encapsulating structures using collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA). Unlike membranes built by layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged biomolecules, the collagen-HA membranes described here form a diffusion barrier upon electrostatic interaction of the oppositely charged biomolecules, which is further driven by osmotic pressure imbalances. The resulting membranes have a nanofibrous architecture, a thicknesses of 130 μm and a tensile modulus (0.59±0.06 MPa) that can increase 7-fold using carbodiimide chemistry (4.42±1.46 MPa). Collagen-HA membranes support mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and have a slow and steady protein release profile (7% at day 28), offering opportunities for targeted tissue regeneration. We demonstrate the capacity to encapsulate cells by injecting HA into the collagen solution, and enhance allograft and implant biocompatibility through a coating technique. This study describes a novel mechanism of collagen-HA membrane formation and provides the groundwork to apply these membranes in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23022546

  8. Evaluation of biodegradation and biocompatibility of collagen/chitosan/alkaline phosphatase biopolymeric membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E BERTEANU; D IONITA; M SIMOIU; M PARASCHIV; R TATIA; A APATEAN; M SIDOROFF; L TCACENCO

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new variant of membranes based on collagen (COL), chitosan (CHI) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) immobilized and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde (GA) at different concentrations. The biodegradation in the presence of collagenase was investigated. Biocompatibility was evaluated by MTT assay using a mouse fibroblast cell culture type NCTC (clone 929). Non-cross-linked samples were biocompatible and membranes cross-linked with low concentrations of GA (0.04, 0.08%) were also iocompatible. However, high concentrations of GA lead to a decreased biocompatibility. The adsorption behaviour of Ca$^{2+}$ ions to all membraneswere evaluated using the Freundlich isotherms. Haemolytic studies were performed in order to consider their applications in biomineralization process. By the addition of collagen and ALP to chitosan, the haemolytic indexdecreases, the COL–CHI–ALP membrane being in the non-haemolytic domain, while the COL–CHI–ALP–GA membrane has a haemolytic index greater than 2, and is slightly haemolytic.

  9. Synthesis and deposition of basement membrane proteins by primary brain capillary endothelial cells in a murine model of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Birkelund, Svend; Burkhart, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    The brain vascular basement membrane is important for both blood-brain barrier (BBB) development, stability, and barrier integrity and the contribution hereto from brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), pericytes, and astrocytes of the BBB is probably significant. The aim of the present study......-culture, in co-culture with pericytes or mixed glial cells, or as a triple-culture with both pericytes and mixed glial cells. The integrity of the BBB models was validated by measures of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and passive permeability to mannitol. The expression of basement membrane...... proteins was analysed using RT-qPCR, mass spectrometry, and immunocytochemistry. Co-culturing mBCECs with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both significantly increased the TEER compared to the mono-culture, and a low passive permeability was correlated with high TEER. The mBCECs expressed all major...

  10. Remodeling of the heart (membrane proteins and collagen) in hypertensive cardiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainte Beuve, C; Leclercq, C; Rannou, F; Oliviero, P; Mansier, P; Chevalier, B; Swynghedauw, B; Charlemagne, D

    1992-06-01

    The basis for impaired left ventricular function of hearts in moderate to severe stages of hypertrophy and congestive heart failure remains uncertain. At the cellular level, the mechanisms governing the movements of calcium in the myocardium are actually depressed and might at least in part account for the slowing of the maximum shortening velocity and the impaired relaxation. These alterations of membrane proteins seem particularly important in species where the slowing of Vmax cannot be a consequence of the myosin heavy chain shift. They lead to an unstable equilibrium of calcium homeostasis and to calcium overload in heart failure. On the other hand, the enhanced density and remodeling of collagen in the hypertrophied heart, which would depend on elevation in circulating aldosterone, impair myocardial stiffness with diastolic dysfunction and lead to altered pumping capacity of the heart. Disturbances of calcium metabolism and matrix collagen remodeling enhance early afterdepolarizations and arrhythmias. PMID:1385839

  11. Detection of the basement membrane-degrading proteolytic activity of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after SDS-PAGE using agarose overlays containing Abz-MKALTLQ-EDDnp

    OpenAIRE

    Puccia, R; M. A. Juliano; L. Juliano; Travassos, L R; Carmona, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized, in the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast phase, an exocellular SH-dependent serine proteinase activity against Abz-MKRLTL-EDDnp and analogous fluorescent-quenched peptides, and showed that it is also active against constituents of the basement membrane in vitro. In the present study, we separated the components of P. brasiliensis culture filtrates by electrophoresis and demonstrated that the serine-thiol exocellular proteinase has a diffuse and heterogeneous migration...

  12. VP08R from Infectious Spleen and Kidney Necrosis Virus Is a Novel Component of the Virus-Mock Basement Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaopeng; Yan, Muting; Wang, Rui; Lin, Ting; Tang, Junliang; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae, brings great harm to fish farming. In infected tissues, ISKNV infection is characterized by a unique phenomenon, in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are speculated to wall off the infected cells from host immune attack. A viral membrane protein, VP23R, binds and recruits the host nidogen-1 protein to construct a basement memb...

  13. Control of mammary epithelial differentiation: basement membrane induces tissue-specific gene expression in the absence of cell-cell interaction and morphological polarity

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Functional differentiation in mammary epithelia requires specific hormones and local environmental signals. The latter are provided both by extracellular matrix and by communication with adjacent cells, their action being intricately connected in what appears to be a cascade of events leading to milk production. To distinguish between the influence of basement membrane and that of cell-cell contact in this process, we developed a novel suspension culture assay in which mammary epithelial cell...

  14. A case of subepidermal blistering disease with autoantibodies to multiple laminin subunits who developed later autoantibodies to alpha-5 chain of type IV collagen associated with membranous glomerulonephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueki, Hirohiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Ohtoshi, Shinpei; Nakada, Tokio; Yoshimura, Ashio; Tateishi, Chiharu; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fader, William; Ghohestani, Reza F; Hirako, Yoshiaki; Koga, Hiroshi; Ishii, Norito; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Qian, Hua; Li, Xiaoguang; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    We report a 68-year-old Japanese female patient with subepidermal blistering disease with autoantibodies to multiple laminins, who subsequently developed membranous glomerulonephropathy. At skin disease stage, immunofluorescence demonstrated IgG anti-basement membrane zone antibodies reactive with dermal side of NaCl-split skin. Immunoblotting of human dermal extract, purified laminin-332, hemidesmosome-rich fraction and laminin-521 trimer recombinant protein (RP) detected laminin γ-1 and α-3 and γ-2 subunits of laminin-332. Three years after skin lesions disappeared, nephrotic symptoms developed. Antibodies to α-3 chain of type IV collagen (COL4A3) were negative, thus excluding the diagnosis of Goodpasture syndrome. All anti-laminin antibodies disappeared. Additional IB and ELISA studies of RPs of various COL4 chains revealed reactivity with COL4A5, but not with COL4A6 or COL4A3. Although diagnosis of anti-laminin γ-1 (p200) pemphigoid or anti-laminin-332-type mucous membrane pemphigoid could not be made, this case was similar to previous cases with autoantibodies to COL4A5 and/or COL4A6. PMID:25633161

  15. Genome wide analysis indicates genes for basement membrane and cartilage matrix proteins as candidates for hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke C M Lavrijsen

    Full Text Available Hip dysplasia, an abnormal laxity of the hip joint, is seen in humans as well as dogs and is one of the most common skeletal disorders in dogs. Canine hip dysplasia is considered multifactorial and polygenic, and a variety of chromosomal regions have been associated with the disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study in Dutch Labrador Retrievers, comparing data of nearly 18,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 48 cases and 30 controls using two different statistical methods. An individual SNP analysis based on comparison of allele frequencies with a χ(2 statistic was used, as well as a simultaneous SNP analysis based on Bayesian variable selection. Significant association with canine hip dysplasia was observed on chromosome 8, as well as suggestive association on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, 20, 25 and 32. Next-generation DNA sequencing of the exons of genes of seven regions identified multiple associated alleles on chromosome 1, 5, 8, 20, 25 and 32 (p<0.001. Candidate genes located in the associated regions on chromosomes 1, 8 and 25 included LAMA2, LRR1 and COL6A3, respectively. The associated region on CFA20 contained candidate genes GDF15, COMP and CILP2. In conclusion, our study identified candidate genes that might affect susceptibility to canine hip dysplasia. These genes are involved in hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix integrity of basement membrane and cartilage. The functions of the genes are in agreement with the notion that disruptions in endochondral bone formation in combination with soft tissue defects are involved in the etiology of hip dysplasia.

  16. Collagencin, an antibacterial peptide from fish collagen: Activity, structure and interaction dynamics with membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaas, Nadia; Hammami, Riadh; Gomaa, Ahmed; Bédard, François; Biron, Éric; Subirade, Muriel; Beaulieu, Lucie; Fliss, Ismail

    2016-04-29

    In this study, we first report characterization of collagencin, an antimicrobial peptide identified from fish collagen hydrolysate. The peptide completely inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus at 1.88 mM. Although non-toxic up to 470 μM, collagencin was hemolytic at higher concentrations. The secondary structure of collagencin was mainly composed by β-sheet and β-turn as determined by CD measurements and molecular dynamics. The peptide is likely to form β-sheet structure under hydrophobic environments and interacts with both anionic (phosphatidylglycerol) and zwitterionic (phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine) lipids as shown with CD spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The peptide formed several hydrogen bonds with both POPG and POPE lipids and remained at membrane-water interface, suggesting that collagencin antibacterial action follows a carpet mechanism. Collagenous fish wastes could be processed by enzymatic hydrolysis and transformed into products of high value having functional or biological properties. Marine collagens are a promising source of antimicrobial peptides with new implications in food safety and human health. PMID:27038545

  17. In vitro aging of mineralized collagen-based composite as guided tissue regeneration membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) has been developed for the regeneration of periodontal tissues, bone around natural teeth and dental implants. The aim of this study is to investigate the biodegradability and mechanic behavior of a novel mineralized nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly (lactic acid) (nHAC/PLA) composite as GTR membrane in vitro. The elastic modulus and maximum tensile strength of GTR film samples with different nHAC/PLA ratio were measured to get an optimal nHAC/PLA ratio. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to evaluate the change of the inorganic component in the samples during the process of in vitro aging. Morphology of samples was checked by using scanning electron microscopy. On the basis of the above results, it can be concluded that the GTR membranes maintained integrity and the original appearance throughout the 1-month in vitro aging. There is an active dissolution and deposition process of crystals which is propitious to the bone formation on the surface of the composite membrane. The optimal nHAC/PLA ratio of the novel membrane is 0.4:1. For a longer period of bone repair, PLA with higher molecular weight should be chosen as the scaffold for the GTR membrane

  18. The extracellular matrix of Gadus morhua muscle contains types III, V, VI and IV collagens in addition to type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Lawson, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal microscopy and immuno‐histochemistry were used to examine collagens in the extracellular matrix of cod Gadus morhua swimming muscle. In addition to the well known presence of type I fibrous collagen, types III and VI were also found in the myocommata and the endomysium. The beaded collagen......, type VI, was found in the endomysium and the network forming collagen, type IV, was found in the basement membrane. This is the first report of type V collagen in cod muscle and of types II, IV and VI in the muscle of a teleost....

  19. Deletion of the Basement Membrane Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Type XVIII Collagen Causes Hypertriglyceridemia in Mice and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Joseph R.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Fong, Loren; Stanford, Kristin I.; Gonzales, Jon C.; Yeh, Erika; Young, Stephen G.; Bensadoun, Andre; Witztum, Joseph L.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Moulton, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) acts on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the peripheral circulation, liberating free fatty acids for energy metabolism or storage. This essential enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle and migrates to the luminal side of the vascular endothelium where it acts upon circulating lipoproteins. Prior studies suggested that Lpl is immobilized by way of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the endothelium, but genetic...

  20. Preparation and characterisation of Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract loaded chitosan-collagen-starch membrane: role in wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, B; Veena, B; Jayachandran, V P; Shilpa, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Engineered scaffolds made from natural biomaterials are crucial elements in tissue engineering strategies. In this study, biological scaffold like chitosan-collagen-starch membrane (CCSM) loaded with the antibacterial agent, Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract was explored for enhanced regeneration of epithelial tissue during wound healing. Collagen was extracted from Rachycentron canadum fish skin. Membranous scaffold was prepared by mixing collagen, starch and chitosan in a fixed proportion, loaded with aqueous extract of P. granatum and its anti-pseudomonal activity was studied. Morphological characterization by SEM and mechanical property like tensile strength of the membrane were studied. Excision wound of 2 cm(2) size was induced in Guinea pig and the effect of P. granatum extract loaded CCSM in wound healing was studied. The SEM image showed deep pores in the membrane and also possessed good tensile strength. Wound surface area was reduced prominently in the experimental group with P. granatum extract loaded CCSM when compared to the group with unloaded membrane and the one with no membrane. Punica granatum extract loaded CCSM has antipseudomonal property and supported enhanced epithelial cell proliferation without leaving a scar after wound healing. This has significant therapeutic application in membranous scaffold mediated skin repair and regeneration. PMID:25893391

  1. Socket repair utilizing collagen membrane and mineralized allograft in the esthetic zone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichetti, John C; D'Amore, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    As the number of patients seeking implants increases, so do the esthetic challenges. Adequate bone is necessary to place an implant with an esthetically pleasing outcome. Failing teeth that require implant replacement often have bony deficiencies, and several surgical techniques have been advocated for maintaining bone volume at the time of extraction. This case report utilized a predictable conservative technique for treating a facial bony defect prior to implant surgery. Atraumatic flapless tooth extraction and the placement of a resorbable collagen membrane and mineralized allograft allowed for adequate regeneration of the alveolar socket prior to implant placement. The dentition was later restored with a zirconia abutment and crown. Socket repair utilizing this technique was a clinically acceptable method for obtaining an esthetic implant restoration. PMID:20829166

  2. Quaternary epitopes of α345(IV) collagen initiate Alport post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Ge, Linna; Hertz, Jens Michael; Kashtan, Clifford E; Sado, Yoshikazu; Segal, Yoav; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including...

  3. The Study of Barrier Function of Collagen Membrane “Osteoplast” in Healing Bone Defects in an Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov S.Y.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to study barrier properties of collagen membrane “Osteoplast” (“Vitaform”, Russia in closing critical bone defect in an experiment. Materials and Methods. The experiments have been carried out on 20 rabbits of “chinchilla” breed. Results. “Osteoplast”, a membrane made on the basis of bone collagen, is reabsorbed and serves as a safe barrier for fibroblasts migration into bone defect area. Its application enables to protect the defect area from fibrous tissue penetrating and initiate bone regeneration. Osseous tissue beneath a membrane goes few differentiation stages, has classical structure including all structural elements (osteons, lacunes, blood vessels that provides its perfect strength characteristics.

  4. Periodontal Responses to Augmented Corticotomy with Collagen Membrane Application during Orthodontic Buccal Tipping in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Yeol Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective randomized split-mouth study was performed to examine the effects of absorbable collagen membrane (ACM application in augmented corticotomy using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM, during orthodontic buccal tipping movement in the dog. After buccal circumscribing corticotomy and DBBM grafting into the decorticated area, flaps were repositioned and sutured on control sides. ACM was overlaid and secured with membrane tacks, on test sides only, and the flaps were repositioned and sutured. Closed coil springs were used to apply 200 g orthodontic force in the buccolingual direction on the second and third premolars, immediately after primary flap closure. The buccal tipping angles were 31.19±14.60° and 28.12±11.48° on the control and test sides, respectively. A mean of 79.5 ± 16.0% of the buccal bone wall was replaced by new bone on the control side, and on the test side 78.9±19.5% was replaced. ACM application promoted an even bone surface. In conclusion, ACM application in augmented corticotomy using DBBM might stimulate periodontal tissue reestablishment, which is useful for rapid orthodontic treatment or guided bone regeneration. In particular, ACM could control the formation of mesenchymal matrix, facilitating an even bone surface.

  5. Periodontal responses to augmented corticotomy with collagen membrane application during orthodontic buccal tipping in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yeol; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Herr, Yeek; Kwon, Young-Hyuk; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This prospective randomized split-mouth study was performed to examine the effects of absorbable collagen membrane (ACM) application in augmented corticotomy using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), during orthodontic buccal tipping movement in the dog. After buccal circumscribing corticotomy and DBBM grafting into the decorticated area, flaps were repositioned and sutured on control sides. ACM was overlaid and secured with membrane tacks, on test sides only, and the flaps were repositioned and sutured. Closed coil springs were used to apply 200 g orthodontic force in the buccolingual direction on the second and third premolars, immediately after primary flap closure. The buccal tipping angles were 31.19 ± 14.60° and 28.12 ± 11.48° on the control and test sides, respectively. A mean of 79.5 ± 16.0% of the buccal bone wall was replaced by new bone on the control side, and on the test side 78.9 ± 19.5% was replaced. ACM application promoted an even bone surface. In conclusion, ACM application in augmented corticotomy using DBBM might stimulate periodontal tissue reestablishment, which is useful for rapid orthodontic treatment or guided bone regeneration. In particular, ACM could control the formation of mesenchymal matrix, facilitating an even bone surface. PMID:25276824

  6. Type IV collagen stimulates pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and inhibits apoptosis through an autocrine loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer shows a highly aggressive and infiltrative growth pattern and is characterized by an abundant tumor stroma known to interact with the cancer cells, and to influence tumor growth and drug resistance. Cancer cells actively take part in the production of extracellular matrix proteins, which then become deposited into the tumor stroma. Type IV collagen, an important component of the basement membrane, is highly expressed by pancreatic cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the cellular effects of type IV collagen produced by the cancer cells were characterized. The expression of type IV collagen and its integrin receptors were examined in vivo in human pancreatic cancer tissue. The cellular effects of type IV collagen were studied in pancreatic cancer cell lines by reducing type IV collagen expression through RNA interference and by functional receptor blocking of integrins and their binding-sites on the type IV collagen molecule. We show that type IV collagen is expressed close to the cancer cells in vivo, forming basement membrane like structures on the cancer cell surface that colocalize with the integrin receptors. Furthermore, the interaction between type IV collagen produced by the cancer cell, and integrins on the surface of the cancer cells, are important for continuous cancer cell growth, maintenance of a migratory phenotype, and for avoiding apoptosis. We show that type IV collagen provides essential cell survival signals to the pancreatic cancer cells through an autocrine loop

  7. Multilayer Membranes of Glycosaminoglycans and Collagen I Biomaterials Modulate the Function and Microvesicle Release of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyan Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer composite membrane of biomaterials can increase the function of adipose stem cells or osteoprogenitor cells. Recent evidence indicates endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and EPCs released microvesicles (MVs play important roles in angiogenesis and vascular repair. Here, we investigated the effects of biomaterial multilayer membranes of hyaluronic acid (HA or chondroitin sulfate (CS and Collagen I (Col I on the functions and MVs release of EPCs. Layer-by-layer (LBL technology was applied to construct the multilayer composite membranes. Four types of the membranes constructed by adsorbing either HA or CS and Col I alternatively with different top layers were studied. The results showed that all four types of multilayer composite membranes could promote EPCs proliferation and migration and inhibit cell senility, apoptosis, and the expression of activated caspase-3. Interestingly, these biomaterials increased the release and the miR-126 level of EPCs-MVs. Moreover, the CS-Col I membrane with CS on the top layer showed the most effects on promoting EPCs proliferation, EPCs-MV release, and miR-126 level in EPCs-MVs. In conclusion, HA/CS and Collagen I composed multilayer composite membranes can promote EPCs functions and release of miR-126 riched EPCs-MVs, which provides a novel strategy for tissue repair treatment.

  8. Anti-EMP2 diabody blocks Epithelial Membrane Protein 2 (EMP2) and FAK mediated collagen gel contraction in ARPE-19 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Shawn A.; Telander, David G.; Mareninov, Sergey; Nagy, Agnes; Wadehra, Madhuri; Braun, Jonathan; Gordon, Lynn K.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial membrane protein 2 (EMP2) regulates collagen gel contraction by the retinal pigment epithelium cell line ARPE-19 by modulating FAK activation. Collagen gel contraction is one in vitro model for an aberrant wound healing response, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which occurs as a complication of severe ocular trauma. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether EMP2 specific recombinant diabody decreases activation of FAK and collagen gel contraction in ARPE-19. Anti-E...

  9. Toward guided tissue and bone regeneration: morphology, attachment, proliferation, and migration of cells cultured on collagen barrier membranes. A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behring, J.; Junker, R.; Walboomers, X.F.; Chessnut, B.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Collagen barrier membranes are frequently used in both guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Collagen used for these devices is available from different species and is often processed to alter the properties of the final product. This is necessary because unprocessed c

  10. Microfabrication of a tunable collagen/alginate-chitosan hydrogel membrane for controlling cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yizhe; Zhang, Demeng; Lv, Yan; Guo, Xin; Lou, Ruyun; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Xiuli; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-11-20

    Indirect cell contact co-culture system is increasingly becoming more attractable owing to their advantages of easy cell separation and desirable outcomes for cell-cell interactions. However, how to precisely control the spatial position of cells within multicellular co-cultures is still experimentally challenging due to the incapability of the conventional methods in vitro. In the present study, a tunable collagen/alginate-chitosan (Col/Alg-Chi) membrane was established, which was capable of controlling intercellular distance between the neighboring cells at a level of micrometer resolution. It was showed that intercellular distance between the hepatocytes and the fibroblasts exerted significant influence on hepatic function in vitro. In particular, maintenance of the functionality of primary hepatocytes requires direct contact between the hepatocytes and their supportive stromal cells, and their effective contact distance is within 30μm. This technical platform would potentially enable investigations of dynamic cell-cell interaction in a multitude of applications including organogenesis, development or even neoplastic transformation. PMID:27561537

  11. Collagen-Coated Polytetrafluoroethane Membrane Inserts Enhances Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cord Blood Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Søballe, Kjeld; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael;

    standard micromass pellet system, layered on calcium polyphosphate (CPP), and on semi-permeable polytetrafluoroethane membranes with and without collagen type I, II or IV pre-coating. Findings / Results: The MPLC cell line used in this study possessed poor chondrogenic potency overall, but membrane...... culturing resulted in a multicellular layer tissue with formation of more cartilaginous tissue compared to micromass or CPP culture. In the membrane system MLPCs produced pellucid discs, 12 mm in diameter by 1 mm in thickness from 2x10^6 cells. The discs had hyaline-like cartilage extracellular matrix, with...... micromass or CPP cultures. Conclusions: In conclusion, we demonstrate that MLPCs possess’ chondrogenic potency, which increased when cultured scaffold-free on membrane inserts resulting in multicellular-layered hyaline-like cartilage tissue. Evaluating the effect of culturing pre-differentiated MLPCs on CPP...

  12. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellynck, K; Shah, R; Deng, D; Parkar, M; Liu, W; Knowles, J C; Buxton, P

    2013-01-01

    Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell's ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton's role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (D1 ORL UVA), osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5) were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a 'pseudo-periosteum' in the regeneration of bone defects. PMID:23813054

  13. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gellynck

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell’s ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton’s role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (D1 ORL UVA, osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5 were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a ‘pseudo-periosteum’ in the regeneration of bone defects.

  14. Biological Evaluation (In Vitro and In Vivo) of Bilayered Collagenous Coated (Nano Electrospun and Solid Wall) Chitosan Membrane for Periodontal Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Yavari, Seyedeh Kimia; Pajoumshariati, Seyedramin

    2016-07-01

    The application of barrier membranes in guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a commonly used surgical technique in periodontal research. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on two different collagenous coatings (nano electrospun fibrous vs. solid wall) of bilayered collagen/chitosan membrane and their histological evaluation on bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects. It was found that chitosan-nano electrospun collagen (CNC) membranes had higher proliferation/metabolic activity compared to the chitosan-collagen (CC) and pristine chitosan membranes. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the CNC membranes induced significant expression of osteogenic genes (Osteocalcin, RUNX2 and Col-α1) in MSCs. Moreover, higher calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs were observed compared to the other groups. Histologic and histomorphometric evaluations were performed on the uncovered (negative control) as well as covered calvarial defects of ten adult white rabbits with different membranes (CNC, CC, BioGide (BG, positive control)) at 1 and 2 months after surgery. More bone formation was detected in the defects covered with CNC and BG membranes than those covered by CC and the negative control. No inflammation and residual biomaterial particles were observed on the membrane surface or in the surrounding tissues in the surgical areas. These results suggest that bilayer CNC membrane can have the potential for use as a GBR membrane material facilitating bone formation. PMID:26586588

  15. Heparanase expression,degradation of basement membrane and low degree of infiltration by immunocytes correlate with invasion and progression of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zun-Jiang Xie; Ying Liu; Li-Min Jia; Ye-Chun He

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To disclose the mechanisms that accelerate or limit tumor invasion and metastasis in gastric cancer patients.METHODS: The heparanase expression,continuity of basement,degree of infiltration by dendritic cells and lymphocytes in gastric cancer tissues from 33 the early and late stage patients were examined by immunohistochemistry,in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: Heparanase mRNA expression in the late stage patients with gastric cancer was stronger than that in the early stage gastric cancer patients.In the early stage gastric cancer tissues,basement membrane (BlVl) appeared intact,whereas in the late stage,discontinuous BM was often present.The density of $100 protein positive tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (TIDC) in the early stage gastric cancer tissues was higher than that in the late stage.The infiltrating degree of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in the early stage patients whose tumor tissues contained a high density of TIDC was significantly higher than that in the late stage gastric cancer tissues patients with a low density of TIDC.There were few cancer cells penetrated through the continuous BM of cancer nests in the early stage gastric cancers,but many cancer cells were found outside of the defective BM of cancer nests in the late stage.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that strong heparanase expression is related with the degradation of BM which allows or accelerates tumor invasion and metastasis.However,high density of TIDC and degree of infiltration by TIL are associated with tumor progression in human gastric cancers.

  16. Mechanical properties of collagen membranes modified with pores--are they still sufficient for orbital floor reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenfeld, F; Flörke, C; Behrens, E; Rohnen, M; Kern, M; Gassling, V; Wiltfang, J

    2015-12-01

    Adequate mechanical strength is essential for materials used to reconstruct the orbital floor, and collagen membranes have recently been suggested for the repair of isolated fractures of the orbital floor. However, their mechanical properties after modification with pores for increased drainage of blood into the sinus have not been sufficiently investigated. We have tested the mechanical resistance of polydioxanone foils (PDS) to distortion and compared it with that of 3 resorbable collagen membranes (Smartbrane(®), Bio-Gide(®), and Creos(®)) in mint condition and when artificially aged (3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 8 weeks) after modification with pores (diameter 2mm) in a standard configuration (n=12 in each group). PDS and Creos(®) had comparable initial values for mechanical resistance of about 2.3N/mm(2), and Bio-Gide(®) and Smartbrane(®) had about 20% and 80% lower initial mechanical resistance, respectively. All materials tested had lower values after artificial ageing. After eight weeks of ageing, PDS lost about 99% of its initial mechanical resistance, Creos(®) about 66%, Bio-Gide(®) about 30%, and Smartbrane(®) about 95%. After 3 weeks the mechanical resistance in all groups was significantly less than the initial values (p=0.05), but there was no difference between samples aged artificially for 6 compared with 8 weeks. The mechanical resistance of the tested materials was not influenced by the presence of pores in a standard configuration and was in the appropriate range for moderate fractures of the orbital floor. We recommend further clinical investigations of collagen membranes modified with pores. PMID:26255542

  17. Cellular origins of type IV collagen networks in developing glomeruli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Dale R; Hudson, Billy G; Stroganova, Larysa; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; St John, Patricia L

    2009-07-01

    Laminin and type IV collagen composition of the glomerular basement membrane changes during glomerular development and maturation. Although it is known that both glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes produce different laminin isoforms at the appropriate stages of development, the cellular origins for the different type IV collagen heterotrimers that appear during development are unknown. Here, immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and podocytes of immature glomeruli synthesize collagen alpha 1 alpha 2 alpha1(IV). However, intracellular labeling revealed that podocytes, but not endothelial or mesangial cells, contain collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). To evaluate the origins of collagen IV further, we transplanted embryonic kidneys from Col4a3-null mutants (Alport mice) into kidneys of newborn, wildtype mice. Hybrid glomeruli within grafts containing numerous host-derived, wildtype endothelial cells never expressed collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). Finally, confocal microscopy of glomeruli from infant Alport mice that had been dually labeled with anti-collagen alpha 5(IV) and the podocyte marker anti-GLEPP1 showed immunolabeling exclusively within podocytes. Together, these results indicate that collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) originates solely from podocytes; therefore, glomerular Alport disease is a genetic defect that manifests specifically within this cell type. PMID:19423686

  18. Bone neoformation in defects treated with fibrin platelet rich membrane versus collagen membrane: a histomorphometric study in rabbit’s femurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jonathan Meza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to compare the bone neoformation in bone defects treated with platelet rich fibrin (PRF and collagen membrane (CM, after 3 and 5 weeks for which two bone defects were created of 4 mm width and 6 mm depth in the left femur distal diaphysis of New Zeland rabbits (n = 12. The subjects were randomly allocated in 2 groups. One of the defects was covered with a platelet rich fibrin membrane (Centrifuged resorbable Autologous blood biopolymer without biochemical modification or collagen membrane (gold standard – Neo Mem. The second defect was left uncovered (NC. The rabbits were sacrified after 3 and 5 weeks (3 rabbits per period. The femur was completely removed and they were processed histomophometrically. The bone neoformation analysis was performed through a differential points counting. The data was statistically analyzed (ANOVA, Tukey. The histomorphometric results showed that bone neoformation of the defects treated with PRF after 3 weeks was equivalent to the neoformation of the CM (p

  19. A two-dimensional model of the colonic crypt accounting for the role of the basement membrane and pericryptal fibroblast sheath.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro.

