WorldWideScience

Sample records for basedows disease

  1. [Congenital hyperthyroidism in maternal Basedow disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meden, H; Rath, W

    1989-09-01

    A case of congenital hyperthyroidism, after pregnancy complicated by Graves' disease is presented. Fetal tachycardia was the cardial symptom. Caesarean section was performed in the 29 years old patient with normal thyroid function in the 29th week of pregnancy. The neonate showed symptoms of a congenital hyperthyroidism with goitre. Antithyroid antibodies were found in the serum of both mother and child. At the age of ten weeks, after a short course of thyrostatic treatment, the infant was discharged with normal thyroid function following complicationfree progress.

  2. Morphometry of extraocular muscles in Basedow disease by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Michiko; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hashimoto, Masato

    1996-01-01

    We measured the thickness of extraocular muscles in 35 patients diagnosed as Basedow disease by physicians. We used the coronal images of computed tomography in measuring the thickness at four points for each muscle. The mean thickness was 3.2±1.0 mm for superior rectus, 3.4±0.8 mm for medial rectus and 4.1 mm±13 mm for inferior rectus. These values were significantly larger than in normal eyes (p<0.01). The value for inferior rectus was significantly larger than for the other two muscles (p<0.01). Thickness of inferior rectus at its posterior portion was significantly correlated with limitation of supraduction of the affected eye (r=0.7). (author)

  3. Clinical Features of Patients with Basedow's Disease and High Serum IgG4 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimoto, Keiichi; Okada, Yosuke; Kurozumi, Akira; Narisawa, Manabu; Arao, Tadashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    Objective IgG4-related disease is a recently characterized condition presenting with high blood IgG4 levels, swelling of organs, and hypertrophic lesions. This disease is associated with thyroid disease, Hashimoto's disease, and Riedel's thyroiditis. However, there is little information on the association between IgG4-related disease and Basedow's disease. We herein defined the clinical features of patients with Basedow's disease and high IgG4 levels. Methods We compared two groups of patients with Basedow's disease (n=72) who had either normal IgG4 levels (IgG4 levels (≥135 mg/dL; n=5 [6.9%], mean IgG4: 206±116 mg/dL, IgG4/IgG ratio: 10.6%±3.3%). Patients Seventy-two newly diagnosed, untreated patients with Basedow's disease. Results Compared to the normal IgG4 group, patients in the high IgG4 group were predominantly male and showed a significantly higher thyroid low-echo score (1.8±0.4 vs. 1.2±0.5) and eosinophil count (363±354/mm 2 vs. 136±122/mm 2 ). Five patients had high IgG4 levels: one had a pancreatic lesion, and four had thyroid lesions. Conclusion Patients with Basedow's disease and high IgG4 levels may represent a new subtype of Basedow's disease. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

  4. Clinical significance of computed tomography in the measurement of thyroid volume after operation for Basedow's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Yoshio; Miyakawa, Makoto; Sugenoya, Akira

    1986-01-01

    The postoperative volume of the thyroid glands was measured using computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients with Basedow's disease. In the group which had normal postoperative thyroid function and did not need to receive T 4 , CT showed increase of thyroid volume. In three of the four patients who needed to receive it, CT showed decreased thyroid volume, as compared with that immediately after operation. CT has proved to serve as a tool for measuring postoperative thyroid volume for Basedow's disease in relation to postoperative prognosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy; Morbus Basedow und Autonomie - Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2002-04-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [German] In dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird ueber die Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen referiert. Dies betrifft gesetzliche Regelungen in Deutschland, grundlegende Ueberlegungen zur Therapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen, die Diskussion konservative versus definitive Therapieindikation der Hyperthyreose und schliesslich die Themenkomplexe Vorbereitung, Durchfuehrung, Ergebnisse, Nebenwirkungen und Komplikationen, Kosten sowie Nachsorge der Radioiodtherapie. Im Vordergrund steht die Abgrenzung der konservativen Therapieindikation gegenueber der primaeren Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow in Deutschland. Waehrend in den USA 70-90% der Morbus-Basedow-Faelle primaer mit Radioiodtherapie behandelt werden, wird in Deutschland bei 90% zunaechst ein

  6. Health locus of control in patients with graves-basedow disease and hashimoto disease and their acceptance of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinska, Malgorzata Anna; Andruszkiewicz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to a chronic somatic disease depends on a variety of factors, including belief in health locus of control. Correlation between health locus of control and illness acceptance in patients with Graves-Basedow and Hashimoto diseases as well as correlation between health locus of control, illness acceptance, sex, and age. THREE METHODS WERE APPLIED: Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale by K.A. Wallston, B.S. Wallston and R. DeVellis; the Acceptance of Illness Scale by B.J. Felton, T.A. Revenson, and G.A. Hinrichsena; and a personal questionnaire. Two groups were subject to the research: 68 patients with Graves-Basedow disease and 54 patients with Hashimoto disease. Patients with Graves-Basedow disease, women above all, have their health locus of control in other persons (P = 0,001) and are less inclined to accept their illness (P = 0,005) when compared to patients with Hashimoto disease. A statistically significant correlation occurred between the age of patients and external (i.e., in other persons) health locus of control. Beliefs in health locus of control and type of illness in female patient group are predictors of illness acceptance (P = 0,0009).

  7. Evaluation of the Basedow disease treatment by a iodine 131 fixed dose; Evaluation du traitement de la maladie de Basedow par une dose fixe d'iode 131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ajmi, W.; Slim, I; Rmadi, S.; Yeddes, I.; Krimi, S.; Ltaief, B.; Mhiri, A.; Ben Slimene, M.F. [Service de medecine nucleaire, institut Salah Azeiz, Tunis, (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    The treatment of the basedow disease by iodine 131 is more and more used. however, the doses used stay variable. In order to reduce the treatment failure, we chose a protocol with strong fix doses of iodine 131. We give our preliminary results for 63 patients. The treatment by strong fix dose of iodine 131 is simple, safe and efficient for the control of hyperthyroidism in the Basedow disease. This protocol has for advantage to be simpler comparatively to these ones using adjusted doses according the weight of the thyroid and its fixation rate. (N.C.)

  8. Occurrence of hypothyroidism after treatment of Basedow's diseases with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji; Mori, Toru; Konishi, Junji; Ikekubo, Katsuji; Morita, Rikushi

    1975-01-01

    Description was made as to the present condition of occurrence of hypothyroidism after treatment of Basedow's disease with 131 I. It was showed that hypothyroidism was not necessarily based on numerical over-dose of 131 I, there were early stage hypothyroidism due to 131 I sensitivity of an individual and delayed hypothyroidism due to irreversible and progressive disorder of the thyroid gland, and examination of inflammatory findings before treatment and reduction of first administered dose of 131 I were effective in prevention of early stage hypothyroidism. At present, the origin of delayed hypothyroidism is not clarified and thus there is not adequate prevention method. It was suggested that it was duty of the person in charge of treatment to observe and guide treated case by careful remote-investigation and to continue efforts in prevention of hypothyroidism hereafter. (M. Tsunoda)

  9. A case presenting concurrence of Marfan syndrome, Basedow's disease and Arg353Gln polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kotoko; Seino, Yoshihiko; Inokuchi, Koiti; Ohmura, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Takano, Teruo

    2005-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old Japanese man who suffered from Marfan syndrome with severe aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation and rapid atrial fibrillation, which were aggravated by hyperdynamic circulatory conditions associated with coexistent Basedow's disease. Furthermore, concurrence of Arg353Gln polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency was discovered at the preoperative assessments. Both of his two brothers suffered from Marfan syndrome; however they had no findings of Arg353Glu polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency or Basedow's disease. After normalization of thyroid function, he had successfully the operations of Bentall procedure: a composite prosthetic graft: replacement of both the ascending aorta and aortic valve, and mitral valve annuloplasty. No specific therapy such as fresh frozen plasma or factor VII replacement therapy was required. He completely returned to his business work 6 weeks after the operation. Concurrence of Marfan syndrome and factor VII deficiency induced by two-hit genomic abnormalities and furthermore Basedow's disease, which significantly compromised the pathophysiological condition of Marfan syndrome, is extremely rare.

  10. F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves` disease; F-18-FDG-PET der Schilddruese bei Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Wienhard, K.; Wagner, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    This study evaluates F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves` disease. Methods: Thirty patients were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy, 15 patients 3-10 days after radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG uptake was higher in Graves` disease patients than in controls. Negative correlations of F-18-FDG uptake with half-life of radioiodine and absorbed radiation dose due to radioiodine therapy were found along with a positive correlation to autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Thus F-18-FDG PET is likely to give information on the biological activity of Graves` disease as well as on early radiation effects. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Diese Studie evaluiert F-18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glukose (F-18-FDG) PET der Schilddruese bei Patienten mit M. Basedow. Methoden: 30 Patienten wurden am Tag vor Radioiod-Therapie, 15 Patienten am 3.-10. Tag nach Radioiodtherapie untersucht. 20 Patienten mit Kopf/Halstumoren und normaler Schilddruesenfunktion dienten als Kontrollgruppe. Ergebnisse: Die F-18-FDG-Aufnahme in der Schilddruese war signifikant hoeher bei Patienten mit M-Basedow im Vergleich zu den Kontrollen. Sie stieg mit hoeheren, antithyreoidalen Antikoerpern und sank bei laengerer I-131-Halbwertzeit. Es bestand eine Korrelation einer reduzierten Glukose-Utilisation bei hoeherer absorbierter Schilddruesendosis nach Radioiod-Therapie. Schlussfolgerung: Damit erscheint die F-18-FDG-PET-Untersuchung zur biologischen Aktivitaetsbeurteilung des M. Basedow und Darstellung von fruehen Strahleneffekten geeignet. (orig.)

  11. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease; Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge < 3,5 {mu}Sv/h at 2 m). An adjuvant treatment with cortisone is recommended in a simultaneous endocrine ophthalmopathy to prevent from deterioration. Radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is cost effective with a low probability of side-effects and is not associated with an increased genetic or somatic risk. Therapy control and life span follow up has to be carried out by the expert physician legally responsible for the radioiodine therapy. (orig.) [German] Die Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow wird in Deutschland, bei Patienten aelter als 20 Jahre, erst nach mindestens einjaehriger, erfolgloser thyreostatischer Therapie, bei Thyreostatikaunvertraeglichkeit, Rezidiven nach Operation und kleinen Strumen durchgefuehrt. Die Beseitigung der Hyperthyreose wird mit einem ablativen Dosiskonzept (300 Gy) in > 90%, verbunden mit einer Hypothyreoserate von ebenfalls > 90% erreicht. Prognostisch unguenstige Einflussfaktoren sind eine zu niedrig gewaehlte Herddosis und/oder eine begleitende Thyreostase. Aus Gruenden der Qualitaetssicherung und des Strahlenschutzes muss in Deutschland die Radiojodtherapie stationaer als Einzeittherapie durchgefuehrt werden. Die

  12. Pathogenesis of Graves` disease and therapeutic implications; Pathogenese des Morbus Basedow und therapeutische Implikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, F.J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1997-12-01

    Graves` disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Morbus Basedow manifestiert sich klinisch hauptsaechlich als Hyperthyreose und infiltrative Orbitopathie, waehrend Demopathie und Akropathie selten sind. Der Krankheit liegt ein Autoimmunprozess zugrunde, wobei stimuliernde Autoantikoerper gegen den TSH-Rezeptor die Hyperthyreose hervorrufen. Autoantikoerper und T-Lymphozyten gegen primaer thyreoidale Antigene verursachen durch Kreuzreaktion mit aehnlichen Antigenen an den Augenmuskeln und orbitalem Bindegewebe die Orbitopathie. Das therapeutsiche Ziel besteht nicht nur in der Behandlung der Hyperthyreose, sondern vor allem in der Induktion einer immuntoleranten Remission, um die irreversiblen Schaeden am Auge zu minimieren. Die Therapie umfasst Thyreostatika, Glukokortikoide und Orbitaspitzenbestrahlung sowie eine Schilddruesenablation entweder durch fast totale Schilddruesenresektion oder durch Radiojodtherapie. Die Differentialindikationen fuer die beiden ablativen Massnahmen werden eroertert. (orig.)

  13. [Epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutive aspects of Basedow-Graves disease in the Depatment of Internal Medicine at CHU Aristide Le Dantec, Dakar (Senegal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Nafissatou; Faye, Atoumane; Ndao, Awa Cheikh; Djiba, Boundia; Kane, Baidy Sy; Ndongo, Souhaibou; Pouye, Abdoulaye

    2016-01-01

    Basedow-Graves disease is an autoimmune affection characterized by the association of thyrotoxicosis with variable frequency events such as goiter, ophthalmopathy and pretibial myxedema. Its diagnosis is often easy, while its management remains difficult. A simple medical treatment exposes patient to recurrence risk. In Senegal and Sub-Saharan Africa few studies have focused on Basedow-Graves disease. This study aims to describe the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of Basedow-Graves disease at a Hospital in Dakar. This was a retrospective study conducted from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2013 in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Aristide Le Dantec University Hospital. During this period, 108 patients receiving outpatient treatment for Basedow-Graves disease were included out of a total of 834 patients receiving outpatient treatment. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical, biological and immunological signs. One hundred and eight patients suffering from Basedow-Graves disease were included out of a total of 834 consultations. Sex ratio was 7.3 and the average age was 34.6 years. The main reasons for consultation were: palpitations and weight loss in 46.3% and 39.8% of cases respectively. Thyrotoxicosis syndrome was found in 93.5% of patients, goiter was found in 87% of patients and exophthalmos in 78.7% of patients. The main complication was cardiothyreosis found in 11.1% of patients. All patients underwent antithyroid synthetic drugs treatment. The evolution was favorable in 19,4% of cases. Disease recurrence was observed in 57% of cases and in 23.1% of patients were lost to follow-up. Basedow-Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, The patient's clinical picture is dominated by manifestations related to hypermetabolism. This study highlights that thyroidectomy isn't the first-line of treatment if we consider the high number of recurrences after medical treatment.

  14. Influence of thyroid metabolism on radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Einfluss der Stoffwechsellage auf die Radioiodtherapie beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Weckesser, M.; Boy, C.; Schmidt, D.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik]|[Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin

    1997-12-01

    Radioiodine therapy is one of two definitive methods of treatment in Graves` disease beside near-total thyreoidectomy. Simple strategies like optimization of thyroid metabolism help to improve efficacy in radioiodine therapy thus lowering applied radioiodine doses, radiation exposure to the patient and to the environment and avoiding multiple vain therapeutic efforts. These strategies are likely to reduce costs at the same time. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Radioiodtherapie ist eine der beiden definitiven Therapiemethoden bei Morbus Basedow neben der nahezu totalen Thyreoidektomie. Ziel ist es, mit einfachen Methoden wie der optimalen Einstellung der Stoffwechsellage die Effizienz der Radioiodtherapie zu optimieren im Hinblick auf eine Reduktion der einzusetzenden Aktivitaet, der Gesamtstrahlenexposition fuer Patient und Umwelt und durch Vermeidung mehrfacher, vergeblicher therapeutischer Ansaetze. Diese Optimierung traegt auch zur Reduktion der Gesamtkrankheitskosten bei. (orig.)