  20. Bone density of defects treated with lyophilized amniotic membrane versus collagen membrane: a tomographic and histomorfogenic study in rabbit´s femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Katty Ríos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare the bone density of bone defects treated with lyophilizated amniotic membrane (LAM and collagen Membrane (CM, at 3 and 5 weeks. Two bone defects of 4 mm in diameter and 6 mm deep were created in left distal femoral diaphysis of New Zealand rabbits (n = 12. The animals were randomly divided into 2 groups. One of the defects was covered with lyophilized amniotic membrane (Rosa Chambergo Tissue Bank/National Institute of Child Health-IPEN, Lima, Peru or collagen Membrane (Dentium Co, Seoul, Korea. The second was left uncovered (NC. The rabbits were killed after 3 and 5 weeks (3 rabbits/period. The results showed a high bone density and repair of the defect by new bone. The tomographic study revealed that the bone density of the defects treated with LAM at 3 weeks was equivalent to the density obtained with CM and higher density compared with NC (p 0.05. The results show that lyophilizated amniotic membrane provides bone density equal or higher to the collagen membrane. RESUMEN El propósito de este estudio fue comparar la densidad ósea (DO de defectos óseos tratados con membrana amniótica liofilizada (MAL y membrana de colágeno (MC, a las 3 y 5 semanas. Se crearon dos defectos óseos, de 4 mm de diámetro y 6 mm de profundidad, en la diáfisis femoral distal izquierda de conejos Nueva Zelanda (n=12. Los animales fueron divididos aleatoriamente en 2 grupos. Uno de los defectos fue cubierto con membrana amniótica liofilizada (Banco de tejidos Rosa Chambergo/INSN-IPEN, Lima, Perú o membrana de colágeno (Dentium Co, Seoul, Korea. El segundo se dejó sin cubrir (NC. Los conejos fueron sacrificados después de 3 y 5 semanas (3 conejos/periodo. Los resultados mostraron una alta DO y reparación del defecto por hueso neoformado. El estudio tomográfico reveló que la DO de los defectos tratados con MAL a las 3 semanas fue comparable a la densidad obtenida con MC y mayor comparado con la densidad de NC (p

  1. Detection of gelatinolytic activity in developing basement membranes of the mouse embryo head by combining sensitive in situ zymography with immunolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Genetic evidence indicates that the major gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 are involved in mammalian craniofacial development. Since these matrix metalloproteinases are secreted as proenzymes that require activation, their tissue distribution does not necessarily reflect the sites of enzymatic activity. Information regarding the spatial and temporal expression of gelatinolytic activity in the head of the mammalian embryo is sparse. Sensitive in situ zymography with dye-quenched gelatin (DQ-gelatin) has been introduced recently; gelatinolytic activity results in a local increase in fluorescence. Using frontal sections of wild-type mouse embryo heads from embryonic day 14.5-15.5, we optimized and validated a simple double-labeling in situ technique for combining DQ-gelatin zymography with immunofluorescence staining. MMP inhibitors were tested to confirm the specificity of the reaction in situ, and results were compared to standard SDS-gel zymography of tissue extracts. Double-labeling was used to show the spatial relationship in situ between gelatinolytic activity and immunostaining for gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, collagenase 3 (MMP-13) and MT1-MMP (MMP-14), a major activator of pro-gelatinases. Strong gelatinolytic activity, which partially overlapped with MMP proteins, was confirmed for Meckel's cartilage and developing mandibular bone. In addition, we combined in situ zymography with immunostaining for extracellular matrix proteins that are potential gelatinase substrates. Interestingly, gelatinolytic activity colocalized precisely with laminin-positive basement membranes at specific sites around growing epithelia in the developing mouse head, such as the ducts of salivary glands or the epithelial fold between tongue and lower jaw region. Thus, this sensitive method allows to associate, with high spatial resolution, gelatinolytic activity with epithelial morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:22688677

  2. Cryopreservation in situ of cell monolayers on collagen vitrigel membrane culture substrata: ready-to-use preparation of primary hepatocytes and ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Tomoyo; Takezawa, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreservation is generally performed on cells in suspension. In the case of adherent cells such as hepatocytes, a loss of their ability to attach is a more serious problem than a decreased viability after cryopreservation. We herein report a novel technology of direct in situ cryopreservation of cells cultured on collagen vitrigel membranes, which have excellent mechanical strength and can be easily handled by tweezers even when coated with cultured cells. Rat primary hepatocytes, mitomycin C-treated mouse fibroblasts (feeder cells for ES cells), and mouse ES cells on the feeder cells were cultured on collagen vitrigel membranes for 1 day. The membranes with cells attached were then plucked up from the dish, soaked in cryopreservation medium containing 10% dimethyl sulfoxide, frozen using a controlled-rate freezer, and transferred to liquid nitrogen. The cells cultured on plastic cell culture dishes were also frozen as controls. After storage in liquid nitrogen for periods from 1 week to 3 months, the cryopreserved membranes with the cells still attached were thawed by adding warmed culture medium. Cell viability estimated by morphology and functional staining with calcein showed significant improvement in comparison to cells cryopreserved without the collagen vitrigel membrane. The recoveries of living cells after cryopreservation were 26.7%, 76.2%, and 58.6% for rat hepatocytes, mitomycin C-treated mouse fibroblasts, and mouse ES cells on collagen vitrigel membranes, respectively. In contrast, essentially no cells at all remained on the plastic cell culture dishes after thawing. Because adherent cell storage under these conditions is very convenient, the use of this technique employing collagen vitrigel membranes should be generally applicable to the cryopreservation of adherent cells that are otherwise problematic to store as frozen stocks. PMID:19775524

  3. The development of collagen-GAG scaffold-membrane composites for tendon tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Caliari, Steven R.; Ramirez, Manuel A.; Harley, Brendan A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering approaches for tendon defects require improved biomaterials to balance microstructural and mechanical design criteria. Collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds have shown considerable success as in vivo regenerative templates and in vitro constructs to study cell behavior. While these scaffolds possess many advantageous qualities, their mechanical properties are typically orders of magnitude lower than orthopedic tissues such as tendon. Taking inspiration from mech...

  4. [Building of defects of the bladder wall by membrane, created on the basis of type I collagen (an experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, A A; Mksimov, V A; Kirpatovskiĭ, V I; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Karpov, V K; Tokarev, F K; Kamalov, D M; Burov, V N; Okhobotov, D A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study was performed on 24 Chinchilla rabbits, which underwent resection of the bladder with building of defect by membrane "Collost", created on the basis of type I collagen. The functional state of the bladder in situ was assessed by infusion cystomanometry during repeated surgery at 7, 14 day and at 1, 3, 6 months, and at 1 and 1.5 years. It is found that developing detrusor pressure during bladder contractions was decreased by 10 times in the first week of the study; it was in line with the subcompensation after 3 months, and was restored at 6 month. At 1 and 1.5 years, increase of cumulative function of bladder while saving detrusor pressure was observed. Dilating cystoplastics using biopolymer "Collost" provides good long-term functional results. PMID:23379236

  5. Divergent mechanisms underlie Smad4-mediated positive regulation of the three genes encoding the basement membrane component laminin-332 (laminin-5

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    Hahn Stephan A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional inactivation of the tumor suppressor Smad4 in colorectal and pancreatic carcinogenesis occurs coincident with the transition to invasive growth. Breaking the basement membrane (BM barrier, a prerequisite for invasive growth, can be due to tumor induced proteolytic tissue remodeling or to reduced synthesis of BM molecules by incipient tumor cells. Laminin-332 (laminin-5, a heterotrimeric BM component composed of α3-, β3- and γ2-chains, has recently been identified as a target structure of Smad4 and represents the first example for expression control of an essential BM component by a tumor and invasion suppressor. Biochemically Smad4 is a transmitter of signals of the TGFβ superfamily of cytokines. We have reported previously, that Smad4 functions as a positive transcriptional regulator of constitutive and of TGFβ-induced transcription of all three genes encoding Laminin-332, LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2. Methods Promoter-reporter constructs harboring 4 kb upstream regions, each of the three genes encoding Laminin-322 as well as deletion and mutations constructs were established. Promoter activities and TGFβ induction were assayed through transient transfections in Smad4-negative human cancer cells and their stable Smad4-positive derivatives. Functionally relevant binding sites were subsequently confirmed through chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results Herein, we report that Smad4 mediates transcriptional regulation through three different mechanisms, namely through Smad4 binding to a functional SBE site exclusively in the LAMA3 promoter, Smad4 binding to AP1 (and Sp1 sites presumably via interaction with AP1 family components and lastly a Smad4 impact on transcription of AP1 factors. Whereas Smad4 is essential for positive regulation of all three genes, the molecular mechanisms are significantly divergent between the LAMA3 promoter as compared to the LAMB3 and LAMC2 promoters. Conclusion We hypothesize that this

  6. Maxillary sinus augmentation: collagen membrane over the osteotomy window. A pilot study

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    F.S. Marchionni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Implant rehabilitation has become a very reliable and safe procedure. However, in some cases, a small amount of bone could make implant surgery extremely difficult or even impossible. Hence, a surgical technique to augment sinus floor has been developed and improved. Nevertheless, there is still controversy over the use of a membrane over the osteotomy window. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of a membrane could be beneficial in sinus floor augmentation. Materials and methods A group of 12 patients requiring sinus floor lift were recruited. The patients were randomly allocated to either control group (membrane or test group (no membrane and only one sinus for patient was augmented. After 6 months, a bone biopsy was harvested from the lateral window to be processed for histological analysis. Results The mean amount of newly formed bone in test group was 28.0±19.5%, the connective tissue accounted for a mean value of 59.2±15.6%, while 12.8±12.6% was the amount of residual graft particles. In the membrane group the newly formed bone counted for a mean value of 30.4±15.8%, the mean quantity of connective tissue was 50.3±18.9% and about residual graft particles a mean value of 18.2±20.4% was registered. Conclusion According to our data, the use of a membrane over the lateral bone wall in sinus lift surgery does not significantly influence healing. However, the membrane could influence the residual particles resorption rate as well as soft tissue ingrowth.

  7. Effects of Calcium Dobesilate on Glomerulus TIMP1 and Collagen Ⅳ of Diabetic Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Junwu; LIU Xiaochen; LIU Shenwei; LI Mingbo; XU Yanmei; CUI Bing

    2005-01-01

    To observe the effects of calcium dobesilate on the expression of glomerular tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), collagen Ⅳ, and ultrastructure of glomerular basement membrane in diabetic rats, rats model of diabetes was established by unilateral nephrectomy and intraperitoneal injection of 1% STZ (55 mg/kg), and rats were administered calcium dobesilate 100 mg/kg (DD group) or distilled water (DM group) respectively. 12 weeks later, the changes in the renal ultrastructure and creatinine clearance rate (Ccr) were examined in each group. The expression of glomerular TIMP1 and collagen Ⅳ were studied by immunohistochemical staining. Our results showed that after 12 weeks, the Ccr in DD group increased and was significantly higher than that in DM group. Electron microscopy showed that thickness of glomerular capillary basement membrane (GBM) in Group DD was less than that of DM group. No hyperplasia of collagen fibers was found, and the distance between the holes of endothelial cells in DD group was not as even as that in the normal group, but more even than that of DM group, and podocyte processes was still in order. Immunohistochemical staining of glomeruli showed that expression of TIMP1 and collagen Ⅳ in DD group were significantly less than those of DM group DM. It is concluded that calcium dobesilate can improve diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the over- accumulation of collagen Ⅳ and calcium dobesilate may also contribute to diabetes by inhibiting the expression of TIMP1.

  8. PECAM-1 (CD31) Homophilic Interaction Up-Regulates α6β1 on Transmigrated Neutrophils In Vivo and Plays a Functional Role in the Ability of α6 Integrins to Mediate Leukocyte Migration through the Perivascular Basement Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Dangerfield, John; Larbi, Karen Y.; Huang, Miao-Tzu; Dewar, Ann; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2002-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 has been implicated in leukocyte migration through the perivascular basement membrane (PBM) though the mechanisms involved are unclear. The present results demonstrate that the ability of α6 integrins to mediate neutrophil migration through the PBM is PECAM-1 dependent, a response associated with PECAM-1–mediated increased expression of α6β1 on transmigrating neutrophils in vivo. An anti-α6 integrins mAb (GoH3) inhibited (78%, P < 0.001) n...

  9. Rapid Upregulation of Orai1 Abundance in the Plasma Membrane of Platelets Following Activation with Thrombin and Collagen Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilai Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood platelets accomplish primary hemostasis following vascular injury and contribute to the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Platelets are activated by an increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which is accomplished by Ca2+-release from intracellular stores and subsequent store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE through Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel moiety Orai1. Powerful activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which are in part effective by activation of small G- protein Rac1. The present study explored the influence of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i in platelets drawn from wild type mice. Methods: Orai1 protein surface abundance was quantified utilizing CF™488A conjugated antibodies, and [Ca2+]i was determined with Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: In resting platelets, Orai1 protein abundance and [Ca2+]i were low. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml and CRP (5ug/ml within 2 min increased [Ca2+]i and Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface. [Ca2+]i was further increased by Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM and by store depletion with the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 µM. However, Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface was not significantly affected by ionomycin and only slightly increased by thapsigargin. The effect of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 abundance and [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (50 µM. Conclusion: The increase of [Ca2+]i following stimulation of platelets with thrombin and collagen related peptide is potentiated by ultrarapid Rac1 sensitive translocation of Orai1 into the cell membrane.

  10. Effects of collagen membranes enriched with in vitro-differentiated N1E-115 cells on rat sciatic nerve regeneration after end-to-end repair

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    Fornaro Michele

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerves possess the capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury but the extent of regeneration is often poor and may benefit from exogenous factors that enhance growth. The use of cellular systems is a rational approach for delivering neurotrophic factors at the nerve lesion site, and in the present study we investigated the effects of enwrapping the site of end-to-end rat sciatic nerve repair with an equine type III collagen membrane enriched or not with N1E-115 pre-differentiated neural cells. After neurotmesis, the sciatic nerve was repaired by end-to-end suture (End-to-End group, end-to-end suture enwrapped with an equine collagen type III membrane (End-to-EndMemb group; and end-to-end suture enwrapped with an equine collagen type III membrane previously covered with neural cells pre-differentiated in vitro from N1E-115 cells (End-to-EndMembCell group. Along the postoperative, motor and sensory functional recovery was evaluated using extensor postural thrust (EPT, withdrawal reflex latency (WRL and ankle kinematics. After 20 weeks animals were sacrificed and the repaired sciatic nerves were processed for histological and stereological analysis. Results showed that enwrapment of the rapair site with a collagen membrane, with or without neural cell enrichment, did not lead to any significant improvement in most of functional and stereological predictors of nerve regeneration that we have assessed, with the exception of EPT which recovered significantly better after neural cell enriched membrane employment. It can thus be concluded that this particular type of nerve tissue engineering approach has very limited effects on nerve regeneration after sciatic end-to-end nerve reconstruction in the rat.

  11. The membrane bound LRR lipoprotein Slr, and the cell wall-anchored M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes both interact with type I collagen.

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    Marta Bober

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR have been identified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20-30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid. The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1 and emm1 mutant strain (MC25 had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors.

  12. Morphometric Changes of the Socket after Site Preservation Using Nanobone and Collagen Membrane or Stypro Versus Extraction Alone

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    Salahi S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The long-term success of a dental implant relies on implant osseointegration into native and viable bone, implant placement in an ideal position, and optimal hard and soft tissue contour. This requires the presence of sufficient alveolar bone volume, good alveolar ridge (Practically with no sign of atrophy and good surgical technique. Objectives: The aim of this randomized controlled clinical study was to evaluate morphometric changes after different alveolar ridge preservation procedures. Materials and Methods: In this study, 33 patients who had single-rooted premolar, which needed to be extracted, were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups and after tooth extraction the following treatments were administered: in group A: NanoBone and a collagen membrane; in group B: NanoBone and Stypro; and in group C: natural healing. The following clinical parameters were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the extraction: buccolingual width, midbuccal height (with the use of a custom made stent and width of keratinized gingiva. For data analysis, Paired t-test,one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests were used. Results: The average reduction in the buccolingual width, midbuccal height and keratinized gingiva was as follows: group A: 1.18±0.6, 0.64±0.92 and 3.45±1.75 mm; group B: 2.18±0.75, 0.73±0.78 and 4.73±0.9 mm; and group C: 1±0.89, 2.36±1.21 and 5±0.63 mm, respectively. Moreover, a significantly reduced resorption was found in both the buccolingual width and the width of keratinized gingiva in group A as compared to groups B and C (p<0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that the use of collagen membrane+Nano bone (group A can significantly reduce the horizontal resorption of the alveolar ridge and keratinized tissue more effectively than stypro+Nano bone (group B and blood clot alone and natural healing (group C.

  13. Injection of Recombinant Human Type VII Collagen Corrects the Disease Phenotype in a Murine Model of Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, Jennifer; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingpin; Zhou, Hui; Burnett, Julie; Muirhead, Trevor; Uitto, Jouni; Keene, Douglas R.; Woodley, David T.; Chen, Mei

    2008-01-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have incurable skin fragility, blistering, and scarring due to mutations in the gene that encodes for type VII collagen (C7) that mediates dermal–epidermal adherence in human skin. We showed previously that intradermal injection of recombinant C7 into transplanted human DEB skin equivalents stably restored C7 expression at the basement membrane zone (BMZ) and reversed the RDEB disease features. In this study, we evaluated the fea...

  14. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, A. Scott; Cummings, Christopher F.; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br−) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br− is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a post-translational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine fo...

  15. Seismic basement in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The area of contact between Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe in Poland has complicated structure of sedimentary cover and basement. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclize is only 0.3-1 km thick, increases to 7-8 km along the East European Craton margin, and 9-12 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1- to 2-km-thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sediments, up to c. 20 km. The map of the basement depth is created by combining data from geological boreholes with a set of regional seismic refraction profiles. These maps do not provide data about the basement depth in the central part of the TESZ and in the Carpathians. Therefore, the data set is supplemented by 32 models from deep seismic sounding profiles and a map of a high-resistivity (low-conductivity) layer from magnetotelluric soundings, identified as a basement. All of these data provide knowledge about the basement depth and of P-wave seismic velocities of the crystalline and consolidated type of basement for the whole area of Poland. Finally, the differentiation of the basement depth and velocity is discussed with respect to geophysical fields and the tectonic division of the area.

  16. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodewotzky, T.I.; Lima-Neto, J.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Pereira-Júnior, O.C.M. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Cirurgia e Anestesiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Sudano, M.J.; Lima, S.A.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Bersano, P.R.O. [Departamento de Patologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Yoshioka, S.A. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Landim-Alvarenga, F.C. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  17. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium

  18. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Wodewotzky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  19. Two-layer membranes of calcium phosphate/collagen/PLGA nanofibres: in vitro biomineralisation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Nora; Schneider, Oliver D.; Mohn, Dirk; Luechinger, Norman A.; Koehler, Fabian M.; Hofmann, Sandra; Vetsch, Jolanda R.; Thimm, Benjamin W.; Müller, Ralph; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study evaluates the in vitro biomedical performance of an electrospun, flexible, anisotropic bilayer with one layer containing a collagen to mineral ratio similar to that in bone. The double membrane consists of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) layer and an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CaP)/collagen (Col)/PLGA layer. In vitro biomineralisation and a cell culture study with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were conducted to characterise such membranes for possible application as biomaterials. Nanofibres with different a-CaP/Col/PLGA compositions were synthesised by electrospinning to mimic the actual composition of bone tissue. Immersion in simulated body fluid and in cell culture medium resulted in the deposition of a hydroxyapatite layer. Incubation of hMSC for 4 weeks allowed for assessment of the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of the cells on both sides of the double membrane. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the proper adhesion of the cells. Calcium and collagen content was proven by Alizarin red S and Sirius red assays. Acute cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles or the chemicals used in the scaffold preparation could be excluded based on viability assays (alamarBlue and alkaline phosphatase activity). The findings suggest possible application of such double membranes is in treatment of bone defects with complex geometries as wound dressing material.The present study evaluates the in vitro biomedical performance of an electrospun, flexible, anisotropic bilayer with one layer containing a collagen to mineral ratio similar to that in bone. The double membrane consists of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) layer and an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CaP)/collagen (Col)/PLGA layer. In vitro biomineralisation and a cell culture study with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were conducted to characterise such membranes for possible application as biomaterials. Nanofibres with different a

  20. Collagen XVIII/endostatin expression in experimental endotoxemic acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Cichy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a frequent complication of Gram-negative sepsis, with a high risk of mortality. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced ARF is associated with hemodynamic changes that are strongly influenced by the overproduction of nitric oxide (NO through the cytokine-mediated up-regulation of inducible NO synthase. LPS-induced reductions in systemic vascular resistance paradoxically culminate in renal vasoconstriction. Collagen XVIII is an important component of the extracellular matrix expressed in basement membranes. Its degradation by matrix metalloproteases, cathepsins and elastases results in the formation of endostatin, claimed to have antiangiogenic activity and to be a prominent vasorelaxing agent. We evaluated the expression of endostatin/collagen XVIII in an endotoxemic ARF model. ARF was induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10 mg/kg followed by sacrifice 4 and 12 h later. Kidney tissue was the source of RNA and protein and the subject of histological analysis. As early as 4 h after LPS administration, blood urea, creatinine and NO levels were significantly increased compared to control. Endostatin/collagen XVIII mRNA levels were 0.71 times lower than sham-inoculated mice 4 h after LPS inoculation, returning to normal levels 12 h after LPS inoculation. Immunohistological examination revealed that acute injury caused by LPS leads to an increase of endostatin basement membrane staining in association with the decrease of CD31 endothelial basement membrane staining. These results indicate that in the early phase of endotoxemic ARF the endostatin levels were not regulated by gene expression, but by the metabolism of collagen XVIII.

  1. Slc20a2 deficiency results in fetal growth restriction and placental calcification associated with thickened basement membranes and novel CD13 and lamininα1 expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallingford, Mary C; Gammill, Hilary S; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2016-03-01

    The essential nutrient phosphorus must be taken up by the mammalian embryo during gestation. The mechanism(s) and key proteins responsible for maternal to fetal phosphate transport have not been identified. Established parameters for placental phosphate transport match those of the type III phosphate transporters, Slc20a1 and Slc20a2. Both members are expressed in human placenta, and their altered expression is linked to preeclampsia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Slc20a2 is required for placental function. Indeed, complete deficiency of Slc20a2 in either the maternal or embryonic placental compartment results in fetal growth restriction. We found that Slc20a2 null mice can reproduce, but are subviable; ∼50% are lost prior to weaning age. We also observed that 23% of Slc20a2 deficient females develop pregnancy complications at full term, with tremors and placental abnormalities including abnormal vascular structure, increased basement membrane deposition, abundant calcification, and accumulation of novel CD13 and lamininα1 positive cells. Together these data support that Slc20a2 deficiency impacts both maternal and neonatal health, and Slc20a2 is required for normal placental function. In humans, decreased levels of placental Slc20a1 and Slc20a2 have been correlated with early onset preeclampsia, a disorder that can manifest from placental dysfunction. In addition, preterm placental calcification has been associated with poor pregnancy outcomes. We surveyed placental calcification in human preeclamptic placenta samples, and detected basement membrane-associated placental calcification as well as a comparable lamininα1 positive cell type, indicating that similar mechanisms may underlie both human and mouse placental calcification. PMID:26952749

  2. Collagen biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Last, J A; Reiser, K M

    1984-01-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of the lung. At least five genetically distinct collagen types have been identified in lung tissue. However, the precise role of collagen in nonrespiratory lung function is not well understood, in part because of the difficulties inherent in studying lung collagen, regardless of the type of assay used. A major problem is the insolubility of lung collagen; generally less than 20% of total lung collagen can be solubilized as intact chains, even with hars...

  3. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting

    OpenAIRE

    Nupur Goyal; Raghavendra Rao; C. Balachandran; Sathish Pai; Bhogal, Balbir S.; Enno Schmidt; Detlef Zillikens

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect I...

  4. Endorepellin, the C-terminal angiostatic module of perlecan, enhances collagen-platelet responses via the α2β1-integrin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Bix, Gregory; Iozzo, Rex A.; Woodall, Ben; Burrows, Michelle; McQuillan, Angela; Campbell, Shelly; Fields, Gregg B.; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2007-01-01

    Endorepellin, a C-terminal fragment of the vascular basement membrane proteoglycan perlecan, inhibits angiogenesis via the α2β1-integrin receptor. Because this integrin is also implicated in platelet-collagen responses and because endorepellin or its fragments are generated in response to injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that endorepellin could also affect platelet biology. We discovered that endorepellin supported α2β1-dependent platelet adhesion, without appreciably activating or ag...

  5. Plumieribetin, a Fish Lectin Homologous to Mannose-binding B-type Lectins, Inhibits the Collagen-binding α1β1 Integrin*

    OpenAIRE

    de Santana Evangelista, Karla; Andrich, Filipe; Figueiredo de Rezende, Flávia; Niland, Stephan; Cordeiro, Marta N.; Horlacher, Tim; Castelli, Riccardo; Schmidt-Hederich, Alletta; Peter H. Seeberger; Sanchez, Eladio F.; Richardson, Michael; Gomes de Figueiredo, Suely; Eble, Johannes A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a few fish proteins have been described with a high homology to B-type lectins of monocotyledonous plants. Because of their mannose binding activity, they have been ascribed a role in innate immunity. By screening various fish venoms for their integrin inhibitory activity, we isolated a homologous protein from the fin stings and skin mucus of the scorpionfish (Scorpaena plumieri). This protein inhibits α1β1 integrin binding to basement membrane collagen IV. By protein chemical and s...

  6. Clinical comparison of guided tissue regeneration, with collagen membrane and bone graft, versus connective tissue graft in the treatment of gingival recessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghighati F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Increasing patient demands for esthetic, put the root coverage procedures in particular attention. Periodontal regeneration with GTR based root coverage methods is the most common treatment used. The purpose of this study was to compare guided tissue regeneration (GTR with collagen membrane and a bone graft, with sub-epithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG, in treatment of gingival recession. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial study, eleven healthy patients with no systemic diseases who had miller’s class I or II recession defects (gingival recession  2mm were treated with SCTG or GTR using a collagen membrane and a bone graft. Clinical measurements were obtained at baseline and 6 months after surgery. These clinical measurements included recession depth (RD, recession width (RW, probing depth (PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL. Data were analyzed using independent t test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Both treatment methods resulted in a statistically significant reduction of recession depth (SCTG=2.3mm, GTR=2.1mm; P<0.0001. CAL gain after 6 months was also improved in both groups (SCG= 2.5mm, GTR=2.1mm, compared to baseline (P<0.0001. No statistical differences were observed in RD, RW, CAL between test and control groups. Root coverage was similar in both methods (SCTG= 74.2%, GTR= 62.6%, P=0.87. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the two techniques are clinically comparable. Therefore the use of collagen membrane and a bovine derived xenograft may alleviate the need for connective tissue graft.

  7. Comparative evaluation of a bioabsorbable collagen membrane and connective tissue graft in the treatment of localized gingival recession: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Mysore Babu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival recession (GR can result in root sensitivity, esthetic concern to the patient, and predilection to root caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate (1 the effect of guided tissue regeneration (GTR procedure using a bioabsorbable collagen membrane, in comparison to autogenous subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG for root coverage in localized gingival recession defects; and (2 the change in width of keratinized gingiva following these two procedures. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 cases, showing at least two localized Miller′s Class I or Class II gingival recession, participated in this study. In a split mouth design, the pairs of defects were randomly assigned for treatment with either SCTG (SCTG Group or GTR-based collagen membrane (GTRC Group. Both the grafts were covered with coronally advanced flap. Recession depth (RD, recession width (RW, width of keratinized gingiva (KG, probing depth (PD, relative attachment level (RAL, plaque index (PI, and gingival index (GI were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Six months following root coverage procedures, the mean root coverage was found to be 84.84% ± 16.81% and 84.0% ± 15.19% in SCTG Group and GTRC Group, respectively. The mean keratinized gingival width increase was 1.50 ± 0.70 mm and 2.30 ± 0.67 mm in the SCTG and GTRC group, respectively, which was not statistically significant. Conclusion: It may be concluded that resorbable collagen membrane can be a reliable alternative to autogenous connective tissue graft in the treatment of gingival recession.

  8. Role of basement membranes and their break-down in human carcinomas:a study by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of the expression of laminin chains, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs)

    OpenAIRE

    Määttä, M. (Mikko)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract In malignancies many alterations involving matrix macromolecule synthesis, secretion and assembly into basement membranes (BMs) as well as their degradation are present. The most important groups associated with matrix turnover are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs). In this study altogether 285 tissue samples were investigated comprising various malignant epithelial tumors and normal tissue structures, in which the distribution of different laminin ...

  9. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  10. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  11. Childhood epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: Confirmation of diagnosis by skin deficient in Type VII Collagen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunoblotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ; indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement.

  12. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  13. Clinical evaluation of GEM 21S® and a collagen membrane with a coronally advanced flap as a root coverage procedure in the treatment of gingival recession defects: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Clinical evaluation of efficacy of rhPDGF-BB plus beta tricalcium phosphate (GEM 21S ® along with a collagen membrane in root coverage using a coronally advanced flap. Materials and Methods: This human case series evaluated the clinical outcome of rhPDGF-BB with beta-tricalcium phosphate (GEM 21S® and a collagen membrane in the treatment of recession defects using a coronally advanced flap. Patients were followed postoperatively, and healing was evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months, with recession depth as the primary outcome measure. Results : This pioneer case series revealed a favorable tissue response to GEM 21S® and collagen membrane from both clinical and esthetic point of view in regenerative periodontal surgery.

  14. Clinical evaluation of GEM 21S® and a collagen membrane with a coronally advanced flap as a root coverage procedure in the treatment of gingival recession defects: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Preetinder Singh; Suresh, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Clinical evaluation of efficacy of rhPDGF-BB plus beta tricalcium phosphate (GEM 21S ® ) along with a collagen membrane in root coverage using a coronally advanced flap. Materials and Methods: This human case series evaluated the clinical outcome of rhPDGF-BB with beta-tricalcium phosphate (GEM 21S®) and a collagen membrane in the treatment of recession defects using a coronally advanced flap. Patients were followed postoperatively, and healing was evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months, with r...