  15. [Myasthenia gravis, Graves-Basedow disease and other autoimmune diseases in patient with diabetes type 1 - APS-3 case report, therapeutic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenczar, Karolina; Deja, Grażyna; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes type 1(T1D) is the most frequent form of diabetes in children and young people, which essence is autoimmune destruction of pancreatic B cells islet. Co-occurrence of other autoimmune diseases is observed in children with T1D, the most often are: Hashimoto disease or coeliac disease. We report the case of the patient, who presents coincidence of T1D with other rare autoimmune diseases such as: Graves - Basedow disease, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo and IgA deficiency. All mentioned diseases significantly complicated both endocrine and diabetic treatment of our patient and they negatively contributed her quality of life. The clinical picture of the case allows to recognize one of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes: APS-3 and is associated with still high risk of developing another autoimmune disease. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  16. An evaluation of the incidence of hyperparathyroidism after {sup 131}I treatment for Basedow disease. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Takehiko; Ito, Kunihiko [Ito Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Murata, Motoi

    1996-07-01

    It is known that external radiation can act as a developing factor in hyperparathyroidism (HPT). To clarify whether or not {sup 131}I acts as a factor of developing HPT or not, levels of calcium and parathyroid hormone in the blood were studied in 2,954 cases of patients treated with {sup 131}I (RI group) and 530 cases treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD group). The calcium level was measured in all cases treated with {sup 131}I and/or antithyroid drugs. PTH-M (parathyroid hormone) was measured in 262 cases of the RI group and 29 cases of the ATD group which showed levels over 10 mg/dl of calcium. Fifty-eight cases (2.50%) in the RI group and three cases (1.19%) in the ATD group showed over 560 pg/ml PTH-M, which is the highest normal value. The increase in incidence of cases with over 560 pg/ml PTH-M in the RI group versus that of the ATD group is statistically significant. However, there is no statistically significant difference in the annual incidence when the follow-up period is taken into account, because the follow-up period differed between the two groups. The incidence of cases with 560 pg/ml of PTH-M was higher in the older patients than in the younger patients. These results suggest that {sup 131}I treatment for Basedow disease affects increase in the development of HPT after treatment and that the age factor is also important in the above fact. (author)

  17. In vivo measurement by thermoluminescence of the gamma ray radiation dose to the uterus delivered during 131I therapy of Basedow's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, B.; Briere, J.

    1977-01-01

    131 I is often the therapy of choice for BASEDOW's disease. The determination of radiation dose to the gonads from a therapeutic dose of 131 I is therefore of importance and the accuracy of radiation dose calculation is uncertain because of the numerous biological variables involved. The dose to the uterus was directly measured in 20 volonteers with Basedow's disease using a thermoluminescent dosimeter of lithium fluoride and calcium dysprosium sulfate, attached to a copper intrauterine contraceptive device. The dosimeters were inserted at the time of administration of 131 I and were retreived one month later. By this method, the dose to the uterus from gamma rays only was measured and a gamma ray dose equal to the dose to the uterus, was assumed to the ovaries. In vivo experimental results were compared with the values calculated using the specific absorbed fractions (PHI (r 2 - r 1 ) determined by SNYDER. In the calculations, the morphology of the patient, in particular the distance from thyroid to uterus was taken into account. The in vivo measurements have also been compared with direct in vivo measurements using phantoms. In vivo measurements indicate that the average dose to the uterus and ovaries is of the order of 1 rad per 10 mCi concentrated in the thyroid gland. These figures are below the generally accepted maximum admissible dose to the gonads of 10 rems [fr

  18. [Psychosomatic aspects of hyperthyroidism with special reference to Basedow's disease. An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodewig, K

    1993-08-01

    The following paper deals with the current research in hyperthyroidism, with special accent to Graves' disease. Besides severe psychological trauma a breakdown of neurotic defense mechanism on the ground of a special personality structure was thought to be the trigger of the disease. The metabolic changes became the main point of interest. The influence of thyrostatic, surgical and radioactive therapies on psychological symptoms, was investigated. Thereby, the previously anticipated emotional factors became less significant in the aetiology of the disease. A recent study (Paschke 1990) suggests that patient with hyperthyroidism have, even in an euthyrotic state, an increased vulnerability to anxiety provoking situations. At this point it is not clear, due to the retrospective nature of the study, whether the vulnerability exists prior to the unset of the disease or is a result of the metabolic disorder. Both thyroxin and TRH are being successfully used in the treatment of major depression. TRH acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system and can be demonstrated in the peripheral lymphocytes. However, the exact mechanisms of action of thyroxin and TRH are still unknown. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, that can be caused by specific HLA antigens. Thereby, a changed subpopulation of lymphocytes can be demonstrated, as well as there disturbed functions. A correlation between high scores for anxiety and depression on one hand and the occurrence of an abnormal T4/T8 ratio on the other hand, have been reported in a small number of cases (Paschke 1990). The psychological symptoms in hyperthyroidism are similar to the symptomatology of neurotic anxiety and the anxious depressive syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects; Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Morbus Basedow - aktuelle Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  20. Contribution of radio-iodine 131 in the treatment of Grave's Basedow disease in the department of nuclear medicine of Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbodj, M.; Amjad, I.; Guerrouj, H.; Ben Rais, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine Grave's Basedow diseases in any gender and variable age patients, coming from several cities of Morocco, were randomized in a study of radio-iodine treatment who took place at the nuclear medicine department of Ibn Sina Hospital (Rabat, Morocco) during the period (from January 2001 to December 2008). The radio-iodine treatment was a first, second or third option and radio-iodine activities delivered varied (from 222 to 555 MBq 6 to 15 mCi) according to the age, the thyroid volume, the degree of hyperthyroidism and socio-economical situation. The high amounts of 131 I were reserved especially to the patients who live far and whose socio-economic level is low with an aim of quickly obtaining an easily controllable state of hypothyroidism by a substitute treatment. The results showed that: (1) 57.36% of patients reverted to euthyroidism (n = 74) with a patient having received two 131 I cures. The second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure; (2) 34.88% passed in hypothyroidism (n = 45) with three patients having received two cures of 131 I, the second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure in two patients and by the persistence of the hyperthyroidism after the first cure for the third patient. The average time of passage in hypothyroidism was 4.5 months; (3) 7.76% had remained in hyperthyroidism after the radioactive iodine treatment. Finally, 92.24% of our patients treated by radioactive iodine had passed in euthyroidism or hypothyroidism against 7.76% whose hyperthyroidism had persisted or occurred. (authors)

  1. Basedow på dansk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The educational ideas of the Enlightenment gained marked acceptance in Denmark towards the end of the 18th century in the form of the so-called philanthropic movement. The dominant figure in this movement was the German educational theorist Johann Bernhard Basedow (1724–90), and since the 19th...... educational handbook. Contrary to what has hitherto been believed, a Danish translation of Baselow could not therefore be helpful in raising interest in philanthropism...

  2. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves` disease; Volumenreduktion der Schilddruese nach Radiojodtherapie bei Patienten mit Schilddruesenautonomie und Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dederichs, B. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Otte, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Klink, J.E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves` disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p<0.001) TVR, which continued up to 1 year after RITh. Receiving equal effective radiation doses, the extent of TVR was significantly greater for GD than for MAG. This difference developed within six weeks up to 3 months after RITh. Conclusion: This observation suggests that the underlying thyroid disease affects the therapeutic effect of RITh and may be partially explained by the total suppression of non-autonomous thyroid tissue in AG at the time of RITh. In patients with SAG with a 1.7 times higher effective radiation dose than in MAG relative TVR was about 1.6 times stronger in SAG than in MAG. This demonstrates a direct relation between the effective radiation dose and the extent of the TVR after RITh. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Es ist bekannt, dass die Radiojodtherapie (RJTh) zu einer relvanten Schilddruesenvolumenreduktion (SVR) fuehrt. Bisher wurden jedoch nur vereinzelt systematische Daten zum zeitlichen Verlauf und quantitativen Ausmass der SVR veroeffentlicht. Methode: Daher fuehrten wir eine retrospektive Auswertung der Daten von 33 Patienten mit Morbus Basedow (MB), 36 Patienten mit multifokaler (MFA) und 31 mit unifokaler (UFA) Autonomie der Schilddruese durch. Ergebnisse: Fuer alle Patientengruppen ergab sich eine hochsignifikante (p<0,001) SVR, welche sich bis ein Jahr nach RJTh signifikant fortsetzte. Obwohl die effektive Herddosis nicht signifikant verschieden war, war das Ausmass der SVR fuer Patienten mit MB signifikant groesser als fuer Patienten mit MFA. Dieser Unterschied war bereits innerhalb der ersten 6

  3. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs; Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow - dosimetrischer Vergleich verschiedener Therapieregime bezueglich der Thyreostatikabgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Einrichtungen der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p<0,001, respectively). In Group B the medication with ATD was stopped in 61 of 111 cases 1-5 days after RITh. In this subgroup the effective RI-half-life increased from 4,4 {+-} 1,7 d to 5,1 {+-} 1,6 d after stopping of ATD (p = 0,001). Conclusion: Stopping of ATD 2 days prior to RITh leads to an increased efficiency of about 50% compared to RITh carried out under ATD and therefore to a clear reduction of radiation exposure to the rest of the body with equal absorbed doses of the thyroid. Stopping of ATD shortly after RITh increases efficiency in case of short effective RI

  4. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  5. [Carl Adolph von Basedow--150th anniversary of his death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wieland

    2004-05-01

    Carl Adolph von Basedow was the son of an aristocratic family and was born 1799 in Dessau. He was the grandson of the famous pedagogue Johann Bernhard Basedow. He studied medicine at the university of Halle and spent two years in the surgical service of Paris hospitals--the Charité and the Hôtel Dieu. In 1822, he settled in Merseburg as a physician. He was soon acclaimed as a genial and skilled helper in all branches of medical practice. He performed his own post-mortem examinations and published findings on a number of different diseases. His famous contribution in the thyroid field appeared in 1840 entitled "Exophthalmos due to hypertrophy of the cellular tissue in the orbit". Exophthalmos, goiter and palpitation of the heart have become known as the Merseburg Triad. In 1848, he published the autopsy findings on a patient who died from "exophthalmic cachexia". In Germany and some other countries, the disease was named as Morbus Basedow since 1858. In 1854 he pricked in his finger in the postmortem room when examining a patient who had died of typhus and he succumbed to septicemia at the early age of fifty-five. The date of his death was April 11, 1854. On April 14, he was laid in the Sixtus Cemetery in Merseburg. Basedow postulated that a wrong mixing of the blood manifested in cell tissue congestion and glandular vegetation cause the manifestations of disease. If we abstract our modern knowledge and accept circulating antibodies and disturbance of the immune balance as a dyscrasia as well as the proliferation of lymphocytic clones and local cellulary infiltration in terms of immune thyroiditis and autoimmune orbitopathy as cell tissue congestion and glandular vegetations, then doubt arise whether we have indeed made much progress in the last 150 years. At least, respect for the genius of the general physician Carl Adolph von Basedow is becoming greater. We may all hope that in the contributions and the discussions, we shall learn where we stand at the end of

  6. Contribution of radio-iodine 131 in the treatment of Grave's Basedow disease in the department of nuclear medicine of Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat; Apport de l'iode 131 dans le traitement de la maladie de Basedow dans le service de medecine nucleaire de l'hopital Ibn Sina de Rabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbodj, M.; Amjad, I. [Faculte de Medecine de Dakar, Lab. de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, UCAD, Dakar (Senegal); Guerrouj, H.; Ben Rais, N.A. [Hopital Ibn Sina de Rabat, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rabat (Morocco)

    2009-10-15

    One hundred and twenty-nine Grave's Basedow diseases in any gender and variable age patients, coming from several cities of Morocco, were randomized in a study of radio-iodine treatment who took place at the nuclear medicine department of Ibn Sina Hospital (Rabat, Morocco) during the period (from January 2001 to December 2008). The radio-iodine treatment was a first, second or third option and radio-iodine activities delivered varied (from 222 to 555 MBq 6 to 15 mCi) according to the age, the thyroid volume, the degree of hyperthyroidism and socio-economical situation. The high amounts of {sup 131}I were reserved especially to the patients who live far and whose socio-economic level is low with an aim of quickly obtaining an easily controllable state of hypothyroidism by a substitute treatment. The results showed that: (1) 57.36% of patients reverted to euthyroidism (n = 74) with a patient having received two {sup 131}I cures. The second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure; (2) 34.88% passed in hypothyroidism (n = 45) with three patients having received two cures of {sup 131}I, the second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure in two patients and by the persistence of the hyperthyroidism after the first cure for the third patient. The average time of passage in hypothyroidism was 4.5 months; (3) 7.76% had remained in hyperthyroidism after the radioactive iodine treatment. Finally, 92.24% of our patients treated by radioactive iodine had passed in euthyroidism or hypothyroidism against 7.76% whose hyperthyroidism had persisted or occurred. (authors)

  7. Measurement of thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAK) with a second generation assay in patients with Graves' disease; Die Bestimmung von Thyreotropin-Rezeptor-Antikoerpern (TRAK) mit einem Assay der zweiten Generation bei Patienten mit Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoephel, K.; Wunderlich, G.; Franke, W.G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Koch, R. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Biometrie, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    Aim: The detection of TSH-receptor-antibodies (TRAb) in patients (pts) with Graves' disease (GD) is routinely used in nuclear medicine laboratories. It is performed by commercial, porcine radioreceptorassays (RRA) measuring TSH binding inhibitory activity. A second generation assay using the human, recombinant TSH-receptor was developed during the last years. The manufacturer composed this new assay as a coated tube RRA (CT RRA) and claimed a higher sensitivity for GD. Methods: TRAb was measured in 207 pts with various thyroid disorders and 205 healthy controls using the new coated tube RRA (Fa. B.R.A.H.M.S. Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) as well as a conventional RRA (Fa. Medipan Diagnostica GmbH, Selchow, Germany): 60 pts suffering from GD showing a relapse after anti-thyroid drug treatment and before radioiodine therapy, 109 pts with disseminated autonomia (DA) and 38 pts suffering from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A ROC-analysis was performed to find the optimal decision threshold level for positivity. Results: We found 42/60 TRAb-positive pts with GD in the established RRA (threshold 6 U/L) and 52/60 in the CT RRA, respectively. The sensitivity increased from 70% (RRA) to 86,7% (CT RRA). The CT RRA found 2 false positives (one Hashimoto's and one healthy control) and the RRA detected 3 Hashimoto's and 2 healthy controls as false positive. Conclusion: The increased sensitivity of CT RRA for GD provides an advantage compared to conventional RRA, especially in GD-patients relapsing afte antithyroid drug treatment. Functional sensitivity and Interassayvariation of CT RRA are very precisely compared to conventional RRA. Handling of the new assay is also improved. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Bestimmung der TSH-Rezeptorantikoerper (TRAK) bei Patienten mit Morbus Basedow ist fester Bestandteil der nuklearmedizinischen In-vitro-Diagnostik. Seit kurzem ist die Bestimmung mit einem TRAK-Assay moeglich, bei dem im Gegensatz zu den herkoemmlichen

  8. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroidismo como el de problemas especiales con el que puede estar asociado. La fisiopatología y el diagnóstico de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow son motivo de otra publicación.

  9. Does an individual estimation of halflife improve the results of radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease?; Verbessert die individuelle Bestimmung der effektiven Halbwertszeit die Ergebnisse der Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, P.; Koerber, C.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, Chr. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Aim: The impact of our dosimetry concept on radioiodine therapy success in Graves' disease (GD) was analysed. Three questions arised: Did individual estimation of pretherapeutic halflife improve therapeutic success? Did individual dosimetry result in accurate dose calculation? Did antithyroid medication have a measurable influence on therapeutic success under the prevailing conditions? Methods: 126 consecutive patients were treated with 200 Gy I-131 in our therapy ward for GD and followed-up six to nine months after therapy. Success quote was assessed using a standardized protocol and treatment was classified as successful when the patients was eu- or hypothyroid, or unsuccessful when he or she presented with a suppressed TSH-level or in hyperthyroid condition after antithyroid medication withdrawal. Antithyroid medication, activity I-131, dose, concentration of fT{sub 3} and fT{sub 4}, specific delivered dose and halflife were put into a multiple regression model to assess their influence on therapeutic success. In order to assess possible factors disturbing the therapeutic outcome, relevant parameters were analyzed using Logit transformation. Results: Out of 126 patients 84 were classified as successfully treated and 42 (33,3%) as failures. A significant influence on the outcome only was found for thyroid mass. However, therapeutic success appeared to be more distinctly determined by the specific delivered dose using an estimated halflife of 5.5 days (Odds: 10.0, p <0.001). Accurate intratherapeutic dosimetry did not play a significant role to enhance therapeutic success. Neither did antihyroid medication during radioiodine therapy exert any significant impact. Conclusions: Measurement of individual intratherapeutic halflife as opposed to an estimate using a standard halflife did not provide improved results concerning the target dose. Retrospectively, the therapeutic outcome on the basis of a measured halflife as compared to a standard halflife did not

  10. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea; Carlos Hernán Sierra-Torres; Ivonne Alejandra Meza-Cabrera

    2014-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroid...

  11. [Carl Adolph von Basedow--on the 200th anniversary of his birth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, W

    1999-04-01

    Carl Adolph von Basedow was the son of an aristocratic family and was born 1799 in Dessau. He was the grandson of the famous pedagogue Johann Bernhard Basedow. He studied medicine at the university of Halle and spent two years in the surgical service of Paris hospitals--the Charité and the Hôtel Dieu. In 1822, he settled in Merseburg as a physician. He was soon acclaimed as a genial and skilled helper in all branches of medical practice. He performed his own post-mortem examinations and published findings on a number of different diseases. His famous contribution in the thyroid field appeared in 1840 entitled "Exophthalmos due to hypertrophy of the cellular tissue in the orbit". Exophthalmos, goiter and palpitation of the heart have become known as the Merseburg Triad. In 1848, he published the autopsy findings on a patient who died from "exophthalmic cachexia". In Germany and some other countries, the disease was named as Morbus Basedow since 1858. In 1854 he pricked in his finger in the postmortem room when examining a patient who had died of typhus and he succumbed to septicemia at the early age of fifty-five. The date of his death was April 11, 1854. On April 14, he was laid in the Sixtus Cemetery in Merseburg. Basedow postulated that a wrong mixing of the blood manifested in cell tissue congestion and glandular vegetation cause the manifestations of disease. If we abstract our modern knowledge and accept circulating antibodies and disturbance of the immune balance as a dyscrasia as well as the proliferation of lymphocytic clones and local cellulary infiltration in terms of immune thyroiditis and autoimmune orbitopathy as cell tissue congestion and glandular vegetations, then doubt arise whether we have indeed made much progress in the last 150 years. At least, respect for the genius of the general physician Carl Adolph von Basedow is becoming greater. We may all hope that in the contributions and the discussions, we shall learn where we stand at the end of

  12. Neonatal hyperthyroidism: neonatal clinical course of two brothers born to a mother with Graves-Basedow disease, before and after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, A A; Sindico, P; Savarese, I; D'Andrea, V; Fracchiolla, A; Cota, F; Romagnoli, C

    2007-04-01

    About 1-2% of infants born to mothers with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis develop neonatal hyperthyroidism because of transplacental passage of IgG stimulating TSH receptors (TRAb). To evaluate the effect of maternal total thyroidectomy on neonatal clinical course. We describe two brothers born to a mother with Graves' disease, before and after total thyroidectomy. The first child showed persistent tachycardia, the presence of TRAb and a laboratory pattern of hyperthyroidism. Lugol's solution was started and then propylthiouracil was added. Digitalis, furosemide and diazepam were necessary for treatment of heart failure, hypertension and irritability. On the 70th day of life, hormone serum levels normalized and treatment was interrupted. TRAb normalized by the third month of life. The second infant was born 2 years after the mother underwent total thyroidectomy. In spite of a laboratory pattern of hyperthyroidism and positivity to TRAb, he showed only considerable weight loss, and no therapy was required. TRAb may persist after total thyroidectomy: clinical and instrumental follow-up of the newborn is recommended.

  13. Fixed dose 131-I treatment in Basedow patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klisarova, A; Bochev, P.; Hristosov, K.

    2003-01-01

    The choice of a treatment for Basedow patients is still unsolved problem. The treatment with 131-I has certain advantages but the determination of the individual therapeutic dose is impossible. The aim of the study is to assess the efficiency of the treatment with a fixed dose. 23 patient have been treated, 30 women and 3 men, age between 48 and 78. All patients are with chronic disease with relapses (1 to 4 relapses). 5 of the patients are with a thyrotoxic heart, 3 - with ophtalmopatia, 2 - with toxic medicamentous hepatitis and 2 with allergies to thyreostatics. Before the treatment with 131-I all patients have been in euthyroid state with normal levels of the peripheral hormones. All patients have received initial doses of 5 mCi 131-I. The hormone levels have been followed on 3rd, 6th, 12th and 24th month after the uptake. From a total of 23 patients, in 3 cases a transitional hypothyroidism has been found between 3th and 6th month, in 3 patients - permanent hypothyroidism. In 5 patients after the 6th month an additional dose of 5 mCi 131-I is given (in one woman a permanent hypothyroidism is reached). Four of the patients have been with a significant thyroid hyperplasia with volume above 60 ml. In three patients in the period between 6th and 12th month a slight hyperthyroidism is registered, which have been suppressed by a low dose thyreostatic. A year after the treatment they have been found euthyroid. The decision for giving a second dose have been based on the evident heptahydrate symptomatic s and the persisting increased thyroid volume. In one case it is observed an acute thyrotoxicosis for 3-5 days after the 131 I uptake. No cases of worsening of the eye symptoms are observed. In conclusion, the treatment with 131 I is a appropriate method for patients with cardiovascular complications, contraindication for surgery or side effects of the thyreostatic treatment. the dose od 5 mCi is sufficient for patients with mild to medium form of Basedow disease and a

  14. Rare presentations of hyperthyroidism--Basedow's paraplegia and pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Kuo-Tai

    2009-02-01

    Typical presentations of hyperthyroidism are palpitation, nervousness, tremor, malaise, and weight loss. Hyperthyroidism affects nearly every system in the body, and some patients may manifest neurologic or hematologic symptoms. Atypical presentations of hyperthyroidism often pose a great challenge in diagnosis and treatment. We report a case of Basedow's paraplegia and pancytopenia that was precipitated by hyperthyroidism. The unusual manifestations led to unnecessary examinations and delayed the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The classical symptoms of Basedow's paraplegia are subacute symmetric weakness of the lower extremities with areflexia and sparing sensation or sphincter involvement. Control of the hyperthyroidism mitigated the neurologic and hematologic complications and prevented unnecessary studies.

  15. Impact of pretreatment variables on the outcome of {sup 131}I therapy with a standardized dose of 150 Gray in Graves` disease; Einfluss praetherapeutischer Variablen auf die Wirkung einer standardisierten {sup 131}J-Therapie mit 150 Gray beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeilschifter, J. [Heidelberg Univ., Radiologische Klinik (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Elser, H. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I; Haufe, S. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I; Ziegler, R. [Heidelberg Univ., Radiologische Klinik (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Georgi, P. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I

    1997-04-01

    Aim: We examined the impact of several pretreatment variables on thyroid size and function in 61 patients with Graves` disease one year after a standardized [131]I treatment with 150 Gray. Methods: FT3, FT4, and TSH serum concentrations were determined before and 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after therapy. Thyroid size was measured by ultrasound and scintigraphy before and one year after therapy. Results: One year after therapy, 30% of the patients had latent or manifest hyperthyroidism, 24% were euthyroid, and 46% had developed latent or manifest hypothyroidism. Age and initial thyroid volume were major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid function. Thus, persistent hyperthyroidism was observed in 70% of the patients age 50 years and older with a thyroid size of more than 50 ml. With few exception, thyroid size markedly decreased after therapy. Initial thyroid size and age were also major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid volume. Thyroid size normalized in all patients younger than 50 years of age, independent from initial thyroid size. Conclusion: Radioiodine treatment with 150 Gray causes a considerable decrease in thyroid size in most patients with Graves` disease. Age and initial thyroid volume are important determinants of thyroid function and size after therapy and should be considered in dose calculation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bei 61 Patienten mit einem Morbus Basedow haben wir den Einfluss praetherapeutischer Variablen auf die Funktion und das Volumen der Schilddruese ein Jahr nach einer {sup 131}J-Therapie mit 150 Gray untersucht. Methoden: FT3, FT4, und TSH wurden vor Therapie und eineinhalb, 3, 6 und 12 Monate nach Therapie gemessen. Das Schilddruesenvolumen wurde vor Therapie und ein Jahr nach Therapie sonographisch und szintigraphisch bestimmt. Ergebnisse: Ein Jahr nach Therapie waren 30% der Patienten latent oder manifest hyperthyreot, 24% euthyreot, und 46% latent oder manifest hypothyreot. Lebensalter und Ausgangsvolumen der Schilddruese

  16. Sources of Kant's Cosmopolitanism: Basedow, Rousseau, and Cosmopolitan Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallar, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this essay is to analyse the influence of Johann Bernhard Basedow and Rousseau on Kant's cosmopolitanism and concept of cosmopolitan education. It argues that both Basedow and Kant defined cosmopolitan education as non-denominational moral formation or "Bildung", encompassing--in different forms--a thin version of moral…

  17. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo; Monte, Osmar; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e; Duprat, Andre; Marone, Marilia; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  18. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP); Monte, Osmar [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Physiology Department; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Speech Therapy School; Duprat, Andre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department; Marone, Marilia [Nuclimagem - Irmanity of the Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department. Endocrinology and Metabology Unit

    2008-07-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  19. Efeitos agudos laringológicos e vocais da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por doença de Basedow Graves Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of Basedow-Graves patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Werlang Isolan-Cury

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Doença de Graves constitui a forma mais comum de hipertireoidismo e três abordagens terapêuticas são atualmente utilizadas: uso de medicamentos antitireoideanos, cirurgia e iodo radioativo (I 131. Os efeitos do o I 131 e a indução precoce de hipotireoidismo são conseqüências da destruição induzida do I131 sobre o parênquima tireoideano. São poucos relatos encontrados na literatura acerca dos efeitos da radioioterapia sobre a laringe e conseqüentemente na produção vocal. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos agudos sobre a voz da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por Doença de Basedow Graves. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de corte contemporâneo longitudinal, prospectivo. Procedimentos: Investigação vocal, mensuração do tempo máximo fonatório de /a/ e relação s/z, análise freqüência fundamental (Software Praat, laringoscopia e análise perceptivo-auditiva em três momentos: pré-dose, 4 dias e 20 dias pós dose. Momentos baseados no perfil inflamatório do tecido tireoideano. RESULTADOS: Não houve mudanças estatisticamente significantes nos aspectos vocais e laringológicos nos três momentos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: A radioiodoterapia não afeta a qualidade vocal.Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131. There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim and the AIM: os this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/ and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software, laringoscopy and (perceptive-auditory analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and

  20. Vasculite cerebral e doença de Basedow-Graves: relato de dois casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Maria Sheila Guimarães

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar dois casos de pacientes com vasculite cerebral associada à doença de Basedow-Graves. RELATO DOS CASOS: O primeiro é uma paciente de 22 anos de idade com quadro súbito de disartria e déficit motor em dimídio esquerdo. Ao exame clínico, apresentava taquicardia, exoftalmia bilateral e bócio difuso. Referia tratamento para hipertiroidismo há um mês. O segundo é uma paciente de 15 anos de idade, que apresentou quadro súbito de perda da consciência seguindo-se distúrbio de linguagem e déficit motor em hemicorpo direito. RESULTADOS: Os exames de imagem revelaram áreas de lesão cerebral sugestivas de isquemia. Os estudos angiográficos cerebrais evidenciaram estenoses vasculares múltiplas compatíveis com arterite. Foram descartadas outras causas possíveis de vasculite cerebral. Os exames laboratoriais revelaram hipertiroidismo e presença dos anticorpos antimicrossomais e antitireoglobulina. As duas pacientes receberam tratamento para o hipertiroidismo. CONCLUSÃO: A associação entre arterite cerebral e doença de Basedow-Graves sugere que possa existir um elo na patogenia das duas doenças através de mecanismo auto-imune comum a ambas.

  1. Enfermedad Graves-Basedow. Fisiopatología y Diagnóstico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow, causa de cerca del 80% de todos los casos de hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo describimos la metodología usada para elaborar un estado del arte del bocio difuso tóxico presente en adultos, en relación con sus antecedentes históricos, fisiopatología y diagnóstico, tanto semiológico como imagenológico, patológico y por laboratorio. Los aspectos –tanto del manejo de hipertiroidismo como el de problemas especiales- son motivo de otra publicación.

  2. Fisiopatología de la expresividad "psicosomática" del Morbus Basedow y del de Addison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gurría

    1949-08-01

    Full Text Available El título de este trabajo pretende, además de consignar su objetivo, señalar una insuficiencia: la de la patología psicosomática, impregnada, desde su origen, por conceptos psicoanalíticos que han dado lugar a explicaciones demasiado subjetivistas y alejadas de las ideas fisiopatológicas no superadas, al menos clínicamente, por la moderna versión norteamericana de las antiguas y equilibradas doctrinas socráticas de integración. Perseguimos en esta comunicación dos propósitos: contrastrar las concepciones psicosomáticas y fisiopatológicas del Basedow y de la insuficiencia suprarrenal, en el intento de poner de manifiesto la insuficiencia del criterio psicosomático; y, estudiar la fisiopatología de los principales síntomas del Basedow y del Addison que se expresan por la doble vertiente somatopsíquica. Estos síntomas serán, en el hipertiroidismo, la hiperemotividad y, singularmente, la prisa; y en la insuficiencia suprarrenal, la astenia.

  3. Abcès thyroïdien révélant un basedow: à propos d'un cas et revue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une radiographie thoracique a été demandée montrant un foyer alvéolaire pulmonaire apical droit. L'étude cytobactériologique des crachats ont isolé le bacille de koch. Le bilan biologique thyroïdien était en faveur d'un Basedow. La prise en charge était médicale comprenait une tri-antibiothérapie par voie parentérale, ...

  4. Influence of antithyroid medication on effective half-life and uptake of {sup 131}I following radioiodine therapy; Einfluss thyreostatischer Medikation beim Morbus Basedow auf die Kinetik von 131-Iod waehrend einer Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-12-01

    Aim of this study was to assess the influence of antithyroid drugs (ADT) on the kinetics of {sup 131}I. Therefore, 56 patients with Graves` disease and with shortened effective half-life of {sup 131}I were examined under stationary conditionary conditions. In 38 patients ATD was stopped three days after radioiodine therapy (RIT). The progress of the first RIT and of a second RIT, which still was necessary in 12 patients, was compared to 18 patients receiving ATD continuously. Values of effective half-life for {sup 131}I rose significantly from 3.4 to 5.7 days 2-3 days after stopping ATD. There was an increase of the {sup 131}I-uptake of a second RIT after stopping ATD from 29.0 to 38.4%. In contrast, {sup 131}I-uptake of a second RIT decreased significantly in patients receiving ATD continuously. Effective half-life and uptake of {sup 131}I were affected significantly by ATD. Interrupting ATD after RIT is useful to improve an apparantly insufficient RIT in thyrotoxic patients receiving ATD. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Studie war es, beim M. Basedow die Kinetik von {sup 131}I unter dem Einfluss thyreostatischer Medikation (tM) zu untersuchen. Dazu wurden die 56 Patienten mit immunogener Hyperthyreose M. Basedow (MB) und mit einem erhoehten `turn over` von {sup 131}I unter tM untersucht. Bei 38 Patienten wurde die tM am 3. Tag nach RITh abgesetzt. Der Verlauf der 1. RITh bzw. einer Nachtherapie wurde mit 18 Patienten unter fortlaufender tM verglichen. 2-3 Tage nach Absetzen der tM stieg die effektive Halbwertzeit (HWZ{sub eff.}) von {sup 131}I signifikant von 3,4 auf 5,7 Tage und der {sup 131}I-Uptake bei der Nachtherapie von 29,0 auf 38,4% an, waehrend er unter fortlaufender tM signifikant abfiel. Beide Effekte zeigen, dass tM die {sup 131}I-Kinetik der Schilddruese sehr schnell beeinflussen kann. Gezieltes Absetzen der tM eignet sich deshalb, um bei ausgewaehlten Patienten eine primaer unzureichende RITh noch waehrend des stationaeren Aufenthaltes zu steuern und

  5. The Basedow disease on ectopic thyroid: a cause of hyperthyroidism with 'white' thyroid scintigraphy; Maladie de Basedow sur thyroide ectopique: une cause d'hyperthyroidie avec scintigraphie thyroidienne 'blanche'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessonnier, L.; Taieb, D.; Mundler, O. [Service central de medecine nucleaire, CHU La Timone, Marseille, (France); Imbert-Joscht, I. [servicede medecine nucleaire, hopital Nord, Marseille, (France)

    2009-05-15

    We report the case of a 55 years old patient sent for a scintigraphy exploration of a biological hyperthyroidism, for which has been enlightened an ectopic thyroid in lingual position. The hyperthyroidism is a rare circumstance of finding a thyroid ectopy. (N.C.)