  15. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo [NovaCell Technology Inc., Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Young [Department of Dermatology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine and Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Graduate School, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hwan-Hee [Functional Food and Nutrition Division, Department of Agrofood Resources, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 441-853 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sung Ho [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Joon [Department of Dermatology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine and Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Graduate School, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taehoon G., E-mail: taehoon@novacelltech.com [NovaCell Technology Inc., Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  16. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. ► YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. ► There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. ► The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. ► The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929–933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  17. Random/aligned electrospun PCL/PCL-collagen nanofibrous membranes: comparison of neural differentiation of rat AdMSCs and BMSCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the aligned (A) and randomly oriented (R) polycaprolactone (PCL-A and PCL-R) and PCL/collagen (PCL/Col-A and PCL/Col-R) nanofibers were electrospun onto smooth PCL membranes (PCLMs) prepared by solvent casting. In order to investigate the effects of chemical composition and nanotopography of fibrous surfaces on proliferation and on neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), adipose and bone marrow-derived rat MSCs (AdMSCs and BMSCs) were cultivated in suitable media i.e. inducing medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), and cell maintenance medium (CMM). BMSCs adhered and proliferated on all nanofibrous membranes more efficiently than AdMSCs. PCL/Col-A was found as the most convenient surface supporting proliferation in both cell types. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that BMSCs and AdMSCs are prone for differentiation to oligodendrocytes more than they differentiate to other neuronal cell types. PCL-A nanofibrous membranes supported differentiation of MSCs to O4+ (an oligodendrocytes surface antigen) cells in both culture media. The intensity of immunoreactivity of O4+ cells differentiated from BMSCs on PCL-A was highest when compared with the other groups (p + cells. In conclusion, this study can be evaluated to establish the cell therapy strategies in neurodegenerative disorders, which are relevant to oligodendrocyte abstinence using BMSCs or AdMSCs on aligned nanofibrous membranes. (paper)

  18. Experimental study of application of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies neutralizing monoclonal antibody on anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis rats%应用抗肾小球基底膜抗体的中和性单克隆抗体治疗抗肾小球基底膜肾炎大鼠的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖静; 刘章锁; 聂志勇; 王雅楠; 赵国强

    2010-01-01

    目的 应用抗肾小球基底膜(GBM)抗体的中和性单克隆抗体注射抗GBM肾炎大鼠,观察各种生化指标及肾脏病理学的变化.方法 将Wistar大鼠随机分为5组,每组9只:(1)肾炎模型组:经尾静脉注入人抗GBM抗体;(2)正常对照Ⅰ组:经尾静脉注入非抗体性的健康人IgG;(3)对照Ⅱ组:经尾静脉注入抗GBM抗体的中和性单克降抗体;(4)干预Ⅰ组:经尾静脉注入人抗GBM抗体,第7天后再经尾静脉注入抗GBM抗体的中和性单克隆抗体(1.5ml/100 g);(5)干预Ⅱ组:经尾静脉注入人抗GBM抗体,第14天后再经尾静脉注入抗GBM抗体的中和性单克隆抗体.分别在实验后第7、14、21天观察大鼠24 h尿蛋白量、BUN、Scr和肾组织病理学的变化.结果 第21天干预Ⅰ组尿蛋白量为(16.62±5.53)g/d、BUN为(11.53±2.26)mmol/L、Scr为(102.46±16.86)μmol/L,均显著低于肾炎模型组(P<0.05);干预Ⅱ组较肾炎模型组也有所降低,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).干预Ⅰ组和干预Ⅱ组肾脏细胞增生、新月体的形成及免疫复合物的沉积均少于肾炎模型组,但干预Ⅰ组更为明显.对照Ⅰ组和对照Ⅱ组之间无明显变化.结论 早期应用抗GBM抗体的中和性单克隆抗体能够有效改善抗GBM肾炎大鼠的肾脏病变.%Objective To observe the effect of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody on anti-GBM nephritis rats. Methods Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: control group Ⅰ was a negative control and was injected with healthy human IgG via the caudal vein. Control group Ⅱ was injected with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to anti-GBM antibody only. Anti- GBM nephritis group was injected with human anti-GBM antibody via the caudal vein only. Intervention group Ⅰ was injected with human anti-GBM antibody via the caudal vein and then with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to anti-GBM antibody at day 7. Intervention group Ⅱ was

  19. 酶法提取鸡蛋壳膜胶原蛋白工艺%Enzymatic Extraction of Collagen from Egg Shell Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任萌; 宫新统; 赵颂宁; 张元元; 孙研博; 殷建伟; 刘静波

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish an enzymatic method for collagen extraction from egg shell membrane, the influence of enzyme type, pH, enzyme dose, material-to-water ratio and extraction time on extraction efficiency was investigated and these extraction parameters were optimized one-factor-at-a-time experiments combined with an L9(3a) orthogonal array design. The optimal extraction condition was hydrolysis for 5 h with 6% papain at normal temperature and a material-to-water ratio of 1:100 (g/mL); resulting in an extraction rate of 0.91%. As a result, an efficient extraction method was obtained. Collagen extraction from egg shell membrane by this method not only avoids environmental pollution caused by abandoned egg shell membrane, but also has great practical value in the collagen production industry.%采用酶解法从鸡蛋膜中提取胶原蛋白,研究酶的种类、pH值、酶用量、料水比和提取时间对胶原蛋白提取的影响,采用单因素试验并结合L9(34)正交试验优化,得出酶法提取蛋壳膜中的胶原蛋白的最佳工艺条件为常温条件下质量分数6%木瓜蛋白酶在pH5、料水比1:100(g/mL)条件下、酶解5h,胶原蛋白的提取率达到0.91%。得到高效提取胶原蛋白的工艺,不仅解决了废弃鸡蛋壳膜的环境污染问题,而且在胶原蛋白生产工业有较大的实际利用价值。

  20. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Parra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1 in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2 between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP. Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis

  2. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, E.R.; Pincelli, M.S. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teodoro, W.R.; Velosa, A.P.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, V.; Rangel, M.P.; Barbas-Filho, J.V.; Capelozzi, V.L. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-04

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation. PMID:27449919

  4. Efficacy of guided bone regeneration using composite bone graft and resorbable collagen membrane in Seibert's Class I ridge defects: radiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Pushparajan; Ramakrishnan, T; Ambalavanan, N; Emmadi, Pamela; John, Thomas Libby

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate radiologically the efficacy of guided bone regeneration using composite bone graft (autogenous bone graft and anorganic bovine bone graft [Bio-Oss]) along with resorbable collagen membrane (BioMend Extend) in the augmentation of Seibert's class I ridge defects in maxilla. Bone width was evaluated using computerized tomography at day 0 and at day 180 at 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the crest. There was a statistically significant increase in bone width between day 0 and day 180 at 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the crest. The results of the study demonstrated an increase in bone width of Seibert's class I ridge defects in the maxilla of the study patients. PMID:23964779

  5. Effects of Maternal Nicotine Exposure on Expression of Collagen Type IV and its Roles on Pulmonary Bronchogenesis and Alveolarization in Newborn Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jalali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is one the chemical substance with high level of toxically. It crosses the placenta and accumulates in the developing organs of fetus. Our previous investigations indicated that collagen type IV plays a key role in basement membrane of various embryonic organs. In this study we evaluated the effect of maternal nicotine exposure pre and postnatal period on collagen IV expression during bronchogenesis and alveolarization in the lungs of newborn mice. Female Balb/C mice were mated and Sperm positive in vaginal smear was designated as embryonic day zero. Pregnant mice were divided into 2 experimental and 2 control groups. Experimental group 1, received 3 mg/kg nicotine intrapritoneally from day 5 of gestation to last day of pregnancy. Experimental group 2 received the same amount of nicotine during the same gestational days as well as 2 first week after birth (lactation. The control groups received the same volume of normal saline during the same periods. At the end of exposure times, all of newborns were anesthetized and their lungs were removed for immunohistochemical method.Our finding indicated that collagen reaction in the bronchial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix of lung parenchyma in experimental groups increased significantly compared to control groups. Our results also showed alveolar remodeling and abnormal bronchogenesis were observed in experimental group especially group 2. These data indicate that maternal nicotine exposure may induce abnormal collagen IV expression and cause defects in bronchopulmonary development.

  6. The Role of Type IV Collagen in Developing Lens in Mouse Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jalali

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sExtracellular matrix (ECM and basement membrane (BM play important roles in many developmental processes during development and after birth. Among the components of the BM, collagen fibers specially type IV are the most important parts. The aim of this study was to determine the time when collagen type IV appears in the BM of lens structure during mouse embryonic development.Materials and MethodsIn this experimental study, 22 female Balb/C mice were randomly selected and were kept under normal condition, finding vaginal plug was assumed as day zero of pregnancy. From embryonic day 10 to 20, all specimens were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and their heads were fixed, serially sectioned and immunohistochemistry study for tracing collagen type IV in lens were carried out.ResultsOur data revealed that collagen type IV appeared at the early stage of gestation day 12 in BM of anterior epithelial lens cells and the amount of this protein gradually increased until days 15-17 in ECM and posterior capsule epithelium. After this period, severe reaction was not observed in any part of the lens.ConclusionThese findings establish the important role of collagen IV in developing optic cup and any changes during critical period of pregnancy may be result in severe visual system defect

  7. Type VII Collagen Replacement Therapy in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa-How Much, How Often?

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Andrew P; Uitto, Jouni

    2016-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a devastating blistering disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which encodes type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. The anchoring fibrils in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be morphologically altered, reduced in number, or absent entirely. There is no specific treatment for this disease, but recent advances in gene, protein replacement, or cell-based therapies, with the purpose of delivering functional type VII collagen to the skin, have shown encouraging results in both preclinical and clinical settings. One critical issue is the stability of type VII collagen in anchoring fibrils, which will ultimately determine the dose and frequency of administration of the missing protein. Kühl et al. attempted to determine the half-life of type VII collagen in the skin, tongue, and esophagus of genetically altered mice that express type VII collagen constitutively, but with its expression abrogated by genetic manipulation. Their results revealed a half-life much shorter than previously anticipated, some 30 days. These findings have implications for strategies to be used for protein replacement therapy, and they also suggest that the basement membrane components at the dermal-epidermal junction are subject to ongoing remodeling and turnover. PMID:27212645

  8. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved by this...... intervention. In cases of diet-refractory 'coeliac disease' it is therefore essential to consider collagenous sprue to initiate treatment at an early stage to prevent the fibrotic progression. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old man with collagenous sprue and present the clinical and histological...

  9. Collagen XIII Induced in Vascular Endothelium Mediates α1β1 Integrin-Dependent Transmigration of Monocytes in Renal Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Jameel; Meehan, Daniel T; Delimont, Duane; Zallocchi, Marisa; Perry, Greg A.; O'Brien, Stacie; Tu, Hongmin; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a common hereditary basement membrane disorder caused by mutations in the collagen IV α3, α4, or α5 genes that results in progressive glomerular and interstitial renal disease. Interstitial monocytes that accumulate in the renal cortex from Alport mice are immunopositive for integrin α1β1, while only a small fraction of circulating monocytes are immunopositive for this integrin. We surmised that such a disparity might be due to the selective recruitment of α1β1-positive mon...

  10. 胶原蛋白/壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜在生物医学工程中的应用%Application of collagen/chitosan compound nanofiber membrane in biomedical engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余丕军; 陈炜

    2011-01-01

    背景:胶原蛋白-壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜以其优异的力学性能和良好的组织细胞相容性而成为近年来科学研究的热点.目的:总结胶原蛋白/壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜在生物医学工程中的应用进展.方法:以"胶原蛋白、壳聚糖、复合纳米纤维膜、胶原蛋白/壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜、collagen/chitosan、compound Nanofiber membrane、collagen/chitosan compound nanofiber membrane、development of research" 为检索词,应用计算机检索Pubmed数据库、Elsevier数据库、万方数据库1993-01/2010-05关于胶原蛋白/壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜研究的相关文章,对53篇文献进行分析.结果与结论:研究表明,将胶原蛋白/壳聚糖共混,在不同条件下交联,其共混复合物在力学性能方面较单一的胶原蛋白有一定的改善,其共混膜可以作为较小软骨缺损的修复的支架材料.研究证实胶原蛋白/壳聚糖复合纳米纤维膜有着优异的力学性能、很好的组织细胞相容性和生物可降解性.文章从胶原蛋白和壳聚糖单一生物材料的缺陷性、复合纤维膜的优势及其在生物医药工程中的应用方面进行了探讨.%BACKGROUND: Coil agen/chitosan compound nanofiber membrane has become a research hotspot in recent years in respect of excellent mechanical properties and good biocompatibilrty.OBJECTIVE: To review the research progress of collagen/chitosan compound nanofiber membrane in biomedica I engineering. METHODS: Literatures related to collogen/chitosan compound nanofiber membranefrom PubMed database, Elsevier database and Wanfang database (1993-01/2010-05) were retrieved by computer with the key words of "collagen, chitosan, compound nanofiber membrane, collagen/chitosan compound nanofiber membrane" in Chinese and Eng is h According to indus ion criteria, 53 literatures were selected in this study.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The studies have demonstrated that collagen combined with chitosan

  11. Role of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen in early fibrotic lesions of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and migration of lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Nagase, Takahide; Fukuda, Yuh; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Early fibrotic lesions are thought to be the initial findings of fibrogenesis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, but little is known about their properties. Type IV collagen comprises six gene products, α1-α6, and although it is known as a major basement membrane component, its abnormal deposition is seen in fibrotic lesions of certain organs. We studied the expression of type I and III collagen and all α chains of type IV collagen in lung specimens from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or organizing pneumonia (OP) via immunohistochemistry. With cultured lung fibroblasts, we analyzed the expression and function of all α chains of type IV collagen via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, and a Boyden chamber migration assay after the knockdown of α1 and α2 chains. Although we observed type I and III collagens in early fibrotic lesions of both UIP and OP, we found type IV collagen, especially α1 and α2 chains, in early fibrotic lesions of UIP but not OP. Fibroblasts enhanced the expression of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen after transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. Small interfering RNA against α1 and α2 chains increased fibroblast migration, with upregulated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and adding medium containing fibroblast-produced α1 and α2 chains reduced the increased levels of fibroblast migration and phosphorylation of FAK. Fibroblasts in OP were positive for phosphorylated FAK but fibroblasts in UIP were not. These results suggest that fibroblasts in UIP with type IV collagen deposition, especially α1 and α2 chains, have less ability to migrate from early fibrotic lesions than fibroblasts in OP without type IV collagen deposition. Thus, type IV collagen deposition in early fibrotic lesions of UIP may be implicated in refractory pathophysiology including migration of lesion fibroblasts via a FAK pathway. PMID:26006016

  12. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  13. Efficacy of Mucograft vs Conventional Resorbable Collagen Membranes in Guided Bone Regeneration Around Standardized Calvarial Defects in Rats: A Histologic and Biomechanical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Babay, Nadir; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Nooh, Nasser; Naghshbandi, Jafar; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Atteya, Muhammad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using a porcine-derived collagen matrix (Mucograft [MG], Geistlich) has not yet been reported. The aim of this histologic and biomechanical study was to compare the efficacy of MG versus resorbable collagen membranes (RCMs) in facilitating GBR around standardized rat calvarial defects. Forty female Wistar albino rats with a mean age and weight of 6 to 9 weeks and 250 to 300 g, respectively, were used. With the rats under general anesthesia, the skin over the calvaria was exposed using a full-thickness flap. A 4.6-mm-diameter standardized calvarial defect was created in the left parietal bone. For treatment, the rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): (1) MG group: the defect was covered with MG; (2) RCM group: the defect was covered with an RCM; (3) MG + bone group: the defect was filled with bone graft particles and covered by MG; and (4) RCM + bone group: the defect was filled with bone graft particles and covered by an RCM. Primary closure was achieved using interrupted resorbable sutures. The animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks after the surgical procedures. Qualitative histologic analysis and biomechanical assessment to identify hardness and elastic modulus of newly formed bone (NFB) were performed. Collected data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Histologic findings revealed NFB with fibrous connective tissue in all groups. The quantity of NFB was highest in the RCM + bone group. Statistically significant differences in the hardness (F = 567.69, dfN = 3, dfD = 36, P RCM + bone group had the highest mean ± standard deviation (SD) hardness of NFB (531.4 ± 24.9 MPa), the RCM group had the highest mean ± SD elastic modulus of NFB (18.63 ± 1.89 GPa). The present study demonstrated that RCMs are better than MG at enhancing new bone formation in standardized rat calvarial defects when used along with mineralized particulate graft material. PMID:27031638

  14. Hybrid Membranes of PLLA/Collagen for Bone Tissue Engineering: A Comparative Study of Scaffold Production Techniques for Optimal Mechanical Properties and Osteoinduction Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic and natural polymer association is a promising tool in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to compare five methodologies for producing hybrid scaffolds for cell culture using poly-l-lactide (PLLA and collagen: functionalization of PLLA electrospun by (1 dialkylamine and collagen immobilization with glutaraldehyde and by (2 hydrolysis and collagen immobilization with carbodiimide chemistry; (3 co-electrospinning of PLLA/chloroform and collagen/hexafluoropropanol (HFP solutions; (4 co-electrospinning of PLLA/chloroform and collagen/acetic acid solutions and (5 electrospinning of a co-solution of PLLA and collagen using HFP. These materials were evaluated based on their morphology, mechanical properties, ability to induce cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity upon submission of mesenchymal stem cells to basal or osteoblastic differentiation medium (ODM. Methods (1 and (2 resulted in a decrease in mechanical properties, whereas methods (3, (4 and (5 resulted in materials of higher tensile strength and osteogenic differentiation. Materials yielded by methods (2, (3 and (5 promoted osteoinduction even in the absence of ODM. The results indicate that the scaffold based on the PLLA/collagen blend exhibited optimal mechanical properties and the highest capacity for osteodifferentiation and was the best choice for collagen incorporation into PLLA in bone repair applications.

  15. Absence of collagen XVIII in mice causes age-related insufficiency in retinal pigment epithelium proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivinen, Niko; Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Kinnunen, Aino I; Setälä, Niko; Aikio, Mari; Kinnunen, Kati; Sironen, Reijo; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Collagen XVIII has the structural properties of both collagen and proteoglycan. It has been found at the basement membrane/stromal interface where it is thought to mediate their attachment. Endostatin, a proteolytic fragment from collagen XVIII C-terminal end has been reported to possess anti-angiogenic properties. Age-related vision loss in collagen XVIII mutant mice has been accompanied with a pathological accumulation of deposits under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have recently demonstrated that impaired proteasomal and autophagy clearance are associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. This study examined the staining levels of proteasomal and autophagy markers in the RPE of different ages of the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. Eyes from 3, 6-7, 10-13 and 18 months old mice were enucleated and embedded in paraffin according to the routine protocol. Sequential 5 μm-thick parasagittal samples were immunostained for proteasome and autophagy markers ubiquitin (ub), SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1. The levels of immunopositivity in the RPE cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Collagen XVIII knock-out mice had undergone age-related RPE degeneration accompanied by an accumulation of drusen-like deposits. Ub protein conjugate staining was prominent in both RPE cytoplasm and extracellular space whereas SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1 stainings were clearly present in the basal part of RPE cell cytoplasm in the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. SQSTM1/p62 displayed mild extracellular space staining. Disturbed proteostasis regulated by collagen XVIII might be responsible for the RPE degeneration, increased protein aggregation, ultimately leading to choroidal neovascularization. PMID:27125427

  16. Human podocytes adhere to the KRGDS motif of the alpha3alpha4alpha5 collagen IV network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Pedchenko, Vadim; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Heather M; Pozzi, Ambra; Saus, Juan; Abrahamson, Dale R; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G

    2008-04-01

    Podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is required for proper function of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the mechanism whereby podocytes adhere to collagen IV networks, a major component of the glomerular basement membrane, is poorly understood. The predominant collagen IV network is composed of triple helical protomers containing the alpha3alpha4alpha5 chains. The protomers connect via the trimeric noncollagenous (NC1) domains to form hexamers at the interface. Because the NC1 domains of this network can potentially support integrin-dependent cell adhesion, it was determined whether individual NC1 monomers or alpha3alpha4alpha5 hexamers support podocyte adhesion. It was found that, although human podocytes did not adhere to NC1 domains proper, they did adhere via integrin alphavbeta3 to a KRGDS motif located adjacent to alpha3NC1 domains. Because the KRGDS motif is a site of phosphorylation, its interactions with integrin alphavbeta3 may play a critical role in cell signaling in physiologic and pathologic states. PMID:18235087

  17. 磷酸锌矿化胶原膜对MG63细胞生物学行为的影响%Influence of zinc phosphate mineralized collagen membranes on behavior of MG63 cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈馥淳; 黄宝鑫; 李志鹏; 张汉卿; 陈卓凡

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究磷酸锌矿化胶原膜对人成骨样细胞MG63增殖及分化的影响.方法:制备磷酸锌矿化胶原膜并在其上接种MG63成骨细胞株,扫描电镜观察MG63细胞在胶原膜表面的生长情况,采用CCK-8及碱性磷酸酶(ALP)试剂盒检测MG63细胞的增殖及分化能力.结果:扫描电镜下可见胶原膜表面有大量晶体样沉积物,在其上培养1d后MG63细胞粘附于胶原膜表面,开始向各方向伸出伪足,与胶原膜相互交联.与阴性对照组相比,磷酸锌矿化胶原膜于第3天明显促进MG63细胞增殖,于第1、5、7d无显著影响;于第1d可提高碱性磷酸酶活性,促进MG63细胞分化,于第7、14d无显著影响.结论:磷酸锌矿化胶原膜具有良好的生物相容性,可促进MG63成骨细胞的早期增殖及分化.%Objective:This study was to determine the effect of zinc phosphate mineralized collagen membranes on the proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast-like cells MG63 in vitro.Method:The collagen membranes were mixed with zinc phosphate by the method of immersing into the mineralization solution.Cells from an established osteoblast-like line (MG63) were cultured on membranes.Cell morphology attached to the membranes was evaluated by scanning electron microscope.The quantity and ALP activity of cells were determined by CCK-8 assay and ALP activity test.Result:MG63 cells attached to the membranes and extended pseudopod.Compared to the control,zinc phosphate mineralized collagen membranes significantly increased the proliferation of MG63 on the 3rd day and no significant influence on the other cultured days was observed.The ALP activity of MG63 planted on zinc phosphate mineralized collagen membranes was significantly higher than the control on the 1st day,while no significant influence on the other cultured days was observed.Conclusion:Zinc phosphate mineralized collagen membranes possess excellent biocompatibility.

  18. Efficacy of Mucograft vs Conventional Resorbable Collagen Membranes in Guided Bone Regeneration Around Standardized Calvarial Defects in Rats: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babay, Nadir; Ramalingam, Sundar; Basudan, Amani; Nooh, Nasser; AlKindi, Mohammed; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo microcomputed tomographic (μCT) study was to compare the efficacy of Mucograft (MG) vs resorbable collagen membranes (RCMs) in facilitating guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects in rats. Forty female Wistar albino rats with a mean age and weight of 6 to 9 weeks and 250 to 300 g, respectively, were used. With the rats under general anesthesia, the skin over the calvaria was exposed using a full-thickness flap. A standardized calvarial defect with a 4.6-mm diameter was created in the left parietal bone. For treatment, the rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): (1) defects covered with MG (MG group); (2) defects covered with an RCM (RCM group); (3) defects filled with xenograft bone particles and covered by MG (MG + bone group); and (4) defects filled with xenograft bone particles and covered by an RCM (RCM + bone group). Primary closure was achieved using interrupted resorbable sutures. The animals underwent high-resolution, three-dimensional μCT scans at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the surgical procedures. Data regarding volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of newly formed bone (NFB) and bone particles revealed an increase in the volume of NFB in all the groups from baseline to 8 weeks. The MG group had the lowest volume of NFB (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 1.32 ± 0.22 mm(3)). No significant differences in mean ± SD values for volume of NFB were observed between the RCM (3.50 ± 0.24 mm(3)) and MG + bone (3.87 ± 0.36 mm(3)) groups, but their values were significantly lower than that of the RCM + bone group (2.95 ± 0.15 mm(3), F = 131.91, dfN = 2, dfD = 27, P RCM group having the highest mean ± SD BMD of NFB (0.42 ± 0.05 g/mm(3)). Significant differences in the bone particle volume between the RCM + bone and MG + bone groups (F = 91.04, dfN = 1, dfD = 18, P RCM + bone group displaying greater reduction in both volume (36.8%) and BMD (19.7%) of bone particles

  19. Tensile mechanical and creep properties of Descemet's membrane and lens capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Carl Christian

    2004-09-01

    Descemet's membrane (DM) and the lens capsule (LC) are two ocular basement membrane structures which in comparison with other basement membranes have exceptional thicknesses which increase with age. Both membranes are supposed to contain networks of type IV collagen and laminin linked together with nidogen/entactin and containing other glycoproteins and proteoglycans. DM is a unique basement membrane which in addition contains fine filaments of type VIII collagen arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The mechanical functions of the LC are in lens suspension and accommodation, and its mechanical properties, previously investigated, are of great interest from a surgical point of view. DM serves as an endothelial basement membrane. Otherwise, its physiological function is unknown but may be one of mechanical support, filtration, or fluid barrier. Data on the mechanical properties of DM or the supramolecular assembly of type VIII collagen are very scarce or absent. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the mechanical properties of the two ocular membranes in order to elucidate the properties of DM in the light of those of LC. The human eyes were from testamentary donors and rat, cow, and sow eyes were obtained from normal animals. The tensile mechanical properties were determined by a volume-strain procedure and creep properties by subjecting the membranes from the latter three species to a constant axial stress. In rat, cow, and sow, DM was less strained to obtain a fixed moderate stress value (0.5 MPa) and showed to be 3.4- to 5.2-fold stiffer and to attain 2.7- to 4.6-fold higher stress at a strain value of 0.10 when compared with LC. The maximal strain, stiffness and stress were found to be less than those of the LC. In humans, DM and LC showed very similar mechanical properties. The instantaneous creep of DM was found to be less than that of LC indicating a higher stiffness of DM in the axial direction. In conclusion, depending on the species, DM showed to

  20. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  2. Marine-derived collagen biomaterials from echinoderm connective tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrario, Cinzia

    2016-03-31

    The use of marine collagens is a hot topic in the field of tissue engineering. Echinoderms possess unique connective tissues (Mutable Collagenous Tissues, MCTs) which can represent an innovative source of collagen to develop collagen barrier-membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR). In the present work we used MCTs from different echinoderm models (sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber) to produce echinoderm-derived collagen membranes (EDCMs). Commercial membranes for GTR or soluble/reassembled (fibrillar) bovine collagen substrates were used as controls. The three EDCMs were similar among each other in terms of structure and mechanical performances and were much thinner and mechanically more resistant than the commercial membranes. Number of fibroblasts seeded on sea-urchin membranes were comparable to the bovine collagen substrates. Cell morphology on all EDCMs was similar to that of structurally comparable (reassembled) bovine collagen substrates. Overall, echinoderms, and sea urchins particularly, are alternative collagen sources to produce efficient GTR membranes. Sea urchins display a further advantage in terms of eco-sustainability by recycling tissues from food wastes.

  3. Normal skin and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts differentially regulate collagen and fibronectin expression as well as mitochondrial membrane potential in response to basic fibroblast growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Song; Hui-Ning Bian; Wen Lai; Hua-De Chen; Ke-Seng Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) regulates skin wound healing; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of bFGF on the regulation of cell growth as well as collagen and fibronectin expression in fibroblasts from normal human skin and from hypertrophic scars. We then explored the involvement of mitochondria in mediating bFGF-inducedeffects on the fibroblasts. We isolated and cultivated normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts...

  4. Autoepitopes and alloepitopes of type IV collagen: role in the molecular pathogenesis of anti-GBM antibody glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies elicited by autoimmune or alloimmune mechanisms are associated with aggressive forms of rapid progressive glomerulonephritis. Pathogenic anti-GBM autoantibodies and alloantibodies target the noncollagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, a major GBM component. In autoimmune anti-GBM glomerulonephritis, a breakdown of immune self-tolerance leads to the activation of autoreactive B and T cells recognizing epitopes within the alpha3NC1 subunit. In the GBM, the conformational epitopes targeted by anti-GBM autoantibodies are structurally sequestered within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer complex formed upon assembly of collagen IV chains into trimeric molecules and networks. Autoantibodies selectively bind to and dissociate a subset of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers composed of monomer subunits, whereas hexamers containing NC1 dimer subunits are resistant to dissociation by autoantibodies. The crypticity of alpha3NC1 autoepitopes suggests that self-tolerance to alpha3(IV) collagen is broken by structural alterations of the native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer that unmask normally sequestered epitopes, triggering an autoimmune reaction. Post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis in the renal allograft of transplanted Alport patients is mediated by an alloimmune reaction to the NC1 domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, present in the allograft GBM but absent from Alport basement membranes. Alloantibodies from patients with autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome predominantly bind to the alpha3NC1 domain, whereas alloantibodies from X-linked Alport patients target preferentially, though not exclusively, epitopes within the alpha5NC1 subunit. The accessibility of the alloantigenic sites within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, contrasting with the crypticity of autoantigenic sites, suggest that different molecular forms of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen initiate the immunopathogenic responses in

  5. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy γ-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy γ-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  6. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hee [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E. [Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Lee, Yong Woo, E-mail: ywlee@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  7. Guided bone regeneration in standardized calvarial defects using beta-tricalcium phosphate and collagen membrane: a real-time in vivo micro-computed tomographic experiment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; ArRejaie, Aws; Nooh, Nasser; Al-Kindi, Mohammed; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures using graft materials have been used for reconstruction of osseous defects. The aim of the present in vivo micro-computed tomographic (µCT) and histologic study was to assess in real time the bone regeneration at GBR sites in standardized experimental calvarial defects (diameter 3.3 mm) using β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with and without collagen membrane (CM). A single full-thickness calvarial defect was created on the left parietal bone in young female Wistar albino rats (n = 30) weighing approximately 300 g and aged about 6 weeks. The animals were randomly divided into three groups for treatment, based on calvarial defect filling material: (1) control group (n = 10); (2) β-TCP + CM group (n = 10); (3) β-TCP group (n = 10). Real-time in vivo µCT analyses were performed immediately after surgery and at 2, 4, 6 and 10 weeks to determine the volume and mineral density of the newly formed bone (BVNFB, MDNFB) and remaining β-TCP particles (VRBP, MDRBP). The animals were killed at 10 weeks and calvarial specimens were evaluated histologically. In the control group, MDNFB increased significantly at 6 weeks (0.32 ± 0.002 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) compared to that at baseline. In β-TCP + CM group, BVNFB (1.10 ± 0.12 mm(3), P < 0.01) and MDNFB (0.13 ± 0.02 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) significantly increased at the 4th week than baseline. In the β-TCP group, BVNFB (1.13 ± 0.12 mm(3), P < 0.01) and MDNFB (0.14 ± 0.01 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) significantly increased at 6 weeks compared to that at baseline. Significant reduction in VRBP was neither seen in the β-TCP + CM group nor in the β-TCP group. While in the β-TCP + CM group MDRBP was reduced significantly at 6 weeks (0.44 ± 0.9 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) from baseline (0.98 ± 0.03 g/mm(3)), similar significant reduction in MDRBP from baseline (0.92 ± 0.07 g/mm(3)) was seen only at 10 weeks (0.45 ± 0.06 g/mm(3), P < 0

  8. Identification of noncollagenous sites encoding specific interactions and quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen: implications for Alport gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Suk; Colon, Selene; Hellmark, Thomas; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2008-12-12

    Defective assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane causes Alport syndrome, a hereditary glomerulonephritis progressing to end-stage kidney failure. Assembly of collagen IV chains into heterotrimeric molecules and networks is driven by their noncollagenous (NC1) domains, but the sites encoding the specificity of these interactions are not known. To identify the sites directing quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen, correctly folded NC1 chimeras were produced, and their interactions with other NC1 monomers were evaluated. All alpha1/alpha 5 chimeras containing alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 replicated the ability of alpha 5 NC1 to bind to alpha3NC1 and co-assemble into NC1 hexamers. Conversely, substitution of alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 by alpha1NC1 abolished these quaternary interactions. The amino-terminal 58 residues of alpha3NC1 encoded binding to alpha 5 NC1, but this interaction was not sufficient for hexamer co-assembly. Because alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 are necessary and sufficient for assembly into alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5 NC1 hexamers, whereas the immunodominant alloantigenic sites of alpha 5 NC1 do not encode specific quaternary interactions, the findings provide a basis for the rational design of less immunogenic alpha 5(IV) collagen constructs for the gene therapy of X-linked Alport patients. PMID:18930919

  9. Molecular characterization of collagen IV evidences early transcription expression related to the immune response against bacterial infection in the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovar-Vera, Ornella; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-02-01

    Collagen IV has been described as a structural protein of the basement membrane, which as a whole forms a specialized extracellular matrix. Recent studies have indicated a possible relationship between collagen IV and the innate immune response of invertebrate organisms. The present study characterized the alpha-1 chain of collagen IV in the red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Hr-ColIV) and evaluated its association with the innate immune response against Vibrio anguillarum. To further evidence the immune response, the matrix metalloproteinase-1 (Hr-MMP-1) and C-type lectin (Hr-CLEC) genes were also assessed. The complete sequence of Hr-ColIV was composed of 6658 bp, with a 5'UTR of 154 bp, a 3'UTR of 1177 bp, and an ORF of 5327 bp that coded for 1776 amino acids. The innate immune response generated against V. anguillarum resulted in a significant increase in the transcript levels of Hr-ColIV between 3 and 6 hpi, whereas Hr-MMP-1 and Hr-CLEC had the highest transcript activity 6 and 12 hpi, respectively. The results obtained in this study propose a putative biological function for collagen IV involved in the early innate immune response of the red abalone H. rufescens. PMID:25463284

  10. Normal skin and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts differentially regulate collagen and fibronectin expression as well as mitochondrial membrane potential in response to basic fibroblast growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Song

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF regulates skin wound healing; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of bFGF on the regulation of cell growth as well as collagen and fibronectin expression in fibroblasts from normal human skin and from hypertrophic scars. We then explored the involvement of mitochondria in mediating bFGF-inducedeffects on the fibroblasts. We isolated and cultivated normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from tissue biopsies of patients who underwent plastic surgery for repairing hypertrophic scars. The fibroblasts were then treated with different concentrations of bFGF (ranging from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL. The growth of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts became slower with selective inhibition of type I collagen production after exposure to bFGF. However, type III collagen expression was affected in both normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Moreover, fibronectin expression in the normal fibroblasts was up-regulated after bFGF treatment. bFGF (1000 ng/mL also induced mitochondrial depolarization in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (P < 0.01. The cellular ATP level decreased in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (P < 0.05, while it increased in the normal fibroblasts following treatment with bFGF (P < 0.01. These data suggest that bFGF has differential effects and mechanisms on fibroblasts of the normal skin and hypertrophic scars, indicating that bFGF may play a role in the early phase of skin wound healing and post-burn scar formation.

  11. Cellular localisation of type XIII collagen, and its induced expression in human neoplasias and corneal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Väisänen, T. (Teemu)

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Type XIII collagen belongs to the group of transmembrane collagens. In this thesis the plasma membrane localisation and function of type XIII collagen have been studied using cell biological methods. Type XIII collagen was found to reside in focal adhesions. It appeared in these structures at a very early stage of their assembly and disappeared from them concurrently with focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin. Insect cells expressing type XIII collagen showed an enhanced ...

  12. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Anhalt, G. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  13. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse type VII collagen gene (Col7a1): Evidence for rapid evolutionary divergence of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kehua; Christiano, A.M.; Chu, Mon Li; Uitto, J. (Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States) Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J. (NCI-Federick Cancer Research and Development Center, Federick, MD (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, critical attachment structures at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. Genetic linkage analyses with recently cloned human type VII collagen cDNAs have indicated that the corresponding gene, COL7A1, is the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa. To gain insight into the evolutionary conservation of COL7A1, in this study the authors have isolated mouse type VII collagen cDNAs by screening a mouse epidermal keratinocyte cDNA library with a human COL7A1 cDNA. Two overlapping mouse cDNAs were isolated, and Northern hybridization of mouse epidermal keratinocyte RNA with one of them revealed the presence of a mRNA transcript of [approximately]9.5 kb, the approximate size of the human COL7A1 mRNA. Nucleotide sequencing of the mouse cDNAs revealed a 2760-bp open reading frame that encodes the 5[prime] half of the collagenous domain and a segment of the NC-1, the noncollagenous amino-terminal domain of type VII collagen. Comparison of the mouse amino acid sequences with the corresponding human sequences deduced from cDNAs revealed 82.5% identity. The evolutionary divergence of the gene was relatively rapid in comparison to other collagen genes. Despite the high degree of sequence variation, several sequences, including the size and the position of noncollagenous imperfections and interruptions within the Gly-X-Y repeat sequence, were precisely conserved. Finally, the mouse Col7a1 gene was located by interspecific backcross mapping to mouse Chromosome 9, a region that corresponds to human chromosome 3p21, the position of human COL7Al. This assignment confirms and extends the relationship between the mouse and the human chromosomes in this region of the genome. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Novel collagen VI mutations identified in Chinese patients with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Zhi Zhang; Hui Xiong; Dan-Hua Zhao; Hai-Po Yang; Ai-Jie Liu; Xing-Zhi Chang; Dao-Jun Hong; Carsten Bonnemann; Yun Yuan; Xi-Ru Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background: We determined the clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of 8 Chinese patients with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). Methods: Clinical data of probands were collected and muscle biopsies of patients were analyzed. Exons of COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Mutations in COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 were identifi ed in 8 patients. Results: Among these mutations, 5 were novel [three in the triple helical domain (THD) and 2 in the second C-terminal (C2) domain]. We also identified five known missense or in-frame deletion mutations in THD and C domains. Immunohistochemical studies on muscle biopsies from patients showed reduced level of collagen VI at the muscle basement membrane and mis-localization of the protein in interstitial and perivascular regions. Conclusions: The novel mutations we identified underscore the importance of THD and C2 domains in the assembly and function of collagen VI, thereby providing useful information for the genetic counseling of UCMD patients.

  15. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many of many ...

  16. Fractured unconventional reservoirs in the Crystalline Basement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Since the late 1960-es, the crystalline basement of Tatarstan has been in the focus of intense geological and geophysical surveys. Since 1975, within the framework of the Subsoil Survey Program of Tatarstan, two extra deep wells have been drilled in the Republic, including: 20000-Minnibaevskaya well (bottomhole depth - 5,099 m, meters drilled in the basement - 3,215 m) and 20009-Novoelkhovskaya well (bottomhole depth - 5,881 m, meters drilled in the basement - 4,077 m), as well as 24 wells penetrating the basement at depth from 100 to 2,432 m. Reservoir properties of the crystalline basement rocks can be evaluated based on the resulting volumes of produced liquid, which vary from 0.027 to 125 m3/day. The highest flow rate was registered for well № 20000 Minnibaevskaya. Therefore, there are high-capacity reservoir zones in the crystalline basement of the eastern margin of the Russian Platform. The statement saying that natural reservoirs with significant sizes and fluid storage capacities occur everywhere within the Precambrian crystalline massive on the territory of Tatarstan can be justified by the following provisions: - deconsolidation and fracturing zones of the crystalline basement are registered by a full set of geological and geophysical methods applied in the process of geophysical well surveys and in the process of surface geophysical studies; - there is a certain regular pattern of crystalline basement zone distribution by area and by profile. Wide-spaced drilling into the crystalline basement helped to identify numerous zones of deconsolidation and fracturing with different fluid storage capacity and different extent of fluid saturation. Thickness of the crystalline basement reservoir zones varies from several meters to dozens of meters. Such zones were identified close to the crystalline basement top, As well as at depths more than 5 km. Well log survey was the key method used for reservoir differentiation in the crystalline basement. In total, 16

  17. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of collagens of marine sponge, Ircinia fusca (Porifera: Demospongiae: Irciniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee; Bojja, Sreedhar; Janapala, Venkateswara Rao

    2011-07-01

    Collagens were isolated and partially characterized from the marine demosponge, Ircinia fusca from Gulf of Mannar (GoM), India, with an aim to develop potentially applicable collagens from unused and under-used resources. The yield of insoluble, salt soluble and acid soluble forms of collagens was 31.71 ± 1.59, 20.69 ± 1.03, and 17.38 ± 0.87 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Trichrome staining, Scanning & Transmission Electron microscopic (SEM & TEM) studies confirmed the presence of collagen in the isolated, terminally globular irciniid filaments. The partially purified (gel filtration chromatography), non-fibrillar collagens appeared as basement type collagenous sheets under light microscopy whereas the purified fibrillar collagens appeared as fibrils with a repeated band periodicity of 67 nm under Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The non-fibrillar and fibrillar collagens were seen to have affinity for anti-collagen type IV and type I antibodies raised against human collagens, respectively. The macromolecules, i.e., total protein, carbohydrate and lipid contents within the tissues were also quantified. The present information on the three characteristic irciniid collagens (filamentous, fibrillar and non-fibrillar) could assist the future attempts to unravel the therapeutically important, safer collagens from marine sponges for their use in pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries. PMID:21501629

  18. Amniotic membrane immobilized poly(vinyl alcohol) hybrid polymer as an artificial cornea scaffold that supports a stratified and differentiated corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Yuichi; Shimmura, Shigeto; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tanaka, Junzo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a biocompatible, transparent hydrogel with physical strength that makes it promising as a material for an artificial cornea. In our previous study, type I collagen was immobilized onto PVA (PVA-COL) as a possible artificial cornea scaffold that can sustain a functional corneal epithelium. The cellular adhesiveness of PVA in vitro was improved by collagen immobilization; however, stable epithelialization was not achieved in vivo. To improve epithelialization in vivo, we created an amniotic membrane (AM)-immobilized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-AM) for use as an artificial cornea material. AM was attached to PVA-COL using a tissue adhesive consisting of collagen and citric acid derivative (CAD) as a crosslinker. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells were air-lift cultured with 3T3 feeder fibroblasts to form a stratified epithelial layer on PVA-AM. The rabbit corneal epithelial cells formed 3-5 layers of keratin-3-positive epithelium on PVA-AM. Occludin-positive cells were observed lining the superficial epithelium, the gap-junctional protein connexin43-positive cells was localized to the cell membrane of the basal epithelium, while both collagen IV were observed in the basement membrane. Epithelialization over implanted PVA-AM was complete within 2 weeks, with little inflammation or opacification of the hydrogel. Corneal epithelialization on PVA-AM in rabbit corneas improved over PVA-COL, suggesting the possibility of using PVA-AM as a biocompatible hybrid material for keratoprosthesis. PMID:16924609

  19. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J;

    2009-01-01

    The uPAR-associated protein (uPARAP/Endo180), a type-1 membrane protein belonging to the mannose receptor family, is an endocytic receptor for collagen. Through this endocytic function, the protein takes part in a previously unrecognized mechanism of collagen turnover. uPARAP/Endo180 can bind and...

  20. Preparation of collagen-based materials for wound dressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志谷; 盛志勇; 孙同柱; 耿淼; 黎君友; 姚咏明; 黄祖琇

    2003-01-01

    Objective To describe the methods which were used to develop collagen-based materials for wound dressing.Methods Fresh frozen bovine tendon was treated with 0.05 mol/L acetic acid at pH 3.2 for 48-72 hours, homogenized, filtered, mixed with 8% chondroitin sulphate, for creating a deaerated 1.5%-2.5% collagen solution. The solution was lyophilized in either a pre-frozen or non-pre-frozen mould. The collagen sponge was then cross-linked with 0.25% glutaraldehyde for 24 hours. Three other types of wound dressings were developed using a similar method: collagen membrane with a polyurethane membrane onlay, polyurethane-coated collagen membrane and collagen membrane on gauze.Results It was demonstrated that the use of frozen bovine tendon was stable, and that the prepared collagen sponge contained pores of 50-400 μm in diameter. Conclusions Collagen could be used as wound dressing.

  1. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While collagenous colitis represents the most common form of the collagenous gastroenteritides, the collagenous entities affecting the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract are much less recognized and possibly overlooked. The aim was to summarize the latest information through a syste...

  2. Quaternary epitopes of α345(IV) collagen initiate Alport post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Ge, Linna; Hertz, Jens Michael; Kashtan, Clifford E; Sado, Yoshikazu; Segal, Yoav; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2013-05-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including renal allografts, forming distinct α345(IV) and α1256(IV) networks. Here, we studied the roles of these networks as antigens inciting alloimmunity and as targets of nephritogenic alloantibodies in APTN. We found that patients with APTN, but not those without nephritis, produce two kinds of alloantibodies against allogeneic collagen IV. Some alloantibodies targeted alloepitopes within α5NC1 monomers, shared by α345NC1 and α1256NC1 hexamers. Other alloantibodies specifically targeted alloepitopes that depended on the quaternary structure of α345NC1 hexamers. In Col4a5-null mice, immunization with native forms of allogeneic collagen IV exclusively elicited antibodies to quaternary α345NC1 alloepitopes, whereas alloimmunogens lacking native quaternary structure elicited antibodies to shared α5NC1 alloepitopes. These results imply that quaternary epitopes within α345NC1 hexamers may initiate alloimmune responses after transplant in X-linked Alport patients. Thus, α345NC1 hexamers are the culprit alloantigen and primary target of all alloantibodies mediating APTN, whereas α1256NC1 hexamers become secondary targets of anti-α5NC1 alloantibodies. Reliable detection of alloantibodies by immunoassays using α345NC1 hexamers may improve outcomes by facilitating early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:23620401

  3. Complications of collagenous colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease.

  4. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making it...... crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  5. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J;

    2009-01-01

    The uPAR-associated protein (uPARAP/Endo180), a type-1 membrane protein belonging to the mannose receptor family, is an endocytic receptor for collagen. Through this endocytic function, the protein takes part in a previously unrecognized mechanism of collagen turnover. uPARAP/Endo180 can bind and...... internalize both intact and partially degraded collagens. In some turnover pathways, the function of the receptor probably involves an interplay with certain matrix-degrading proteases whereas, in other physiological processes, redundant mechanisms involving both endocytic and pericellular collagenolysis seem...... receptor in collagen breakdown seems to be involved in invasive tumor growth....

  6. The anti-tumor NC1 domain of collagen XIX inhibits the FAK/ PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway through αvβ3 integrin interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Doué, Manon; Vautrin, Alexia; Brassart, Bertrand; Sellier, Christèle; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, François-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; Ramont, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Type XIX collagen is a minor collagen associated with basement membranes. It was isolated for the first time in a human cDNA library from rhabdomyosarcoma and belongs to the FACITs family (Fibril Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple Helices). Previously, we demonstrated that the NC1 domain of collagen XIX (NC1(XIX)) exerts anti-tumor properties on melanoma cells by inhibiting their migration and invasion. In the present work, we identified for the first time the integrin αvβ3 as a receptor of NC1(XIX). Moreover, we demonstrated that NC1(XIX) inhibits the FAK/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, by decreasing the phosphorylation and activity of the major proteins involved in this pathway. On the other hand, NC1(XIX) induced an increase of GSK3β activity by decreasing its degree of phosphorylation. Treatments targeting this central signaling pathway in the development of melanoma are promising and new molecules should be developed. NC1(XIX) seems to have the potential for the design of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26621838

  7. Comparison of material mechanics and histocompatibility between collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane and gelatin sponge scaffold%胶原/透明质酸膜与明胶海绵支架材料力学及组织相容性的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖荣冬; 翁国星

    2012-01-01

    背景:课题组前期实验证明胶原/透明质酸膜具有良好的力学性能和组织相容性.目的:观察复合材料胶原/透明质酸膜及明胶海绵的生物学性能.方法:应用材料复合交联的实验方法构建胶原/透明质酸膜并测定胶原/透明质酸膜、明胶海绵支架的力学性能.将支架材料种植于兔皮下,按照2,4,6,8,12 周不同时间点评价材料在体内的降解情况和组织相容性.结果与结论:①成功制备了胶原/透明质酸膜.②胶原/透明质酸膜具有较好的韧性和抗张强度,明胶海绵的力学性能不够理想.③两种材料在体内的降解均符合生物材料的组织反应过程,胶原/透明质酸膜在体内12 周可完全降解,明胶海绵约6 周完全降解.④胶原/透明质酸膜与平滑肌细胞的黏附率高,细胞的增殖和代谢状况较好,而明胶海绵的细胞黏黏附和增殖率相对较低.说明胶原/透明质酸膜具有较好的生物学性能.%BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have confirmed that collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane has good mechanical properties and histocompatibility.OBJECTIVE: To explore the biological properties of collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane and gelatin sponge scaffold.METHODS: The collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane was constructed by compound cross linking method. The mechanical property of the collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane and gelatin sponge scaffold was detected. The scaffold materials were implanted subcutaneously in rabbits; the in vivo degradation and mechanical properties were evaluated at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after implantation.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane was constructed successfully. Collagen/hyaluronic acid membrane had a better toughness and tensile strength while the mechanical property of gelatin sponge was not ideal. The in vivo degradation of the two materials was compatible with the tissue reactions of biomaterials. Complete degradation of the collagen

  8. Distribution of type VI collagen expression in synovial tissue and cultured synoviocytes: relation to fibronectin expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, J; Carsons, S E

    1991-01-01

    Type VI collagen has recently been shown to be an important component of connective tissue. Double label immunofluorescence procedures were used to immunolocalize type VI collagen in normal and rheumatoid synovium and its distribution was compared with that of fibronectin. In normal synovium type VI collagen is expressed in the synovial membrane but not in the interstitium of the villus. In rheumatoid synovium, however, type VI collagen is extensively deposited in both the interstitial connec...

  9. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–...

  10. Collagen and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of basement membrane components during hair follicle morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westgate, G E; Shaw, D A; Harrap, G J; Couchman, J R

    1984-01-01

    visible by indirect immunofluorescence in the BMZ before epidermal involution but appeared in all regions of BMZ after this had occurred. As follicular length increased during maturation, the distribution of BPA was no longer uniform, being reduced or absent from the BMZ around the lower part of the...

  12. Inducing of Angiogenesis is the Net Effect of the Amniotic Membrane Without Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Niknejad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic membrane (AM, the nearest layer of placenta to the fetus, has some biological properties important for the experimental and clinical applications including anti-microbial, anti-fibrosis, anti-scarring, as well as low immunogenicity. The basement membrane of the AM contains several extracellular matrix components such as types І, III, IV, V collagen, laminin, fibronectin and perlecan which can induce proliferation of endothelial cells. The stormal side of the AM consists of mesenchymal cells which have capability to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, several angiogenic factors such as interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, growth-related oncogene (GRO, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and intravascular adhesion molecule (ICAM are secreted by the amniotic mesenchymal cells. Since the majority of anti-angiogenic factors are released by amniotic epithelial cells and due to the advantages of basement membrane and stromal side for inducing of angiogenesis, we have suggested here that the AM without epithelial layer would promote angiogenesis, an effect that would be a beneficial therapeutic approach for ischemic vascular diseases. To evaluate the hypothesis, the AM with or without epithelial cells will be implanted onto the striated muscle tissue of rats. The dorsal skinfold chamber model will be employed for intravital microscopic observation of the angiogenic host tissue response to implanted biomaterials throughout a time period of 7-14 days.

  13. Breakdown of cell-collagen networks through collagen remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Iordan, Andreea; Duperray, Alain; Gérard, Anaïs; Grichine, Alexei; Verdier, Claude

    2010-01-01

    International audience Collagen model tissues are analyzed, which consist of cells embedded in a collagen matrix at different concentrations (of cells and collagen). Rheological properties are measured and complementary confocal microscopy analyses are carried out. An important feature is observed, corresponding to the breakdown of the collagen network (i.e. decrease in network elasticity) for high collagen concentrations, due to the presence of cells. Thanks to confocal microscopy, we sho...

  14. Membrane-type-3 matrix metalloproteinase (MT3-MMP functions as a matrix composition-dependent effector of melanoma cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tatti

    Full Text Available In primary human melanoma, the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase, MT3-MMP, is overexpressed in the most aggressive nodular-type tumors. Unlike MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP, which promote cell invasion through basement membranes and collagen type I-rich tissues, the function of MT3-MMP in tumor progression remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that MT3-MMP inhibits MT1-MMP-driven melanoma cell invasion in three-dimensional collagen, while yielding an altered, yet MT1-MMP-dependent, form of expansive growth behavior that phenocopies the formation of nodular cell colonies. In melanoma cell lines originating from advanced primary or metastatic lesions, endogenous MT3-MMP expression was associated with limited collagen-invasive potential. In the cell lines with highest MT3-MMP expression relative to MT1-MMP, collagen-invasive activity was increased following stable MT3-MMP gene silencing. Consistently, MT3-MMP overexpression in cells derived from less advanced superficially spreading melanoma lesions, or in the MT3-MMP knockdown cells, reduced MT1-MMP-dependent collagen invasion. Rather than altering MT1-MMP transcription, MT3-MMP interacted with MT1-MMP in membrane complexes and reduced its cell surface expression. By contrast, as a potent fibrinolytic enzyme, MT3-MMP induced efficient invasion of the cells in fibrin, a provisional matrix component frequently found at tumor-host tissue interfaces and perivascular spaces of melanoma. Since MT3-MMP was significantly upregulated in biopsies of human melanoma metastases, these results identify MT3-MMP as a matrix-dependent modifier of the invasive tumor cell functions during melanoma progression.

  15. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H;

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  16. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaouther Ben Abdelghani; Hana Sahli; Leila Souabni; Selma Chekili; Salwa Belhadj; Selma Kassab; Ahmed Laatar; Leith Zakraoui

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association s...

  17. Update on collagenous sprue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Collagenous sprue has traditionally been defined as a small intestinal mucosal disorder characterized by persistent diarrhea, severe malabsorption with multiple nutrient def iciencies and progressive weight loss. Pathologically, a severe to variably severe "flattened" mucosal biopsy lesion with distinctive sub-epithelial deposits in the lamina propria region is detected. Histochemical stains and ultrastructural studies have conf irmed that these deposits contain collagens. Often, an initial diagnosis of cel...

  18. PCR-SSCP analysis of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1): Detection of a point mutation in five patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnil, M.G.S.; Richards, A.J.; Pope, F.M. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, structures which extend below the lamina densa of the epidermal basement membrane in stratified squamous epithelia. Genetic linkage studies and two mutation reports have implicated the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), an inherited disorder characterized by blistering and scarring of the skin and mucous membranes after minor trauma. We have used PCR-SSCP of genomic DNA to screen exons of COL7A1 for mutations in recessive DEB patients. Band mobility shifts were detected in exon FN4-B in five patients. Sequencing revealed a C to T transition changing a codon for arginine into a stop codon, homozygous in two related patients and heterozygous in the others. We are currently searching for a second mutation in these three heterozygous patients who are presumably genetic compounds. Screening for an informative Xho I restriction site altered by the mutation showed parental heterozygosity but no evidence for the mutation in 50 normal chromosomes. Segregation of COL7A1 markers in these patients suggests that the mutation has arisen independently in at least two of our families. The premature stop mutation in the 5{prime} end of the gene predicts a severely shortened collagen VII molecule. The homozygote formation of anchoring fibrils would be impaired providing an explanation at the molecular level for the ultrastructural findings of reduced numbers or absence of anchoring fibrils in this disease. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that this novel premature stop mutation is the cause of DEB in the homozygotes and contributes to the disease in the other patients. The important role of anchoring fibrils in dermal-epidermal adhesion is also underlined.

  19. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenya Kamimura; Masaaki Kobayashi; Yuichi Sato; Yutaka Aoyagi; Shuji Terai

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterizedby the subepithelial deposition of collagen bandsthicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatorymononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenouscolitis and collagenous sprue have similar histologicalcharacteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thoughtto be part of the same disease entity. However, whilecollagenous colitis has become more common inthe field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinicalsymptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients,collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was firstreported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documentedin the English literature. No safe and effective treatmentshave been identified from randomized, controlled trials.Therefore, better understanding of the disease and thereporting of more cases will help to establish diagnosticcriteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore,here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopicand histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomesfrom case reports and case series published to date,and provide a summary of the latest information on thedisease. This information will contribute to improvedknowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians canrecognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and willhelp to develop a standard therapeutic strategy forfuture clinical trials.

  20. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M.A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  1. Different assembly of type IV collagen on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrata alters endothelial cells interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Coelho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the structural role of type IV collagen (Col IV in the assembly of the basement membrane (BM and the perspective of mimicking its organization for vascular tissue engineering purposes, we studied the adsorption pattern of this protein on model hydrophilic (clean glass and hydrophobic trichloro(octadecylsilane (ODS surfaces known to strongly affect the behavior of other matrix proteins. The amount of fluorescently labeled Col IV was quantified showing saturation of the surface for concentration of the adsorbing solution of about 50μg/ml, but with approximately twice more adsorbed protein on ODS. AFM studies revealed a fine – nearly single molecular size – network arrangement of Col IV on hydrophilic glass, which turns into a prominent and growing polygonal network consisting of molecular aggregates on hydrophobic ODS. The protein layer forms within minutes in a concentration-dependent manner. We further found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC attach less efficiently to the aggregated Col IV (on ODS, as judged by the significantly altered cell spreading, focal adhesions formation and the development of actin cytoskeleton. Conversely, the immunofluorescence studies for integrins revealed that the fine Col IV network formed on hydrophilic substrata is better recognized by the cells via both α1 and α2 heterodimers which support cellular interaction, apart from these on hydrophobic ODS where almost no clustering of integrins was observed.

  2. Transmembrane collagen XVII modulates integrin dependent keratinocyte migration via PI3K/Rac1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Löffek

    Full Text Available The hemidesmosomal transmembrane component collagen XVII (ColXVII plays an important role in the anchorage of the epidermis to the underlying basement membrane. However, this adhesion protein seems to be also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte migration, since its expression in these cells is strongly elevated during reepithelialization of acute wounds and in the invasive front of squamous cell carcinoma, while its absence in ColXVII-deficient keratinocytes leads to altered cell motility. Using a genetic model of murine Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes we elucidated ColXVII mediated signaling pathways in cell adhesion and migration. Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes exhibited increased spreading on laminin 332 and accelerated, but less directed cell motility. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the integrin subunits β4 and β1. The migratory phenotype, as evidenced by formation of multiple unstable lamellipodia, was associated with enhanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activity. Dissection of the signaling pathway uncovered enhanced phosphorylation of the β4 integrin subunit and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK as activators of PI3K. This resulted in elevated Rac1 activity as a downstream consequence. These results provide mechanistic evidence that ColXVII coordinates keratinocyte adhesion and directed motility by interfering integrin dependent PI3K activation and by stabilizing lamellipodia at the leading edge of reepithelializing wounds and in invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Altered stress fibers and integrin expression in the Malpighian epithelium of Drosophila type IV collagen mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András A; Popovics, Nikoletta; Szabó, Gábor; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-06-01

    Basement membranes (BMs) are highly specialized extracellular matrices (ECMs) that provide support and polarization cues for epithelial cells. Proper adhesion to the BM is pivotal in epithelial cell function and survival. Type IV collagens are the predominant components of all types of BMs, that form an irregular, polygonal lattice and serve as a scaffold for numerous other BM components and BM-associated cells. Mutations in the ubiquitous human BM components COL4A1 and COL4A2 cause a multisystem disorder involving nephropathy. Affected patients develop renal dysfunction and chronic kidney failure with or without hematuria. Mouse Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutants recapitulate the human symptoms. In vertebrates, excretion is accomplished by the kidneys and by the Malpighian tubules in insects, including the fruit fly Drosophila. Our present results with dominant, temperature-sensitive mutation of the Drosophila col4a1 gene demonstrate altered integrin expression and amplified effects of mechanical stress on the Malpighian epithelial cytoskeleton. PMID:27077087

  4. Autoantibodies to Multiple Epitopes on the Non-Collagenous-1 Domain of Type VII Collagen Induce Blisters

    OpenAIRE

    Vorobyev, Artem; Ujiie, Hideyuki; Recke, Andreas; Buijsrogge, Jacqueline J. A.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Pas, Hendrikus; Iwata, Hiroaki; HASHIMOTO, TAKASHI; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, Jong Hoon; Groves, Richard; Samavedam, Unni; Gupta, Yask; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes, characterized by autoantibodies against type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils. Different clinical EBA phenotypes are described, including mechanobullous and inflammatory variants. Most EBA patients' sera react with epitopes located within the non-collagenous 1 (NC1) domain of human COL7. However, it has remained unclear whether antibody binding to these differ...

  5. Role of collagens and perlecan in microvascular stability: exploring the mechanism of capillary vessel damage by snake venom metalloproteinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Escalante

    Full Text Available Hemorrhage is a clinically important manifestation of viperid snakebite envenomings, and is induced by snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs. Hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic SVMPs hydrolyze some basement membrane (BM and associated extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Nevertheless, only hemorrhagic SVMPs are able to disrupt microvessels; the mechanisms behind this functional difference remain largely unknown. We compared the proteolytic activity of the hemorrhagic P-I SVMP BaP1, from the venom of Bothrops asper, and the non-hemorrhagic P-I SVMP leucurolysin-a (leuc-a, from the venom of Bothrops leucurus, on several substrates in vitro and in vivo, focusing on BM proteins. When incubated with Matrigel, a soluble extract of BM, both enzymes hydrolyzed laminin, nidogen and perlecan, albeit BaP1 did it at a faster rate. Type IV collagen was readily digested by BaP1 while leuc-a only induced a slight hydrolysis. Degradation of BM proteins in vivo was studied in mouse gastrocnemius muscle. Western blot analysis of muscle tissue homogenates showed a similar degradation of laminin chains by both enzymes, whereas nidogen was cleaved to a higher extent by BaP1, and perlecan and type IV collagen were readily digested by BaP1 but not by leuc-a. Immunohistochemistry of muscle tissue samples showed a decrease in the immunostaining of type IV collagen after injection of BaP1, but not by leuc-a. Proteomic analysis by LC/MS/MS of exudates collected from injected muscle revealed higher amounts of perlecan, and types VI and XV collagens, in exudates from BaP1-injected tissue. The differences in the hemorrhagic activity of these SVMPs could be explained by their variable ability to degrade key BM and associated ECM substrates in vivo, particularly perlecan and several non-fibrillar collagens, which play a mechanical stabilizing role in microvessel structure. These results underscore the key role played by these ECM components in the mechanical stability of

  6. Real-Time Assessment of Guided Bone Regeneration in Standardized Calvarial Defects Using a Combination of Bone Graft and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor With and Without Collagen Membrane: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Experiment in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Ahmari, Fatemah; Ramalingam, Sundar; Nooh, Nasser; Wang, Cun-Yu; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vivo microcomputed tomography (μCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) with and without resorbable collagen membrane (RCM). A total of 50 female Wistar albino rats with a mean age of 7.5 months and mean weight of 275 g were used. The calvarium was exposed following midsagittal scalp incision and flap reflection. A full-thickness standardized calvarial defect (4.6 mm diameter) was created. Study animals were randomly divided into five groups based on biomaterials used for GBR within the defect: (1) no treatment (negative control), (2) bone graft alone (BG), (3) bone graft covered by RCM (BG + RCM), (4) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF (BG + rhPDGF), and (5) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF and covered with RCM (BG + rhPDGF + RCM). In vivo μCT for determination of newly formed bone volume (NFBV) and mineral density (NFBMD) and remnant bone particles volume (RBPV) and mineral density (RBPMD) was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Eight weeks following surgery, the animals were sacrificed and harvested calvarial specimens were subjected to histologic and biomechanical analysis. There was an increase in NFBV and NFBMD associated with a corresponding decrease in RBPV and RBPMD in all the study groups. Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the measured values within and between the groups across the timelines examined during the study period (P RCM, and BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups, the NFBMD was similar in all the groups except negative control. The greatest decreases in RBPV and RBPMD were observed in the BG + rhPDGF + RCM group in comparison to the other groups. Similarly, BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups had hardness and elastic modulus similar to that of natural bone. The in vivo μCT results were validated by the qualitative histologic findings. In real

  7. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  8. A biomimetic strategy to form calcium phosphate crystals on type I collagen substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study is to induce mineralization of collagen by introducing phosphate groups onto type I collagen from eggshell membrane (ESM) by treating with sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). This strategy is based on the hypothesis that phosphate groups introduced on collagen can mimic the nucleating role of phosphorylated non-collagenous proteins bound to collagen for inducing mineralization in natural hard tissue. Method: The collagen membrane was phosphorylated by treating it with a solution of STMP and saturated calcium hydroxide. The phosphorylated collagen was subsequently exposed to a mineralization solution and the pattern of mineralization on the surface of phosphorylated collagen substrate was analyzed. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness test were used to characterize the collagen substrate and the pattern of minerals formed on the collagen surface. Results: The FTIR and EDX results indicated that the phosphate groups were incorporated onto the collagen surface by treatment with STMP. During the mineralization process, the plate-like mineral, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), which was initially formed on the surface of ESM, was later transformed into needle-like hydroxyapatite (HAP) as indicated by the SEM, FESEM, EDX and XRD findings. The microhardness test displayed significant increase in the Knoop hardness number of the mineralized collagen. Conclusions: Phosphate groups can be introduced onto type I collagen surface by treating it with STMP and such phosphorylated collagen can induce the mineralization of type I collagen.

  9. A biomimetic strategy to form calcium phosphate crystals on type I collagen substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhang [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road 119074, Singapore (Singapore); Neoh, Koon Gee [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Kishen, Anil, E-mail: anil.kishen@utoronto.ca [Discipline of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 124 Edward Street, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-20

    Objective: The aim of this study is to induce mineralization of collagen by introducing phosphate groups onto type I collagen from eggshell membrane (ESM) by treating with sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). This strategy is based on the hypothesis that phosphate groups introduced on collagen can mimic the nucleating role of phosphorylated non-collagenous proteins bound to collagen for inducing mineralization in natural hard tissue. Method: The collagen membrane was phosphorylated by treating it with a solution of STMP and saturated calcium hydroxide. The phosphorylated collagen was subsequently exposed to a mineralization solution and the pattern of mineralization on the surface of phosphorylated collagen substrate was analyzed. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness test were used to characterize the collagen substrate and the pattern of minerals formed on the collagen surface. Results: The FTIR and EDX results indicated that the phosphate groups were incorporated onto the collagen surface by treatment with STMP. During the mineralization process, the plate-like mineral, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), which was initially formed on the surface of ESM, was later transformed into needle-like hydroxyapatite (HAP) as indicated by the SEM, FESEM, EDX and XRD findings. The microhardness test displayed significant increase in the Knoop hardness number of the mineralized collagen. Conclusions: Phosphate groups can be introduced onto type I collagen surface by treating it with STMP and such phosphorylated collagen can induce the mineralization of type I collagen.