  6. Grave's disease 1835-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, A P

    2003-01-01

    This brief review describes the history of Graves' disease, starting with the original descriptions by Parry, Graves and von Basedow. The true aetiology of the disorder was uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s, based on the search for a novel thyroid stimulator which turned out to be an immunoglobulin G autoantibody. Assays for these thyroid stimulatory antibodies have been continually refined and their epitopes on the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor are increasingly well characterized. We also understand far more about the genetic and environmental susceptibility factors that predispose to disease, and even thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy has now been better defined as primarily a T-cell-mediated disease resulting from cytokine stimulation of orbital fibroblasts. These advances should improve treatment options for Graves' disease in the foreseeable future.

  7. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  8. Radioactive iodine ablation of Grave disease; Traitement ablatif par iode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Nwatsock, F.J.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalo-universitaire de la Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The isotopic destruction by iodine of the thyroid body is an alternative to the surgery in the radical treatment of the Basedow disease, particularly for recurrent forms. Several strategies are possible in the use of iodine 131. between 2004 and 2008, 240 patients with a Basedow disease were treated in our service by an ablative activity of iodine 131 (555 MBq on average). the results are rather reproducible, that is to say a quasi constant hypothyroidism in the first three months. It appears important to underline that the ambulatory management of induced hypothyroidism is often unappropriated with too progressive introductions of LT4, leaving the patient in deep hypothyroidism during several weeks. The recurrences at short and middle term are very rare ( under 4%). A case of severe exophthalmos was observed. The other patients did not progressed with corticosteroids. The evolution of anti receptors autoantibodies of the TSH have been studying. to conclude, this kind of strategy is very efficient and reproducible, but needs an appropriate management of post therapy hypothyroidism, source of discomfort and potential morbidity. (N.C.)

  9. Basedow paraplegia: A possible misnomer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyrotoxic myopathy frequently occurs in clinical practice; however, the ... The occurrence of hyperthyroidism with a flaccid, areflexic paraplegia appears ... It is important to consider and treat other causes, such as acute idiopathic polyneuritis.

  10. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Leisner, B. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin des Allg. Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3{sup rd} version. (orig.) [German] Die Version 3 der Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen stellt im Wesentlichen eine redaktionelle Ueberarbeitung der Version 2 dar. Im Kapitel Indikation und Empfehlungen fuer eine Radioiodtherapie, eine Operation oder eine thyreostatische Therapie bei gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen basiert die Leitlinie auf einem interdisziplinaer abgestimmten Konzept. Die Entscheidungskriterien sind multifaktoriell und beruecksichtigen die Art der Schilddruesenerkrankung (Autonomie, Morbus Basedow, Struma, Rezidivstruma

  11. Measurements of {sup 131}I-Labelled Triiodothyronine Uptake by a Resin as a Means of Diagnosing Iodine-Basedow Produced by Intramuscular Administration of Iodized Oil in an Area of Endemic Goitre; Utilidad de la Prueba de la Captacion de Triyodotironina Marcada con {sup 131}I por Resina en el Diagnostico de Yod-Basedow Producido por la Administracion Intramuscular de Aceite Yodado, en una Area de Bocio Endemico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro-Benitez, R.; Ramirez, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Escuela Politecnica Nacional y Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Central, Quito (Ecuador)

    1970-02-15

    The authors gave intramuscular injections of iodized oil with a view to studying its prophylactic effects on endemic goitre and related defects (such as endemic cretinism) in isolated areas where more traditional techniques have serious limitations. This system had been tried earlier in New Guinea, where the results showed a reduction in the prevalence of goitre and proved the technique to be both safe and practical. However, because of the remoteness of the population in question it was impossible to continue the observations and no information was obtained regarding the effectiveness of iodized oil in reducing the incidence of defects associated with endemic goitre, Ecuador's program, involving studies of the whole population of two rural communities in the Andes, was begun in March 1966. The final control check came three years later. Ethiodol (37% iodized oil, 450 mg iodine per cm{sup 3}, obtained from Fougera, Hicksville, Long Island, N.Y. United States of America) was injected intramuscularly, 2 cm{sup 3} being administered to subjects 12 years of age and older and proportionately smaller doses to younger children. The ethiodol produced extensive changes in the physiological behaviour of the thyroid. {sup 131}I uptake was depressed for six months and afterwards remained normal. Similarly, BEI and T{sub 4} returned to and stayed at normal levels from the very first control checks onwards, which indicated that even during the first few months the thyroid glands of these subjects were maintaining a normal capacity to secrete thyronines, i.e. that they were not exhibiting the effect described by Wolff and Chaikoff, PBI and BII maintained high livels in all the controls. Urinary excretion of iodine followed a double exponential path: calculations indicated that the subjects would still be excreting significant amounts five years after the injection. Six months after injection there was an unequivocal diagnosis of Iodine-Basedow in three older women with large

  12. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with 131 I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with 131 I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  13. Is Graves' disease a primary immunodeficiency? New immunological perspectives on an endocrine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struja, Tristan; Kutz, Alexander; Fischli, Stefan; Meier, Christian; Mueller, Beat; Recher, Mike; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-09-25

    Uncertainty about factors influencing the susceptibility and triggers for Graves' disease persists, along with a wide variation in the response to anti-thyroid drugs, currently at approximately 50% of non-responders. The aim of this narrative review is to summarize immunological concepts, with a combined endocrine and immunological perspective, to highlight potential new areas of research. Relevant studies were identified through a systematic literature search using the PubMed and EMBASE databases in March 2016. No cut-offs regarding dates were imposed. We used the terms "Graves' Disease" or "Basedow" or "thyrotoxicosis" together with the terms "etiology", "pathophysiology", "immunodeficiency", "causality", and "autoimmunity". The terms "orbitopathy", "ophthalmopathy", and "amiodarone" were excluded. Articles in English, French, German, Croatian, Spanish, and Italian were eligible for inclusion. While concepts such as the impact of iodine, smoking, human leucocyte antigen, infections, and ethnicity are established, new ideas have emerged. Pertaining evidence suggests the involvement of autoimmunity and immunodeficiency in the pathophysiology of Graves' disease. Recent studies point to specific immunological mechanisms triggering the onset of disease, which may also serve as targets for more specific therapies.

  14. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  15. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  16. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  17. Prevention, screening and therapy of thyroid diseases and their cost-effectiveness; Praevention, Screening und Therapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen unter dem Aspekt von Kosten und Nutzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Schmidt, M.; Theissen, P.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2003-10-01

    Cost-effectivness analyses focused on benign thyroid diseases are under-represented in the literature. The calculation of costs per additionally gained life year is difficult: The benefit of prevention is shifted into the distant future. The influence of an untreated subclinical thyroid disease on life expectancy can only be demonstrated by a long-term follow-up and by epidemiological databases. Iodine supplementation and programs for the prevention of tobacco smoking (primary prevention) are very cost-effective. Smoking increases the risk both of multinodular goiter and of Graves' disease. Screening programs (secondary prevention) are discussed for the laboratory parameters thyrotropin (TSH), calcium and calcitonin. TSH testing seems to be very cost-effective for epidemiological considerations in a certain lifespan (newborn, pregnancy, postpartal), older persons, hospitalisation due to acute diseases and in persons with previously elevated TPO-antibodies for TSH-values >2 mU/l, but dedicated cost-effectiveness analyses are lacking. On the other hand, the cost-effectiveness of a routine TSH testing beyond the age of 35 years has been shown by a high-quality decision analysis. Therapeutic strategies (tertiary prevention) aim at the avoidance of complications (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and of iatrogenic complications. Examples of a tertiary prevention are: firstly the definitive therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have on increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), secondly the radioiodine therapy for subclinical hyperthyroidism and the radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant comorbidity. Cost-effectiveness analyses for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease were published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a fist line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds

  18. Impact of the serum thyroglobulin concentration on the diagnostics of benign and malignant thyroid diseases; Stellenwert des Serum-Thyreoglobulinspiegels bei der Diagnostik benigner und maligner Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, T.; Schroth, H.J. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Staedtisches Klinikum, Hanau (Germany); Dembowski, W.; Klinger, K. [Medizinische Klinik, St. Vinzenz Krankenhaus, Hanau (Germany)

    2000-08-01

    concentrations cannot exclude the respective disorder, a routine Tg determination seems not to be justified in benign thyroid diseases. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie ist es, neue und bislang zum Teil kontrovers diskutierte Indikationen zur Bestimmung des Thyreoglobulins (Tg) bei unterschiedlichen Schilddruesenerkrankungen in der klinischen Routine zu ueberpruefen. Methoden: Die Studie umfasst folgende Kollektive: 250 gesunde Probanden, 50 Patienten mit euthyreoter Struma diffusa, 161 Patienten mit euthyreoter Knotenstruma (davon 108 operierte Faelle, wobei sich 17 Karzinome fanden), 60 hyperthyreote Patienten mit autonomer Knotenstruma, 150 Patienten mit Thyreoiditis Hashimoto und 30 hyperthyreote Patienten mit M. Basedow. Ergebnisse: Die Grenze des Referenzbereichs errechnete sich zu 30 ng Tg/ml. Die Analyse der diffusen Strumen zeigte eine lineare Abhaengigkeit des Tg-Spiegels von der Schilddruesengroesse, wobei der Erwartungswert in etwa dem Organvolumen in ml entsprach. Knotige Veraenderungen fuehrten zu einem ueberproportionalen Tg-Anstieg, der allerdings einer grossen Varianz unterlag und daher im Einzelfall nur schwer abzuschaetzen war. Von den 17 Patienten mit Schilddruesenkarzinom lag der Tg-Spiegel in 10 Faellen unterhalb des Erwartungswertes, 2 Patienten zeigten einen Tg-Wert von >1000 ng/ml. Bei Autonomien fand sich bezogen auf eine durch Substitution extrem supprimierte Vergleichsgruppe ein signifikant hoeherer mittlerer Tg-Spiegel. Aufgrund der hohen Varianz der Tg-Werte beider Kollektive war die Diagnose der Autonomie anhand der Tg-Bestimmung jedoch kaum moeglich. In der Gruppe mit Thyreoiditis Hashimoto zeigte sich im Vergleich zum Normalkollektiv ein erniedrigter Tg-Spiegel. Bei M. Basedow war die mittlere Tg-Konzentration signifikant hoeher als in der Vergleichsgruppe mit Struma diffusa, dennoch lagen 47% aller Werte noch im Referenzbereich. Schlussfolgerung: Hohe Tg-Werte fuehren bei Verdacht auf Malignitaet, Autonomie oder M. Basedow zu einer hoeheren

  19. Investigation of the imaging diagnosis on the ophthalmic orbital diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonographic examination, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on orbital diseases. Ultrasonographic examination was a simple, rapid and harmless noninvasive precedure as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of soft tissues. Echography was not more precise than X-ray CT and MRI scan in orbital diagnosis of the localization, size and well-defined outline of the lesion, relating to the peri- and retroorbital organs, however, was useful for screening study of an orbital lesion. B-mode of orbital tumors was effective for the ultrasonic diagnosis and classification according to four types; solid, cystic, angiomatous and infiltrative patterns. B-scan study of intraorbital inflammatory pseudo tumor could provide a differential diagnosis between inflammatory edema and an inflammatory mass lesion. Echographic pictures of dural arterio-venous fistula disclosed the vascular dilatation of superior ophthalmic vein and those of Basedow's disease with thickening of extraocular muscles. X-ray CT revealed intraorbital and intraocular disease, the globes and its immediate surrounding tissue (optic nerve, extraocular muscle, etc.) and bony orbital walls as the same slice of film. X-ray CT pictures of a coronal section, the contrast enhancement, calcification and destruction of the bone were helpful for diagnosis. However, the displays of disorders near the bone were ill-defined because of an artifact induced by high X-ray absorptive power of the bone. MRI was an equipment for superior contrast resolution, with provided a tomography of any section, without artifacts of the bone, and was the superior technique for displaying a vascular lesion. MRI of orbital disease was effective for reconstructing the spatial correlations between the lesion and its surounding tissues. MRI, however, provided no information of the skeleton, being not available for subjects with a magnetic substance. (author)

  20. Case report basedow: à propos d'un cas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    12 janv. 2017 ... (anémie microcytaire); plaquettes =383000/mm3. Fonctions rénale et hépatique normales. Glycémie veineuse : 3,5mmol/l. Le traitement prescrit associait: Carbimazole (Neomercazole*) à la dose de 0,5mg/kg/j, Propanolol (Avlocardyl*) 0,5mg/kg/j et un anxiolytique ainsi qu'un déparasitage systématique à ...

  1. Case report: Basedow paraplegia: A possible misnomer | Smith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyrotoxic myopathy frequently occurs in clinical practice; however, the association of hyperthyroidism with a flaccid, areflexic paraplegia, so-called ... It is important to consider and treat other causes, such as acute idiopathic polyneuritis.

  2. Patient management in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Ambulante Vorbereitung und Nachsorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Benign thyroid disease ranks by far as the most frequent therapy in nuclear medicine. In Germany approximately 25 000 cases of hyperthyreosis are being treated in association with autonomy or Graves` disease, but also for the reduction of goiters or the correction of latent functional disturbances. In such indications radiotherapy is virtually free of risk as opposed to surgery and ranks more favorable in regard to costs and curative effects versus pharmacological long term treatment. Still regional varying therapeutical concepts and intentions are being pursued and trials of improvements described. There is consent in therapy that quality of treatment is closely linked to a specialized out-door platient preparation, individual hospital activity dosage and lifelong follow up including continued evaluation of therapeutical results. In this paper minimal requirements of outpatient measures before and after therapy are summarized which in Germany is only permitted on an inhospital patient basis. Considering basics of radioactive preventive law, scientific evidence of available results of therapeutical studies and a survey of German therapeutic centers, suggestions for a quality maintaining management in view of the most effective utilization for the limited available number of beds is presented for discussion. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die mit Abstand haeufigste nuklearmedizinische Therapie betrifft die gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen. In Deutschland werden jaehrlich etwa 25 000 Hyperthyreosen bei Autonomie oder Morbus Basedow, aber auch Strumen zur Verkleinerung oder Beseitigung einer latenten Funktionsstoerung behandelt. Die Radiojodtherapie ist bei den genannten Indikationen gegenueber der Operation praktisch risikofrei, gegenueber einer medikamentoesen Langzeitbehandlung kurativ und kostenguenstiger. Nach wie vor werden regional variierende Behandlungskonzepte und -ziele verfolgt und Optimierungsversuche beschrieben. Einigkeit besteht bei den Therapeuten, dass die

  3. Farber's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ...

  4. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma Thyroid Tests Turner Syndrome Contact Us The National ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  5. Isotope therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Junji; Kasagi, Kanji; Iida, Yasuhiro; Torizuka, Kanji; Mori, Toru.

    1979-01-01

    131 I was first used to treat Basedow's disease approximately thirty years ago. Today, 131 I therapy widely used because it is effective and easy to apply. No notable side effects have been observed until now. The only demerit is a high incidence of hypothyroidism which occurs many years after therapy. The onset of hypothyroidism can be delayed by reducing the dose but can not be prevented. Therefore, patients should understand fully the possibility of the onset of hypothyroidism in the future. To obtain favorable results, patients with Basedow's disease should be given an ordinary dose of 131 I and should be followed up. (Nisio, M.)

  6. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  7. Guideline for in vivo- and in vitro procedures for thyroid diseases. Version 2; Leitlinie zur Schilddruesendiagnostik. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Dressler, J.; Gruenwald, F.; Joseph, K.; Leisner, B.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Rendl, J.; Schicha, H.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    The version 2 of the guideline for diagnostic standards of thyroid disorders is an update of the guideline published in 1999 and describes standards of in vitro and in vivo procedures. The following statements are modified: In vitro procedures: When measurement of the TSH-receptor antibodies is indicated, the guideline recommends the use of a second generation assay (recombinant human TSH-receptor as antigen). The functional assay sensitivity for the measurement of thyroglobulin should reach a value {<=}1 ng/ml. Moleculargenetic tests (RET proto-oncogen) are indicated in patients with a newly diagnosed medullary thyroid cancer and in the relatives of patients with hereditary medullary thyroid cancer. In vivo procedures: The sonographic examination should use a probe with a frequency of at least 7.5 MHz. Indications for the thyroid scintigraphy: nodule size {>=}1 cm in diameter, autonomous goitre/nodule with clinical or subclinical hyperthyroidism, necessity of a differentiation between Graves' disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, therapy control after a definitive treatment and - in individual cases - the follow-up of untreated autonomous nodules. (orig.) [German] Mit der Version 2 der Leitlinie zur Schilddruesendiagnostik wird die 1999 publizierte Leitlinie aktualisiert. Die Leitlinie behandelt sowohl In-vitro- als auch In-vivo-Diagnostik. Die Aenderungen umfassen folgende Aspekte: In-vitro-Diagnostik: Zur Messung der Antikoerper gegen den TSH-Rezeptor werden Assaysysteme der zweiten Generation empfohlen, bei denen der rekombinante humane TSH-Rezeptor als Antigen eingesetzt wird. Die funktionelle Assaysensitivitaet der Thyreoglobulinbestimmung sollte {<=}1 ng/ml betragen. Molekulargenetische Untersuchungen (RET Protoonkogen) haben ihren Platz bei der Erstmanifestation eines medullaeren Schilddruesenkarzinoms und im Familienscreening, falls eine hereditaere Form des medullaeren Schilddruesenkarzinoms vorliegt. In-vivo-Diagnostik: Die sonographische

  8. Respuesta al tratamiento de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow en pacientes pediátricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Calagua Quispe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir la respuesta clínica y bioquímica al tratamiento del hipertiroidismo por enfermedad de Graves en pacientes pediátricos. Diseño: Estudio retrospectivo. Institución: Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú. Participantes: Niños con enfermedad de Graves. Métodos: Se incluyó 32 pacientes con diagnóstico de hipertiroidismo por Enfermedad de Graves, entre 1996 a 2007. Se consideró remisión, cuando se encontraban asintomáticos y bioquímicamente eutiroideos, luego de 6 meses de suspendido el tratamiento; y recaída, si luego de este periodo de tiempo, se encontró valores hormonales alterados. Principales medidas de resultados: Remisión o recaída luego del tratamiento. Resultados: Al diagnóstico, la edad promedio fue 10,5 años (3,2 a 17,9 años; 26 pacientes (81,2% fueron de sexo femenino, 13 (40,6% púberes y 19 (59,3% pre-púberes. Los síntomas y signos más frecuentes fueron bocio, sudoración, nerviosismo, pérdida de peso, taquicardia y exoftalmos. Se usó metimazol como primera opción terapéutica a una dosis inicial promedio de 0,78 mg/kg/ día (0,4 a 2 mg/kg/día. La TSH (57,1% y el T4L (50% alcanzaron valores normales entre los 6 y 8 meses. Se observó remisión en 11 pacientes (34,3%, 3 (9,3% sufrieron recaída, 12 (37,5% pasaron a tratamiento con radioyodo (I131 y 6 (18,7% continuaron recibiendo metimazol. La remisión de la enfermedad se alcanzó a los 2,81± 0,91 años de tratamiento (rango de 1.5 a 4,8; 4,1% remitió luego del primer año, y 35,3%, 37,5% y 25% luego del segundo, tercer y cuarto año de tratamiento, respectivamente. La edad promedio de los que recibieron I131 fue 14,6 años (7,1 a 19,6 años, a una dosis alrededor de 7mCi. El 75% de ellos remitió a los 0,64± 0,60 años (rango de 0,16 a 1,5 años. Conclusiones: El hipertiroidismo por enfermedad de Graves es de relativa frecuencia en pediatría. Se obtuvo remisión en 34,3% de pacientes tratados con metimazol en un tiempo promedio de 2,81± 0,91 años y se alcanzó remisión en 75% de los tratados con I131, en un tiempo promedio de 0,64+/- 0,60 años.

  9. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  10. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  11. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom ...

  12. Prion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Prion Diseases Prion diseases are a related group of ... deer and elk. Why Is the Study of Prion Diseases a Priority for NIAID? Much about TSE ...

  13. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  14. Addison's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of potassium and low levels of sodium. What causes Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease is caused by injury to your ... example, a problem with your pituitary gland can cause secondary Addison’s disease. Or, you may develop Addison’s disease if you ...

  15. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  16. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  17. MR imaging of diffuse thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Fujii, Koichi; Ohnishi, Takuya; Higashikawa, Motoki; Araki, Yutaka; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 38 diffuse goiters, including 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. MR findings were analyzed as to degree of swelling, margin, internal structures including homogeneity and low intensity bands. With regard to signal intensity, thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios on T1 and T2-weighted images were measured in 19 normal thyroid glands, 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. Additionally thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios were compared between 19 hypothyroid glands and 11 euthyroid glands in chronic thyroiditis. Chronic thyroiditis tended to show lobulated margins, inhomogeneous intensity, and low intensity bands connecting with vessels or not. Basedow disease tended to display smooth margins, inhomogeneous intensity and low intensity bands connecting with vessels. Thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of Basedow disease and chronic thyroiditis were significantly higher than those of normal thyroid gland at all sequences. In chronic thyroiditis thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of euthyroid glands were significantly higher than those of hypothyroid glands. MR imaging could reflect pathologic features of diffuse goiters. Moreover, MR imaging is potentially contributory to speculate about thyroid function and degree of serious condition in diffuse thyroid disorders. (author)

  18. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types ...

  19. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of Lyme disease ... My Lyme Disease Risk? Bug Bites and Stings Bell's Palsy Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Meningitis View more About ...

  20. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation Fighting Blindness supports research studying lipofuscin build up and ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is ...

  1. Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  2. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  3. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Menkes Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ... arteries. Weakened bones (osteoporosis) may result in fractures. × Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ...

  5. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ... severe symptoms similar to males with the disorder. × Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ...

  6. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  7. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  8. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactose Intolerance Liver Disease Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Pancreatitis Peptic Ulcers (Stomach ... and outreach materials. Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer hope for many people and opportunities to help researchers ...

  9. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidney Disease What's in ... Coping With Kidney Conditions Print What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  10. Sandhoff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ...

  11. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  12. Cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  13. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaranda P, Edgar; Spinel B, Nestor; Restrepo, Jose F; Rondon H, Federico; Millan S, Alberto; Iglesias G Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  14. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  15. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder in which a person lacks an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Causes Gaucher disease is rare in the general population. People of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to have this disease. It ...

  16. Dent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina R Rus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dent disease is an x-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction that occurs almost exclusively in males. It is characterized by significant, mostly low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and chronic kidney disease. Signs and symptoms of this condition appear in early childhood and worsen over time. There are two forms of Dent disease, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms (type 1 and type 2. Dent disease 2 is characterized by the features described above and also associated with extrarenal abnormalities (they include mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, and cataract. Some researchers consider Dent disease 2 to be a mild variant of a similar disorder called Lowe syndrome.We represent a case of a 3-year old boy with significant proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. We confirmed Dent disease type 1 by genetic analysis.

  17. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  18. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  19. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  20. Peyronie's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick L; Levine, Laurence A

    2007-11-01

    Peyronie's disease is a psychologically and physically devastating disorder that is manifest by a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea, resulting in palpable penile scar in the flaccid condition and causing penile deformity, including penile curvature, hinging, narrowing, shortening, and painful erections. Peyronie's disease remains a considerable therapeutic dilemma even to today's practicing physicians.

  1. Parasitogenic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiological semiotics of parasitogenic diseases of the intestinal tract is presented. The problem of radiological examination in the case of the diseases consists in the determination of the large intestine state, depth and extension of lesions, and also in solution of treatment efficiency problem

  2. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the country. NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Much of NINDS’ research on Batten disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses focuses on gaining a better understanding of the disease, gene therapy, and developing novel drugs to treat the disorders. ...

  3. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  4. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-linked form of Leigh’s disease, a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may be recommended. View Full Treatment Information Definition Leigh's disease is a rare inherited neurometabolic disorder that affects the central nervous system. This progressive disorder begins in infants between the ...

  5. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ears and head) special tests that check your balance and how well your ears work. Can Meniere’s disease be prevented or avoided? Because ... find ways to limit the stress in your life or learn how to deal with stress ... Let your family, friends, and co-workers know about the disease. Tell ...

  6. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  7. Angara disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... 1988). Since the disease emerged in this specific geographic area, HHS was initially referred to as “Angara. Disease”. The disease is caused by an avian adenovirus serotype-iv in Pakistan. This virus is responsible for development of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  8. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor a disease) for HD. A large and related NINDS-supported study aims to identify additional genetic factors in people that influence the course of the disease. Other research hopes to identify variations in the genomes of individuals with HD that may point to new targets ...

  9. Coeliac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-08

    Mar 8, 2013 ... Two factors are involved in the development of coeliac disease, namely the ... degradation by gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush ... epithelial layer with chronic inflammatory cells in patients ... Coeliac disease increases the risk of malignancies, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and enteropathy-.

  10. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  11. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  12. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  13. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  14. [Infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis-Taillard, Caroline; de Vallière, Serge; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-07

    In 2008, several publications have highlighted the role of climate change and globalization on the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Studies have shown the extension towards Europe of diseases such as Crimea-Congo fever (Kosovo, Turkey and Bulgaria), leismaniosis (Cyprus) and chikungunya virus infection (Italy). The article also contains comments on Plasmodium knowlesi, a newly identified cause of severe malaria in humans, as well as an update on human transmission of the H5NI avian influenza virus. It also mentions new data on Bell's palsy as well as two vaccines (varicella-zoster and pneumococcus), and provides a list of recent guidelines for the treatment of common infectious diseases.

  15. Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Georgeson, Keith E

    2008-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a relatively common condition managed by pediatric surgeons. Significant advances have been made in understanding its etiologies in the last decade, especially with the explosion of molecular genetic techniques and early diagnosis. The surgical management has progressed from a two- or three-stage procedure to a primary operation. More recently, definitive surgery for Hirschsprung disease through minimally invasive techniques has gained popularity. In neonates, the advancement of treatment strategies for Hirschsprung disease continues with reduced patient morbidity and improved outcomes.

  16. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  17. Norries disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini J

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old male infant was found to have Norrie′s disease. The clinical presentation and detailed histological features diagnostic of the disease are discussed. This is the first authentic, histologically proven case of Norrie′s disease from India. The absence of hearing loss and mental retardation at the time of presentation at the early stage of infancy and the fact that the case was sporadic do not detract from the diagnosis. However the child at the age of one year developed hearing loss.

  18. Blount disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unlike bowlegs , which tend to straighten as the child develops, Blount disease slowly gets worse. It can cause severe bowing of one or both legs. This condition is more common among African American children. It is also associated with obesity ...

  19. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  20. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  1. Coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Husby, Steffen; Sanders, David S

    2018-01-01

    Coeliac disease is increasingly recognized as a global problem in both children and adults. Traditionally, the findings of characteristic changes of villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis identified in duodenal biopsy samples taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy have...... been required for diagnosis. Although biopsies remain advised as necessary for the diagnosis of coeliac disease in adults, European guidelines for children provide a biopsy-sparing diagnostic pathway. This approach has been enabled by the high specificity and sensitivity of serological testing. However......, these guidelines are not universally accepted. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of a biopsy-avoiding pathway for the diagnosis of coeliac disease, especially in this current era of the call for more biopsies, even from the duodenal bulb, in the diagnosis of coeliac disease. In addition, a contrast...

  2. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of Addison disease include: Chronic diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting Darkening of the skin in some places Dehydration Dizziness when standing up Low-grade fever Extreme weakness , fatigue , and slow, sluggish movement Darker ...

  3. Alpers' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying liver disease, failure to thrive, infection-associated encephalopathy, spasticity, myoclonus (involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles), seizures, or liver failure. An increased protein level is seen in ...

  4. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  5. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  6. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  7. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... boys 10 years to 12 years of age. Soccer players and gymnasts often get Sever’s disease, but ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  8. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The disease leads to shaking ( tremors ) and trouble walking and moving . ... include: Difficulty starting movement, such as starting to walk or ... are not moving. This is called resting tremor. Occur when your ...

  9. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  10. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  11. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms....

  12. Elm diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Dutch elm disease was found in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1930, and is now in most of the contiguous 48 states. The disease is caused by a fungus that has killed millions of wild and planted elms. Losses have been the greatest in the eastern United States. The fungus attacks all elms, but our native species, American, slippery, and rock elm have little or no resistance to the...

  13. Ollier disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüppner Harald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology. The estimated prevalence of Ollier disease is 1/100,000. Clinical manifestations often appear in the first decade of life. Ollier disease is characterized by an asymmetric distribution of cartilage lesions and these can be extremely variable (in terms of size, number, location, evolution of enchondromas, age of onset and of diagnosis, requirement for surgery. Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformities, limb-length discrepancy, and the potential risk for malignant change to chondrosarcoma. The condition in which multiple enchondromatosis is associated with soft tissue hemangiomas is known as Maffucci syndrome. Until now both Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome have only occurred in isolated patients and not familial. It remains uncertain whether the disorder is caused by a single gene defect or by combinations of (germ-line and/or somatic mutations. The diagnosis is based on clinical and conventional radiological evaluations. Histological analysis has a limited role and is mainly used if malignancy is suspected. There is no medical treatment for enchondromatosis. Surgery is indicated in case of complications (pathological fractures, growth defect, malignant transformation. The prognosis for Ollier disease is difficult to assess. As is generally the case, forms with an early onset appear more severe. Enchondromas in Ollier disease present a risk of malignant transformation of enchondromas into chondrosarcomas.

  14. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  15. Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Roon, Alexander C; Reese, George E; Orchard, Timothy R; Tekkis, Paris P

    2007-11-07

    Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty.

  16. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  17. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  18. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed with hypothyroidism or had not yet started treatment for hypothyroidism. 4 Problems during pregnancy. The unborn baby's brain ... can last up to a year and requires treatment. Most often, thyroid function returns to normal as the ... from Hashimoto's disease treated during pregnancy? During pregnancy, ...

  19. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  20. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  1. Grover's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the ... dermatosis) is a condition that appears suddenly as itchy red spots on the trunk, most often in older men. Minor cases of Grover's disease may be rather common. ...

  2. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  3. Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects how the body breaks down and uses aspartic acid . ... scan Head MRI scan Urine chemistry for elevated aspartic acid ... Matalon KM, Matalon RK. Aspartic acid (Canavan disease). In: ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. ...

  4. DEVIC'S DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had been poor in the right eye and he had found it hard to pass urine. ... right optic:-nerve disease, and was followed in 1880 by mention pupil was large and reacted very sluggishly to light, and the left .... The enzyme theory is that an enzyme-.

  5. Wilson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eye (jaundice) Golden-brown eye discoloration (Kayser-Fleischer rings) Fluid buildup ... is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that to develop the disease you must inherit one copy of the ...