  10. Novel X-linked glomerulopathy is associated with a COL4A5 missense mutation in a non-collagenous interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Zender, Gloria A; Houston, Ronald; Baker, Peter B; McBride, Kim L; Luo, Wentian; Hains, David S; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Schwaderer, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    A novel COL4A5 mutation causes rapid progression to end-stage renal disease in males, despite the absence of clinical and biopsy findings associated with Alport syndrome. Affected males have proteinuria, variable hematuria, and an early progression to end-stage renal disease. Renal biopsy findings include global and segmental glomerulosclerosis, mesangial hypercellularity and basement membrane immune complex deposition. Exon sequencing of the COL4A5 locus identified a thymine to guanine transversion at nucleotide 665, resulting in a phenylalanine to cysteine missense mutation at codon 222. The phenylalanine at position 222 is absolutely conserved among vertebrates. This mutation was confirmed in 4 affected males and 4 female obligate carriers, but was absent in 6 asymptomatic male family members and 198 unrelated individuals. Immunostaining for α5(IV) collagen in renal biopsies from affected males was normal. This mutation, in a non-collagenous interruption associated with severe renal disease, provides evidence for the importance of this structural motif and suggests the range of phenotypes associated with COL4A5 mutations is more diverse than previously realized. Hence, COL4A5 mutation analysis should be considered when glomerulonephritis presents in an X-linked inheritance pattern, even with a presentation distinct from Alport syndrome. PMID:20881942

  11. Mutations in the 180-kD bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPAG2), a hemidesmosomal transmembrane collagen (COL17A1), in generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, J A; Gatalica, B; Christiano, A M; Li, K; Owaribe, K; McMillan, J R; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1995-09-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessively inherited blistering skin disorder associated with fragility at the dermal-epidermal junction. Characteristic ultrastructural findings in JEB are abnormalities in the hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complexes. These focal attachment structures, which extend from the intracellular compartment of the basal keratinocytes to the underlying basement membrane, have been shown to be hypoplastic or rudimentary in different forms of JEB. Previously, in different JEB phenotypes, mutations have been found in the three genes for the anchoring filament component laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) and in the gene for the hemidesmosome-associated integrin beta 4 subunit. Here, we describe the first mutations in the gene encoding the 180-kD bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPAG2), a transmembranous hemidesmosomal collagen, also known as type XVII collagen (COL17A1). The patient is affected with generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa (GABEB), a rare variant of JEB, and is a compound heterozygote for premature termination codons on both alleles. These novel findings emphasize the molecular heterogeneity of this group of genodermatoses, and attest to the importance of BPAG2 in maintaining adhesion between the epidermis and the dermis. PMID:7550320

  12. Corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bikbov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical crosslinking is widely applied in ophthalmology. Its biochemical effect is due to the release of singlet oxygen that promotes anaerobic photochemical reaction. Keratoconus is one of the most common corneal ectasia affecting 1 in 250 to 250 000 persons. Currently, the rate of iatrogenic ectasia following eximer laser refractive surgery increases due to biomechanical weakening of the cornea. Morphologically and biochemically, ectasia is characterized by corneal layers thinning, contact between the stroma and epithelium resulting from Bowman’s membrane rupture, chromatin fragmentation in keratocyte nuclei, phagocytosis, abnormal staining and arrangement of collagen fibers, enzyme system disorders, and keratocyte apoptosis. In corneal ectasia, altered enzymatic processes result in the synthesis of abnormal collagen. Collagen packing is determined by the activity of various extracellular matrix enzymes which bind amines and aldehydes of collagen fiber amino acids. In the late stage, morphological changes of Descemet’s membrane (i.e., rupture and detachment develop. Abnormal hexagonal-shaped keratocytes and their apoptosis are the signs of endothelial dystrophy. The lack of analogs in domestic ophthalmology encouraged the scientists of Ufa Eye Research Institute to develop a device for corneal collagen crosslinking. The parameters of ultraviolet (i.e., wavelength, exposure time, power to achieve the desired effect were identified. The specifics of some photosensitizers in the course of the procedure were studied. UFalink, a device for UV irradiation of cornea, and photosensitizer Dextralink were developed and adopted. Due to the high risk of endothelial damage, this treatment is contraindicated in severe keratoconus (CCT less than 400 microns. Major effects of corneal collagen crosslinking are the following: Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity increase by 328.9 % (on average, temperature tolerance increase by 5

  13. Platelet-collagen interaction: inhibition by a monoclonal antibody raised against collagen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously reported that polyclonal antibody raised against the purified platelet collagen receptor cross reacted with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex of platelets. In order to study the receptor function further, the authors prepared a monoclonal antibody to the collagen receptor (65K). Platelet collagen receptor was purified as described previously by the authors. Mice were immunized by injection of purified 65K protein emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and hybridomas were obtained from the fusion of spleen cells of immunized mice with myeloma cells (SP 2/0). The assay for antibody was performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The hybridoma cells producing specific anti-65K protein were subcloned and the subcloned cells were injected into peritoneal cavity of Pristane-Primed mice. Immunoglobulin G(IgG) was isolated from ascitic fluids by an Affigel Blue chromatography. The Fab' fragments were isolated from papain digested IgG followed by an Affigel Blue chromatography. Immunoblot experiments using the monoclonal IgG of solubilized platelet membrane proteins following NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the monoclonal IgG reacted with the antigen specifically. It did not react with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. The isolated IgG and Fab' fragments inhibited competitively the binding of radiolabelled α1(I) to washed platelets and soluble collagen- as well as fibrillar collagen-induced but not ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This indicates that collagen-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through interaction of collagen with 65K platelet receptor

  14. Platelet-collagen interaction: inhibition by a monoclonal antibody raised against collagen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, T.; Jin, A.; Kang, A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously reported that polyclonal antibody raised against the purified platelet collagen receptor cross reacted with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex of platelets. In order to study the receptor function further, the authors prepared a monoclonal antibody to the collagen receptor (65K). Platelet collagen receptor was purified as described previously by the authors. Mice were immunized by injection of purified 65K protein emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and hybridomas were obtained from the fusion of spleen cells of immunized mice with myeloma cells (SP 2/0). The assay for antibody was performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The hybridoma cells producing specific anti-65K protein were subcloned and the subcloned cells were injected into peritoneal cavity of Pristane-Primed mice. Immunoglobulin G(IgG) was isolated from ascitic fluids by an Affigel Blue chromatography. The Fab' fragments were isolated from papain digested IgG followed by an Affigel Blue chromatography. Immunoblot experiments using the monoclonal IgG of solubilized platelet membrane proteins following NaDodSO/sub 4/-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the monoclonal IgG reacted with the antigen specifically. It did not react with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. The isolated IgG and Fab' fragments inhibited competitively the binding of radiolabelled ..cap alpha..1(I) to washed platelets and soluble collagen- as well as fibrillar collagen-induced but not ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This indicates that collagen-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through interaction of collagen with 65K platelet receptor.

  15. Geochemistry of the Puna Austral and Cordillera Oriental basement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major and trace elements, rare earths, and 143Nd/147Nd and, 147Sm/144Nd isotope ratios have been determined in the Puna Austral and Cordillera Oriental basement. The basement is formed by high temperature amphibolite facies rocks ranulites (750-550 degrees C) and green schists. They are represented by schists, paragneiss, orthogneiss, migmatites, few metabasites, marbles and chalcosilicatic banks. Hypotheses on the formation and evolution of the basement are presented

  16. Collagen in organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  17. Water coning in fractured basement reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, S.E.D.M.; Darwich, T.D.; Asaad, Y.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of water coning in fractured basement reservoirs has been addressed in this work. The outcome of experimental and theoretical investigation to determine the critical production rate for single- and multi-fractured system, the capillary pressure effect, and the break-through time is presented. The results of the experimental work verify the presented theoretical relationship for different fluid viscosities, fracture angles, oil-water contacts (OWC), and rates for the case of single fracture system. The results also indicate that the capillary pressure effect may be generally neglected if the distance between the OWC and the fluid entry is sufficiently large compared to the capillary rise. The extension of the critical rate determination for a multi-fractured reservoir is also discussed. Finally, the main factors influencing the break-through time were investigated. The difference in viscosity between the oil and water phases has been fond to be the main factor affecting the breakthrough time.

  18. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  19. Potential Development of Hydrocarbon in Basement Reservoirs In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sunarjanto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i3.165Basement rocks, in particular igneous and metamorphic rocks are known to have porosity and permeability which should not be ignored. Primary porosity of basement rocks occurs as the result of rock formation. The porosity increases by the presence of cracks occurring as the result of tectonic processes (secondary porosity. Various efforts have been carried out to explore hydrocarbon in basement rocks. Some oil and gas fields proved that the basement rocks are as reservoirs which so far have provided oil and gas in significant amount. A review using previous research data, new data, and observation of igneous rocks in some fields has been done to see the development of exploration and basement reservoirs in Indonesia. A review on terminology of basement rock up till the identification of oil and gas exploration in basement rocks need to be based on the latest technology. An environmental approach is suggested to be applied as an alternative in analyzing the policy on oil and gas exploration development, especially in basement reservoirs.

  20. The alloantigenic sites of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen: pathogenic X-linked alport alloantibodies target two accessible conformational epitopes in the alpha5NC1 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Suk; Kashtan, Clifford E; Turner, A Neil; Heidet, Laurence; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2007-04-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody nephritis is caused by an autoimmune or alloimmune reaction to the NC1 domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen. Some patients with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop post-transplant nephritis mediated by pathogenic anti-GBM alloantibodies to collagen IV chains present in the renal allograft but absent from the tissues of the patient. In this work, the epitopes targeted by alloantibodies from these patients were identified and characterized. All XLAS alloantibodies recognized conformational epitopes in the NC1 domain of alpha5(IV) collagen, which were mapped using chimeric alpha1/alpha5 NC1 domains expressed in mammalian cells. Allograft-eluted alloantibodies mainly targeted two conformational alloepitopes mapping to alpha5NC1 residues 1-45 and 114-168. These regions also encompassed the major epitopes of circulating XLAS alloantibodies, which in some patients additionally targeted alpha5NC1 residues 169-229. Both kidney-eluted and circulating alloantibodies to alpha5NC1 distinctively targeted epitopes accessible in the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers of human GBM, unlike anti-GBM autoantibodies, which targeted sequestered alpha3NC1 epitopes. The results identify two immunodominant alpha5NC1 epitopes as major alloantigenic sites of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplant nephritis in XLAS patients. The contrast between the accessibility of these alloepitopes and the crypticity of autoepitopes indicates that distinct molecular forms of antigen may initiate the immunopathogenic processes in the two forms of anti-GBM disease. PMID:17293596

  1. Dynamic expression of alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin receptors by human vascular smooth muscle cells. Alpha 2 beta 1 integrin is required for chemotaxis across type I collagen-coated membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R.

    1994-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of normal arteries express alpha 1 beta 1 integrin with no detectable alpha 2 beta 1 as determined by immunocytochemistry. In contrast, immunoprecipitation of integrins expressed by human SMCs cultured from medial explants shows strong expression of alpha 2 beta 1 and no expression of alpha 1 beta 1. The apparent reciprocal expression of these two collagen and laminin receptors was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent labeled ce...

  2. Effects of sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose membrane on collagen and fibroblast formation in bowel suture healing: experimental study in rats Efeitos da membrana de hialuronato de sódio e carboximetilcelulose na formação de colágeno e fibroblastos no processo de cicatrização de colorrafias: estudo experimental em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Perez

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the effects of sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose membrane on collagen and fibroblast formation in bowel suture healing in rats. METHODS: 48 male Wistar rats, weighing 250 to 343g, were randomized into two groups: group I - bowel suture without applying a biologically absorbable membrane and group II - bowel suture with application of an absorbable membrane. The two groups were divided into subgroups of 3, 14 and 30 days of observation, with 8 rats in each subgroup. All were sacrificed after the end of the observation period. RESULTS: No morbidity or mortality was observed during the experiment. The amounts of collagen in group I were 23.4%, 72.1% and 67.6% and in group II were 22.5%, 52.5% and 51.6%, for the subgroups of 3, 14 and 30 days, respectively. Comparison between groups showed that the 14-day (p=0.0013 and 30-day (p=0.0587 subgroups had significant variance, with larger collagen zones in animals in which the membrane was not applied. However, with regard to fibroblasts, group I had 2%, 13% and 8% and group II had 2%, 10% and 8%, for the 3-day (p=1.0, 14-day (p=0.3184 and 30-day (p=0.5995 subgroups, respectively, showing no significant variance. CONCLUSION: The use of the biologically absorbable membrane cause a decrease in collagen formation, while not altering the number of fibroblasts, in bowel suture healing in rats, without increased morbidity and mortality.OBJETIVO: Analisar os efeitos da membrana de hialuronato de sódio e carboximetilcelulose, na formação de colágeno e fibroblastos na colorrafia de ratos. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 48 ratos machos da linhagem Wistar, com peso entre 250 e 343g, distribuídos em dois grupos: grupo I colorrafia sem aplicação de membrana bioabsorvível e grupo II colorrafia com aplicação de membrana bioabsorvível; tendo sido divididos em subgrupos de 3, 14 e 30 dias de observação, com 8 animais em cada um dos subgrupos, todos submetidos à eutanásia após o

  3. Subsidence resistant repair of a block basement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one story house was damaged by mine subsidence movement. The house is located in a small subsidence sag and is experiencing differential settlement and compressive ground strains. Instead of waiting for the ground movements to eventually stop, The Illinois Mine Subsidence Insurance Fund developed a permanent repair scheme that was implemented at the same time damaging mine subsidence movement was affecting the structure. This repair provided a significant structural resistance against the anticipated residual mine subsidence movement and was aesthetically acceptable to the homeowners. The repair consisted of epoxying vertical and horizontal steel straps and then applying a cover coat of fiber-cement on the unreinforced concrete block basement walls. The repair scheme was relatively untried, but had been successfully researched. This paper provides information on the mine subsidence movement/damage, the design concepts of steel strap/fiber-cement repair, construction details, performance and costs. Other applications of the use of the steel strap repair method are also discussed for releveling of a building and/or correcting subsidence damage to structures located in the tension zone

  4. Effect of papain-based gel on type I collagen - spectroscopy applied for microstructural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, Zenildo Santos Silva; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Deana, Alessandro; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2015-01-01

    Considering the improvement of biomaterials that facilitate atraumatic restorative techniques in dentistry, a papain-based gel can be used in the chemomechanical removal of decayed dental tissue. However, there is no information regarding the influence of this gel on the structure of sound collagen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of a papain-based gel (PapacarieTM) to collagen and determine collagen integrity after treatment. A pilot study was first performed with 10 samples of type I collagen membrane obtained from bovine Achilles deep tendon to compare the influence of hydration (Milli-Q water) on infrared bands of collagen. In a further experiment, 10 samples of type I collagen membrane were used to evaluate the effects of PapacarieTM on the collagen microstructure. All analyses were performed using the attenuated total reflectance technique of Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The results demonstrated that the application of PapacarieTM does not lead to the degradation of collagen and this product can be safely used in minimally invasive dentistry. As the integrity of sound collagen is preserved after the application of the papain-based gel, this product is indicated for the selective removal of infected dentin, leaving the affected dentin intact and capable of re-mineralization. PMID:26101184

  5. Proteolysis breaks tolerance toward intact α345(IV) collagen, eliciting novel anti-GBM autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Florina; Wang, Xu-Ping; Luo, Wentian; Ge, Linna; Miner, Jeffrey H; Kleinau, Sandra; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Wasiluk, Andrew; Heidet, Laurence; Kitching, A. Richard; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture disease is an autoimmune kidney disease mediated by autoAbs against NC1 monomers of α3(IV) collagen that bind to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), usually causing rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. We identified a novel type of human IgG4-restricted anti-GBM autoAbs associated with mild non-progressive glomerulonephritis, which specifically targeted α345NC1 hexamers but not α3NC1 monomers. The mechanisms eliciting these anti-GBM autoAbs were investigated in mouse models recapitulating this phenotype. Wild type and FcγRIIB−/− mice immunized with autologous murine GBM NC1 hexamers produced mouse IgG1-restricted autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which bound to the GBM in vivo but did not cause glomerulonephritis. In these mice, intact collagen IV from murine GBM was not immunogenic. However, in Col4a3−/− Alport mice, both intact collagen IV and NC1 hexamers from murine GBM elicited IgG antibodies specific for α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, which were not subclass restricted. As heterologous antigen in COL4A3-humanized mice, murine GBM NC1 hexamers elicited mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers and induced anti-GBM Ab glomerulonephritis. These findings indicate that tolerance toward autologous intact α3α4α5(IV) collagen is established in hosts expressing this antigen, even though autoreactive B cells specific for α345NC1 hexamers are not purged from their repertoire. Proteolysis selectively breaches this tolerance by generating autoimmunogenic α3α4α5NC1 hexamers. This provides a mechanism eliciting autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which are restricted to non-inflammatory IgG subclasses and non-nephritogenic. In Alport syndrome, lack of tolerance toward α3α4α5(IV) collagen promotes production of alloantibodies to α345NC1 hexamers, including pro-inflammatory IgG subclasses which mediate post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis. PMID:23303673

  6. Shining Light on Collagen: Expressing Collagen in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagens are a remarkable group of proteins that are critical from a physiological perspective due to their diverse and versatile functions in vivo. However, collagens are challenging to generate ex vivo for biomaterials or regenerative medicine due to their complex processing and assembly into functional materials. Therefore, collagen availability remains a major unmet need for biomaterials, as relatively limited supplies of the protein in pure form are available mainly through harvesting b...

  7. Primary hepatocyte culture in collagen gel mixture and collagen sandwich

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jie Wang; Hong-Ling Liu; Hai-Tao Guo; Hong-Wei Wen; Jun Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the methods of hepatocytes culture in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration and to examine the functional and cytomorphological characteristics of cultured hepatocytes.METHODS: A two-step collagenase perfusion technique was used to isolate the hepatocytes from Wistar rats or newborn Chinese experimental piglets. The isolated hepatocytes were cultured in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration respectively. The former was that rat hepatocytes were mixed with type I rat tail collagen solution till gelled, and the medium was added onto the gel. The latter was that swine hepatocytes were seeded on a plate precoated with collagen gel for 24 h, then another layer of collagen gel was overlaid, resulting in a sandwich configuration. The cytomorphological characteristics, albumin secretion, and LDH-release of the hepatocytes cultured in these two models were examined.RESULTS: Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were successfully mixed and fixed in collagen gel, and cultured in the gel condition. During the culture period, the urea synthesized and secreted by rat hepatocytes was detected throughout the period. Likewise, newborn experimental piglet hepatocytes were successfully fixed between the double layers of collagen gel, forming a sandwich configuration.Within a week of culture, the albumin secreted by swine hepatocytes was detected by SDS/PAGE analysis. The typical cytomorphological characteristics of the hepatocytes cultured by the above two culture models were found under a phasecontrast microscope. There was little LDH-release during the culture period.CONCLUSION: Both collagen gel mixture and double layers of collagen sandwich configuration can provide cultural conditions much closer to in vivoenvironment, and are helpful for maintaining specific hepatic fiJnctions and cytomorphological characteristics. A collagen gel mixture culture may be more eligible for the

  8. [Anders Jahre Prize for Young Researchers 1994. The collagen family: new members and new concepts about their biosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlajaniemi, T

    1995-01-01

    Nineteen distinct types of collagen have been found in vertebrates. Studies with newly discovered collagens have lead us to propose two new subgroups of collagens, namely membrane-associated collagens, including type XIII and XVII collagens, and a subgroup formed by the homologous collagens XV and XVIII. Type XIII collagen is found ubiquitously in the matrix, and in view of its plasma membrane localization it may function in cell adhesion. The new homologous collagens XV and XVIII are characterized by a collagenous sequence with frequent interruptions and large amino and carboxyterminal noncollagenous domains. Type XVIII collagen chains have three variant amino-terminal ends and one of these variants is characterized by a new cysteine-rich sequence motif, termed the fz sequence. A key enzyme of collagen biosynthesis is prolyl 4-hydroxylase consisting of two alpha and two beta subunits. The beta subunit is a multifunctional polypeptide with several distinct activities. Furthermore, two types of alpha subunit have been identified resulting in enzyme tetramers with highly similar properties with some interesting differences. PMID:7892127

  9. 64 Effect of Formoterol on Eosinophil Trans-Basement Migration Induced by Interleukin-8-Stimulated Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    KAWASHIMA, Akiko; Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are often increased in the airways of either chronic severe disease or acute exacerbation of asthma. Neutrophils migrated in response to interleukin-8 (IL-8) may lead eosinophils to accumulate in the airways of asthma and possibly aggravate this disease. In this study, we investigated whether formoterol modify the trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils stimulated with neutrophils and IL-8. Methods Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral...

  10. Interactions between the discoidin domain receptor 1 and β1 integrin regulate attachment to collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Staudinger

    2013-09-01

    Collagen degradation by phagocytosis is essential for physiological collagen turnover and connective tissue homeostasis. The rate limiting step of phagocytosis is the binding of specific adhesion receptors, which include the integrins and discoidin domain receptors (DDR, to fibrillar collagen. While previous data suggest that these two receptors interact, the functional nature of these interactions is not defined. In mouse and human fibroblasts we examined the effects of DDR1 knockdown and over-expression on β1 integrin subunit function. DDR1 expression levels were positively associated with enhanced contraction of floating and attached collagen gels, increased collagen binding and increased collagen remodeling. In DDR1 over-expressing cells compared with control cells, there were increased numbers, area and length of focal adhesions immunostained for talin, paxillin, vinculin and activated β1 integrin. After treatment with the integrin-cleaving protease jararhagin, in comparison to controls, DDR1 over-expressing cells exhibited increased β1 integrin cleavage at the cell membrane, indicating that DDR1 over-expression affected the access and susceptibility of cell-surface β1 integrin to the protease. DDR1 over-expression was associated with increased glycosylation of the β1 integrin subunit, which when blocked by deoxymannojirimycin, reduced collagen binding. Collectively these data indicate that DDR1 regulates β1 integrin interactions with fibrillar collagen, which positively impacts the binding step of collagen phagocytosis and collagen remodeling.

  11. Reevaluation of the role of the polar groups of collagen in the platelet-collagen interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Chesney, C. M.; Pifer, D D; Crofford, L J; Huch, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical modification of collagen is a tool for exploring the platelet-collagen interaction. Since collagen must polymerize prior to the initiation of platelet aggregation and secretion, modification must be shown to affect platelet-collagen interaction and not collagen-collagen interaction. To address this point, the authors carried out the following chemical modifications on soluble monomeric collagen and preformed fibrillar collagen in parallel: 1) N-and O-acetylation, 2) esterification of...

  12. Survey of Scania county (basement rock part). Geologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad survey of the geologic conditions in Scania county is presented, with the aim to give background for the location of a repository for spent fuels. The study is restricted to the basement rock part of the county

  13. Survey of Jaemtland county (basement rock part). Geologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad survey of the geologic conditions in Jaemtland county is presented, with the aim to give background for the location of a repository for spent fuels. The study is restricted to the basement rock part of the county

  14. Survey of Dalarna county (basement rock part). Geologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad survey of the geologic conditions in Dalarna county is presented, with the aim to give background for the location of a repository for spent fuels. The study is restricted to the basement rock part of the county

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Basement Insulation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

  16. Production, characterization and biocompatibility of marine collagen matrices from an alternative and sustainable source : the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Di Benedetto; Alice Barbaglio; Tiziana Martinello; Valentina Alongi; Dario Fassini; Emanuele Cullorà; Marco Patruno; Francesco Bonasoro; Mario Adolfo Barbosa; Maria Daniela Candia Carnevali; Michela Sugni

    2014-01-01

    Collagen has become a key-molecule in cell culture studies and in the tissue engineering field. Industrially, the principal sources of collagen are calf skin and bones which, however, could be associated to risks of serious disease transmission. In fact, collagen derived from alternative and riskless sources is required, and marine organisms are among the safest and recently exploited ones. Sea urchins possess a circular area of soft tissue surrounding the mouth, the peristomial membrane (PM)...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis, and arthropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cut (cleave) a protein called type IV collagen. Type IV collagen is a major structural component of basement membranes, ... metallopeptidase 2 enzyme, preventing the normal cleavage of type IV collagen. It is unclear how a loss of enzyme ...

  18. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores;

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  19. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  20. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs. PMID:25546439

  1. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D. (TJU); (IIT); (Widener)

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  2. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  3. A biocomposite of collagen nanofibers and nanohydroxyapatite for bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to design a synthetic construct that mimics the natural bone extracellular matrix through innovative approaches based on simultaneous type I collagen electrospinning and nanophased hydroxyapatite (nanoHA) electrospraying using non-denaturating conditions and non-toxic reagents. The morphological results, assessed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a mesh of collagen nanofibers embedded with crystals of HA with fiber diameters within the nanometer range (30 nm), thus significantly lower than those reported in the literature, over 200 nm. The mechanical properties, assessed by nanoindentation using AFM, exhibited elastic moduli between 0.3 and 2 GPa. Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry confirmed the collagenous integrity as well as the presence of nanoHA in the composite. The network architecture allows cell access to both collagen nanofibers and HA crystals as in the natural bone environment. The inclusion of nanoHA agglomerates by electrospraying in type I collagen nanofibers improved the adhesion and metabolic activity of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. This new nanostructured collagen–nanoHA composite holds great potential for healing bone defects or as a functional membrane for guided bone tissue regeneration and in treating bone diseases. (paper)

  4. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  5. Collagen fibril formation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth

  6. Microbial community transitions across the deep sediment-basement interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, J.; Lever, M. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of microbial abundance and geochemistry in deep marine sediments indicate a stimulation of microbial activity near the sediment-basement interface; yet, the extent to which microbial communities in bottom sediments and underlying crustal habitats interact is unclear. We conducted tag pyrosequencing on DNA extracted from a spectrum of deep sediment-basement samples to try to identify patterns in microbial community shifts across sediment-basement interfaces, focusing on samples from the subsurface of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank (IODP Expedition 327). Our results demonstrate that sediment and the basaltic crust harbor microbial communities that are phylogenetically connected, but the eveness is characteristic of the environment. We will discuss the microbial community transitions that occur horizontally along fluid flow pathways and vertically across the sediment basement interface, as well as the possible implications regarding the controls of microbial community composition along deep sediment-basement interfaces in hydrothermal systems. We will also highlight efforts to overcome sample contamination in crustal subsurface samples.

  7. Basement depressurization using dwelling mechanical exhaust ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical ventilation exhaust system is commonly used in France to generate air renewal into building and especially into dwelling. It consists of a permanent mechanical air extraction from technical rooms (kitchen, bathrooms and toilets) using a unique fan connected to exhaust ducts. Natural air inlets in living room and bed rooms ensure an air flow from living spaces towards technical rooms. To fight against radon into building, the most recognised efficient technique is the Soil Depressurization System (S.D.S.) consisting in depressurizing the house basement. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the dwelling mechanical ventilation system to depressurize the basement in conjunction with air renewal of a house. For that purpose, a S.D.S. has been installed in an experimental house at CSTB during its construction. At first, tests undertaken with a variable velocity fan connected to the S.D.S. have characterised the permeability of the basement. It is shown that basement can be depressurized adequately with a relatively low air flow rate. At a second stage, S.D.S. has been connected to the exhaust ventilation fan used for the mechanical ventilation of the house. Results obtained show the ability of such ventilation system to generate sufficient depressurization in the basement and to ensure simultaneously adequate air change rate in the dwelling. (author)

  8. Discussion on the basement topography and its relation with the uranium mineralization in Xiangshan basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth of the basement and the relation between the basement relief shape and uranium mineralization are discussed by forward and inverse computation for large-scale gravity data in Xiangshan basin. The difference of basement topography result in the inhomogeneous distribution of uranium mineralization. The margin of the basement upheaval section and the variation place of basement topography are the favorable place for uranium mineralization. It's helpful to prospect deep and blind uranium deposit in Xiangshan basin

  9. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar

  10. Mouse models of membranous nephropathy: the road less travelled by.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Zhang, Jun-Jun; Beck, Laurence H; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Luo, Wentian

    2013-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a major cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in adults, often progressing to end-stage kidney disease. The disease is mediated by IgG antibodies that form subepithelial immune complexes upon binding to antigens expressed by podocytes or planted in the subepithelial space. Subsequent activation of the complement cascade, podocyte injury by the membrane attack complex and the expansion of the glomerular basement membrane cause proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome. The blueprint for our current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of MN has largely been provided by studies in rat Heymann nephritis, an excellent animal model that closely replicates human disease. However, further progress in this area has been hindered by the lack of robust mouse models of MN that can leverage the power of genetic approaches for mechanistic studies. This critical barrier has recently been overcome by the development of new mouse models that faithfully recapitulate the clinical and morphologic hallmarks of human MN. In these mouse models, subepithelial ICs mediating proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome are induced by injection of cationized bovine serum albumin, by passive transfer of heterologous anti-podocyte antibodies, or by active immunization with the NC1 domain of α3(IV) collagen. These mouse models of MN will be instrumental for addressing unsolved questions about the basic pathomechanisms of MN and also for preclinical studies of novel therapeutics. We anticipate that the new knowledge to be gained from these studies will eventually translate into much needed novel mechanism-based therapies for MN, more effective, more specific, and less toxic. PMID:23885331

  11. Stimulation of MMP-11 (stromelysin-3) expression in mouse fibroblasts by cytokines, collagen and co-culture with human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are central to degradation of the extracellular matrix and basement membrane during both normal and carcinogenic tissue remodeling. MT1-MMP (MMP-14) and stromelysin-3 (MMP-11) are two members of the MMP family of proteolytic enzymes that have been specifically implicated in breast cancer progression. Expressed in stromal fibroblasts adjacent to epithelial tumour cells, the mechanism of MT1-MMP and MMP-11 induction remains unknown. To investigate possible mechanisms of induction, we examined the effects of a number of plausible regulatory agents and treatments that may physiologically influence MMP expression during tumour progression. Thus NIH3T3 and primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were: a) treated with the cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β for 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours; b) grown on collagens I, IV and V; c) treated with fibronectin, con-A and matrigel; and d) co-cultured with a range of HBC (human breast cancer) cell lines of varied invasive and metastatic potential. Competitive quantitative RT-PCR indicated that MMP-11 expression was stimulated to a level greater than 100%, by 48 hour treatments of IL-1β, IL-2, TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen V. No other substantial changes in expression of MMP-11 or MT1-MMP in either tested fibroblast culture, under any treatment conditions, were observed. We have demonstrated significant MMP-11 stimulation in mouse fibroblasts using cytokines, matrix constituents and HBC cell lines, and also some inhibition of MT1-MMP. Our data suggest that the regulation of these genes in the complex stromal-epithelial interactions that occur in human breast carcinoma, is influenced by several mechanisms

  12. Stimulation of MMP-11 (stromelysin-3 expression in mouse fibroblasts by cytokines, collagen and co-culture with human breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthaei Klaus I

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are central to degradation of the extracellular matrix and basement membrane during both normal and carcinogenic tissue remodeling. MT1-MMP (MMP-14 and stromelysin-3 (MMP-11 are two members of the MMP family of proteolytic enzymes that have been specifically implicated in breast cancer progression. Expressed in stromal fibroblasts adjacent to epithelial tumour cells, the mechanism of MT1-MMP and MMP-11 induction remains unknown. Methods To investigate possible mechanisms of induction, we examined the effects of a number of plausible regulatory agents and treatments that may physiologically influence MMP expression during tumour progression. Thus NIH3T3 and primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were: a treated with the cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β for 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours; b grown on collagens I, IV and V; c treated with fibronectin, con-A and matrigel; and d co-cultured with a range of HBC (human breast cancer cell lines of varied invasive and metastatic potential. Results Competitive quantitative RT-PCR indicated that MMP-11 expression was stimulated to a level greater than 100%, by 48 hour treatments of IL-1β, IL-2, TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen V. No other substantial changes in expression of MMP-11 or MT1-MMP in either tested fibroblast culture, under any treatment conditions, were observed. Conclusion We have demonstrated significant MMP-11 stimulation in mouse fibroblasts using cytokines, matrix constituents and HBC cell lines, and also some inhibition of MT1-MMP. Our data suggest that the regulation of these genes in the complex stromal-epithelial interactions that occur in human breast carcinoma, is influenced by several mechanisms.

  13. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  14. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  15. PHAGOCYTOSIS AND REMODELING OF COLLAGEN MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Leah C.; Dice, J. Fred; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradation of collagen and the deposition of new collagen-based extracellular matrices are of central importance in tissue remodeling and function. Similarly, for collagen-based biomaterials used in tissue engineering, the degradation of collagen scaffolds with accompanying cellular infiltration and generation of new extracellular matrix is critical for integration of in vitro grown tissues in vivo. In earlier studies we observed significant impact of collagen structure on primary lun...