  6. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  7. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  8. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  9. [Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinkler, M

    2012-09-01

    The clinical signs and symptoms of primary adrenal insufficiency are unspecific often causing a delayed diagnosis or even misdiagnosis. In the diagnostic work-up the short synacthen test is regarded as the gold standard. Hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone are the preferred therapy for Addison's disease. The management and surveillance of therapy requires experience and several aspects need to be followed to prevent side effects which might occur due to overtreatment or undertreatment. Very important aspects in therapy are the repeated teaching of the patient and relatives, the issuing of an emergency steroid card and the prescription of a glucocorticoid emergency set. Acute adrenal failure (adrenal crisis), which might be the first manifestation of adrenal insufficiency, is a life-threatening situation requiring immediate glucocorticoid administration and fluid substitution. The most common causes for an adrenal crisis are gastrointestinal infections and fever and discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy. This article gives an up-to-date overview of diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Addison's disease.

  10. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  11. Thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  12. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  13. Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainaux, B.; Christophe, C.; Hanquinet, S.; Perlmutter, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report our observations made by conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3 1/2-year-old girl with Gaucher's disease. The interest of the case consists in the exceptional lungs involvement, the demonstration by MRI of the bone marrow involvement and the necrosis and fibrosis of the liver, as shown by CT. This liver complication has been previously reported only once. (orig.)

  14. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  15. Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  16. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  17. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  18. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  19. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  20. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  1. Clinical implications of a new TSH-receptor-antibody-assay (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) in autoimmune thyroid diseases; Klinische Implikationen eines neuen TSH-Rezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, J.; Schreivogel, I.; Becker, W. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bergmann, A.; Morgenthaler, N. [B.R.A.H.M.S Diagnostica, Berlin (Germany); Huefner, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Innere Medizin

    2000-07-01

    Aim: Conventional radioreceptor-antibody-assays (RAAs) fail in the detection of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAKs) in 10-30% of patients with Graves' disease (GD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic and clinical impact of a new RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) which uses the human recombinant TSH-Receptor in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods: Sera from 142 consecutive patients (GD: n=50, autoimmune thyroiditis/AIT: n=92) and from 55 controls (31 patients without any thyroid disease and 14 with euthyroid goiter) were evaluated both with the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-assay and a conventional RRA (TRAK-Assay {sup trademark}). Thyroid in vitro parameters and thyroid sonography were performed in all patients. Results: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay was significantly superior to the conventional RRA in the diagnosis of GD (p<0,00012), especially in those who were treated by thionamides (p<0,003) and in the diagnosis of TRAK-positive patients with AIT (p<0,003). The majority of TRAK-positive AIT-patients suffered from hypothyroidism. One false positive result in patients with euthyroid goiter was found in the TRAK-Assay {sup trademark} as well as in the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-Assay. Therefore the specifity of the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman was not inferior compared with the conventional assay. Conclusion: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay is superior in the diagnostic work up of Graves' disease compared with a conventional TRAK-assay and offers an equal specifity. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bei konventionellen Radiorezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (RRAs) misslingt der Nachweis von TSH-Rezeptor Antikoerpern (TRAKS) bei 10-30% der immunogenen Hyperthyreosen (IH). Ziel der Studie war es, den diagnostischen und klinischen Stellenwertes eines neuen RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen zu evaluieren. Methoden: Serumproben von 142

  2. [Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism secondary to weight loss medication. Predictive factors for their precocious detention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goday, A; Recasens, A; Manresa, J M; Vila, J; Moix, S

    1998-05-01

    To establish the differential clinical characteristics between the Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism for not conventional medication for obesity treatment (weight losers) and the endogenous by Graves Basedow disease. Observational and analytical study, populational based, in the one which prospectively were compared cases with Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism (secondary to weight losers) with those with endogenous hyperthyroidism (Graves Basedow disease) as controls. Consisted of the variable clinical record of 100 correlative patients that consulted in specialized attention of endocrinology for Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism secondary to weight losers and for Graves Basedow disease. The differences observed between Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism (secondary to weight losers) (n = 43) as compared to endogenous hyperthyroidism (Graves Basedow disease) (n = 57) were: smaller age (31.8 +/- 10 as compared to 37.8 +/- 12.6 years), greater body mass index (27.6 +/- 7.2 as compared to 23.4 +/- 3.1), smaller goiter frequency (16.3% as compared to 84.2%) as well as absence of signs of ophthalmopathy (0% as compared to 57.9%). Both groups had low levels of TSH, and the difference rests in the values of free T4, low in the first group and increased in the endogenous hyperthyroidism. The odds ratio were: IMC > 27: 3.92 (0.91-16.72), age weight losers use was not selective of the first group, being detected in a 12.3% of cases of endogenous hyperthyroidism, though in periods of time remoter in relationship to the beginning of the clinic. In the differential diagnosis of a case of hyperthyroidism, it can be suspected Iatrogenic hyperthyroidism (secondary to weight losers) for medication for the obesity in patients of the feminine sex with overweight, without previous or familiar history of thyroid disease, and in those which in the physical exploration is not verified goiter neither ophthalmopathy.

  3. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  4. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  5. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  6. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  7. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  8. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  9. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  10. Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Mad Cow Disease What's ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  11. Niemann-Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... lipofuscinoses or Batten disease (Wolman disease, cholesteryl ... metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  12. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  13. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  14. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  15. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  16. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  17. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  18. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  19. Osler's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U.; Lieb, J.; Schneider, G.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.) [de

  20. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  1. Hematopoietic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  2. Results of radioiodine treatment in various types of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    During an investigation period starting early in 1982 and ending in the middle of 1985 a total of 360 patients were treated with iodine-131 for hyperthyroidism of different origins. The case reports of 337 of these patients were reviewed for the purposes of this study. The patients were divided into three groups. In this cohort, the healing rates achieved with one single treatment were 84.4% for autonomic adenomas, 50.8% for hyperthyroidism of other than immunologic origins and 22.7% for Basedow's disease. After a series of up to four treatments the healing rates were seen to be increased to 93% for autonomous adenomas, 84% for nonimmunogenic hyperthyroidism and 80% for Basedow's disease. The results thus achieved appeared to be unrelated to the patients' sex or previous surgical interventions for disorders of the thyroid. The findings show that therapeutic regimes calculated individually on the basis of a formula should be approached with some caution. Thus, doses lower than 100 Gy are hardly advisable for patients showing diffuse hyperthyroidism. It would also appear wise in autonomous adenomas to reduce the dose from 400 to 200 Gy. Likewise, the use of doses above 15 mCi should be restricted to special cases. A dose-effect relationship could not be detected in patients suffering from Basedow's disease. It seems recommendable here to use low initial doses so as to permit less radiosensitive patients to be healed by repeat treatment with a higher dose. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  4. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  5. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  6. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease is an inherited intricate brain illness. It is a neurodegenerative, insidious disorder; the onset of the disease is very late to diagnose. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene, which encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine repeat in the Huntingtin protein. Huntington's disease ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  8. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  10. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  11. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  13. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  14. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  15. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  16. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  17. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Who Gets ALS? Although this disease can strike anyone, ALS is extremely rare in kids. According ... home to provide care that the family cannot handle alone. Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease Living with ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? Unconditional Love How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  19. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... materials Why is CDC concerned about Lyme disease? Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... sixth most common Nationally Notifiable disease . Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  20. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? CareMAP: Dealing ...

  2. Chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease, together with other related non -communicable diseases. (NCDs), poses not only a threat ... but because if we do not act against NCDs we will also be increasing individual and ... respiratory diseases and cancer. This is in recognition ...

  3. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  4. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  5. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  6. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  7. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  9. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  10. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  11. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  12. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  13. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  14. The integrated disease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  15. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  16. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  18. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  19. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  20. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  1. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Wilson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Hanağası

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Clinical phenotypes include hepatic, haemolytic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Wilson’s disease is caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper-transporting protein, which is important for copper excretion into bile. Neurological symptoms in Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysathria, ataxia, parkinsonism, dystonia and tremor. Wilson’s disease is lethal if untreated. This review discusses the epidemiology, genetics, clinical features, etiopathophysiology, diagnostic tests, and treatment of Wilson’s disease

  3. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Library is an extensive collection of books, fact sheets, videos, podcasts, and more. To get started, use ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  7. Lyme Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks ( Amblyomma americanum ), the American dog tick ( Dermacentor ... of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Beckham Leads Stretches Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? What Are Some Practical Strategies ...

  9. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? Why Is It Important to Continue Self-Care ...

  12. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: ...

  15. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  16. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  17. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  18. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, Parte 1 ...

  2. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  3. Gum Disease and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? 2013 PSA Featuring Katie Couric What Are ...

  5. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for Following a Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 What Is Patient-Centered Care? ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the ...

  8. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... for Parkinson's Care Partners OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Progression ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Hallucinations and ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... the Helpline? What are some strategies to prevent falls in PD patients? How Does Speech Therapy Help ...

  11. Machado-Joseph Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Machado-Joseph Disease Fact Sheet What is Machado-Joseph disease? What are the ... the repeat is in a protein-producing or coding region of the gene. Modifications of the mutant ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: Treatment ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, Parte 2 What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Caregiver ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Putting Things in Place ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert Care Research shows people with Parkinson’s who ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model ... Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease ...

  20. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Who Were Treated with hGH Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Thyroid disease is a group of disorders that ... prescribes. What role do thyroid hormones play in pregnancy? Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  2. Glomerular Disease in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wiles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences exist in the prevalence of glomerular diseases. Data based on histological diagnosis underestimate the prevalence of preeclampsia, which is almost certainly the commonest glomerular disease in the world, and uniquely gender-specific. Glomerular disease affects fertility via disease activity, the therapeutic use of cyclophosphamide, and underlying chronic kidney disease. Techniques to preserve fertility during chemotherapy and risk minimization of artificial reproductive techniques are considered. The risks, benefits, and effectiveness of different contraceptive methods for women with glomerular disease are outlined. Glomerular disease increases the risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including preeclampsia; yet, diagnosis of preeclampsia is complicated by the presence of hypertension and proteinuria that precede pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in pregnancy is examined, in addition to the use of emerging angiogenic biomarkers. The safety of drugs prescribed for glomerular disease in relation to reproductive health is detailed. The impact of both gender and pregnancy on long-term prognosis is discussed.

  3. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has used its fundraising efforts to help further research programs at Mount Sinai. Spotlight: Gaucher Gaucher Disease is the most common of the lipid storage diseases. Learn about its symptoms, how it ...

  4. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better understanding of how neurological deficits arise in lipid storage diseases and on the development of new treatments targeting disease mechanisms. Specific research on the gangliodisoses including expanding the use of ...

  5. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  6. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000373.htm Maple syrup urine disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder in ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Las Actividades en ...

  8. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Misconceptions About Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Pensamiento y el Comportamiento, Parte 2 CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Musica en vivo ...

  12. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this disease. Learn more In your area About Shop A A ... Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Is There a Cure ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary ... Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Caregiver Summit 2016: Maintaining Dignity & Identity What to Expect Emotionally Walking for ... Around the House: Part 2 What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? Tips for Caregivers ...

  19. Gallstone disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...... disease and death from cancer and gastrointestinal disease was not associated. No differences in mortality for ultrasound-proven gallstones or cholecystectomy were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone disease is associated with increased overall mortality and to death from cardiovascular disease. Gallstones...

  20. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rule out conditions such as asthma , cystic fibrosis , acid reflux, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, and immune deficiency. Various ... a lung infection. Acid-blocking medicines can prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Otros Trastornos que Tienen Síntomas Similares? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? How Does Parkinson's Disease ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  4. Takayasu's disease and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basic disease appears to be unaffected by pregnancy. S Afr Med J ... Takayasu's disease is an idiopathic chronic granulomatous .... prevalence of tuberculosis in Asia." In our 3 .... lower limbs may be significantly lower than the central blood.

  5. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  6. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  7. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  8. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... About Sexual Dysfunction? Attachment: consultation.jpg CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  14. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  15. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  16. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Credit: NIAID Some classic histopathologic changes ... as Mycobacterium leprae . Why Is the Study of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) a Priority for NIAID? At the ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexual Dysfunction? Attachment: consultation.jpg What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story CareMAP: ...

  18. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, Alana Y.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Massey, Brandon Z.; Graham, Anna R.; Friend, Christopher J.; Walsh, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by intermittent episodes of acute inflammation manifested by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of myonecrosis associated with Behcet's disease. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease can mimic soft tissue abscess and therefore awareness of this entity in the appropriate clinical setting is important for initiation of appropriate and timely treatment. (orig.)

  19. Addison′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Brata Sarkar; Subrata Sarkar; Supratim Ghosh; Subhankar Bandyopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrinal disorder, with several oral and systemic manifestations. A variety of pathological processes may cause Addison's disease. Classically, hyperpigmentation is associated with the disease, and intraoral pigmentation is perceived as the initial sign and develops earlier than the dermatological pigmentation. The symptoms of the disease usually progress slowly and an event of illness or accident can make the condition worse and may lead to a life-threatening cr...

  20. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  1. [Tick-borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot Dupont, H; Raoult, D

    1993-05-01

    Due to their worldwide distribution, from hottest to coldest climates, and due to their behaviour, ticks are capable of transmitting numerous human and animal bacterial viral or parasitous diseases. Depending on the disease, they play the role of biological vector or intermediate host. In France, six tick borne diseases are of epidemiologic importance. Q fever (not often tick-borne), Mediterranean Spotted Fever, Lyme disease, Turalemia (human and animal), Babesiosis and Tick-borne Viral Encephalitis.

  2. Gender and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    More women than men die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year in every major developed country and most emerging economies. Nonetheless, CVD has often been considered as men’s disease due to the higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) of men at younger age. This has led to the

  3. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: La Alimentación y la Deglución, ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Walk at Moving Day CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Aware in Care: Real Stories CareMAP: End-of- ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  6. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested for celiac disease and if negative the test should be repeated on a periodic basis. These conditions include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (requiring insulin therapy), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Turner’s syndrome, Williams syndrome, Graves disease and Sjogren’s disease. what turns ...

  7. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site ACG Patients Home / Digestive Health Topic / Peptic Ulcer Disease Peptic Ulcer Disease Basics Overview An “ulcer” is an open ... for pain in patients at risk for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic – caused by acid. PPIs – P roton P ump ...

  8. Armillaria Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Parkinson's Disease? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  10. diseases free body

    OpenAIRE

    thararose

    2018-01-01

    Diseases are very common now a days . It is our food habits itself that causes this diseases. Diseases can cause many health problems. goiter causes and symptoms It is very important to follow healthy food habits and to maintain good health. A healthy body is always a treasure to every person.

  11. Granulomatous diseases in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczkowski, J.; Barcinski, G.; Narozny, W.

    1994-01-01

    The authors describe clinical material of 49 patients treated in period 1960-1992 at the Dept. of Otolaryngology Medical Acad. of Gdansk on reason various granulomatous diseases. On the ground of retrospective analysis 44 cases with mild granulomas disease and 5 cases with malignant granulomatous disease were separated. Clinical course diagnosis, treatment and prognosis were discussed. (author)

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  14. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lyme Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Lyme Disease What's in this article? Ticks Want to Suck ... and summer, you might hear about something called Lyme disease. It has nothing to do with limes, but ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Foundation How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  16. Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Walters

    1992-01-01

    Since its discovery in the United States in 1930, Dutch elm disease has killed thousands of native elms. The three native elms, American, slippery, and rock, have little or no resistance to Dutch elm disease, but individual trees within each species vary in susceptibility to the disease. The most important of these, American elm, is scattered in upland stands but is...

  17. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  18. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory...... pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future...... prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline- based recommendations...

  19. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not as great as men's. Heredity (Including Race) Children of parents with heart disease are more likely to develop it themselves. African Americans have more severe high blood pressure than Caucasians and a higher risk of heart ...

  20. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  1. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  2. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some...... to identify late-onset Pompe disease often leads to false-negative results and subsequent delays in identification and treatment of the disorder. Serum creatine kinase level can be normal or only mildly elevated in late-onset Pompe disease and is not very helpful alone to suggest the diagnosis...