  16. Current Trends about Inner Limiting Membrane Peeling in Surgery for Epiretinal Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Semeraro; Francesco Morescalchi; Sarah Duse; Elena Gambicorti; Andrea Russo; Ciro Costagliola

    2015-01-01

    The inner limiting membrane (ILM) is the basement membrane of the Müller cells and can act as a scaffold for cellular proliferation in the pathophysiology of disorders affecting the vitreomacular interface. The atraumatic removal of the macular ILM has been proposed for treating various forms of tractional maculopathy in particular for macular pucker. In the last decade, the removal of ILM has become a routine practice in the surgery of the epiretinal membranes (ERMs), with good anatomical re...

  17. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, L.; Yamada, S.S.; Wimer, H.;

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic...... activity associated with the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) results in disrupted skeletal development and growth in both cartilage and bone, where MT1-MMP is required for pericellular collagen dissolution. We show here that reconstitution of MT1-MMP activity in the type II collagen......-expressing cells of the skeleton rescues not only diminished chondrocyte proliferation, but surprisingly, also results in amelioration of the severe skeletal dysplasia associated with MT1-MMP deficiency through enhanced bone formation. Consistent with this increased bone formation, type II collagen was identified...

  18. Advantages of collagen based biological dressings in the management of superficial and superficial partial thickness burns in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathangi Ramakrishnan, K.; Babu, M.; Mathivanan; Jayaraman, V.; Shankar, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen based dressings for acute burn wound management have been extensively used in India, particularly in the city of Chennai. Due to the high levels of humidity in our city, closed dressings become infected and treatment with topical antimicrobials, like Silver Sulfadiazine cream, quickly become desiccated. Collagen membrane dressings were manufactured by the biomaterial laboratory of the Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Government of India in Chennai, and then the process was patented. Collagen was extracted from bovine skin and Achilles tendons, and then reconstituted. This was used on burn wounds as dressings after clearance from the Institutional Review Board and Ethics Committees of the Hospital and CLRI. Continued research in this field to enable resulted in the design of silver sulphadiazine loaded alginate microspheres which were embedded in the reconstituted collagen. Controlled delivery of silver sulphadiazine. This collagen membrane was used in chronic infected burns. Low molecular weight heparin was given subcutaneously to improve wound healing in burn injuries and collagen membrane dressings were also applied. After several trials the process technology was patented. The advantages and disadvantages of the collagen membrane cover is elaborated in a group of 487 pediatric burn patients. The trial was conducted at the burn unit of Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital (KKCTH) in Chennai, India. PMID:24133405

  19. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. Methods We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. Results We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  20. Chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in a leakproof collagen sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a porous scaffold has been developed as a promising strategy for cartilage tissue engineering. The chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs derived from human bone marrow was studied by culturing the cells in a novel scaffold constructed of leakproof collagen sponge. All the surfaces of the collagen sponge except the top were wrapped with a membrane that has pores smaller than the cells to protect against cell leakage during cell seeding. The cells adhered to the collagen, distributed evenly, and proliferated to fill the spaces in the sponge. Cell seeding efficiency was greater than 95%. The MSCs cultured in the collagen sponge in the presence of TGF-β3 and BMP6 expressed a high level of genes encoding type II and type X collagen, sox9, and aggrecan. Histological examination by HE staining indicated that the differentiated cells showed a round morphology. The extracellular matrices were positively stained by safranin O and toluidine blue. Immunostaining with anti-type II collagen and anti-cartilage proteoglycan showed that type II collagen and cartilage proteoglycan were detected around the cells. These results suggest the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs when cultured in the collagen sponge in the presence of TGF-β3 and BMP6

  1. Injection-induced seismicity on basement faults including poroelastic stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K. W.; Segall, P.

    2016-04-01

    Most significant induced earthquakes occur on faults within the basement beneath sedimentary cover. In this two-dimensional plane strain numerical study, we examine the full poroelastic response of basement faults to fluid injection into overlying strata, considering both (1) the permeability of the fault zone and (2) the hydraulic connectivity of the faults to the target horizon. Given hydraulic and mechanical properties, we compute the spatiotemporal change in Coulomb stress, which we separate into (1) the change in poroelastic stresses Δτs+fΔσn, where Δτs and Δσn are changes in shear and normal stress (Δτs>0 and Δσn>0 both favor slip), and (2) the change in pore pressure fΔp. Pore pressure diffusion into hydraulically connected, permeable faults dominates their mechanical stability. For hydraulically isolated or low-permeability faults, however, poroelastic stresses transmitted to deeper basement levels can trigger slip, even without elevated pore pressure. The seismicity rate on basement fault zones is predicted using the model of Dieterich (1994). High seismicity rates can occur on permeable, hydraulically connected faults due to direct pore pressure diffusion. Lower rates are predicted on isolated steeply dipping normal faults, caused solely by poroelastic stressing. In contrast, seismicity on similarly oriented reverse faults is inhibited.

  2. Magnetic basement in the central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L; Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Rao, M.M.M.

    . The N10-12 degrees W trending subsurface 85 degrees E Ridge buried under 2 to 3 km thick sediments is a prominent tectonic feature. Offshore basins characterised by deeper magnetic basement (approx. 9 km) and 100-200 km wide are present on either sides...

  3. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko;

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  4. The relationship of expression of zinc, matrix metalloproteinases-9 and collagen Ⅳ levels and premature rupture of membranes at term%足月胎膜早破孕妇血浆锌、基质金属蛋白酶9及Ⅳ型胶原的表达及其相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭延霞; 陈燕; 韩素新; 何艳舫

    2014-01-01

    目的 检测足月胎膜早破孕妇血浆锌、血清及羊水基质金属蛋白酶(MMP)9、血清Ⅳ型胶原含量变化.方法 选择2012年11月至2013年3月确诊为足月胎膜早破患者30例作为胎膜早破组,另30例在同一时期正常分娩的非胎膜早破患者作为对照组,收集所有病例的母体血液及羊水,血浆锌含量用原子吸收法检测,血清和羊水MMP-9含量用ELISA法检测、血清Ⅳ型胶原含量用上转发光法检测,并对它们之间的相关性进行分析.结果 胎膜早破组与对照组比较,孕妇血浆锌、血清Ⅳ型胶原、血清MMP-9、羊水MMP-9比较,差异均有统计学意义[锌:(109.10±16.07) μnol/L与(90.54±10.99)μmol/L,t=-5.22,P=0.000;血清Ⅳ型胶原:(56.86±41.26) μg/L与(88.61±44.87))μg/L,t=2.852,P=0.006;血清MMP-9:(1 463.25±483.6) μg/L与(1 196.9±357.43) μg/L,t=-2.426,P=0.018;羊水MMP-9:(125.48±67.18) μg/L与(72.64±60.74) μg/L,t=-2.873,P=0.006].孕妇血浆锌与血清Ⅳ型胶原之间呈负相关(r=-0.261,P=0.044);孕妇血浆锌、血清MMP-9之间呈正相关(r =0.274,P=0.034);孕妇血清MMP-9、羊水MMP-9之间呈正相关(r=0.264,P=0.047);血浆锌与羊水MMP-9、血清Ⅳ型胶原与血清MMP-9、血清Ⅳ型胶原与羊水MMP-9之间均无相关性(r值分别为0.215、-0.172、-0.172,P均>0.05).结论 足月胎膜早破与母体血浆锌、血清及羊水MMP-9含量升高、血清Ⅳ型胶原含量降低有关.%Objective To investigate the changes of zinc in maternal plasma and MMP-9,collagen Ⅳ levels in serum and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) level in amniotic fluid in patients with premature rupture of membranes at term(TPROM).Methods Thirty cases who were diagnosed as PROM at term during Nov.2012 to Mar.2013 were enrolled as case group,and 30 cases delivered during the same time without PROM were enrolled as control group.Maternal blood and ammiotic fluid were collected from all the cases.The level of zinc in maternal plasma was measured

  5. Basement configuration of KG offshore basin from magnetic anomalies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Subrahmanyam; K V Swamy; Neetha Raj

    2016-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies along three representative profiles falling between shelf break and continent–ocean boundary in the offshore Krishna–Godavari basin were quantitatively interpreted for understandingthe nature and structure of the magnetic basement using inversion technique. The interpretation of theanomalies shows that the magnetic basement lies deeper than the base of the sediments, i.e., acousticbasement identified by the seismic studies. This interpretation also shows that the magnetic basementis faulted along the NW–SE direction with the upthrown side lying to the north of the anomaly trendof this region. The coincidence of magnetizations observed through the present interpretation with thatof charnockites of neighbouring EGMB and onshore K–G basin areas indicates that EGMB geology(charnockites, granitic gneiss, etc.) extends up to COB in the offshore K–G basin.

  6. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  7. Collagen gene expression during limb cartilage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    As limb mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrocytes, they initiate the synthesis of type II collagen and cease synthesizing type I collagen. Changes in the cytoplasmic levels of type I and type II collagen mRNAs during the course of limb chondrogenesis in vivo and in vitro were examined using cloned cDNA probes. A striking increase in cytoplasmic type II collagen mRNA occurs coincident with the crucial condensation stage of chondrogenesis in vitro, in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal c...

  8. Effects of chitosan/collagen substrates on the behavior of rat neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord and brain injuries usually lead to cavity formation.The transplantation by combining stem cells and tissue engineering scaffolds has the potential to fill the cavities and replace the lost neural cells.Both chitosan and collagen have their unique characteristics.In this study,the effects of chitosan and collagen on the behavior of rat neural stem cells (at the neurosphere level) were tested in vitro in terms of cytotoxicity and supporting ability for stem cell survival,proliferation and differentiation.Under the serum-free condition,both chitosan membranes and collagen gels had low cytotoxicity to neurospheres.That is,cells migrated from neurospheres,and processes extended out from these neurospheres and the differentiated cells.Compared with the above two materials,chitosan-collagen membranes were more suitable for the co-culture with rat neural stem cells,because,except for low cytotoxicity and supporting ability for the cell survival,in this group,a large number of cells were observed to migrate out from neurospheres,and the differentiating percentage from neurospheres into neurons was significantly increased.Further modification of chitosan-collagen membranes may shed light on in vivo nerve regeneration by transplanting neural stem cells.

  9. Electrospun nanofibers of collagen-chitosan and P(LLA-CL) for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiumei; CHEN Zonggang; Hans J.Weber

    2007-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers could be used to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in native tissue.In tissue engineering,the ECM could be used as tissue engineering scaffold to solve tissue engineering prob-lems.In this paper,poly(L-lactid-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)] nanofibers and collagen-chitosan complex nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning.Results of the experi-ments showed that the mechanical properties of the collagen- chitosan complex nanofibers varied with the collagen content in the complex.It was also found that the biodegradability of P(LLA-CL) nanofibers was faster than its membrane and that smooth muscle cells (SMC) grow faster on collagen nanofibers than on P(LLA-CL) nanofibers.

  10. Collagen and Collagen-derived Fragments Are Chemotactic for Tumor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mundy, Gregory R; Demartino, Sandra; Rowe, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Organs that are rich in collagen such as liver, lungs, and bone are frequently sites of tumor cell metastasis. In this study, we have found that cultured tumor cells of human and rat origin migrated unidirectionally in response to collagen in vitro. Synthetic di- and tri-peptides that contained amino acid sequences found frequently in the collagen helix caused similar effects. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that collagen or collagen fragments released during connective tissu...

  11. Collagen breakdown products and lung collagen metabolism: an in vitro study on fibroblast cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardi, C.; Calzoni, P.; Marcolongo, P.; E. Cavarra; Vanni, L.; Lungarella, G.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In fibrotic diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis there is evidence suggesting enhanced synthesis and degradation of lung connective tissue components, including collagen. It has therefore been hypothesised that products of collagen degradation may have a role in the promotion of collagen deposition. In support of this hypothesis, it has recently been shown that intravenous injection of lung collagen degradation products in experimental animals stimulated collagen synthesis leading ...

  12. Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Schadow; Hans-Christian Siebert; Günter Lochnit; Jens Kordelle; Markus Rickert; Jürgen Steinmeyer

    2013-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen ...

  13. Real-time-guided bone regeneration around standardized critical size calvarial defects using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and collagen membrane with and without using tricalcium phosphate: an in vivo micro-computed tomographic and histologic experiment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Askar, Mansour; ArRejaie, Aws S; Nooh, Nasser; Jawad, Fawad; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Atteya, Muhammad; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present real time in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial critical size defects (CSD) using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), and collagen membrane (CM) with and without tricalcium phosphate (TCP) graft material. In the calvaria of nine female Sprague-Dawley rats, full-thickness CSD (diameter 4.6 mm) were created under general anesthesia. Treatment-wise, rats were divided into three groups. In group 1, CSD was covered with a resorbable CM; in group 2, BMSCs were filled in CSD and covered with CM; and in group 3, TCP soaked in BMSCs was placed in CSD and covered with CM. All defects were closed using resorbable sutures. Bone volume and bone mineral density of newly formed bone (NFB) and remaining TCP particles and rate of new bone formation was determined at baseline, 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks using in vivo µCT. At the 10th week, the rats were killed and calvarial segments were assessed histologically. The results showed that the hardness of NFB was similar to that of the native bone in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the NFB in group 3. Likewise, values for the modulus of elasticity were also significantly higher in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2. This suggests that TCP when used in combination with BMSCs and without CM was unable to form bone of significant strength that could possibly provide mechanical "lock" between the natural bone and NFB. The use of BMSCs as adjuncts to conventional GBR initiated new bone formation as early as 2 weeks of treatment compared to when GBR is attempted without adjunct BMSC therapy. PMID:27025260

  14. Effects of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/type-Ⅰcollagen/chitosan composite membrane in rabbit models of spinal cord injury%聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物/Ⅰ型胶原/壳聚糖人工硬脊膜在兔脊髓损伤模型中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白万山; 王新伟; 袁文; 王占超; 梁磊; 王会学

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous tissue, allograft tissue, and dural substitute materials originated from animals are all difficult to reduce the morbidity and mortality of spinal cord injury. OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) /type-Ⅰcollagen/chitosan composite membrane in rabbit models with spinal cord injury. METHODS: Seventy rabbits were randomly divided randomly into sham-operation group (n=10, simple laminectomy without spinal cord injury), model group (n=20, spinal cord injury without treatment), chitosan group (n=20, spinal cord injury treated with artificial dura mater of chitosan), and composite group (n=20, spinal cord injury treated with PLGA/type-Ⅰcollagen/chitosan composite membrane). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Twenty-four hours after spinal cord injury, the motor behavior scores was higher in the chitosan group and composite group than model group (P < 0.01), and the scores in the composite group were also higher than those in the chitosan group (P < 0.05). The latency of somatosensory evoked potential was longer in the model, chitosan, and composite groups than the sham-operation group after spinal cord injury. The latencies were increased at 6 hours after spinal cord injury and reached the peak at 24 hours, and then began to decrease. Two days after spinal cord injury, the differences in the latencies were insignificant among the model, chitosan and composite groups. The apoptotic rate of the sham-operation group was lower than that of other groups (P < 0.05). At 6 and 24 hours after spinal cord injury, the apoptotic rates of the chitosan and composite groups were lower than that of the model group (P < 0.05). Early surgical intervention with PLGA/type-Ⅰcollagen/chitosan composite membrane can acquire best neurological functional recovery in rabbit models of spinal cord injury.%背景:自体组织、异体组织、动物来源的硬脊膜替代材料都难达到降低脊髓损伤后致残率与致死率的修复结

  15. The initiation of embryonic-like collagen fibrillogenesis by adult human tendon fibroblasts when cultured under tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Yeung, Chin-Yan C; Kadler, Karl E;

    2010-01-01

    Tendon fibroblasts synthesize collagen and form fibrils during embryonic development, but to what extent mature fibroblasts are able to recapitulate embryonic development and develop normal tendon structure is unknown. The present study examined the capability of mature human tendon fibroblasts to...... along the axis of tension. The fibrils had a homogeneous narrow diameter that was similar to collagen fibrils occurring in embryonic tendon. Immunostaining showed colocalization of collagen type I with collagen III, XII and XIV. A fibronectin network was formed in parallel with the collagen, and...... fibroblasts stained positive for integrin alpha(5). Finally, the presence of cell extensions into the extracellular space with membrane-enclosed fibrils in fibripositors indicated characteristics of embryonic tendon. We conclude that mature human tendon fibroblasts retain an intrinsic capability to perform...

  16. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  17. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  18. Advantages of collagen based biological dressings in the management of superficial and superficial partial thickness burns in children

    OpenAIRE

    Mathangi Ramakrishnan, K.; Babu, M.; Mathivanan,; Jayaraman, V.; Shankar, J.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen based dressings for acute burn wound management have been extensively used in India, particularly in the city of Chennai. Due to the high levels of humidity in our city, closed dressings become infected and treatment with topical antimicrobials, like Silver Sulfadiazine cream, quickly become desiccated. Collagen membrane dressings were manufactured by the biomaterial laboratory of the Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Government of India in Chennai, and then the process was ...

  19. Basement configuration of KG offshore basin from magnetic anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Swamy, K.V.; Raj, N.

    . The calculated depth (5.1 km) in this method corresponds to the depth to the center of the sheet. Thus for a throw of 1 km the depths to the top and bottom of the mag- netic basement will be 4.6 and 5.6 km respectively with an intensity of magnetization of 1030 n.... I V Radhakrishna Murthy for his valuable suggestions to improve the manuscript. The first author Dr. V Subrahmanyam is grateful to CSIR, New Delhi for grant of Emeritus Fellow- ship under which this work was carried out. Neetha Raj is thankful...

  20. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  1. The Study of Morphological Structure, Phase Structure and Molecular Structure of Collagen-PEO 600K Blends for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Mohd Nasir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new material which is collagen/ poly (ethylene oxide (PEO blend was developed to determine its possibility as a promising material for tissue scaffold. PEO with average molecular weight of 600,000 and collagen originated from calf skin were dispersed in 0.1 M acetic acid to prepare a concentration of 1 wt% for PEO and 0.15 wt% for collagen. The collagen-PEO600K blend film was then obtained by solution casting method. SEM results shown that by having certain ratio of collagen and PEO, the membrane began to developed porous structures which are possible to assist tissue attachment on the scaffold. The X-ray diffractograms demonstrate PEO 600K influences on the blend thus enhancing crystallinity of collagen. The Infra red spectrum shows intermolecular interactions of collagen and PEO which alter the collagen structure thus explained the membrane morphological changes. Therefore, we concluded that the phase structure and also the molecular structure of the blend are crucial to produce desirable morphological structure of the membrane which is required for a reliable tissue scaffold.

  2. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  3. Localization of type V collagen and type IV collagen in human cornea, lung, and skin. Immunohistochemical evidence by anti-collagen antibodies characterized by immunoelectroblotting.

    OpenAIRE

    Konomi, H.; Hayashi, T.; NAKAYASU, K.; Arima, M.

    1984-01-01

    Tissue distribution of Type V collagen in comparison with Type IV collagen was investigated by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Affinity-purified rat antibodies to Type IV and Type V collagens obtained from human placenta reacted specifically only with the corresponding type of collagen in both native and denatured conformations. In indirect immunofluorescent stainings of human skin, lung, and cornea tissues, Type IV and Type V collagens showed distinct distributions. Type IV collagen ...

  4. Scanning electron microscopic observation of Bruch's membrane with the osmium tetroxide treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, T; Yamashita, H.

    1989-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic observation of Bruch's membrane was performed after removal of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with the osmium tetroxide treatment. Eight human eyes from subjects at various ages (from newborn to 77 years old) were examined in order to investigate aging changes in Bruch's membrane. The collagen fibres of the inner collagenous zone in young eyes formed a tightly interwoven membrane, and the meshes were regular and fine. In old eyes the meshes were irregular and c...

  5. Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen diminishes collagen-proteoglycan binding and weakens cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Reigle, Kristin L.; Di Lullo, Gloria; Turner, Kevin R.; Last, Jerold A; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E.; Funderburgh, James L.; Elrod, Elizabeth; Markus W. Germann; Surber, Charles; Sanderson, Ralph D.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen occurs in aging and diabetes, and may affect collagen solubility, charge, polymerization, and intermolecular interactions. Proteoglycans1(PGs) bind type I collagen and are proposed to regulate fibril assembly, function, and cell-collagen interactions. Moreover, on the collagen fibril a keratan sulfate (KS) PG binding region overlaps with preferred collagen glycation sites. Thus, we examined the effect of collagen modified by simple glycation on PG-co...

  6. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  7. Electrospun gelatin/PCL and collagen/PLCL scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Fu,1,2,* Zhenling Liu,1,* Bei Feng,1,2 Renjie Hu,1 Xiaomin He,1 Hao Wang,1 Meng Yin,1 Huimin Huang,1 Haibo Zhang,1 Wei Wang11Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Electrospun hybrid nanofibers prepared using combinations of natural and synthetic polymers have been widely investigated in cardiovascular tissue engineering. In this study, electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (PCL and collagen/poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL scaffolds were successfully produced. Scanning electron micrographs showed that fibers of both membranes were smooth and homogeneous. Water contact angle measurements further demonstrated that both scaffolds were hydrophilic. To determine cell attachment and migration on the scaffolds, both hybrid scaffolds were seeded with human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells. Scanning electron micrographs and MTT assays showed that the cells grew and proliferated well on both hybrid scaffolds. Gross observation of the transplanted scaffolds revealed that the engineered collagen/PLCL scaffolds were smoother and brighter than the gelatin/PCL scaffolds. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the engineered blood vessels constructed by collagen/PLCL electrospun membranes formed relatively homogenous vessel-like tissues. Interestingly, Young's modulus for the engineered collagen/PLCL scaffolds was greater than for the gelatin/PCL scaffolds. Together, these results indicate that nanofibrous collagen/PLCL membranes with favorable mechanical and biological properties may be a desirable scaffold for vascular tissue engineering.Keywords: electrospinning, gelatin, collagen, polycaprolactone, poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone

  8. Basement topography and fresh-water resources of the coastal aquifer at Acapetahua, Chiapas, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Birgit Steinich; Gerardo Bocanegra; Eva Sánchez

    1999-01-01

    The coastal aquifer of Acapetahua, Chiapas, southeastern Mexico, consists of one hydrostratigraphic unit composed of continental sediments overlying a crystalline basement. Twenty-four resistivity soundings were conducted and fifty-one water samples were taken in order to determine basic aquifer characteristics such as aquifer geometry and fresh water reserves. The basement topography in the study area is characterized by hills and deep valleys with highly variable basement depths ranging fro...

  9. Recombinant gelatin and collagen from methylotrophic yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin,, Henk

    2002-01-01

    Based on its structural role and compatibility within the human body, collagen is a commonly used biomaterial in medical applications, such as cosmetic surgery, wound treatment and tissue engineering. Gelatin is in essence denatured and partly degraded collagen and is, as a result of its unique functional and chemical properties, also used in many medical and pharmaceutical products. Collagen and gelatin are traditionally extracted from animal tissues. The quality and the characteristics of t...

  10. Fibrillogenesis in Continuously Spun Synthetic Collagen Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Wen, Jing; Cui, Wanxing; Martinez, Adam; Apkarian, Robert; Coats, Julie E.; Berland, Keith; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2010-01-01

    The universal structural role of collagen fiber networks has motivated the development of collagen gels, films, coatings, injectables, and other formulations. However, reported synthetic collagen fiber fabrication schemes have either culminated in short, discontinuous fiber segments at unsuitably low production rates, or have incompletely replicated the internal fibrillar structure that dictates fiber mechanical and biological properties. We report a continuous extrusion system with an off-li...

  11. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Baniasadi; Majid Minary-Jolandan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of th...

  12. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  13. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  14. Collagen I confers gamma radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of collagen on the response of somatomammotroph tumor cells (GH3) to gamma, radiation therapy was studied in vitro. After incubating confluent GH3 cell monolayers in a serum-free, maintaining medium, either with or without collagen, the monolayers were irradiated with 137Cs, gamma radiation. Collagen reduces cell mortality via ERK1/2 activation, abolishing gamma radiation, cell death, and promotes cell invasion when acting in synergy with collagen and in association with the, MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation. The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors, confers resistance to radiation. - Highlights: ► Collagen effect on GH3 cells response to gamma radiation therapy was studied. ► Collagen ERK activation abolishes gamma radiation GH3 cell death. ► Gamma radiation promotes cell invasion and ERK activation in synergy with collagen. ► The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors confers radiotherapy resistance. ► Analysis of tumor surrounding tissue before applying radiotherapy would be advisable.

  15. Suppression of type II collagen-induced arthritis by intragastric administration of soluble type II collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    NAGLER-ANDERSON, C; Bober, L A; Robinson, M E; Siskind, G W; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Although oral administration of protein antigens may lead to specific immunologic unresponsiveness, this method of immunoregulation has not been applied to models of autoimmune disease. Type II collagen-induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice and rats by immunization with type II collagen, a major component of cartilage. Intragastric administration of soluble type II collagen, prior to immunization with type II collagen in adjuvant, suppresses the inc...

  16. Investigation on evaluation method for characteristic seismic transmission. Standard earthquake basement from observation records of earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of standard earthquake movement in seismic-resistant design for nuclear power plants is important and carried out at free surface of base stratum according to the guidelines. However, the seismic transmittance differs from site to site depending on the geological features, basement depth, and the state of uppers above the basement. The present method takes into account site characteristic propagation character between the basement surface and top surface and using standard and uniform earthquake motion throughout the country. Thus, the report presents investigation results of characteristic seismic motion at the basement from the records of observed earthquakes. (S. Ohno)

  17. 1,4-Dioxane enhances properties and biocompatibility of polyanionic collagen for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Fabio L; Bet, Marcos R; Goissis, Gilberto; Plepis, Ana M G

    2011-08-01

    Polyanionic collagen obtained from bovine pericardial tissue submitted to alkaline hydrolysis is an acellular matrix with strong potential in tissue engineering. However, increasing the carboxyl content reduces fibril formation and thermal stability compared to the native tissues. In the present work, we propose a chemical protocol based on the association of alkaline hydrolysis with 1,4-dioxane treatment to either attenuate or revert the drastic structural modifications promoted by alkaline treatments. For the characterization of the polyanionic membranes treated with 1,4-dioxane, we found that (1) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows a stronger reorientation and aggregation of collagen microfibrils; (2) histological evaluation reveals recovering of the alignment of collagen fibers and reassociation with elastic fibers; (3) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows an increase in thermal stability; and (4) in biocompatibility assays there is a normal attachment, morphology and proliferation associated with high survival of the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 in reconstituted membranes, which behave as native membranes. Our conclusions reinforce the ability of 1,4-dioxane to enhance the properties of negatively charged polyanionic collagen associated with its potential use as biomaterials for grafting, cationic drug- or cell-delivery systems and for the coating of cardiovascular devices. PMID:21643966

  18. Collagen with simvastatin promotes cell metabolism in osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanga Kumaran Suthanthiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simvastatin (SMV is one of the cholesterol-lowering pharmacological drugs. Recent studies demonstrate that it has a bone stimulatory effect. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of SMV along with collagen membrane on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells and also to standardize the dosage of SMV to be incorporated into the collagen membrane to achieve regeneration. Materials and Methods: SMV at doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mg was incorporated into the collagen membrane and cell metabolism was assessed by (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay for 24 h. Results: SMV enhanced cell metabolism dose dependently at 24-h time and the maximum effect was obtained at a concentration of 1.5 mg of SMV. Conclusion: These results indicate that collagen with 1.5 mg SMV exhibits positive effect on cell metabolism of human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells.

  19. Structural analysis of a fractured basement reservoir, central Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeningen, Resi; Rice, Hugh; Schneider, Dave; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The Pan-African Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), within which Yemen lies, formed as a result of Neoproterozoic collisional events between c. 870-550 Ma. Several subsequent phases of extension occurred, from the Mesozoic (due to the breakup of Gondwana) to the Recent (forming the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea). These resulted in the formation of numerous horst- and-graben structures and the development of fractured basement reservoirs in the southeast part of the ANS. Two drill cores from the Mesozoic Marib-Shabwa Basin, central Yemen, penetrated the upper part of the Pan-African basement. The cores show both a lithological and structural inhomogeneity, with variations in extension-related deformation structures such as dilatational breccias, open fractures and closed veins. At least three deformation events have been recognized: D1) Ductile to brittle NW-SE directed faulting during cooling of a granitic pluton. U-Pb zircon ages revealed an upper age limit for granite emplacement at 627±3.5 Ma. As these structures show evidence for ductile deformation, this event must have occurred during the Ediacaran, shortly after intrusion, since Rb/Sr and (U-Th)/He analyses show that subsequent re-heating of the basement did not take place. D2) The development of shallow dipping, NNE-SSW striking extensional faults that formed during the Upper Jurassic, simultaneously with the formation of the Marib-Shabwa Basin. These fractures are regularly cross-cut by D3. D3) Steeply dipping NNE-SSW to ENE-WSW veins that are consistent with the orientation of the opening of the Gulf of Aden. These faults are the youngest structures recognized. The formation of ductile to brittle faults in the granite (D1) resulted in a hydrothermally altered zone ca. 30 cm wide replacing (mainly) plagioclase with predominantly chlorite, as well as kaolinite and heavy element minerals such as pyrite. The alteration- induced porosity has an average value of 20%, indicating that the altered zone is potentially a

  20. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  1. Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Koch, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix toward the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  2. Entactin: ultrastructural localization of an ubiquitous basement membrane glycoprotein in mouse skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horiguchi, Y; Fine, J D; Ljubimov, A V; Yamasaki, H; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    present study, we have sought to determine the localization of entactin in mouse skin. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (the latter via immunoperoxidase technique) were performed on both intact and NaCl-separated mouse skin, using a well-characterized IgG class entactin...

  3. IgA-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: an uncommon mechanism of Goodpasture's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Moulis, Guillaume; Huart, Antoine; Guitard, Joëlle; Fortenfant, Françoise; Chauveau, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture's (GP) disease is usually mediated by IgG autoantibodies. We describe a case of IgA-mediated GP, in a patient presenting with isolated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was established on kidney biopsy, since routine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeted at IgG circulating autoantibodies failed to detect the nephritogenic antibodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intense linear deposition of IgA along the glomerular capillary walls. An eleva...

  4. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. ► Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. ► miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. ► miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs.

  5. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Karina J. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia); Tsykin, Anna [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Giles, Keith M. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Sladic, Rosemary T. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Epis, Michael R. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Ganss, Ruth [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine Angiogenesis Unit, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Goodall, Gregory J. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Leedman, Peter J., E-mail: peter.leedman@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs.

  6. Dye Transport across the Retinal Basement Membrane of the Blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala

    OpenAIRE

    Weyrauther, E.; Roebroek, J.G.H.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    In the blowfly, Calliphora erythrocephala, transport of dye into or out of the retina, following injection into the eye or thorax, was investigated, mainly by microspectrophotometry and fluorimetry. After injection into the eye, Phenol Red, Trypan Blue, Lucifer Yellow and 9-amino-acridine were transported out of the retina; Procion Yellow and Rhodamine-123 stayed in it. The time constants of this transport process were in the range 45-80 min at 23°C, depending on the dye. When Lucifer Yellow ...

  7. Adipocyte-derived basement membrane extract with biological activity: applications in hepatocyte functional augmentation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nripen S.; Nagrath, Deepak; Martin L Yarmush

    2010-01-01

    Natural and synthetic biomaterials utilized in tissue engineering applications require a dynamic interplay of complex macromolecular compositions of hydrated extracellular matrices (ECMs) and soluble growth factors. The challenges in utilizing synthetic ECMs is the effective control of temporal and spatial complexity of multiple signal presentation, as compared to natural ECMs that possess the inherent properties of biological recognition, including presentation of receptor-binding ligands, s...