  3. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Didde; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Heegaard, Niels Henrik H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease has been reported in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is regarded an extraintestinal manifestation or more rarely a side effect of the medical treatment. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we describe the extent of kidney pathology in a cohort of 56...... children with IBD. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of kidney disease and ultrasonography was performed to evaluate pole-to-pole kidney length. Results: We found that 25% of the patients had either previously reported kidney disease or ultrasonographic signs of chronic kidney disease...... are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and the risk seems to be increased with the severity of the disease....

  4. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  5. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  6. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  7. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  8. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  9. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...... to the number of patients suffering from the disease. This hypothesis is based on a study of bipolar disorder....

  10. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  11. Celiac disease in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malekzadeh R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until a few decades ago, celiac disease was considered to be essentially a disease of European people and to be very rare in Middle Eastern countries. During the last two decades, having met the criteria for the WHO general screening, the advent and application of novel serological assays used to screen for celiac disease and the use of endoscopic small bowel biopsy have led to increasing numbers of diagnoses of celiac disease in western countries. With this new data, our knowledge on both the clinical pattern and epidemiology of celiac disease has increased, and is now known to be a relatively common autoimmune disorder. Studies performed in different parts of the developing world have shown that the prevalence of celiac disease in this area is similar to or even higher than that in western countries. In fact, celiac disease is known to be the most common form of chronic diarrhea in Iran. However, contrary to common belief, celiac disease is more than a pure digestive alteration. It is a protean systemic disease, and, with a 95 percent genetic predisposition, has a myriad of symptoms including gastrointestinal, dermatological, dental, neurological and behavioral that can occur at a variety of ages. Monosymptomatic, oligosymptomatic, atypical (without gastrointestinal symptoms, silent and latent forms of celiac disease have been identified. In this study we review the epidemiology of celiac disease based on the studies performed in Iran and discuss its pathogenesis, the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the importance of its diagnosis and treatment in Iran.

  12. [Male breast diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin-Lefebvre, D; Misery, L

    2013-01-01

    Because andrology is relatively undeveloped in France, the dermatologist is often the doctor first consulted for diseases of the nipple in men. All dermatological diseases can in fact occur at this site. There are some specific nipple diseases such as gynaecomastia, congenital abnormalities, hyperplasia, benign tumours and breast cancer. All clinical examinations and laboratory examinations should focus on diagnosis of this type of cancer and its elimination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Diseases Transmitted by Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    Although many people these days actually work very hard at leisure time activities, diseases are most commonly acquired from birds during the course of work in the usual sense of the term, not leisure. However, travel for pleasure to areas where the diseases are highly endemic puts people at risk of acquiring some of these bird-related diseases (for example, histoplasmosis and arbovirus infections), as does ownership of birds as pets (psittacosis).

  14. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  15. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most ... blood vessels in your kidneys. Other causes of kidney disease Other causes of kidney disease include a genetic ...

  16. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Hispanic Women “I thought it couldn’t be true,” says ... disease is their No. 1 killer. Why Hispanic women? While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, you could ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not have celiac disease . On average, a diagnosis of celiac disease is not made until 6 to 10 years ... and tissues and leads to the signs and symptoms of celiac disease . Almost all people with celiac disease have specific ...

  18. Mad Cow Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / Mad Cow Disease What's ... Is Being Done About It Print About Mad Cow Disease Mad cow disease has been in the ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  20. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 3,2018 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  1. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of ... or Team Approach Important? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & ...

  3. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  4. "Diseases and natural kinds".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2005-01-01

    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease can be understood as making necessary reference to living natural kinds without invoking the claim that diseases themselves are natural kinds. The idea that natural kinds have a natural disposition to flourish as the kinds of things that they are provides a telos to which to tether the notion of disease - an objective telos that is broader than mere survival and narrower than subjective choice. It is argued that while nosology is descriptive and may have therapeutic implications, disease classification is fundamentally explanatory. Sickness and illness, while referring to the same state of affairs, can be distinguished from disease phenomenologically. Scientific and diagnostic fallibility in making judgments about diseases do not diminish the objectivity of this notion of disease. Diseases are things, not kinds. Injury is a concept parallel to disease that also makes necessary reference to living natural kinds. These ideas provide a new possibility for the development of a philosophy of medicine with implications for medical ethics.

  5. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers of Excellence Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert ...

  7. Moyamoya disease: Diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kułakowska, Alina; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Korneluk-Sadzyńska, Alicja; Brzozowska, Joanna; Drozdowski, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a progressive vasculopathy leading to stenosis of the main intracranial arteries. The incidence of moyamoya disease is high in Asian countries; in Europe and North America, the prevalence of the disease is considerably lower. Clinically, the disease may be of ischaemic, haemorrhagic and epileptic type. Cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbance are atypical symptoms of moyamoya disease. Characteristic angiographic features of the disease include stenosis or occlusion of the arteries of the circle of Willis, as well as the development of collateral vasculature. Currently, magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography with multi-row systems are the main imaging methods of diagnostics of the entire range of vascular changes in moyamoya disease. The most common surgical treatment combines the direct arterial anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral, and the indirect synangiosis involving placement of vascularised tissue in the brain cortex, in order to promote neoangiogenesis. Due to progressive changes, correct and early diagnosis is of basic significance in selecting patients for surgery, which is the only effective treatment of the disease. An appropriate qualification to surgery should be based on a comprehensive angiographic and imaging evaluation of brain structures. Despite the rare occurrence of moyamoya disease in European population, it should be considered as one of causes of ischaemic or haemorrhagic strokes, especially in young patients

  8. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  9. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  10. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  11. Chronic Diseases Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Templates All Chronic Surveillance Systems Communications Center Social Media Press Room Press Release Archives Multimedia Communication Campaigns Publications Chronic Disease Overview 2016–2017 At A ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, ... Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  13. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M.M.; Salama, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  14. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  15. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, M M; Salama, R P [Ajman Univ. of Science and Technology Network, Abu-Dhabi Campus (United Arab Emirates)

    2004-06-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  16. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  17. Disease quantification in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the House: Part 1 What Are the Neuroprotective Benefits of Exercise for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Falls: Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Changes Around the House: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  20. Insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Couston

    2009-01-01

    Insects and diseases are a natural part of forested ecosystems. Their activity is partially regulated by biotic factors, e.g., host abundance, host quality; physical factors, e.g., soil, climate; and disturbances (Berryman 1986). Insects and diseases can influence both forest patterns and forest processes by causing, for example, defoliation and mortality. These...

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure High blood cholesterol Coronary heart disease Stroke Metabolic syndrome Screening and Prevention Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) and its complications. Know your family history of health problems related to P.A. ...

  2. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women with rheumatic diseases constitute a high-risk population, with potential adverse fetal ... who are not actively planning a pregnancy, or are taking drugs that are ... disease.[9] Fetal loss (miscarriage or stillbirth) occurs in about 20% of ..... trimester,[3] with up to 70% of patients needing NSAIDs. .... No. Use low dose.

  3. Coeliac disease and lymphangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Perisic, V N; Kokai, G

    1992-01-01

    Two out of 74 children with coeliac disease demonstrated severe intestinal protein loss. In both children a serial small bowel biopsy specimen showed intestinal lymphangiectasia to be also present. Intestinal lymphangiectasia is another disorder that may be associated with coeliac disease.

  4. Beech Bark Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Houston; James T. O' Brien

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease causes significant mortality and defect in American beech, Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.). The disease results when bark, attacked and altered by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., is invaded and killed by fungi, primarily Nectria coccinea var. faginata Lohman, Watson, and Ayers, and sometimes N. galligena Bres.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for PD Patients? How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Bathroom: Part 2 CareMAP: El Vestirse ¿Cómo ...

  7. Kashin-Beck's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, J.; Uyttendaele, D.; Broecke, van den W.; Claessens, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    A case of Kashin-Beck's disease is presented. It is an acquired, disabling, polyarthritic, degenerative condition of early onset, sometimes leading to a variable degree of dwarfism. It occurs endemically in certain Asian areas. Treatment is, if possible, preventive. In the established disease the

  8. Myopathy in Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mor, F; Green, P; Wysenbeek, A J

    1987-01-01

    Since the first description of primary adrenocortical insufficiency by Thomas Addison in 1855 several large series of patients with Addison's disease have been published. The common signs and symptoms include: weakness, hyperpigmentation, weight loss, gastrointestinal complaints, and hypotension. It is rare for patients with Addison's disease to present with musculoskeletal symptoms including flexion contractures, hyperkalaemic neuromyopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, migratory myalgia, sciati...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Functioning? CareMAP: Las Actividades en Casa CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Música en vivo ...

  10. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medicinal: “Terapia fisica para el Parkinson” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  12. Imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the diagnostic and interventional use of imaging techniques in hepatobiliary disease. The first of the book's two sections describes the role of imaging in the diagnostic work up of common clinical syndromes. The second part is concerned with therapy and reviews interventional techniques for hepatobiliary disease

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Affect the Urinary System? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: Getting Dressed CareMAP: End-of-Life Care ... Care: Real Stories How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's Disease CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  15. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et.al. Clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316( ... of Washington, Associate Director, Kidney Research Institute ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? How ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Getting Dressed Adolfo Diaz, PTA, NPF - ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, ...

  18. Cushing's disease and craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, F M; Stanhope, R; Preece, M A

    1987-01-01

    A 14-year old girl presented with growth failure and Cushing's disease. Histological examination confirmed a craniopharyngioma but failed to show that the tumour secreted adrenocorticotrophic hormone. We suggest that her Cushing's disease was caused by hypothalamic dysfunction associated with increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone secretion, secondary to the craniopharyngioma. Images Figure PMID:2823728

  19. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged...

  20. Malignent diseases in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havers, W.

    1980-01-01

    As malignant diseases in childhood are rare, and only a small group of radiotherapists have been able to gain experience in this field, this chapter treats the particularities of childhood from this aspect. The side effects of radiotherapy are particularly important here for the growing and developing organism of the child. The most frequently occuring malignant diseases are treated individually. (MG) [de

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ... Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? CareMAP: Las ...

  2. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  3. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Psychosis What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life What Treatments Exist for Parkinson's Disease Patients with a ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device ... When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? Building ...

  6. Hodgkin's disease in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szelc, S.; Szeliga, E.

    1993-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome and its influence on the effect of the MOPP chemotherapy for 30 patients with Hodgkin's disease were analyzed. During the first 6 months after completing the treatment 305 of pregnancies were interrupted. Pregnancy during complete remission of Hodgkin's disease after combined treatment does not increase the risk of relapse and is not a risk to delivery and foetus. (author)

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  8. Pathology of Gaucher's Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-01

    Jun 1, 1974 ... disability in 2 of them. One patient also developed restric- tive lung disease, presumably on the ... Brother of case 9; diagnosed as Gaucher's. 8500 g disease at age 6 yrs on basis of hepato- ... other siblings, one of whom is said to have an enlarged spleen. Estimations of ,a-glucosidase on lymphocytes from.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Health Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  10. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medicamentos y la Salud en General, Parte 2 CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Day to Day? CareMAP: Is a Care Facility Needed? CareMAP: Caring from Afar CareMAP: Dressing CareMAP: ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  13. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 CareMAP: Ayudando a una ...

  15. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Day? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? NPF Caregiver Summit 2016: Tools For Family Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Benefits of DBS Surgery? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Caregiver Summit 2016: Embracing The Challenge: A Panel ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Panel de Expertos: Sesión ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  19. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... MAPC - Parkinson- Pasion, Positivismo y Participacion” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  1. Bowel Diseases and Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeiev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review of contemporary publications analyzes the prevalence of combinations of bowel and renal diseases. Special attention is paid to the problem of correlation between bowel diseases and urolithiasis. We consider the possible pathogenic mechanisms of lesions, such as genetically determined violations of intestinal absorption and secretion, changes in the intestinal microbiota, systemic inflammatory response, water and electrolyte disturbances.

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part 1 Ask the ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Care: Real Stories How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  4. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Transportation: Part 1 How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Mealtime and Swallowing: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  7. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, you can continue to live a productive life, work, spend time with friends and family, stay physically active, and do other things you enjoy. You may need to change what you eat and add healthy ... active, and enjoy life. Will my kidneys get better? Kidney disease is ...

  8. Diarrheal Diseases PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about the risk of diarrheal diseases after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  9. Tick-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Robert L; Corey, Ralph

    2005-06-15

    Tick-borne diseases in the United States include Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, tularemia, babesiosis, Colorado tick fever, and relapsing fever. It is important for family physicians to consider these illnesses when patients present with influenza-like symptoms. A petechial rash initially affecting the palms and soles of the feet is associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever, whereas erythema migrans (annular macule with central clearing) is associated with Lyme disease. Various other rashes or skin lesions accompanied by fever and influenza-like illness also may signal the presence of a tick-borne disease. Early, accurate diagnosis allows treatment that may help prevent significant morbidity and possible mortality. Because 24 to 48 hours of attachment to the host are required for infection to occur, early removal can help prevent disease. Treatment with doxycycline or tetracycline is indicated for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and relapsing fever. In patients with clinical findings suggestive of tick-borne disease, treatment should not be delayed for laboratory confirmation. If no symptoms follow exposure to tick bites, empiric treatment is not indicated. The same tick may harbor different infectious pathogens and transmit several with one bite. Advising patients about prevention of tick bites, especially in the summer months, may help prevent exposure to dangerous vector-borne diseases.

  10. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life CareMAP: El Vestirse What Are ...

  12. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.

  13. Membrane microparticles and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z-H; Ji, C-L; Li, H; Qiu, G-X; Gao, C-J; Weng, X-S

    2013-09-01

    Membrane microparticles (MPs) are plasma membrane-derived vesicles shed by various types of activated or apoptotic cells including platelets, monocytes, endothelial cells, red blood cells, and granulocytes. MPs are being increasingly recognized as important regulators of cell-to-cell interactions. Recent evidences suggest they may play important functions not only in homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases such as vascular diseases, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes mellitus. Accordingly, inhibiting the production of MPs may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for these diseases. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism underlying the generation of MPs and the role of MPs in vascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, and pathogen infection.

  14. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  15. Obesity and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity has been pointed out as an important cause of kidney diseases. Due to its close association with diabetes and hypertension, excess weight and obesity are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD. Obesity influences CKD development, among other factors, because it predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Excess weight and obesity are associated with hemodynamic, structural and histological renal changes, in addition to metabolic and biochemical alterations that lead to kidney disease. Adipose tissue is dynamic and it is involved in the production of "adipokines", such as leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and angiotensin-II. A series of events is triggered by obesity, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and hypertension. There is evidence that obesity itself can lead to kidney disease development. Further studies are required to better understand the association between obesity and kidney disease.

  16. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  17. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  18. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  19. Hyperosmia in Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Puri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurological involvement in Lyme disease has been reported to include meningitis, cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuritis. While it is known that in some cases of asceptic meningitis patients may develop hyperosmia, the association between hyperosmia and Lyme disease has not previously been studied. Objective To carry out the first systematic study to ascertain whether hyperosmia is also a feature of Lyme disease. Method A questionnaire regarding abnormal sensory sensitivity in respect of the sense of smell was administered to 16 serologically positive Lyme disease patients and to 18 control subjects. Results The two groups were matched in respect of age, sex and body mass. None of the 34 subjects was suffering from migraine. Eight (50% of the Lyme patients and none (0% of the controls suffered from hyperosmia (p=0.0007. Conclusion This first systematic controlled study showed that Lyme disease is associated with hyperosmia.

  20. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  1. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederik; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment but strongly interacts with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on micro- and astroglia and trigger an innate immune response, characterized by the release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome wide analysis suggests that several genes, which increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease en-code for factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity are likely to interfere with the immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. This re-view provides an overview on the current knowledge and focuses on the most recent and exciting findings. Modulation of risk factors and intervention with the described immune mechanisms are likely to lead to future preventive or therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  2. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease.

  3. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  4. Peyronie's Disease: Still a Surgical Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Daniel; Ercole, Cesar E; Hakky, Tariq S; Kramer, Andrew; Carrion, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie's Disease (PD) remains a challenging and clinically significant morbid condition. Since its first description by François Gigot de la Peyronie, much of the treatment for PD remains nonstandardized. PD is characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques at the level of the tunica albuginea. Clinical manifestations include morphologic changes, such as curvatures and hourglass deformities. Here, we review the common surgical techniques for the management of patients with PD.