  8. Histopathological and ultrastructural analysis of vestibular endorgans in Meniere's disease reveals basement membrane pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCall Andrew A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the systematic analysis of the ultrastructural and cytological histopathology of vestibular endorgans acquired from labyrinthectomy in Meniere's disease. Methods 17 subjects with intractable Meniere's disease and ipsilateral non-serviceable hearing presenting to the Neurotology Clinic from 1997 to 2006 who chose ablative labyrinthectomy (average age = 62 years; range 29–83 years participated. The average duration of symptoms prior to surgery was 7 years (range 1–20 years. Results Nearly all vestibular endorgans demonstrated varying degrees of degeneration. A monolayer of epithelial cells occurred significantly more frequently in the horizontal cristae (12/13 = 92% (p Conclusion Systematic histopathological analysis of the vestibular endorgans from Meniere's disease demonstrated neuroepithelial degeneration which was highly correlated with an associated BM thickening. Other findings included hair cell and supporting cell microvessicles, increased intercellular clear spaces in the stroma, and endothelial cell vacuolization and stromal perivascular BM thickening.

  9. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beavan, L A; Davies, M; Couchman, J R;

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at...... methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of [35S]heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a...... metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-[(cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio]-1...

  10. Basement membrane components secreted by mouse yolk sac carcinoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damjanov, A; Wewer, U M; Tuma, B;

    1990-01-01

    Three new cell lines (NE, ME, LRD) were cloned from mouse-embryo-derived teratocarcinomas and characterized on the basis of developmental, ultrastructural, and cytochemical criteria as nullipotent embryonal carcinoma (EC), pure parietal yolk sac (PYS) carcinoma and mixed parieto-visceral yolk sac...

  11. Rat hair follicle dermal papillae have an extracellular matrix containing basement membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1986-01-01

    Dermal papillae are small mesenchymally derived zones at the bases of hair follicles which have an important role in hair morphogenesis in the embryo and control of the hair growth cycle in postnatal mammals. The cells of the papilla are enmeshed in a dense extracellular matrix which undergoes...

  12. Tectonic evolution of the Tombel graben basement, southwestern Cameroon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Njome; C.E.Suh

    2005-01-01

    Planar structures (foliations and fractures) around the Tombel graben (southwestern end of the Central African Shear zone system) have been investigated and analyzed with the aim of unraveling the tectonic evolution of the basement. The foliations show two major trends, an older N-S-trending gneissose layering of uncertain agereworked by a later Pan-African (600 + 50 Ma) NE-SW ductile trend that is contemporaneous with sinistral shearing and mylonitization. The brittle phase characterized by NW-SE-trending open and partially filled fractures is younger than the mylonitization event and although it has not been dated, it is suggested that the origin of these fractures is linked to the onset of volcanism along the Cameroon volcanic line-31 m.y. ago.The mylonitic foliation is recognized for the first time and supports a tectonic evolution model for the Tombel graben in which ductile non-coaxial deformation was succeeded by brittle failure.

  13. Basement structures and geophysical anomalies in eastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, G.R.; Suleiman, A.S.

    1986-03-01

    To understand basement structures in eastern New Mexico better, an integrated analysis of subsurface and geophysical data in the area was undertaken. A data base of 6600 gravity stations was used to generate complete Bouguer anomaly, polynomial, and residual maps. Aeromagnetic data for the New Mexico area were used to generate total intensity, residual, and low-pass filtered magnetic maps. The complete Bouguer gravity and total intensity magnetic maps show a large relief, which indicates substantial structures are present. A fifth-order polynomial surface map shows a regional gravity increase from the northwest to the southeast, and the residuals with respect to this surface provide a better definition of upper crustal structures, which are some-what obscured in the complete Bouguer gravity map. A low-pass filtered magnetic map, which was constructed from the third-order residual magnetic map, enhanced the major structures of interest in this study. These anomaly maps and the drilling results in the area were used to construct new maps of the depth to the Precambrian basement in the area. The authors obtained four major results concerning the features in this study area: (1) they believe the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen extends northwest as far as the Cimarron arch; (2) the north-south-trending, negative anomalies located along long. 105/sup 0/W in southern New Mexico possibly represent an extension of the Tucumcari basin or a new basin; (3) the exposed Precambrian rocks located west of the Raton and Las Vegas basins may be allochthonous because they overlie the negative anomalies associated with these basins; and (4) the central Basin platform is underlain by a large mafic mass, which has been recently penetrated by deep drilling in Pecos County, Texas.

  14. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-09-15

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport posttransplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM Abs. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b(-/-) mice susceptible to Ab-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine alpha3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 crosslinks, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked alpha3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys, a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by posttranslational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  15. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by post-translational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  16. Implicit mechanistic role of the collagen, smooth muscle, and elastic tissue components in strengthening the air and blood capillaries of the avian lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, John N; Jimoh, Sikiru A; Hosie, Margo

    2010-11-01

    To identify the forces that may exist in the parabronchus of the avian lung and that which may explain the reported strengths of the terminal respiratory units, the air capillaries and the blood capillaries, the arrangement of the parabronchial collagen fibers (CF) of the lung of the domestic fowl, Gallus gallus variant domesticus was investigated by discriminatory staining, selective alkali digestion, and vascular casting followed by alkali digestion. On the luminal circumference, the atrial and the infundibular CF are directly connected to the smooth muscle fibers and the elastic tissue fibers. The CF in this part of the parabronchus form the internal column (the axial scaffold), whereas the CF in the interparabronchial septa and those associated with the walls of the interparabronchial blood vessels form the external, i.e. the peripheral, parabronchial CF scaffold. Thin CF penetrate the exchange tissue directly from the interparabronchial septa and indirectly by accompanying the intraparabronchial blood vessels. Forming a dense network that supports the air and blood capillaries, the CF weave through the exchange tissue. The exchange tissue, specifically the air and blood capillaries, is effectively suspended between CF pillars by an intricate system of thin CF, elastic and smooth muscle fibers. The CF course through the basement membranes of the walls of the blood and air capillaries. Based on the architecture of the smooth muscle fibers, the CF, the elastic muscle fibers, and structures like the interparabronchial septa and their associated blood vessels, it is envisaged that dynamic tensional, resistive, and compressive forces exist in the parabronchus, forming a tensegrity (tension integrity) system that gives the lung rigidity while strengthening the air and blood capillaries. PMID:20819116

  17. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  18. Zosteriform collagen nevus in a young boy

    OpenAIRE

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Kamali, Gulcin Harman; Gungor, Sule; Goncu, Ozgur Emek Kocaturk

    2014-01-01

    Zosterifom connective tissue nevus is a rare kind of connective tissue nevi composed of collagen, elastin, or glycosaminoglycan, which was first reported by Steiner 1944. Herein, we report a young boy with a collagen nevus that presented in a zosteriform distribution.

  19. Recombinant gelatin and collagen from methylotrophic yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de E.C.

    2002-01-01

    Based on its structural role and compatibility within the human body, collagen is a commonly used biomaterial in medical applications, such as cosmetic surgery, wound treatment and tissue engineering. Gelatin is in essence denatured and partly degraded collagen and is, as a result of

  20. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations

  1. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: diwu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  2. Basement domain map of the conterminous U.S.A. and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The basement-domain map is a compilation of basement domains in the conterminous United States and Alaska designed to be used at 1:5,000,000-scale, particularly as...

  3. Basement Surface Faulting and Topography for Savannah River Site and Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1998-12-17

    This report integrates the data from more than 60 basement borings and over 100 miles of seismic reflection profiling acquired on the Savannah River Site to map the topography of the basement (unweathered rock) surface and faulting recorded on this surface.

  4. Basement Surface Faulting and Topography for Savannah River Site and Vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report integrates the data from more than 60 basement borings and over 100 miles of seismic reflection profiling acquired on the Savannah River Site to map the topography of the basement (unweathered rock) surface and faulting recorded on this surface

  5. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  6. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  7. Radionuclide distribution in TMI-2 reactor building basement liquids and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of radioactive water and some core debris solids were released to the reactor building basement during the March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). A reactor building basement sampling and analysis program is underway to support fission product mass balance and source term studies, TMI-2 accident analysis, and decontamination planning. Liquid and solid samples were collected from a variety of locations to determine the composition, quantity, and distribution of the debris and fission products released to the basement environment. Basement water sources, sample history, and sampling techniques are discussed. Fuel, radionuclide content and elemental composition of liquid and solid samples are presented. Conclusions are presented on the partitioning of fission products within liquids and solids and on the transport paths within the basement area

  8. A sonic well log of the basement complex of the Walvis Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Philip D.; Borella, Peter E.

    1984-03-01

    A sonic well log was obtained within the basement complex of the Walvis Ridge during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 74. The top of the basement complex is characterized by smooth acoustic reflectors. The rocks recovered within the basement complex consist of basalts with intercalated sediments. According to the log ˜-50% of the upper 75 m of basement are igneous rocks and the other 50% sedimentary. Sonobuoy results indicate that the ratio of sediments to basalt increases with depth for an additional 225 m until a typical oceanic velocity structure is observed. Paleontological results suggest that the processes forming this upper 300 m of the basement complex was accomplished within a short time interval.

  9. Production, Characterization and Biocompatibility of Marine Collagen Matrices from an Alternative and Sustainable Source: The Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Di Benedetto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen has become a key-molecule in cell culture studies and in the tissue engineering field. Industrially, the principal sources of collagen are calf skin and bones which, however, could be associated to risks of serious disease transmission. In fact, collagen derived from alternative and riskless sources is required, and marine organisms are among the safest and recently exploited ones. Sea urchins possess a circular area of soft tissue surrounding the mouth, the peristomial membrane (PM, mainly composed by mammalian-like collagen. The PM of the edible sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus therefore represents a potential unexploited collagen source, easily obtainable as a food industry waste product. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to extract native collagen fibrils from the PM and produce suitable substrates for in vitro system. The obtained matrices appear as a homogeneous fibrillar network (mean fibril diameter 30–400 nm and mesh < 2 μm and display remarkable mechanical properties in term of stiffness (146 ± 48 MPa and viscosity (60.98 ± 52.07 GPa·s. In vitro tests with horse pbMSC show a good biocompatibility in terms of overall cell growth. The obtained results indicate that the sea urchin P. lividus can be a valuable low-cost collagen source for mechanically resistant biomedical devices.

  10. Production, characterization and biocompatibility of marine collagen matrices from an alternative and sustainable source: the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Cristiano Di; Barbaglio, Alice; Martinello, Tiziana; Alongi, Valentina; Fassini, Dario; Cullorà, Emanuele; Patruno, Marco; Bonasoro, Francesco; Barbosa, Mario Adolfo; Carnevali, Maria Daniela Candia; Sugni, Michela

    2014-09-01

    Collagen has become a key-molecule in cell culture studies and in the tissue engineering field. Industrially, the principal sources of collagen are calf skin and bones which, however, could be associated to risks of serious disease transmission. In fact, collagen derived from alternative and riskless sources is required, and marine organisms are among the safest and recently exploited ones. Sea urchins possess a circular area of soft tissue surrounding the mouth, the peristomial membrane (PM), mainly composed by mammalian-like collagen. The PM of the edible sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus therefore represents a potential unexploited collagen source, easily obtainable as a food industry waste product. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to extract native collagen fibrils from the PM and produce suitable substrates for in vitro system. The obtained matrices appear as a homogeneous fibrillar network (mean fibril diameter 30-400 nm and mesh urchin P. lividus can be a valuable low-cost collagen source for mechanically resistant biomedical devices. PMID:25255130

  11. Influence of modified polyester on the material properties of collagen-based biocomposites and in vitro evaluation of cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chin-San, E-mail: t50008@cc.kyu.edu.tw

    2015-03-01

    The cytocompatibility of composite materials collagen (Col)/poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and collagen/maleic anhydride-grafted PHA (PHA-g-MA) was investigated in this study. Col was homogeneously dispersed in the PHA-g-MA matrix as a result of condensation reactions. Mechanical characterisation indicated that the improved adhesion between Col and PHA-g-MA enhanced the tensile strength of the composite compared with that of PHA/Col. PHA-g-MA/Col composites were also more water-resistant than PHA/Col composites. Collagen and cell proliferation analysis indicated that PHA and PHA-g-MA and their composites were biocompatible with respect to FB proliferation. Cell-cycle and apoptosis assays by FBs on the PHA series composite samples were not affected by DNA content related to damage, i.e. rapid apoptosis/necrosis was not observed, demonstrating the potential of PHA/Col or PHA-g-MA/Col membranes for biomedical material applications. - Highlights: • Composites were prepared using polyester and collagen to explore their cytocompatibility. • The mechanical properties of the composite were significantly enhanced by the use of grafted polyester and collagen. • The polyester and collagen composites facilitated excellent cell viability and collagen production. • The cell cycle was not affected by DNA content related to damage, and it did not lead to rapid apoptosis or necrosis of the cells by the composite.

  12. Influence of modified polyester on the material properties of collagen-based biocomposites and in vitro evaluation of cytocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytocompatibility of composite materials collagen (Col)/poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and collagen/maleic anhydride-grafted PHA (PHA-g-MA) was investigated in this study. Col was homogeneously dispersed in the PHA-g-MA matrix as a result of condensation reactions. Mechanical characterisation indicated that the improved adhesion between Col and PHA-g-MA enhanced the tensile strength of the composite compared with that of PHA/Col. PHA-g-MA/Col composites were also more water-resistant than PHA/Col composites. Collagen and cell proliferation analysis indicated that PHA and PHA-g-MA and their composites were biocompatible with respect to FB proliferation. Cell-cycle and apoptosis assays by FBs on the PHA series composite samples were not affected by DNA content related to damage, i.e. rapid apoptosis/necrosis was not observed, demonstrating the potential of PHA/Col or PHA-g-MA/Col membranes for biomedical material applications. - Highlights: • Composites were prepared using polyester and collagen to explore their cytocompatibility. • The mechanical properties of the composite were significantly enhanced by the use of grafted polyester and collagen. • The polyester and collagen composites facilitated excellent cell viability and collagen production. • The cell cycle was not affected by DNA content related to damage, and it did not lead to rapid apoptosis or necrosis of the cells by the composite

  13. Changes in collagenous tissue microstructures and distributions of cathepsin L in body wall of autolytic sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Yan-Fei; Li, Dong-Mei; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Tan, Ming-Qian; Du, Ming; Zhu, Bei-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The autolysis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) was induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and the changes of microstructures of collagenous tissues and distributions of cathepsin L were investigated using histological and histochemical techniques. Intact collagen fibers in fresh S. japonicus dermis were disaggregated into collagen fibrils after UV stimuli. Cathepsin L was identified inside the surface of vacuoles in the fresh S. japonicus dermis cells. After the UV stimuli, the membranes of vacuoles and cells were fused together, and cathepsin L was released from cells and diffused into tissues. The density of cathepsin L was positively correlated with the speed and degree of autolysis in different layers of body wall. Our results revealed that lysosomal cathepsin L was released from cells in response to UV stimuli, which contacts and degrades the extracellular substrates such as collagen fibers, and thus participates in the autolysis of S. japonicus. PMID:27374541

  14. Simulating Oil Production from Fractured/Faulted Basement Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Forster, C.; Fu, Y.; Huang, C.; Yang, Y.; Deo, M.

    2006-12-01

    A fully-implicit, three-dimensional (3D), three-phase, discrete fault/fracture, black oil simulator provides new insight and understanding of oil production from reservoirs in fractured, low-permeability basement rocks. Results obtained with a controlled volume finite element (CVFE) method compare favorably to those obtained using both single- and dual-porosity finite difference methods (e.g., ECLIPSE). A regularized network of 30 orthogonal faults within a 1000 by 1000 by 200 feet model domain is used to compare the simulator results and to explore the implications of grid sensitivity. In this simple reservoir, cumulative oil recoveries over 900 days of production are similar for CVFE, single-porosity and dual-porosity approaches. CVFE is used to simulate a complex network of intersecting faults that mimic a more realistic basement reservoir with the same fault surface area and fault volume as the regularized network. Cumulative oil production at 900 days is about 3% lower than for the regularized network. The CVFE method provides a much improved ability to represent complex fracture/fault geometries and spatial variations in the internal properties of faults. CVFE simulations of the realistic network illustrate the possible consequences of uncertainty in knowing fracture/fault properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, thickness, dip orientation, connectivity and flow transmissibility). For example, introducing spatial variability in permeability within the fault planes (using spatially randomized patterns of 10, 100 and 1000 md), while retaining a constant geometric mean permeability of 100 md, yields enhanced oil production due to the high-permeability pathways. A 50:50 mix of 10 and 1000 md elements yields 36%OOIP while a 33:33:33 mix of 10, 100 and 1000 md yields 24%OOIP. These results are 26% and 14% greater, respectively, than that obtained for the uniform 100 md case (11%OOIP). This inherent variability, combined with uncertainty in knowing the detailed

  15. Collagen-platelet interactions: recognition and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, Richard W; Siljander, Pia R; Onley, David J; Sundaresan, Pavithra; Knight, C Graham; Barnes, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The collagen-platelet interaction is central to haemostasis and may be a critical determinant of arterial thrombosis, where subendothelium is exposed after rupture of atherosclerotic plaque. Recent research has capitalized on the cloning of an important signalling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, which is expressed only on platelets, and on the use of collagen-mimetic peptides as specific tools for both glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1. We have identified sequences, GPO and GFOGER (where O denotes hydroxyproline), within collagen that are recognized by the collagen receptors glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 respectively, allowing their signalling properties and specific functional roles to be examined. Triple-helical peptides containing these sequences were used to show the signalling potential of integrin alpha 2 beta 1, and to confirm its important contribution to platelet adhesion. Glycoprotein VI appears to operate functionally on the platelet surface as a dimer, which recognizes GPO motifs that are separated by four triplets of collagen sequence. These advances will allow the relationship between the structure of collagen and its haemostatic activity to be established. PMID:14587284

  16. Characterization of Genipin-Modified Dentin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Nagaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biomodification techniques to dentin can improve its biochemical and biomechanical properties. Several collagen cross-linking agents have been reported to strengthen the mechanical properties of dentin. However, the characteristics of collagen that has undergone agent-induced biomodification are not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a natural cross-linking agent, genipin (GE, on dentin discoloration, collagen stability, and changes in amino acid composition and lysyl oxidase mediated natural collagen cross-links. Dentin collagen obtained from extracted bovine teeth was treated with three different concentrations of GE (0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.5% for several treatment times (0–24 h. Changes in biochemical properties of NaB3H4-reduced collagen were characterized by amino acid and cross-link analyses. The treatment of dentin collagen with GE resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent pigmentation and stability against bacterial collagenase. The lysyl oxidase-mediated trivalent mature cross-link, pyridinoline, showed no difference among all groups while the major divalent immature cross-link, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine/its ketoamine in collagen treated with 0.5% GE for 24 h, significantly decreased compared to control (P< 0.05. The newly formed GE-induced cross-links most likely involve lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these cross-links appear to be reducible and stabilized with NaB3H4.

  17. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications for...

  18. Movement of fossil pore fluids in granite basement, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compositions of pore fluids in granite cores from the Precambrian basement in northern Illinois were determined. The estimated chloride concentration in the aqueous phase increases from near zero at the upper contact with sandstone to 2.7 M at 624 m below the contact. Traces of aliphatic oil are present in the overlying sandstone and the upper 516 m of granite, and oil occupies most of the pore space in one sample of unaltered granite 176 m below the contact. The oil has a Δ13C of -25%, about the same as average petroleum. The high concentrations of salt more than 500 m below the contact imply that little or no fresh water has reached these levels of the granite by flow. Lower concentrations near the contact are consistent with replacement of brine in the sandstone by fresh water at least 11 m.y. ago and subsequent upward diffusion of salt from the granite. Geologic data suggest that the time of replacement was about 130 Ma. The purpose of the investigation is to study the record of movement of intergranular fluids within a granite pluton. The composition and movement of ground waters can determine the extent that hazardous or radioactive wastes disposed in igneous rock will remain isolated

  19. Geophysical siting of boreholes in crystalline basement areas of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayinka, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness of surface geophysical methods namely electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, seismic refraction, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization for groundwater exploration in crystalline basement complex areas. Most of these geophysical techniques can provide quantitative information on the characteristics of the weathered zone which relate to the occurrence of an economic aquifer. The critical factors in the choice of a particular method include the local geological setting, the initial and maintenance costs of the equipment, the speed of surveying, the manpower required as field crew, the degree of sophistication entailed in data processing to enable a geologically meaningful interpretation, and anomaly resolution. The particular advantages and limitations of each technique are highlighted. Several case histories from Nigeria and the rest of Africa indicate that electrical resistivity (both vertical sounding and horizontal profiling) is the most widely used, followed by electromagnetic traversing. These are often employed in combination to improve upon the percentage of successful boreholes. Due to the high cost of equipment, large scale of the field operations and difficulties in data interpretation, seismic refraction is not widely adopted in commercial-type surveys. Similarly, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization are used only sparingly.

  20. Uranium distribution in the Variscan Basement of Northeastern Sardinia

    CERN Document Server

    Kaçeli, Xhixha M; Baldoncini, M; Bezzon, G P; Buso, G P; Callegari, I; Casini, L; Cuccuru, S; Fiorentini, G; Guastaldi, E; Mantovani, F; Mou, L; Oggiano, G; Puccini, A; Alvarez, C Rossi; Strati, V; Xhixha, G; Zanon, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed map of the uranium distribution and its uncertainties in the Variscan Basement of Northeastern Sardinia (VBNS) at a scale 1:100,000. An area of 2100 km2 was investigated by means of 535 data points obtained from laboratory and in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. These data volume corresponds to the highest sampling density of the European Variscides, aimed at studying the genetic processes of the upper crust potentially triggered by an enrichment of radiogenic heat-producing elements. For the first time the Kriging with Variance of Measurement Error method was used to assign weights to the input data which are based on the degree of confidence associated to the measurements obtained with different gamma-ray spectrometry techniques. A detailed tuning of the model parameters for the adopted Experimental Semi-Variogram led to identify a maximum distance of spatial variability coherent to the observed tendency of the experimental data. We demonstrate that the obtained uranium distri...

  1. Tracers in high temperature and fractured basement rock reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background on FBR. Fractured Basement Reservoir is uncommon oil reservoir where hydrocarbone storage and conductivity are provided by fracture system which is fault oriented. The fractures can be classified by macrofracture developing close to the fault with high porosity and being filled with clay or minerals, microfracture of much smaller porosity developing in the solid rock. The average porosity of fractured reservoir is rather small, about 2-3% while the permeability distributed in relative wide range. Fracture system divides reservoir into compartments and creates high heterogeneity of permeability and porosity distribution. Flow in FBR is unpredictable. Water is injected in the deeper part of reservoir to maintain the reservoir pressure and replace the oil toward production zone at the upper part. Combining all available geology data and seismic data the reservoir model and flow model are not completed. Considering all these uncertainties, it is indispensable to develop a new concept to work on oil production in FBR and other applied techniques including tracer need to comply with.

  2. CARS and SHG microscopy to follow the collagen production in living human corneal fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin gel 3D cultures

    CERN Document Server

    Mortati, Leonardo; Sassi, Maria Paola

    2011-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is combined with second harmonic generation (SHG) technique in order to follow the early stage of stem cell differentiation within a 3D scaffold. CARS microscopy can detect lipid membranes and droplet compartments in living cells and SHG microscopy enables a strong imaging contrast for molecules with a non-centrosymmetric ordered structure like collagen. One of the first evidence of hMSCs differentiation is the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) where the collagen protein is its main component. This work demonstrated the multimodal CARS and SHG microscopy as a powerful non-invasive label free technique to investigate the collagen production dynamic in living cell 3D cultures. Its ability to image the cell morphology and the produced collagen distribution on a long term (4 weeks) experiment allowed to obtain important information about the cell-scaffold interaction and the ECM production. The very low limit reached in detecting collagen has permit...

  3. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Borumand, Sara Sibilla Minerva Research Labs Ltd., London, UK Abstract: With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. Keywords: hydrolyzed collagen, antiaging, wrinkles, firmness, skin

  4. Asporin competes with decorin for collagen binding, binds calcium and promotes osteoblast collagen mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Lindblom, Karin;

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of the ECM (extracellular matrix) protein asporin with ECM components have previously not been investigated. Here, we show that asporin binds collagen type I. This binding is inhibited by recombinant asporin fragment LRR (leucine-rich repeat) 10-12 and by full-length decorin, but...... not by biglycan. We demonstrate that the polyaspartate domain binds calcium and regulates hydroxyapatite formation in vitro. In the presence of asporin, the number of collagen nodules, and mRNA of osteoblastic markers Osterix and Runx2, were increased. Moreover, decorin or the collagen-binding asporin...... fragment LRR 10-12 inhibited the pro-osteoblastic activity of full-length asporin. Our results suggest that asporin and decorin compete for binding to collagen and that the polyaspartate in asporin directly regulates collagen mineralization. Therefore asporin has a role in osteoblast-driven collagen...

  5. A New Kind of Biomaterials-Bullfrog Skin Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He LI; Bai Ling LIU; Hua Lin CHEN; Li Zhen GAO

    2003-01-01

    Pepsin-soluble collagen was prepared from bullfrog skin and partially characterized. This study revealed interesting differences, such as molecular weight, amino acid composition, denaturation temperature (Td), in the frog skin collagen when compared to the known vertebrate collagens. This study gives hints that bullfrog skin can be a potential, safe alternative source of collagen from cattle for use in various fields.

  6. Antibody Response Against Perlecan and Collagen Types IV and VI in Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Joosten, Simone A.; van Dixhoorn, Mieneke G. A.; Borrias, Maria C.; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; van Veelen, Peter A.; van Kooten, Cees; Paul, Leendert C.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the leading cause of late renal transplant failure. Various structural lesions are observed in grafts undergoing chronic rejection including glomerular basement membrane (GBM) duplications. The well-established Fisher (F344) to Lewis (LEW) rat renal transplant model for chronic rejection was used to assess the presence and role of the humoral immune response against graft antigens during chronic rejection. LEW recipients of F344 allografts develop transplant glomerulopath...

  7. Effects of solar radiation on collagen-based biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Sionkowska; Marcin Wisniewski; Joanna Skopinska; Diego Mantovani

    2006-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on collagen and collagen/synthetic polymer blends in the form of thin films and solutions has been studied by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopies. Films and solutions of collagen blended with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) were irradiated by solar light. It was found that UV-VIS spectra, which characterize collagen, collagen/PVA, and collagen/PVP blended films, were significantly altered by solar radiation. FTIR spectra of collagen, collag...

  8. Targeting collagen expression in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyle J Thompson; Iain H McKillop; Laura W Schrum

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver disease and liver-related deaths globally, particularly in developed nations. Liver fibrosis is a consequence of ALD and other chronic liver insults, which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma if left untreated. Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of excess extracellular matrix components, including type Ⅰ collagen, which disrupts liver microcirculation and leads to injury. To date, there is no therapy for the treatment of liver fibrosis; thus treatments that either prevent the accumulation of type Ⅰ collagen or hasten its degradation are desirable. The focus of this review is to examine the regulation of type Ⅰ collagen in fibrogenic cells of the liver and to discuss current advances in therapeutics to eliminate excessive collagen deposition.

  9. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.;

    2006-01-01

    disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional to the...... content of the 4,6-disulfated disaccharide in the different cartilage extracts, with growth plate cartilage glycosaminoglycan being the most efficient enhancer. These findings demonstrate a role for perlecan chondroitin sulfate side chains in cartilage extracellular matrix assembly and provide an...... collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  10. Effect of Bio-Oss ® Collagen and Collagen matrix on bone formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, R.W.K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to compare the amount of new bone produced by Bio-Oss ® Collagen to that produced by collagen matrix in vivo. Method: eighteen bone defects, 5mm by 10mm were created in the parietal bone of 9 New Zealand White rabbits. 6 defects were grafted with Bio-Oss ® Collagen. 6 defects were grafted with collagen matrix alone (positive control) and 6 were left empty (negative control). Animals were killed on day 14 and the defects were dissected and prepared for histological assessment. Quant...

  11. Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Shin, Tae Joo

    2009-11-01

    Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber and its distribution in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major, were investigated. By virtue of Zernike phase-contrast hard X-ray microscopy, it has been firstly observed that collagen fiber consists of helical substructures of collagen fibrils wrapped with incrustation. As it close to the scalar focus (that is, with aging), loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies started to be observed with loosing wrapping incrustation, indicative of the distortion of the basic helical assembly. Various distributions and packing arrangements of collagen fibers were observed dependent on subdivisions of fish scale. Freshly growing edge region of fish scale, embedded into fish skin, showed rarely patched and one directionally arranged collagen fibers, in which specifically triple helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were found. On the contrary, relatively aged region of the rostral field close to the scalar focus displayed randomly directed and densely packed collagen fibers, in which loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were mostly found. Our results have demonstrated that hard X-ray microscope can be a powerful tool to study in situ internal structure of biological specimens in an atmospheric pressure. PMID:19666125

  12. Studies on fish scale collagen of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideki; Tone, Yurie; Shimizu, Kouske; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Hara, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We purified and characterized Type I collagen from the scales of the Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and compared it with collagen from other organisms. Subunit composition of C. saira collagen (2α1+α2) was similar to that of red sea bream (Pagrus major) and porcine collagen. C. saira collagen did not form a firm gel after neutralization of pH in solution. The temperature of denaturation (24-25 °C) of C. saira collagen was slightly lower than that of P. major collagen (26-27 °C). The contents of proline and hydroxyproline were lower in red sea bream and Pacific saury collagen than in porcine collagen. Circular dichroism spectra and Fourier-transformed infrared spectra showed that heat denaturation caused unfolding of the triple helices in all three collagens. PMID:25428059

  13. Cardiac tumours simulating collagen vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Lanham, J. G.; Doyle, D V

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac tumours can mimic collagen vascular disease and they are often accompanied by profound systemic upset. Both benign and malignant tumours may present in this way. Three cases of cardiac tumour, two malignant and one benign, are reported with just such a presentation. A review of fifteen similar case reports showed that a spectrum of different collagen vascular diseases was diagnosed and treated before the true diagnosis emerged. In half of these cases the cardiac tumour was only diagno...

  14. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Tiago H.; Joana Moreira-Silva; Marques, Ana L. P.; Alberta Domingues; Yves Bayon; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most ...

  15. Why collagens best survived in fossils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shuang-Yin; Cappellini, Enrico; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Explaining why type I collagens are preferentially preserved in the geological time scale remains a challenge. Several pieces of evidence indicate that its rich content in the bone and its unique, stable structure played key roles in its preservation. By considering the distinct thermal stability...... of amino acids, we reveal that the elevated abundance of thermostable amino acid residues in type I collagens also contribute to its survival....

  16. Collagen quantification across human skeletal muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Evie Ya Hui

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular connective tissue provides structural stability and facilitates force transmission in skeletal muscle. Additionally, it contains extracellular matrix that is crucial for muscle development and regeneration¹. Alterations of collagen content within intramuscular connective tissue have been associated with aging or diseased muscle ²,³. Data of baseline collagen content among different muscles, to provide deeper understanding of normal muscular functions, does not exist. Hence the a...

  17. DSC Study of Collagen in Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    S. Skrzyński; Sionkowska, A.; A. Marciniak

    2010-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to estimate the effect of disc disease on the collagen helix-coil transition and morphology for tissue extracted from patients during surgical operation. Forty discs were obtained from patients with degenerative disc disease undergoing surgery for low back pain. The patients were in the age between 20 and 70 years old. The specimens were kept wet during DSC experiment. The data allow the comparison between thermal stability of collagen ti...

  18. Biological Safety of Fish (Tilapia) Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Igawa, Kazunari; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yoshizawa, Yuu; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing...

  19. Biological Safety of Fish (Tilapia) Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 耕平

    2015-01-01

    Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing...

  20. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  1. Collagen coated tantalum substrate for cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinli; Zhang, Shuai; Guo, Lijun; Dong, Mingdong; Liu, Bo; Mamdouh, Wael

    2012-06-15

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in cell culture in various physiological and pathological processes in the field of tissue engineering. Recently, the type I collagen ECM has been widely utilized in vitro model systems for the attachment of many different cell lines since it has multi-functions in human tissues. For example it accounts for 6% of the weight of strong, tendinous muscles. In this paper, we reported a new material by coating tantalum (Ta), one highly biocompatible metal, with type I collagen fibrils. The morphology of the new material was studied by high resolution atomic force microscope. It was shown that the adhesion force between type I collagen fibrils network and Ta was strong enough to overcome surface defects. A possible way to explain the phenomenon is that the longitudinal periodicity of collagen fibrils matches the grain size of the Ta domains, which results in increase of the physical adsorption contact area, thereby inducing the dramatic adhesion enhancement between collagen fibrils and Ta. The obtained material was then employed as a template for cell proliferation. Although the surface of this template is more hydrophobic by comparison with the bare Ta surface, the cells on this material were successfully incubated, indicating that the collagen coated Ta might be used as the buffer layer for proliferating cells in hydrophobic biomaterials. PMID:22494669

  2. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago H. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation.

  3. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Collagen in Tissue Engineered Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Shannon L. M.; Vaughn, Megann E.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2007-01-01

    Collagen is the structural molecule that is most correlated with strength in blood vessels. In this study, we compared the properties of collagen in engineered and native blood vessels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image sections of engineered and native arteries. Band periodicities of engineered and native collagen fibrils indicated that spacing between collagen molecules was similar in engineered and native tissues. Engineered arteries, however, had thinner collagen fi...

  4. Collagen scaffold remodeling by human mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, SJ; Chan, BP

    2011-01-01

    Type I collagen has been widely used as scaffold for tissue engineering because of its excellent biocompatibility and negligible immunogenicity. We previously have developed a collagen microencapsulation technology entrapping many cells including human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in microspheres made of nanofibrous collagen meshwork. Nevertheless, little is understood about how stem cells interact with and remodel the collagen meshwork. This study aims to investigate collagen remodeling by...

  5. Exploring the Structural Requirements of Collagen-Binding Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-Elgaliel, Wael R; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Collagen synthesis and tissue remodeling are involved in many diseases; therefore collagen specific binding agents have been developed to study collagen changes in various tissues. Based on a recently reported collagen binding peptide, which contains unnatural Biphenylalanine (Bip) amino acid residue, constructs with various structure variations were synthesized to explore the contributions of unnatural Bip residue, conformational restrain, and amino acid sequence in collagen recognition. The...

  6. Autoimmunity to citrullinated type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Mamoru; TSUJI, Michiko; Kurosaka, Daitaro; Kurosaka, Daisaburo; Yasuda, Jun; Ito, Yoshitaka; Nishizawa, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akio

    2006-01-01

    The production of autoantibodies to citrullinated type II collagen and the citrullination of type II collagen were analyzed in rheumatoid arthritis. Autoantibodies to citrullinated type II collagen were detected in 78.5% of serum samples from 130 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Autoantibodies to native noncitrullinated type II collagen were detected in 14.6% of serum samples, all of which were positive for anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies. Serum samples were also positive for ant...

  7. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by i...

  8. Effects of soybean peptide and collagen peptide on collagen synthesis in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Kage, Madoka; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2012-09-01

    The collagen present in the dermis of the skin is a fibrous protein that fills the gaps between cells and helps maintain tissue flexibility. Effectively increasing the collagen present in the skin is an important goal for cosmetic research. Recent research has shown that soybean peptide (SP) has anti-fatigue activity, antioxidant activity, and the ability to increase type I collagen, while collagen peptide (CP) has the ability to enhance corneal moisture content and viscoelasticity, as well as to increase levels of hyaluronic acid synthesizing enzymes in human skin. Little documented research, however, has been conducted on collagen formation in relation to these peptides. Therefore, this research applied SP and CP with molecular weights primarily around 500 and preparations containing both SP and CP to normal human dermal fibroblasts together with magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (VC-PMg), and used real-time PCR to determine the gene expression of type I collagen (COL1A1), which contributes to collagen synthesis, and Smad7, which contribute to collagen breakdown. In addition, enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure collagen content in the media. COL1A1 gene expression at 24 h after sample addition showed higher tendency in all samples and increased with time at 4, 8 and 24 h after addition. Smad7 gene expression was not substantially different at 4 h after addition. matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene expression was higher following SP addition, but was lower after the addition of CP and SP+CP. Medium collagen content was higher in all samples and increased with time at 8 h after addition. Collagen levels were higher when SP and CP were added together. PMID:22264122

  9. Basement configuration of Visakhapatnam - Paradip continental margin from inversion of magnetic anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, M.M.M.; Rao, S.J.; Venkateswarlu, K.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Murthy, I.V.R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.

    Inversion of magnetic data was carried out on 40 profiles collected across the continental margin of Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India at a spacing of about 10 km and magnetic basement map for this region is prepared. The map reveals complex...

  10. Numerical investigation of thermal response of basement wall systems with low emissivity material and furred airspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Hamed H.; Maref, Wahid; Swinton, Michael C. [Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada (Canada)], email: hamed.saber@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2011-07-01

    In Canada, most basements are used as a living space rather than a utility area and they are presumed to be inside the envelope. Basements account for significant heat loss and it is therefore crucial to improve their thermal resistance. The aim of this paper is to present a new method for increasing a basement's insulation by using foil in a furred-assembly with airspace next to the foil. The steady-state and transient thermal performance of this system was modeled using hygIRC-C and compared to a wall without furred airspace assembly. Results showed that the thermal performance of the system depends on the soil, outdoor and indoor temperatures, and that it can provide 17.7% energy savings compared to a wall without furred airspace assembly. This study highlighted that using foil in a furred-assembly with airspace next to the foil in basements can help reduce energy consumption.

  11. Characteristics of the crystalline basement beneath the Ordos Basin:Constraint from aeromagnetic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhentao Wang; Hongrui Zhou; Xunlian Wang; Xiuchun Jing

    2015-01-01

    Aeromagnetic anomaly zonation of the Ordos Basin and adjacent areas was obtained by processing high-precision and large-scale aeromagnetic anomalies with an approach of reduction to the pole upward continuation. Comparative study on aeromagnetic and seismic tomography suggests that aeromagnetic anomalies in this area are influenced by both the magnetic property of the rock and the burial depth of the Precambrian crystalline basement. Basement depth might be the fundamental control factor for aeromagnetic anomalies because the positive and negative anomalies on the reduction to the pole-upward-continuation anomaly maps roughly coincide with the uplifts and depressions of the crystal-line basement in the basin. The results, together with the latest understanding of basement faults, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of metamorphic rock and granite, drilling data, detrital zircon ages, and gravity data interpretation, suggest that the Ordos block is not an entirety of Archean.

  12. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, J. M.; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by ...

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels Reflects Transition From Series to Parallel Interactions With Increasing Collagen Content

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Victor K.; Lake, Spencer P.; Frey, Christina R.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin and collagen, biopolymers occurring naturally in the body, are commonly-used biomaterials as scaffolds for tissue engineering. How collagen and fibrin interact to confer macroscopic mechanical properties in collagen-fibrin composite systems remains poorly understood. In this study, we formulated collagen-fibrin co-gels at different collagen-to-fibrin ratios to observe changes in overall mechanical behavior and microstructure. A modeling framework of a two-network system was developed b...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells and collagen patches for anteriorcruciate ligament repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Gantenbein; Neha Gadhari; Samantha CW Chan; Sandro Kohl; Sufian S Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate collagen patches seeded withmesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and/or tenocytes (TCs)with regards to their suitability for anterior cruciateligament (ACL) repair.METHODS: Dynamic intraligamentary stabilizationutilizes a dynamic screw system to keep ACL remnantsin place and promote biological healing, supplementedby collagen patches. How these scaffolds interact withcells and what type of benefit they provide has not yetbeen investigated in detail. Primary ACL-derived TCsand human bone marrow derived MSCs were seededonto two different types of 3D collagen scaffolds,Chondro-Gide? (CG) and Novocart? (NC). Cells wereseeded onto the scaffolds and cultured for 7 d eitheras a pure populations or as "premix" containing a 1:1ratio of TCs to MSCs. Additionally, as controls, cells wereseeded in monolayers and in co-cultures on both sidesof porous high-density membrane inserts (0.4 μm). Weanalyzed the patches by real time polymerase chainreaction, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA and hydroxyproline(HYP) content. To determine cell spreadingand adherence in the scaffolds microscopic imagingtechniques, i.e. , confocal laser scanning microscopy(cLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wereapplied.RESULTS: CLSM and SEM imaging analysis confirmedcell adherence onto scaffolds. The metabolic cellactivity revealed that patches promote adherenceand proliferation of cells. The most dramatic increasein absolute metabolic cell activity was measuredfor CG samples seeded with tenocytes or a 1:1 cellpremix. Analysis of DNA content and cLSM imagingalso indicated MSCs were not proliferating as nicely astenocytes on CG. The HYP to GAG ratio significantlychanged for the premix group, resulting from a slightlylower GAG content, demonstrating that the cells aremodifying the underlying matrix. Real-time quantitative Gantenbein B et al . Mesenchymal stem cells for ACL repair polymerase chain reaction data indicated that MSCs

  15. Contribution To The Geology Of Basement Rocks In The South Western Desert Of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three major Precambrian basement inliers are exposed in the South Western Desert of Egypt between Long. 29 degree E and the River Nile within the Uweinat-Bir Safsaf-Aswan E-W uplift system. These are Bir Safsaf, Gabal EI-Asr and Gabal Umm Shaghir areas. Smaller outcrops include Gabal EI-Gara El-Hamra and Gabal El-Gara EI-Soda, Gabal Siri, GabaI EI-Fantas and Aswan-Kalabsha area as well as the scattered outcrops around Darb El-Arbain road. Band ratios 5/7, 5/1, 4 of Landsat TM images were applied to delineate the borders, the lithologic units and structural features of low relief basement outcrops within the surrounding flat lying sedimentary rocks and sand plains. These basement rocks comprise ortho gneisses (assumed by many authors as related to old continent pre Pan-African rocks), G 1 tonalite-granodiorite, and G2 monzogranite-alkali feldspar granite intruded by variable dykes. The boundaries between the basement exposures and the sedimentary rocks are marked by nonconformity surfaces or sets of faults. Both basement and sedimentary rocks are intruded by Mesozoic syenite-G3 granites, rhyolite, trachytic plugs and Upper Cretaceous to Tertiary basalts. The basement exposures are structurally controlled by major E- W fault systems. Their vertical uplifting is overprinted by folding the overlying sedimentary rocks. This study revealed that, the different basement exposures in the SE of the Western Desert of Egypt are similar in appearance and field relations to the Pan-African basement rocks extending towards the east of the River Nile and exposed everywhere in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

  16. Petrography Of The Basement Complex Of Maddhapara Mining (Production Level) Dinajpur District, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Saidul; Quamruzzaman, Chowdhury; Monir, Md. Minhaj Uddin; Jahan, Sakura; Begum, Momtaj

    2014-01-01

    This research work deals with the petrography of the Palaeoproterozoic Basement Complex (production level) Maddhapara Granite mining project area, Dinajpur district, Bangladesh. Tectonically the study area is a continuation of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ), where the Basement Complex is overlain by the Tertiary thin to moderate sediment sequence. The present study has been performed on the basis of collected samples which are taken from the production level at the elevation of about...

  17. The geology and geochemistry of the Lumwana Basement hosted copper-cobalt (uranium) deposits, NW Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Bernau, Robin

    2007-01-01

    The Lumwana Cu±Co deposits Malundwe and Chimiwungo are examples of pre-Katangan mineralized basement that are located in the Domes Region of the Lufilian Arc, an arcuate North neo-Proterozoic fold belt, which hosts the Zambian and Congolese deposits that make up the Central African Copperbelt. The Lumwana deposits are situated within the Mwombezhi Dome; a Mesoproterozoic basement inlier consisting of highly sheared amphibolite grade schist to gneiss units that host the Cu±Co mineralization. K...

  18. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  19. Gravity and magnetic field features and basement relief of the Sanjiang Basin in Heilongjiang Province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sanjiang Basin has received more attention in Mesozoic stratum and petroleum potential research because of its particularity in geographic and tectonic position. There remains debate on the basement structure of the basin since igneous rocks and faults make the structure and stratigraphy more complicated. In this paper we utilize gravity and magnetic data as well as petrophysical properties and drilling logs to understand the structure of the Sanjiang Basin. The study is focused on the comparison between the western and eastern parts of the basin. The comparison reveals that there are distinct differences in the gravity and magnetic field between the western and eastern parts. The integrated analysis of the gravity, magnetic, geological, petrophysical data and drilling logs indicates that the difference in the gravity and magnetic field results from the different basement structure and caprock formation of the two parts of the basin. The basement consists of three parts from west to east, the Proterozoic crystalline basement, the Neopaleozoic fold basement and the Lower Mesozoic fold basement separately. The Tongjiang–Yingchun Fault and the Qinglongshan–Xiaoheyan Fault controlled the formation and development of depressions and uplifts and also affected the sedimentation and volcanic activities of the basin. The Sanjiang Basin has relatively thin and stable crust thickness, varying around 33 km, and the deep structure has control and constraint over the shallow conformations. (paper)

  20. Basement Kind Effects on Air Temperature of a Solar Chimney in Baghdad - Iraq Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miqdam Tariq Chaichan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A solar updraft tower power plant (solar tower is a solar thermal power plant that utilizes a combination of solar air collector and central updraft tube to generate an induced convective flow which drives pressure staged turbines to generate electricity. This paper presents practical results of a prototype of a solar chimney with thermal mass, where the glass surface is replaced by transparence plastic cover. The study focused on chimney's basements kind effect on collected air temperatures. Three basements were used: concrete, black concrete and black pebbles basements. The study was conducted in Baghdad from August to November 2009. The results show that the best chimney efficiency attained was 49.7% for pebbles base. The highest collected air temperature reached was 49ºC when using the black pebbles basement also.also, the maximum basement temperature measured was 59ºC for black pebbles. High increaments in collected air temperatures were achieved in comparison with the ambient air temperatures for the three basement kinds. The highest temperature difference reached was 22ºC with the pebble ground.

  1. ADHERENCE, PROLIFERATION AND COLLAGEN TURNOVER BY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS SEEDED INTO DIFFERENT TYPES OF COLLAGEN SPONGES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIDDELKOOP, E; DEVRIES, HJC; RUULS, L; EVERTS, [No Value; WILDEVUUR, CHR; WESTERHOF, W

    1995-01-01

    We describe an in vitro model that we have used to evaluate dermal substitutes and to obtain data on cell proliferation, the rate of degradation of the dermal equivalent, contractibility and de novo synthesis of collagen. We tested three classes of collagenous materials: (1) reconstituted non-crossl

  2. Cell-collagen interactions : the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farndale, Richard W.; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S.; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G.; Jarvis, Gavin E.; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. we have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptide

  3. The preosteoblast response of electrospinning PLGA/PCL nanofibers: effects of biomimetic architecture and collagen I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian YZ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yunzhu Qian,1,2 Hanbang Chen,1 Yang Xu,1 Jianxin Yang,2 Xuefeng Zhou,3 Feimin Zhang,1 Ning Gu3 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Center of Stomatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 3School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Constructing biomimetic structure and incorporating bioactive molecules is an effective strategy to achieve a more favorable cell response. To explore the effect of electrospinning (ES nanofibrous architecture and collagen I (COL I-incorporated modification on tuning osteoblast response, a resorbable membrane composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/poly(caprolactone (PLGA/PCL; 7:3 w/w was developed via ES. COL I was blended into PLGA/PCL solution to prepare composite ES membrane. Notably, relatively better cell response was delivered by the bioactive ES-based membrane which was fabricated by modification of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and COL I. After investigation by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and mechanical test, polyporous three-dimensional nanofibrous structure with low tensile force and the successful integration of COL I was obtained by the ES method. Compared with traditional PLGA/PCL membrane, the surface hydrophilicity of collagen-incorporated membranes was largely enhanced. The behavior of mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell infiltration and proliferation on membranes was studied at 24 and 48 hours. The negative control was fabricated by solvent casting. Evaluation of cell adhesion and morphology demonstrated that all the ES membranes were more favorable for promoting the cell adhesion and spreading than the casting membrane. Cell Counting Kit-8 assays revealed that biomimetic architecture, surface topography, and bioactive properties of membranes were favorable for cell

  4. Fluorescently labeled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Katy Nash; Bouten, Carlijn V C; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes advantage of the inherent specificity of collagen binding protein domains present in bacterial adhesion proteins (CNA35) and integrins (GST-alpha1I). Both collagen binding domains were obtained as fusion proteins from an Escherichia coli expression system and fluorescently labeled using either amine-reactive succinimide (CNA35) or cysteine-reactive maleimide (GST-alpha1I) dyes. Solid-phase binding assays showed that both protein-based probes are much more specific than dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein (DTAF), a fluorescent dye that is currently used to track collagen formation in tissue engineering experiments. The CNA35 probe showed a higher affinity for human collagen type I than did the GST-alpha1I probe (apparent K(d) values of 0.5 and 50 microM, respectively) and showed very little cross-reactivity with noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins. The CNA35 probe was also superior to both GST-alpha1I and DTAF in visualizing the formation of collagen fibers around live human venous saphena cells. Immunohistological experiments on rat tissue showed colocalization of the CNA35 probe with collagen type I and type III antibodies. The fluorescent probes described here have important advantages over existing methods for visualization of collagen, in particular for monitoring the formation of collagen in live tissue cultures over prolonged time periods. PMID:16476406

  5. Function of glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha2beta1 in the procoagulant response of single, collagen-adherent platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, J W; Siljander, P; Vuist, W M; Breikers, G; Reutelingsperger, C P; Barnes, M J; Knight, C G; Lassila, R; Farndale, R W

    1999-05-01

    Various collagen-based materials were used to assess the structural requirements of collagen for inducing the procoagulant response of adhering platelets, as well as the collagen receptors involved. Cross-linked or monomeric collagen-related peptide (CRP), Gly-Cys-Hyp-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)10-Gly-Cys-Hyp-Gly was highly adhesive for platelets in a glycoprotein VI-(GpVI-)dependent manner. Adhesion was followed by a prolonged increase in cytosolic [Ca2+]i, formation of membrane blebs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) and generation of prothrombinase-stimulating activity. Fibrils of type-I collagen were less adhesive but, once adhered, many of the platelets presented a full procoagulant response. Monomeric type-I collagen was unable to support adhesion, unless Mg(2+)-dependent integrin alpha2beta1 interactions were facilitated by omission of Ca2+ ions. With all surfaces, however, post-addition of CaCl2 to adhering platelets resulted in a potent Ca(2+)-influx signal, followed by PS exposure and bleb formation. The procoagulant response elicited by binding to CRP was inhibited by anti-GpVI Fab fragments, but not by impeding integrin alpha2beta1-mediated events. With fibrillar collagen, it was inhibited by blocking either the GpVI- or integrin alpha2beta1-mediated interactions. This suggests that the triple-helical Gly-Pro-Hyp repeat in CRP and analogous sequences in fibrillar collagen stimulate the procoagulant response of adherent platelets by acting as ligands for GpVI. Influx of Ca2+ is required for this response, and adhesion via integrin alpha2beta1 serves to potentiate the signaling effects of GpVI. PMID:10365754

  6. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat. PMID:27057755

  7. Collagen-curcumin interaction - A physico-chemical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Nishad Fathima; R Saranya Devi; K B Rekha; Aruna Dhathathreyan

    2009-07-01

    Curcumin is a widely used therapeutic agent with a wide spectrum of biological and physiological applications like wound healing and interacts with the skin protein, collagen. This work reports the effect of curcumin on various physico-chemical properties of collagen. The results suggest that significant changes in viscosity and surface tension occur on collagen interacting with curcumin. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism shows that curcumin does not alter the triple helical structure of collagen. Increasing concentration of curcumin resulted in aggregation of the protein. Further, curcumin imparts high level of thermal stability to collagen with shrinkage temperature of collagen increasing from 60 to 90°C.

  8. Mineralization of Hydroxyapatite Regulated by Recombinant Human-like Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We reported recombinant human-like type I collagen inducing growth of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro in the form of self-assembly of nano-fibrils of mineralized collagen resembling extracellular matrix, which obey the same rules, but is superior to the collagen derived from animal tissues because the latter may carry diseases of animals and cause immunological reactions. The mineralized collagen fibrils aligned parallel to each other to form mineralized collagen fibers. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals grew on the surface of these collagen fibrils with the c-axis of nanocrystals of HA orienting along the longitudinal axis of the fibrils.

  9. Pembuatan Membran Selulosa Bakteri Coating Kitosan - Kolagen Untuk Aplikasi Gtr ( Guide Tissue Regeneration ) Sebagai Pembalut Luka Pada Mencit (Mus Musculus)Secara In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Humaira, Nadia Maulida

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose produced from the fermentation process used in the development of Acetobacter xylinum to increase efficiency of bacterial cellulose one of them in the biomedical field , is membrane . This study aimed to determine the effect concentration of chitosan-collagen, see optimum characterization of bacterial cellulose membrane coating of chitosan-collagen that can be used in the application as wound dressings in mice by In Vivo. Preparation of the bacterial cellulose membrane usi...

  10. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders. PMID:27423205

  11. The significance of grafting collagen on polycaprolactone composite scaffolds: processing-structure-functional property relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; Nune, K C; Misra, R D K

    2015-09-01

    The study concerns processing-structure-functional property relationship in organic-inorganic hybrid scaffolds based on grafted collagen for bone tissue engineering. Biodegradable polyester, polycaprolactone (PCL) and nanohydroxyapatite were used to fabricate three-dimensional porous scaffolds by adopting a combination of solvent casting, particulate leaching, and polymer leaching approaches. The PCL scaffold was subsequently surface modified by chemical bonding of 1,6-hexanediamine to the ester groups of PCL to introduce free NH2 groups. The introduction of NH2 groups as active sites enabled immobilization of biocompatible macromolecule, collagen, on the aminolyzed PCL via a cross-linking agent, glutaraldehyde. The osteoblasts' functions, notably cell adhesion, proliferation, and mineralization, were favorably modulated because of the chemical interaction between Arg-Gly-Asp domains in collagen molecule and integrin receptor in the cell membrane. The study underscores the significance of grafting collagen on PCL-nHA scaffold in modulating cellular activity and biological functions expanding its current use in soft tissue engineering to hard tissue regeneration. PMID:25691223

  12. Late-Paleozoic emplacement and Meso-Cenozoic reactivation of the southern Kazakhstan granitoid basement

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmaeker, Elien; Glorie, Stijn; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Zhimulev, Fedor I.; Poujol, Marc; Korobkin, Valeriy V.; Vanhaecke, Frank; Vetrov, Evgeny V.; De Grave, Johan

    2015-11-01

    The Ili-Balkhash Basin in southeastern Kazakhstan is located at the junction of the actively deforming mountain ranges of western Junggar and the Tien Shan, and is therefore part of the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The basement of the Ili-Balkhash area consists of an assemblage of mainly Precambrian microcontinental fragments, magmatic arcs and accretionary complexes. Eight magmatic basement samples (granitoids and tuffs) from the Ili-Balkhash area were dated with zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS and yield Carboniferous to late Permian (~ 350-260 Ma) crystallization ages. These ages are interpreted as reflecting the transition from subduction to (post-) collisional magmatism, related to the closure of the Junggar-Balkhash Ocean during the Carboniferous-early Permian and hence, to the final late Paleozoic accretion history of the ancestral Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Apatite fission track (AFT) dating of 14 basement samples (gneiss, granitoids and volcanic tuffs) mainly provides Cretaceous cooling ages. Thermal history modeling based on the AFT data reveals that several intracontinental tectonic reactivation episodes affected the studied basement during the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Late Mesozoic reactivation and associated basement exhumation is interpreted as distant effects of the Cimmerian collisions at the southern Eurasian margin and possibly of the Mongol-Okhotsk Orogeny in SE Siberia during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. Following tectonic stability during the Paleogene, inherited basement structures were reactivated during the Neogene (constrained by Miocene AFT ages of ~ 17-10 Ma). This late Cenozoic reactivation is interpreted as the far-field response of the India-Eurasia collision and reflects the onset of modern mountain building and denudation in southeast Kazakhstan, which seems to be at least partially controlled by the inherited basement architecture.

  13. Modeling differentiation of Karaj Dam basement igneous rocks (northern Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeily, D.; M-Mashhour, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Karaj Dam basement igneous body (KDB) is located in the north of city of Karaj, 30 km from city of Tehran, which lies between 35° 50' N to 36° 05' N and between 50° 50' E to 51° 15' E. It is one of the several plutonic bodies within the E-W trending Alborz zone in northern Iran. Following the late Cretaceous orogenic movements, vast volumes of dacite, andesites and basaltic lavas with tuffaceous and other clastic sediments were deposited during Eocene time, forming Karaj Formation in central Iran and Albourz. The KDB is penetrated thorough middle and upper tuff units from Karaj Formation which is underlain by late Jurassic depositions (Shemshak Formation) and overlain by the Neogene red Conglomerates in regard to stratographic consideration. It is mainly composed of a layered series dominated by gabbro, diorite and monzonite, which is a rock sequence formed upward from the lower to upper chilled margins, respectively. The chilled margins, which have gabbroic in composition, show porphyritic texture with euhedral to subhedral plagioclase (andesine & labradorite) and pyroxene (augite) megacrysts up to 5 mm long. These rocks become coarse-grained inward and transform to equigranular texture gradually.In addition, a small fine-grained doleritic stock as well as some doleritic dykes is intrusive into the pyroclastic volcanic rocks of Karaj Formation. It is possible to observe doleritic enclaves included in the KDB, indicating that the KDB are slightly younger than the dolerites. Whole rock geochemistry and mineral chemistry of the plagioclase and pyroxene in various rock samples, suggest differentiation processes. The Mg# of the pyroxene and An% of plagioclase of the contact chilled samples can be used as an indication of the original magma and plotted between the gabbro and monzonitic samples. In addition, increasing of the Mg# within the whole rock samples from the upper of contact chilled, in comparison to the lower one, demonstrates elemental differentiation

  14. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  15. A rare case of cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meah, Nekma; Khirwadkar, Nitin; Ellison, Judith

    2016-08-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy is a rare microangiopathy first described by Salama and Rosenthal in 2000. Several cases have been reported to date, describing distinct histological findings of thick hyaline collagenous blood vessel walls in the superficial dermis. Clinical confusion can arise with generalised essential telangiectasia. We report a case occurring in a 76-year-old woman who presented with a 2-year history of a telangiectatic rash progressing from her knees upwards. The diagnosis was confirmed on skin biopsy and treatment with pulsed dye laser was later initiated at the patient's request. PMID:25872701

  16. Fracture and vein characterization of a crystalline basement reservoir, central Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeningen, R.; Grasemann, B.; Decker, K.; Bischoff, R.; Rice, A. H. N.

    2012-04-01

    The country of Yemen is located in the south-western part of the Arabian plate. The Pan-African basement found in western and central Yemen is highly deformed during the Proterozoic eon and is part of the Arabian-Nubian shield ANS (670-540Ma). This ANS is a result of the amalgamation of high-grade gneiss terranes and low-grade island arcs. The development of an extensive horst-and-graben system related to the breakup of Gondwana in the Mesozoic, has reactivated the Pan-African basement along NW-SE trending normal faults. As a result, younger Meosozoic marls, sandstones, clastics and limestones are unconformably overlying the basement. Some of these formations act as a source and/or reservoir for hydrocarbons. Due to fracturing of the basement, hydrocarbons have migrated horizontally into the basement, causing the crystalline basement to be a potential hydrocarbon reservoir. Unfortunately, little is known about the Pan-African basement in Central Yemen and due its potential as a reservoir, the deformation and oil migration history (with a main focus on the fracturing and veining history) of the basement is investigated in high detail. Representative samples are taken from 2 different wells from the Habban Field reservoir, located approximately 320 ESE of Sana'a. These samples are analysed using e.g. the Optical Microscope, SEM, EDX and CL, but also by doing Rb-Sr age dating, isotope analysis and fluid inclusion analysis. In well 1, the only lithology present is an altered gneiss with relative large (<5 cm diameter) multi-mineralic veins. In well 3, quartzite (top), gneiss (middle) and quartz porphyry's (middle) are intruded by a so called "younger" granitoid body (592.6±4.1Ma). All lithologies record polyphase systems of mineral veins. Pyrite and saddle dolomite in these veins have euhedral shapes, which means that they have grown in open cavities. Calcite is the youngest mineral in these veins, closing the vein and aborting the fluid flow. Fluid inclusions inside

  17. The metamorphic basement of the Cordillera Frontal of Mendoza: New geochronologic and isotopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metamorphic rocks of the Cordillera Frontal exposed in the Cordon del Portillo, Mendoza were examined by Rb/Sr geochronology and Nd/Sm isotopic analysis. The Rb/Sr data defined a Devonian age for the last metamorphic episode, similar to the previous K/Ar and Ar/Ar ages obtained in this region and western Precordillera. The isotopic analysis identified three sets of model ages: 1.- The oldest corresponds to a set of meta sedimentary rocks with a model age of 1,400 to 1,700 Ma; 2.- A monzogranodiorite with a model age of 1,000 Ma; and 3.- Metabasites with model ages between 577 and 330 Ma. These rocks are interpreted as 1.- A typical Grenvillian derived basement; 2.- Late Paleozoic granitoids derived from a different Proterozoic basement; and 3.- Some Eopaleozoic metabasites tectonically inter fingered with the Grenvillian basement. These new data are coherent with the existence of a Laurentia derived terrane, Chilenia, that was separated by oceanic rocks from the basement of Pre cordillera during Eopaleozoic times. This last basement known as the Cuyania terrane, was also derived from Laurentia. (author)

  18. Cuddapah uranium province, Andhra Pradesh role of basement granites, tectonism and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cuddapah Uranium Province encompasses two economically viable genetic types of uranium deposits as the carbonate-hosted stratabound uranium deposits around Tummalapalle-Rachakuntapalle area, and the unconformity-proximal type in basement granitoids and overlying Srisailam/Banganapalle quartzite in the Lambapur-Peddagattu-Chitrial-Koppunuru area . Besides, the basin characteristically hosts important occurrences, of fracture controlled uranium mineralisation in Gulcheru quartzite near Gandi and in basement granitoid around Lakkireddipalle-Rayachoti; shear-controlled along the thrusted eastern margin of Cuddapah basin in basic metavolcanics and schists at Gudarukoppu and Kasturigattu. In the northern part of the basin, uranium deposits of Lambapur, Peddagattu, Chitrial, and Koppunuru area characteristically show association of ore bodies along structures formed by intersection of prominent basement fractures with the unconformity separating Srisailam and Palnad sediments from the basement. In the southwestern part of the basin, potential carbonate-hosted, stratabound uranium mineralisation extends over a 160 km long belt from Chelumpalli to Maddimadugu with large-tonnage, low-grade, uranium deposits in Tummallapalle-Rachakuntapalle area. The unconformity-proximal and fracture controlled deposits/prospects characteristically share a common source for uranium, repeated tectonism, weathering of the basement granitoids and episodic, epigenetic hydrothermal processes of uranium mineralisation. This paper evaluates the role of granitoids spatially and temporally associated with uranium mineralisation in making the Cuddapah Basin a unique uranium province. (author)

  19. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhib...

  20. The initiation of embryonic-like collagen fibrillogenesis by adult human tendon fibroblasts when cultured under tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Yeung, Chin-Yan C; Kadler, Karl E;

    2010-01-01

    Tendon fibroblasts synthesize collagen and form fibrils during embryonic development, but to what extent mature fibroblasts are able to recapitulate embryonic development and develop normal tendon structure is unknown. The present study examined the capability of mature human tendon fibroblasts to...... fibroblasts stained positive for integrin alpha(5). Finally, the presence of cell extensions into the extracellular space with membrane-enclosed fibrils in fibripositors indicated characteristics of embryonic tendon. We conclude that mature human tendon fibroblasts retain an intrinsic capability to perform...... initiate collagen fibrillogenesis when cultured in fixed-length fibrin gels. Fibroblasts were dissected from semitendinosus and gracilis tendons from healthy humans and cultured in 3D linear fibrin gels. The fibroblasts synthesized an extracellular matrix of parallel collagen fibrils that were aligned...