  5. Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Chris

    2004-02-17

    Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) is a parasitic disease that is limited to remote, rural villages in 13 sub-Saharan African countries that do not have access to safe drinking water. It is one the next diseases targeted for eradication by the World Health Organization. Guinea worm disease is transmitted by drinking water containing copepods (water fleas) that are infected with Dracunculiasis medinensis larvae. One year after human ingestion of infected water a female adult worm emerges, typically from a lower extremity, producing painful ulcers that can impair mobility for up to several weeks. This disease occurs annually when agricultural activities are at their peak. Large proportions of economically productive individuals of a village are usually affected simultaneously, resulting in decreased agricultural productivity and economic hardship. Eradication of guinea worm disease depends on prevention, as there is no effective treatment or vaccine. Since 1986, there has been a 98% reduction in guinea worm disease worldwide, achieved primarily through community-based programs. These programs have educated local populations on how to filter drinking water to remove the parasite and how to prevent those with ulcers from infecting drinking-water sources. Complete eradication will require sustained high-level political, financial and community support.

  6. Management of pilonidal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Michelle P; Maloney, Caroline; Lipskar, Aaron M

    2018-06-01

    Pilonidal disease, and the treatment associated with it, can cause significant morbidity and substantial burden to patients' quality of life. Despite the plethora of surgical techniques that have been developed to treat pilonidal disease, discrepancies in technique, recurrence rates, complications, time to return to work/school and patients' aesthetic satisfaction between treatment options have led to controversy over the best approach to this common acquired disease of young adults. The management of pilonidal disease must strike a balance between recurrence and surgical morbidity. The commonly performed wide excision without closure has prolonged recovery, while flap closures speed recovery time and improve aesthetics at the expense of increased wound complications. Less invasive surgical techniques have recently evolved and are straightforward, with minimal morbidity and satisfactory results. As with any surgical intervention, the ideal treatment for pilonidal disease would be simple and cost-effective, cause minimal pain, have a limited hospital stay, low recurrence rate and require minimal time off from school or work. Less invasive procedures for pilonidal disease may be favourable as an initial approach for these patients reserving complex surgical treatment for refractory disease.

  7. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  8. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  9. Cardiovascular diseases and periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, R A; Preshaw, P M; Thomason, J M; Ellis, J S; Steele, J G

    2003-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a widespread heterogeneous group of conditions that have significant morbidity and mortality. The various diseases and their treatments can have an impact upon the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. In this paper we consider three main topics and explore their relationship to the periodontist and the provision of periodontal treatment. The areas reviewed include the effect of cardiovascular drugs on the periodontium and management of patients with periodontal diseases; the risk of infective endocarditis arising from periodontal procedures; the inter-relationship between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease. Calcium-channel blockers and beta-adrenoceptor blockers cause gingival overgrowth and tooth demineralisation, respectively. Evidence suggests that stopping anticoagulant therapy prior to periodontal procedures is putting patients at a greater risk of thromboembolic disorders compared to the risk of prolonged bleeding. The relationship between dentistry and infective endocarditis remains a controversial issue. It would appear that spontaneous bacteraemia arising from a patient's oral hygiene practices is more likely to be the cause of endocarditis than one-off periodontal procedures. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis is uncertain (and unlikely to be proven), and the risk of death from penicillin appears to be greater than the risk of death arising from infective endocarditis. Finally, the association between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease has been explored and there seem to be many issues with respect to data handling interpretation. Many putative mechanisms have been suggested; however, these only further highlight the need for intervention studies.

  10. Osteomalacia in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, Meryem; Garip, Yesim; Bodur, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Osteomalacia is a metabolic bone disorder characterized by impaired mineralization of the bone matrix. Vitamin D deficiency due to malabsorption syndromes may cause osteomalacia. This is a case of a patient with a 6-year history of seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated with Crohn's disease who was admitted to our outpatient clinic with symptoms of osteomalacia. Osteomalacia is a metabolic bone disease characterized by an impaired mineralization of the bone matrix, frequently caused by disorders in vitamin D or phosphate metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency due to malabsorption syndromes (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, and jejuno-ileal bypass for obesity) may cause osteomalacia. A 43-year-old male presented with fatigue, low back pain, and morning stiffness. He had a 6-year history of seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated with Crohn's disease. Laboratory findings revealed low serum calcium, low 25-hydroxy vitamin D3, normal phosphorus, elevated parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase levels. Radiographs revealed grade IV sacroiliitis and Looser zones. He was diagnosed with osteomalacia due to the malabsorption of vitamin D. His symptoms and signs were relieved with supplements of vitamin D and calcium. Osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis when assessing low back pain in the patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Vitamin D deficiency should be treated with vitamin D supplementation in patients with Crohn's disease to prevent osteomalacia.

  11. Gaucher′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Bohra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher′s disease (GD is the most common amongst the various disorders classified under the lysosomal storage disorders. GD is a model for applications of molecular medicine to clinical delineation, diagnosis, and treatment. The multiorgan and varied presentation of the disease makes it a challenge to diagnose GD early. The advent of enzyme replacement therapy in the early 1990s changed the management, and survival, of patients with GD. In addition to this, development of substrate reduction, pharmacological chaperone, and gene therapies has broadened the horizon for this rare disease. However, in resource-poor countries like ours, optimal management is still a distant dream.

  12. Rare Disease Video Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bocanegra, Carlos Luis

    2011-01-01

    Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) is a portal web where contains videos from Youtube including all details from 12 channels of Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) es un portal web que contiene los vídeos de Youtube incluyendo todos los detalles de 12 canales de Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) és un portal web que conté els vídeos de Youtube i que inclou tots els detalls de 12 Canals de Youtube.

  13. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2011-11-01

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  14. Lateralisation in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riederer, P.; Jellinger, K. A.; Kolber, P.

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetry of dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequent lateralisation of motor symptoms are distinctive features of Parkinson’s disease compared to other forms of neurodegenerative or symptomatic parkinsonism. Even 200 years after the first description of the disease, the underlying causes...... for this striking clinicopathological feature are not yet fully understood. There is increasing evidence that lateralisation of disease is due to a complex interplay of hereditary and environmental factors that are reflected not only in the concept of dominant hemispheres and handedness but also in specific...

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jian-rong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a degenerative central nervous system (CNS disease caused by infection of prion protein (PrP, with clinical features including short course, rapid development and 100% mortality. This article aims to discuss the pathogenesis, histopathological features, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram (EEG findings, imaging data and treatment progress of this disease based on literature review. Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein detection, EEG and MRI are three important methods to make an early diagnosis on patients with suspected CJD, such as elderly patients with rapidly progressive dementia (RPD and young patients with mental symptoms involving multiple systems (MS.

  16. Black lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal workers` pneumoconiosis (CWP), often called Black Lung Disease is a occupational disease which results from inhalation of coal mine dust which usually contains small amounts of free crystalline silica. This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and clinical aspects of CWP and how it has been controlled in the USA through the 1969 Coal Mine Act and dust level standards. It describes the sampling methods used. Medical control methods and engineering control of the disease is discussed. Work of the Generic Mineral Technology Center for Respirable Dust is described. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  18. The Vitality of Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2017-01-01

    of what we might be conceptualised as the vitality of disease. Medical interventions are increasingly as much about improving (quality of) life as they are about saving and prolonging life. As a consequence, morbid living has come to be disciplined, for example, in patient schools aimed at teaching...... patients to learn how to live with their disease, through rating scales used to measure treatment effect on the ‘quality of life’ of patients in clinical trials and through disease-specific ‘Living with’ guides aimed at patients and carers....

  19. Connexins and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delmar, Mario; Laird, Dale W; Naus, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Inherited or acquired alterations in the structure and function of connexin proteins have long been associated with disease. In the present work, we review current knowledge on the role of connexins in diseases associated with the heart, nervous system, cochlea, and skin, as well as cancer...... of connexins are fundamental components in the pathophysiology of multiple connexin related disorders, many of them highly debilitating and life threatening. Improved understanding of connexin biology has the potential to advance our understanding of mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of disease....

  20. Management of endocrine orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahaly, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    Endocrine orbitopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Basedow's disease and is characterized by a lymphocyte infiltration of the peribulbar space. Infiltrating and activated T cells react with orbital target cells and secrete cytokines, leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans, interstitial edema, and enlargement of the extra ocular muscels. Interdisciplinary management is recommended for rapid diagnosis and effective therapy of patients with endocrine orbitopathy. Immunosuppressive treatment is often used initially, and by suppressing inflammatory changes, it can result in subjective and objective improvement of thyroid eye disease. (orig.) [de

  1. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Why We Walk at ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ... Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the ... Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? What ... 2 What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Dra. Claudia ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Motor Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Swallowing and Dental Challenges Expert Briefings: Caregiving and Parkinson's: Laying the ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... for Following a Medication Schedule? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners CareMAP: Medications and ...

  8. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  9. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  10. Krabbe Disease (GLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... properly. Children with Krabbe disease have difficulty with memory, learning, speaking, understanding, and other mental functions. They ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PTA, NPF - National Parkinson Foundation CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life ... Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are the ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ...

  13. Comorbidity of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an independent association between periodontitis and a range of comorbidities, for example cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, psoriasis, and respiratory infections. Shared....... The present article presents an overview of the evidence linking periodontitis with selected systemic diseases and calls for increased cooperation between dentists and medical doctors to provide optimal screening, treatment, and prevention of both periodontitis and its comorbidities....... inflammatory pathways are likely to contribute to this association, but distinct causal mechanisms remain to be defined. Some of these comorbid conditions may improve by periodontal treatment, and a bidirectional relationship may exist, where, for example, treatment of diabetes can improve periodontal status...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Why We Walk at ...

  15. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  16. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, M.T.; Carson, M.J.; Khoury, J. El; Landreth, G.E.; Brosseron, F.; Feinstein, D.L.; Jacobs, A.H.; Wyss-Coray, T.; Vitorica, J.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Herrup, K.; Frautschy, S.A.; Finsen, B.; Brown, G.C.; Verkhratsky, A.; Yamanaka, K.; Koistinaho, J.; Latz, E.; Halle, A.; Petzold, G.C.; Town, T.; Morgan, D.; Shinohara, M.L.; Perry, V.H.; Holmes, C.; Bazan, N.G.; Brooks, D.J.; Hunot, S.; Joseph, B.; Deigendesch, N.; Garaschuk, O.; Boddeke, E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Breitner, J.C.; Cole, G.M.; Golenbock, D.T.; Kummer, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  17. Epidemiology of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-08-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ... What Does a Caregiver Need to Know About Cognitive Impairment? How Do I Manage Non-Motor Problems ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part ... Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? What Is the Impact of PD Medications ...

  20. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Care or Team Approach Important? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Jose Maria Lobo: ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Ask the Helpline: What Is a Movement Disorder Specialist? What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? How Do I Know ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 What Is the Progression ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Soy el compas de otra canción” Expert Briefings: Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the Impact of ... Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in ...

  7. Mad Cow Disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mad Cow Disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is one of ... humoral immunity is developed against such infections. ... Most infecti ve agents, ranging from the more complex protozoans to bacteri(! and viruses, contain nucleic.

  8. Asbestos and its diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibbs, A. R; Craighead, John E

    2008-01-01

    ... Chapter 8. Malignant Diseases of the Pleura, Peritoneum, and Other Serosal Surfaces Allen R. Gibbs and John E. Craighead 190 Chapter 9. Nonthoracic Cancers Possibly Resulting from Asbestos Exposu...

  9. Treatment of autoinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ter Haar, Nienke; Lachmann, Helen; Özen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response to treatment of autoinflammatory diseases from an international registry and an up-to-date literature review. METHODS: The response to treatment was studied in a web-based registry in which clinical information on anonymised patients with autoinflammatory...... diseases was collected retrospectively as part of the Eurofever initiative. Participating hospitals included paediatric rheumatology centres of the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organisation network and adult centres with a specific interest in autoinflammatory diseases. The following...... diseases were included: familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), pyogenic arthritis pustulosis acne (PAPA) syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexuality and Intimacy in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Improving Communication in Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert ... You Need to Know Expert Briefings: What's Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who seek skilled care are at a lower risk of complications and have better quality of life. ... Disease Affect the Urinary System? What Are the Risks and Benefits of DBS Surgery? NPF Caregiver Summit ...

  12. Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be increased in women because their digestive system may be less able to process alcohol, thus increasing the amount of alcohol reaching the liver. Genetic makeup Genetic makeup is thought to be involved because alcoholic liver disease often ...

  13. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , including lymphoma and Hodgkin disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , lung abscess, hepatitis B or hepatitis C Symptoms Anemia of ...

  14. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... With Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are ...

  15. Lipid Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes of Health (NIH), the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. As part of its mission, ... develop treatments, which has enabled ongoing and promising research to develop gene therapy for this disease. The NINDS, along with other ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Parkinson's Nurse: Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the Impact of Genitourinary Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Is ... With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? What Is the Impact of PD Medications on Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? What ...

  17. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  18. Metabolism and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grodzicker, Terri; Stewart, David J; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    ...), cellular, organ system (cardiovascular, bone), and organismal (timing and life span) scales. Diseases impacted by metabolic imbalance or dysregulation that were covered in detail included diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer...

  19. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect CKD: blood pressure, urine albumin and serum creatinine. What causes CKD? The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure , which are responsible for up to ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert ... What Is a Movement Disorder Specialist? Are There Any Interactions With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Dealing with ...

  1. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprue; Nontropical sprue; Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... intestines will heal if you follow a lifelong gluten-free diet . Do not eat foods, drink beverages, or take ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Cognitive Impairment? How Do I Manage Non-Motor Problems Such as Hypersexuality? Are There Any Interactions With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? What to Expect Emotionally What are some ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Program: Step by Step OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Ask the Helpline: What ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? CareMAP: When Is It Time to Get ...

  5. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... range of symptoms, including Changes in alertness and attention Hallucinations Problems with movement and posture Muscle stiffness Confusion Loss of memory Lewy body disease can be hard to diagnose, ...

  6. Polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't have other diseases may be good candidates for a kidney transplant. Possible Complications Health problems ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  7. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... half of pregnancy. Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy A blood test for parvovirus B19 can show ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en General, Parte 1 Expert Briefings: Apathy or Depression: Which One Is It? Expert Briefings: What's in ... Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... Have Similar Symptoms? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and ...

  10. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...... et al., Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11 (2009) 407-420). The finding is surprising in view of the fact that other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with relatively modest effects on the circulating levels of 24S-OH. We determined the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of 24S-OH and 27......-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH) in patients with PD with different disease duration using a highly accurate method based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. All the patients had plasma levels of the different oxysterols within the normal range. When analyzing CSF, 10% of the PD patients were found to have levels of 24...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Urinary System? What Are the Risks and Benefits of DBS Surgery? NPF Caregiver Summit 2016: Tools ... Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are the Neuroprotective Benefits of Exercise for PD Patients? Hallucinations and Delusions ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Nurse Webinars: Nursing ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert Care Research shows people with Parkinson’s who ... Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Your Area Resources & Support PD Library Legal, Financial, & Insurance Matters Blog For Caregivers Living with Parkinson's ... Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A You are here Home PD Library Search library Topic Type Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  16. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... because of lack of H2 production. Based on a cut-off level of 10 ppm rise of H2 concentration, malabsorption was apparent in 13 patients, in 7 of which the calculated absorption capacities were below 15 g. In contrast, in patients given 50 g of sucrose, malabsorption could not be detected. Ingestion...... with functional bowel disease. The findings may have direct influence on the dietary guidance given to a major group of patients with functional bowel disease and may make it possible to define separate entities in this disease complex....

  17. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Parkinson's Disease Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  18. Learning about Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Huntington's Disease Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and what treatment options are available. ... your gift takes, you can be confident that it goes toward providing crucial resources for those affected ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ...